Facebook Twitter Appstore
Page d'accueil > Résultats de la recherche

§ KISS c. ROYAUME-UNI

Imprimer

Type d'affaire : Decision
Type de recours : Partly admissible ; partly inadmissible

Numérotation :

Numéro d'arrêt : 6224/73
Identifiant URN:LEX : urn:lex;coe;cour.europeenne.droits.homme;arret;1976-12-16;6224.73 ?

Analyses :

(Art. 14) DISCRIMINATION, (Art. 9-1) LIBERTE DE RELIGION


Parties :

Demandeurs : KISS
Défendeurs : ROYAUME-UNI

Texte :

APPUCATION/REQUETE N° 6724/ 73 Lazlo KISS v/the UNITED KINGDOM Lazlo KISS c/ROYAUME-UN I DECISION of 16 December 1976 on the admissibility of the application DECISION du 16 décembre 1976 sur la recevabilité de la requête
Article 6, paragraph 1 of the Conventio n a) Criminal cherge . Does this provision apply to disciplinary punishment of a convicted pnsoner, consisting of 8 7 days' loss of remission ? Examinetion according to criteria established by the European Court of Human Rights in the case of Enge/and others . b) Access to a court : Prisoner not el%wed to consult a solicitor in order to institute civil proceedings ageinst a prison officer, or to take proceedings in person . Reference to the judgment.of the European Court of Human Rights in the Golder case . Complaint admissibte: Artic/e 6, paragraphe 1, de la Convention : a) Accusation en matiére pénale . Cette disposition est-elle applicable A la punition disciptinaire d'un détenu condamnd, consistant à retrencher 80 jours de ses perspectives de libEration conditionnelle (loss of remissionl ? Examen selon les critéres énonces par la Cour européenne des Droits de l Homme dans / Aftaire Enge/ et autres . b) AccA aux tribunaux. Détenu non autorisé à consulter un homme de /oi en vue .s d'intenter une action civile contre un gardien ou A intenter cette action en personne . RAtérence A l'arrêt Golder de la Cour européenne des Droits de l'Homme . Grief déclaré receveble .
(franqais : voir p. 64 )
THE FACTS
The facts of the case as submitted by the applicant may be summarised as follows : The applicant is a Hungarian national, born in 1935, and at the time of lodging his application he was se rving a term of imprisonment at H .M. Prison, Preston . He alleges that on 25 Februa ry 1973 he was struck on the back by prison officer H . after an ahercation about his breakfast . The incident was witnessed by his cell-mate, B . The applicant compWined to the Governor the following day of the incident an d was warned about making false and malicious allegations against an officer . The applicant commenced a hunger strike the day after that in protest .
- 55 -
There was no evidence of injury as a result of the assault but the applicant had to be sent to hospital for a few days because of his hunger strike, being discharged from hospital on 5 March 1973 . On 28 February 1973 the applicant repeated his allegations to the Board of Visitors who did not look into them as they thought that the applicant had petitioned the Home Secretary about the matter . On 10 March 1973 he was charged with making false and malicious allegations against an officer, found guilty of this charge on 15 March 1973 and punished with, inter alia, 80 days' loss of remission . On 1 March 1973 the applicant petitioned the Home Secretary about the assault . The petition was rejected on 31 July 1973 . On 16 May 1973 the applicant again petitioned the Home Office for "permission to take legal proceedings" for this assault . After inquiry, the petititon was rejected on 16 January 1974 and another dated 23 January 1974 was also refused, no new evidence or arguments having been submitted . Towards the end of his imprisonment the applicant alleged that he was not receiving the regular medical treatment he required for an injury he had received 12 years before . He petitioned the Home Secretary on this point but his petition was rejected on 25 September 1974 . The applicant was released from prison on 14 March 1975 . He is represented before the Commission by Messrs Turners, solicitors, Manchester . COMPLAINTS The applicant complains of the following : Ill-treatment by a prison officer . Insufficient medical treatment . The allegedly false charge brought against him as a consequence and the subsequent unfair proceedings . The refusal by the Home Secretary to allow him to institute legal proceedings . The applicant invokes Arts . 3, 6 Itl, (21 and (3) of the Convention .
PROCEEDINGS BEFORE THE COMMISSIO N The present application was lodged with the Commission on 23 April 1973 and registered on 20 July 1973 . On 21 May 1975 the Commission examined the admissibility of the application in the light of the report of the Rapporteur, dated 10 February 1975 and provided for in Rule 40 of the Commission's Rules of Procedure . It decided, in accordance with Rule 42 (2) (b) of the Rules of Procedure, that notice of the application should be given to the Government of the United Kingdom and that the Government should be invited to submit their observations in writing on the admissibility of the application insofar as the applicant complained of a breach of Art . 6 (1) of the Convention in the refusal by the Home Secretary of permission to instruct a solicitor to institute legal proceedings . The Government's observations were accordingly submitted on 24 July 1975, and those of the applicant, in reply, were submitted on 6 February 1976 by Messrs Turners, Solicitors, Manchester .
-56-
A further report dated 10 February 1976 by the Rapporteur, together with the parties' observations, was considered by the full Commission on 5 July 1976 when it decided that an issue also arose in this application, in the light of the judgment of the European Court of Human Rights of 8 June 1976 in the case of Engel and others. It considered that an issue arose under Art . 6 of the Convention in respect of the applicant's complaint of an unfair disciplinary hearing and his complaint of an unwarranted punishment of 80 days' loss of remission imposed at that hearing . To expedite the proceedings, the Commission decided, in accordance with Rule 42 (2) (b) in fine of its Rules of Procedure, to invite the parties to an oral hearing on both the admissibility and merits of the applicant's complaints under Art . 6 of the Convention as outlined above . This hearing was held at the Palais des Droits de l'Homme in Strasbourg on 16 December 1976, the Government meanwhile having submitted further observations on the applicant's complaints about his disciplinary hearing . At the hearing the applicant was represented by Mr . J . Wood of Messrs Turners, Solicitors, Manchester . The Government were represented by their Agent, Mrs E .M . Denza, Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Mr N . Bratza, Barrister-at-law as counsel, Miss S . Austin, Legal Assistant, Home Office and Mr A .K . Guymer, Home Office Prison Department . The hearing lasted the morning only after which the Commission reached its decision on admissibility after having deliberated on the various submissions of the parties .
OBSERVATIONS OF THE PARTIE S Observetions of the respondent Governmen t The fact a Having set out the relevant domestic law concerning pr'isoners' correspondence and disciplinary offences, the Government describe the alleged assault : The prison warder concerned denied the applicant's allegation that he had assaulted the applicant on 25 February 1973 at breakfast-time . However it appears to be conceded that he caused the applicant to spill his tea over his breakfast . According to the Government this incident was witnessed by two other prison officers . 2 . The refusal of permission to Institute legal proceeding s The Government submit that the applicant at no stage requested permission to instruct a solicitor to take proceedings and accordingly his complaint is manifestty illfounded . However, in so far as his complaint may concern a refusal of permission to take proceedings in person, if c riminal proceedings against the prison officer were the object of the applicant's request to the Home Office, the Government submit that there is no right to institute criminal proceedings guaranteed by Art . 6(1 ) or any other provision of the Convention . Such a complaint would therefo re be incompatible with the Convention retione materiae . Finelly, if the applicant wished to institute civil proceedings in pe rs on, the Government accept that the applicant was hindered in his access to the cou rts and, therefore, an issue arises under Art . 6 (1) of the Convention as interpreted by the European Cou rt of Human Rights in its judgment in the Go/der Case . However, the Government contend that no fu rt her action need be taken by the Commission i n
- 57 -
respect of this complaint in view of the fact that the applicant was not time-barred on his release from prison from instituting the desired proceedings and the Government has now amended the Prison Rules to take account of the Go/der judgment . 3 . TheapplicabilltyofArt .6todisclplinary hearingsbeforetheBoardofViehor e The Government's observations on the admissibility of this aspect of the application are contained in further written observations submitted to the Commission prior to the oral hearing on the admissibility and merits of the application and were elaborated at the hearing itself . These observations concern the disciplinary procedure before the Board of Vishors to which the applicant was subject, the nature of remission of sentence and the nature of loss of remission as a sanction against prison indiscipline . The Government submit details of the composition of the Board of Visitors, its function as supervisor of the good administration of a prison, including the investigation of prisoners' complaints and the determination of serious disciplinary charges against prisoners, and the actual disciplinary procedure before the Board of Visitors which should ensure a fair hearing to the prisoner. The Government contend that the provisions of Art . 6 of the Convention, which contains procedural guarantees for a fair hearing to anyone facing a criminal charge, do not apply to disciplinary charges and disciplinary hearings before a Board of Visitors . It is stated that the Court in its judgment in the case of Engel and others, limiting itself to the consideretions of military service, laid down three criteria which may determine whether a charge is of a criminal nature : whether the charge figures as a criminal charge in the domestic law of the respondent Government, the real nature of the offence and the degree of severity of the penalty imposed . The Government submit that the charge against the applicant of making a false and malicious allegation against a prison officer is not a criminal charge under English law . Such a charge is clearly a disciplinary matter having consequences which only affect goof order and discipline in prison as well as the career prospects of the maligned officer . Furthermore, the Government state that the applieant's punishment for this offence of 80 days' loss of remission did not constitute any deprivation of liberty as the applicant, unlike Engel and his colleagues in military service, had been so deprived for the whole length of his sentence . This loss of remission only involved the forfeiture of a privilege, prescribed by lew, which enables prisoners to be considered for release from prison after two thirds of their sentence has been served, on condition that their behaviour in prison has been satisfactory . Finally, it is submitted that the severity of the punishment of 80 days' loss of remission does not itself give the apparent disciplinary charge the character of a criminal affair, as it was not out of proportion to the possible grave effects of such a false and malicious allegation against the prison officer . The Government conclude that there is nothing in the nature of loss of remission which could be likened to a penal sanction and which, consequently, would imply that the applicant's disciplinary charge and hearing were of a criminal nature . Accordingly, it is submitted, Art . 6 did not apply to these proceedings . However, if the Commission should decide otherwise, the Government submit that the procedure followed by the Board of Visitors, in generel and in this particular case, observed the rules of natural justice and the spirit, if not the letter, of Art . 6 . The disciplinary procedure provides a speedy and fair hearing for the prisoner with th e
- 5g-
minimum of formality before an independent and impartial authority, well-suited to the requirements of good prison order and discipline . The provisions of Art . 6 are observed except that judgments are not pronounced publicly and no legal representation is allowed . The Government contend that it would not be reasonable or in the interests of prisoners to apply these provisions to disciplinary hearings in prison ; besides which the applicant has never complained about these aspects of Art . 6 . In respect of this application the Government maintain that the applicant was fully aware of the charge against him and its possible consequences and understood and was understood adequately as is shown by the record of the hearing . Furthennore they state that the applicant was given the opportunity of having his cell-mate give evidence on his behalf, but his cell-mate refused to do so without his lawyer present . The Government conclude that the Commission should declare the applicant's complaint that the provisions of Art . 6 were not observed at his disciplinary hearing incompatible with the provisions of the Convention, or, if not incompatible, manifestly ill-founded . Observetions of the applicant in reply Thefect s The applicant maintains his allegations of assault which he also claims was witnessed solely by his cell-mate . He submits that the absence of medical evidence in support of his complaint is immaterial as under English law such evidence is unnecessary to prove an assault . He complains that the Board of Visitors did not properly investigate his allegations and if they misunderstood him on 28 February 1973 in thinking that he had referred his allegations to the Home Office, this only demonstretes the serious difficulties he has with the English language, which difficulties also plagued his disciplinary hearing on 15 March 1973 . The applicant, accordingly, maintains his allegations of an unfair disciplinary hearing, not only because of these languague difficulties, but also because of allegedly false evidence presented by prison officers who did not witness the incident and the oppressive formal atmosphere of the hearing, the applicant being encircled by prison officers for security reasons . 2 . The refusal of permission to institute legsl proceeding s The applicant states that the distinction made by the Government between requesting permission to instruct a solicitor and requesting permission to institute legal proceedings is immaterial . He submits that he frequently asked to instruct e solicitor and the fact that such phraseology does not appear in his petitions to the Home Office may have been because, being semi-illiterate, he had to ask somebody else to write them for him who may have paraphresed his expressions . In any event instructing a solicitor is often an inherent part of instituting proceedings . The purpose of the applicant's desire to institute proceedings was to clear his name, to have a court establish the truth of the alleged assauh by a prison officer which would have obliged the Home Secretary to restore the lost remission . The applicant submits firstly that the refusal of the Home Office denied his right of access to the courts to institute civil proceedings, a right ensured by Art . 6 (1) of the Convention as interpreted by the European Court of Human Rights in the Go/der
-5g-
Case . As in the Go/der Case, therefore, the applicant claims to be a victim of a violation of the Convention . Furthermore, he contends that the facts that the Prison Rules have now been changed and that he could still institute such proceedings do not satisfy the basis of his grievance for those extra 80 days of imprisonment he had to serve are irrecoverable . Secondly, the applicant submits that the refusal of the Home Office denied his right of access to the courts to institute criminal proceedings against the prison officer . At first sight such a contention may seem incompatible with the provisions of Art . 6 111 of the Convention . However, the applicant puts forward the notion that essentially he was concerned with his civil right not to be assaulted, i .e . of security of person . This right may be determined by both a civil and criminal procedure . The proceedings themselves do not change the true nature of the issue-the determination of a civil right . Accordingly the applicant contends that the Golder Case principle applies equally to this aspect of his complaint . Consequently the Home Secretary's refusal of permission to institute criminal proceedings was also in breach of Art . 6 (1) of the Convention .
3 . TheapplicabilityofArt .6todisclplinary hearings bef orethe Board of Visitors The applicant submits that his disciplinary hearing before the Board of Visitors determined a criminal charge within the meaning of Art . 6(1 ) of the Convention as interpreted by the European Court of Human Rights in the case of Engel and others . The Government distinguished the case of Engel and others from the present application as the fonner concerned military disciplinary hearings . However, the applicant maintains that no such distinction can usefully be made, because, in accepting that the context of disciplinary proceedings is significant, that of penal institutions renders it more likely, not less, that the internal disciplinary procedures are of a criminal nature . In considering the criteria enumerated by the Court in the case of Engel and others for detennining the criminal nature of a charge, the applicant states that the charge of making a false and malicious allegation against a prison officer is wider than the nearest equivalent in English criminal law, that of criminal libel . However, in considering the essential notion of a crime, regard must be had to its effects on society : In this instance the offence charged was central to prison discipline . Discipline is the keystone of penal institutions and accordingly the efficacy of the penal system . Furthermore, there is an affinity between this offence and other serious crimes importing clear mental responsibility, such as that of malicious wounding . The applicant concludes therefore that the offence of making a false and malicious ellegation, bearing an affinity to the trdditional notion of crime in English law, could be classified, therefore, as a criminal charge . The applicant then elaborated on the nature of the sanction of loss of remission imposed for this offence . Although loss of remission may not technically constitute a deprivation of liberty, remission of sentence being a mere privilege, nevertheless, in reality it is a deprivation of liberty, otherwise such a sanction would be ineffective . Nowadays a prisoner has a prima facie right to have one third of his sentence remitted even though it is not a right prescribed by law . Most prisoners enjoy this right . Accordingly the existence of this right gives the sanction of loss of remission substance and effiracy, being essentially a further deprivation of liberty . The applicant contends that it is not only necessary to consider the punishment awarded, 80 days' loss of remission, but also to consider the punishment which th e
-60-
offender may risk incurring . The Board of Visitors may make a maximum award of 1 80 days' kus of remission which is equivalent to 6 extra months' imprisonment . The applicant submits that the possible degree of severity in this sanction renders the offences dealt with by the Board of Visitors criminal charges . As to the policy question mentioned by the Government that the Commission should be cautious in concluding that Art . 6 applies to disciplinary hearings in prisons because of the purported need to maintain speedy and infonnal internal procedures, the applicant submits that a more open procedure subject to external scrutiny would be of a greater advantage in the light of recent prison discontent and disorder . He considers that prison life would be better tolerated by prisoners if they were assured of a fair hearing of their complaints and serious disciplinary charges before an external impartial authority having no connection with the prisons . The applicant concludes that the offence with which he was charged was of a criminal nature, the punishment he received was similarly of a criminal nature, being a deprivation of liberty, the proceedings before the Board of Visitors therefore determined a criminal charge within the meening of Art . 6 111 and the provisions of Art . 6(1) and the provisions of Art . 6 should accordingly have been observed by the Board of Visitors . However, the applicant maintains that the Board of Visitors failed to observe the said provisions, thus the hearing was unfair and he therefore claims to be a victim of a further violation of Art . 6 of the Convention .
THE LAW 1 . The applicant has alleged that he was assauhed by a prison officer and thereby ill-treated contrary to Art . 3 of the Convention which prohibits inhuman and degrading treatment . However the Commission finds that the incident complained of was relatively trivial, as, if true, it was only a push from the prison officer causing the applicant to spill tea over his breakfast . There is no evidence of injury . Accordingly the treatment complained of does not amount to a breach of Art . 3 of the Convention . The applicant has complained of further ill-treatment in the form of inadequate medical treatment . However an examination of this complaint does not reveal any evidence of neglectful treatment by the prison medical staff . No appearance of a violation of the rights and freedoms set out in the Convention and in particular in Art . 3 of the Convention is, therefore, disclosed . It follows that this part of the application is manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Art . 27 (2) of the Convention . 2 . The applicant has next complained of an unfair disciplinary hearing before the Board of Visitors on 15 March 1973 contrary to Art . 6111 of the Convention ensuring a fair trial in the determination of a criminal charge . Although the Commission has held in the past that the provisions of Art . 6 do not apply in principle to disciplinary hearings, the applicant submits that in the light of the judgment of the European Court of Human Rights in the case of Engel and othe rs , the Commission should examine the true nature of the proceedings and conclude that in fact his disciplinary hearing determined a criminal charge and the provisions of Art . 6 should, therefore, have been observed . In particular, the applicant maintains that the charge against him of making a false and malicious allegation, although having no specific equivalent in English criminal law, . nevertheless imports the necessary elements of the traditional notion of crime unde r
- 61 -
English criminal law . Furthermore the penatty of 80 days' loss of remission imposed for this offence was the imposition of a serious punishment involving a deprivation of his liberty, a veritable extension of his sentence, and thereby constituted a penal sanction .Theaplicntoudsh icplnaryegthiof enc charged and penalty imposed was clearly of a criminal nature and the provisions of Art . 6 should have been, but were not, observed . The Government counter these submissions by stating that making a false and malicious allegation against a prison officer is only of relevance in the context of prison dfscipline and has no affinity with any criminal provision in English law . Furthermore they submit that remission of sentence is only a privilege granted by the Executive in accordance with the law . A prisoner is obliged to serve the whole of the sentence imposed by a court on his conviction . However if he is of good behaviour he is usually considered . for release after having served a minimum of two-thirds of his sentence . Conversety, 'rf he is of bad behaviour, and is found guilty of serious offences against discipline he may Iose part of that privilege with the imposition of a penalty of several days' loss of remission, the maximum punishment which can be awarded by the Board of Visitors being 180 days' loss of remission . It is contended that loss of remission in no way extends the length of a prisoner's sentence and accordingly does not constitute the penal sanction of deprivation of liberty . The Government conclude that the proceedings against the applicant were of a purely disciplinary nature to which the provisions of Art . 6 need not have applied . In any event, the Government submit that the applicant had a full and fair hearing of his case before the Board of Visitors which is an impartial and independent authority . The Commission has examined the admissibility of this complaint, using the same method as the parties, in the light of the notion of a criminal charge expounded by the Court in the case of Engel and others. In that case the Court, "limiting itself to the sphere of military service", held that a Contracting State is free, in principle, to designate certain acts or omissions as criminal offences, such designation escaping supervision by the Court . On the other hand, where a State classifies an offence as disciplinary, the Court is competent to satisfy itself that the provisions of Art . 6 have not thereby been circumvented and that "the disciplinary does not improperly encroach upon the criminal" (European Court of Human Rights, Case of Enge/and others, judgment of 8 June 1976, paragraph 81) . The Court laid down three criteria which may determine whether a disciplinary charge is, in fact, of a criminal nature . Although the Court limited its decision to military service, the Commission considers that the said criteria are applicable to the present case of a prison disciplinary offence . They were as follows : (1) "whether the provisions defining the offence charged belong, according to the legal system of the respondent State, to criminal law, disciplinary law, or both concurrently" ; (2) consideration of "the very nature of the offence " (3) consideration of "the degree of severity of the penalty that the person concerned risks incurring" . (lbid, peragraph 821 . Thus, the Commission takes as its starting point the question whether the charge was either or both a criminal or disciplinary charge under the domestic law of the respondent Government . It notes that in the present application the charge of making a false and malicious allegation against a prison officer is a disciplinary offence under English law in the prison system . However it is not clear whether this charge could also
- 62 -
constitute the offence of criminal libel under English criminal law, and therefore no useful purpose is served in considering this aspect of the problem further . The Commission has next examined the true nature of this charge . It observes that the offence of making false and malicious allegations may have serious repercussions in the prison system . To function effectively the prison system depends on discipline . Discipline is controlled by prison officers and may be subverted by unwarranted attacks on their authority or conduct . Such an allegation outside prison ha . Accordingly the Commission concludes that this offence is, prima smuchleipat facie, of a disciplinary nature for which a disciplinary procedure was justified . The Court, having reached e similer conclusion in the case of Engel and others went on to consider the degree of severity of the penalty that Mr Engel and his colleagues risked incurring for offences against military discipline . It found that the punishment of committal to a military disciplinary unit for three to four months which three of the applicants could have incurred was a serious punishment involving deprivation of liberty . Accordingly the charges against them came within the criminal sphere which obliged the authorities to afford the guarantees of Art . 6 to their disciplinary hearings . The Commission has, therefore, had regard to the degree of severity of the penalty imposed on Mr Kiss, namely 86 days' loss of remission, taking into account the fact that he also risked a maximum punishment of 1 80 days' loss of remission . However, the Commission finds that loss of remission does not constitute deprivation of liberty . A prisoner, unlike a person doing military service, is deprived of his liberty for the whole of his sentence, any remission of that sentence for good behaviour is mere privilege and loss of that privilege does not alter the original basis for detention . In addition, the Commission observes that the severity of the penalty cannot be said to be wholly unrelated to the offence of making false and malicious allegations against an officer in view of the possible repercussions that such allegations may have on the career of the officer concerned and on prison good order and discipline . Moreover, the Commission considers that the severity of the punishment alone does not bring the offence charged within the criminal sphere . The Commission concludes therefore that the proceedings in question were outside the scope of Art . 6 of the Convention and that the Government were not obliged to afford the applicant the guarantees of Art . 6 of the Convention at his disciplinary hearing before the Board of Visitors . This part of the application is, therefore, manifestly ill-founded . 3 . Finally, the applicant has complained that the refusal by the Home Secretary to allow him to institute legal proceedings was in violation of his right of access to the Courts, a right assured by Art . 6 (1) of the Convention as interpreted by the European Court of Human Rights in the Golder case . Art . 6(1 ) of the Convention secures to everyone in the determination of his civil rights or criminal charge against him a fair hearing before an impartial tribunal . The Court held in its judgment in the Go/der case that inherent in this provision was the right of access to the said impartial tribunal . The applicant's complaint has three aspects : whether the applicant should have specifically requested permission to instruct a solicitor as in the Golder case, whether the applicant intended to institute criminal proceedings and whether he intended to institute civil proceedings .
- 63 -
The Government submit that the essence of the judgment in the Go/der case is the recognition of the right to instruct a solicitor to institute civil proceedings . The applicant submits that he had orelh' requested permission from the Prison Governor to seek legal advirs from a solicitor about instituting legal proceedings . The Government deny this, pointing out that no such request was made in the applicant's petition to the Home Secretary . They submit that this complaint should therefore be declared manifestly ill-founded . The Commission finds that no significant distinction can be made between instituting legal proceedings in person or through a solicitor although the latter may be common practice . The principle raised is that of access to the Courts . The Home Secretary's refusal of permission to institute legal proceedings denied that access to the applicant . The applicant states that he wished to institute either or both civil and criminal proceedings against the prison officer for assault . However, according to the Commission's constant jurisprudence Art . 6 does not import a right to institute criminal proceedings (See, for example, Application No . 2942/66, X . against the Federal Republic of Germerry, Collection of Decisions, Vol . 23, p . 64) . This aspect of the complaint is therefore incompatible with the provisions of the Convention within the meaning of Art . 27 (2) . On the other hand the applicant was entitled under Art . 6(1) of the Convention to institute civil proceedings against the prison officer for the tort of trespass to person . This he was prevented from doing because of the refusal of permission by the Home Secretary . The fact that the applicant was not time-barred from instituting proceedings against the officer on his release from prison is of little relevance . At the time of lodging this complaint with the Commission the applicant had exhausted the only domestic remedy available, that of petitioning the Home Office for permission to institute proceedings . This aspect of the complaint raises, therefore, a substantial issue of law under Art . 6 (1) of the Convention as interpreted by the Court in the Golder case . The determination of this issue accordingly necessitates an examination on its merits . For these reasons, the Commissio n 1) DECLARES ADMISSIBLE THAT PART OF THE APPLICATION CONCERNING THE REFUSAL OF PERMISSION TO INSTITUTE CIVIL PROCEEDINGS IA rt. 6 111 ; 2) DECLARES INADMISSIBLE THE REMAINDER OF THE APPLICATION .
(TRADUCTION) EN FAI T Les falte de la cause tels qu'ils ont été présentés par le requérant peuvent se résumer comme suit : Le requérant est un ressortissant hongrois né en 1935 et, à la date de l'introduction de sa requête, il purgeait une peine de réclusion à la prison de Preston . II allégue que le 25 février 1973, un gardien, H ., l'a frappé sur le dos à la suite d'une altercation au sujet de son petit déjeuner . Son compagnon de cellule, B ., a été témoin de l'incident .
- 64 -
Le requérant s'est plaint le lendemain de l'incident au directeur de la prison, qui lui a demandé de se garder de formuler des allégations mensongéres et malveillantes contre un gardien . Le requérant a commencé le jour suivant une grève de la faim en signe de protestation . Il n'y a pas eu de traces de dommages corporels à la suite des voies de fait mais le requérant, suite à sa gréve de la faim, a d0 passer quelques jours à l'hOpital, qu'il a quitté le 5 mars 1973 . Le 28 février 1973, le requérant a réitéré ses accusations devant la commiseion des visiteurs des prisons, qui ne fit aucune enquête parce qu'elle pensait que le requérant avait adressé une requéte au ministre de l'intérieur à ce sujet . Le 10 mars 1973, le requérant a été accusé de dénonciation mensongère et malveillante contre un gardien, et reconnu coupable le 15 mars 1973 ; sa punition a consisté, entre autres, en 80 jours de perte de remise de peine (loss of remission) . Le 1•' mars 1973, le requérant a adressé une requête au ministre de l'intérieur à propos des voies de fait . Sa requête a été rejetée le 31 juillet 1973 . Le 16 mai 1973, le requérant a adressé au ministère de l'intérieur une nouvelle requête en we d'obtenir « l'autorisation d'intenter une action en justice » concernant les voies de fait . Aprés enquête, la requête a été rejetéele 16 janvier 1974 de même qu'une autre en date du 23 janvier 1974, ni preuves ni arguments n'ayant été fournis . Vers la fin de sa période d'emprisonnement, le requérant a allégué ne pas recevoir réguliérement les soins médicaux que nécessitait une blessure qui remontait à 12 ans . Il a adressé une requête au ministre de l'intérieur sur cette question mais cette requête a été rejetée le 25 septembre 1974 .
Le requérant a été libéré le 14 mars 1975 . II est représenté devant la Commission par MM . Turner et Cie, solicitors à Manchester .
GRIEFS Le requérant se plaint : 1 . de mauvais traitements infligés par un gardien 2 . de soins médicaux insuffisants ; 3 . de fausse accusation portée contre lui et de l'iniquité de la procédure ultérieure 4 . du refus du ministre de l'intérieur de l'autoriser à intenter une action en justice . Le requérant invoque les articles 3, 6§4 1, 2 et 3, de la Conventio n
PROCEDURE DEVANT LA COMMISSIO N La présente requête a été introduite auprés de la Commission le 23 avril 1973 et enregistrée le 20 juillet 1973 . Le 21 mai 1975,: la Commission a examiné la recevabilité de la requête à la lumière du rapport de son Rapporteur, en date du 10 février 1975, rapport prévu à l'a rticle 40 de son Réglement intérieur . Elle a décidé, conformément à l'article 42, § 2 (b), dudit Règlement, de donner connaissance de la requéte au Gouvernement du Royaume-Uni .etd'inviter celui-ci à présenter par écrR ses observations sur la recevabilité de la requête pour autant que le requérant se plaignait d'une violation de l'article 6, § 1, de la Convention en ce que le ministre de l'intérieur lui avait refusé la permission de constituer avoué (solicitor) pour intenter une action en justice .
- 65 -
Les observations du Gouvernement ont été présentées le 24 juillet 1975 et celles du requérant en réponse ont été soumises le 6 février 1976 par MM . Turner et Cie à Manchester . Un autre rapport, daté du 10 février 1976, du Rapporteur ainsi que les observationsdes parties ont été examinés par la Commission pléniére le 5 juillet 1976, date à laquelle celle-ci a estimé que la requête comportait un autre point litigieux, vu l'arrêt de la Cour européenne des Droits de l'Homme du 8 juin 1976 dans l'affaire Engel et autres. Elle a estimé en effet qu'une question se posait sur le plan de l'article 6 de la Convention à propos de la plainte du requérant alléguant que la procédure disciplinaire n'était pas équitable et que la punition consistant en la perte de 80 jours de remise de peine, prononcée à l'issue de ladite procédure, n'était pas just'rfiée . Pour accélérer la procédure, la Commission a décidé, conformément à l'article 42, § 2 in fine de son Réglement intérieur, d'inviter les parties à une audience contradictoire portant tant sur la recevebilité que sur le fond des griefs du requérant au titre de l'article 6 de la Convention, tels qu'ils sont retracés ci-dessus .
Cette audience a eu lieu au Palais des Droits de l'Homme à Strasbourg le 16 décembre 1976, le Gouvernement ayant entre-temps présenté d'autres observations sur les griefs du requérant concernant la procédure disciplinaire . A l'audience, le requérant était représenté par M• J . Wood, de chez MM . Turner et Cie, à Manchester . Le Gouvernement était représenté par son Agent, Mme E .M . Denza, du ministére des Affaires étrangéres et du Commonwealth, M . N . Bratza, barrister-at-law, en qualité de conseil, Mlle S . Austin, collaboratrice juridique au Ministére de l'intérieur, et M . A .K . Guymer, du Ministére de l'intérieur, division des questions pénitentiaires . L'audience n'a duré que la rnatinée ; la Commission a alors rendu sa décision sur la recevabilité, aprés avoir délibéré sur les divers arguments des parties .
OBSERVATIONS DES PARTIES Observetions du Gouvernement défendeur 1 . Les faits Après avoir rappelé la législation interne pertinente relative à la correspondance des détenus et aux infractions disciplinaires, le Gouvernement décrit les prétendues voies de fait : Le gardien de prison mis en cause a nié l'accusation du requérant selon laquelle il se serait livré sur lui à des voies de fait le 25 février 1973 à l'heure du petit déjeuner. Il semble cependant admettre qu'à cause de lui le requérant a renversé son thé sur son petit déjeuner . Selon le Gouvernement, deux autres gardiens auraient été témoins de l'incident . 2 . Le refus d'autoriser le requérant é intenter une action en justic e Le Gouvernement affirme que le requérant n'a à aucun moment demandé l'autorisation de constituer avocat pour engager une procédure et que le grief est donc manifestement mal fondé . Toutefois, pour autant que son grief aurait trait au refus de l'autoriser à engager en personne une procédure, si une procédure pénale contre le gardien était l'objet de la requête du requérant auprés du ministère de l'intérieur, le Gouvernement soutient que ni l'article 6, § 1 ni aucune autre disposition de la Convention ne garantit le droi t
- 66 -
d'engager une procédure pénale . Un tel grief serait donc incompatible ratione meteriee avec les dispositions de la Convention . Enfin, si le requérant souhaitait engager lui-même une procédure civile, le Gouvernement admet qu'il a été fait obstacle à son accés aux tribunaux et qu'une question se pose donc sur le plan de l'article 6, § 1, de la Convention, tel que la Cour européenne des Droits de l'Homme l'a interprété dans son arrêt dans l'affaire Golder . Cependant, selon le Gouvernement, il n'est pas nécessaire que la Commission donne une suite à ce grief, du fait que le requérant n'était pas forclos au moment de son élargissement pour intenter la procédure envisagée et que le Gouvernement a maintenant modifié le réglement pénitentiaire pour tenir compte de l'arrêt Golder . 3 . Applicabllité de l'article 6 à une procédure disciplinaire devant le Commission des visiteurs des prison s L'argumentation du Gouvernement sur la recevabilité de cet aspect de la requête figure dans les nouvelles observations écrites présentées à la Commission avant l'audience contradictoire sur la recevabilité et le fond de l'affaire et a été développée à l'audience mBme . Elle porte sur la procédure disciplinaire dont le requérant a fait l'objet devant la commission des visiteun :, la nature de la remise de peine et la nature de la perte de remise de peine, en tant que sanction d'une infraction à la discipline des prisons . Le Gouvernement indique dans le détail la composition de la commission des visiteurs, ses fonctions de contrôle de la bonne administration d'une prison, y compris l'instruction des plaintes des détenus et la décision sur les accusations disciplinaires graves portées contre eux, ainsi que la procédure disciplinaire telle qu'elle se déroule devant la commission des visiteurs, qui doit veiller à ce que le détenu soit entendu équitablement . Le Gouvernement soutient que les dispositions de l'article 6 de la Convention, qui contient des garanties procédureles pour que toute cause soit entendue équitablement lorsqu'une personne fait l'objet d'une accusation en matière pénale, ne s'applique pas à des accusations d'infractions à la discipline ni à une procédure disciplinaire devant une commission des visiteurs . Il expose que la Cour, dans son arrêt dans l'affaire Engel et autres, se limitant à la question du service militaire, a énoncé trois critères permettant de décider si une accusation relève de la matière pénale : le point de savoir si l'accusation constitue une accusation en matière pénale dans le droit interne de l'Etat défendeur, la nature réelle de l'infraction et le degré de sévérité de la sanction . Selon le Gouvernement, le reproche fait au requérant d'avoir formulé une accusation mensongère et malveillante contre un gardien ne constitue pas une accusation en matière pénale en droit anglais . Il s'agit manifestement d'une question disciplinaire ayant des conséquences qui ne peuvent concerner que le bon ordre et la discipline d'une prison ainsi que les perspectives de carriére du gardien airui diffamé . Le Gouvernement déclare en outre que la sanction infligée au requérant pour cette infraction, une perte de remise de peine de 80 jours, ne constitue pas une privation de liberté puisque le requérant, contrairement à Engel et à ses camarades militaires, était de toute manière privé de sa liberté pour toute la durée de sa peine . Cette perte de remise de peine n'entraPnait que la suppression d'un privilège, prévu par la loi, qui permet d'envisager l'élargissement des détenus après qu'ils ont purgé deux tiers de leur peine, à condition que leur conduite en prison ait été satisfaisante . Enfin, selon le Gouvernement, la sévérité de la sanction, à savoir 80 jours de perte de remise de peine, ne donne pas par elle-même à une infraction manifestement disciplinaire le caractér e
- 67 -
d'une infraction pénale, puisqu'elle n'était pas disproportionnée aux conséquences néfastes possibles d'une telle allégation mensongére et malvaillante contre le gardien . Le Gouvernement conclut que rien dans la nature de la perte de remise de peine ne peut faire penser à une sanction pénale et ne peut donc permettre de dim que l'accusation et la procédure disciplinaires contre le requérant étaient de nature pénale . En conséquence, l'article 6 ne s'applique pas à cette procédure . Néanmoins, pour le cas où la Commission en déciderait autrement, le Gouvernement fait valoir que la procédure suivie par la commission des visiteurs, en général et en l'espéce, respecte les principes d'impartialité et de loyauté et l'esprit, sinon la lettre, de l'article 6 . La procédure disciplinaire prévoit que le détenu sera entendu équitablement et rapidement, avec le minimum de fonnalités par un organe impartial et indépendant, adapté aux exigences de la discipline et du bon ordre dans les prisons . Les dispositions de l'article 6 sont respectées à ceci près que les décisions ne sont pas prononcées publiquement et que l'intéressé n'est pas autorisé à se faire représenter. Le Gouvernement soutient qu'il ne serait ni raisonnable ni conforme à l'intérêt des détenus que de telles dispositions s'appliquent à une procédure disciplinaire en prison ; du reste, le requérant ne s'est jamais plaint de ces aspects de l'article 6. Revenant à la présente requéte, le Gouvernement fait valoir que le requérant était pleinement au fait de l'accusation portée contre lui et de ses conséquences possibles ; il a compris et a été compris correctement, comme le montre le compte rendu de l'audience . En outre, le requérant aureit pu faire témoigner en sa faveur son compagnon de cellule, mais celui-ci a refusé de le faire en l'absence de son avowt . Le Gouvernement conclut que la Commission devrait déclarer le grief du requérant selon lequel les dispositions de l'article 6 n'ont pas été respectées au cours de la procédure disciplinaire contre lui, incompatible avec les dispositions de la Convention ou, sinon, manifestement mal fondé . Observetions du requérant en réponse 1 . Les feite Le requérant maintient ses accusations de voies de fait dont, prétend-il, son compagnon de cellule a été le seul témoin . Il soutient que l'absence de pièces médicales à l'appui de son grief est sans importance puisqu'en droit anglais cet élément de preuve n'est pas nécessaire pour établir des voies de feit . Il se plaint que la commission des visiteurs n'ait pas fait une enquête appropriée sur ses accusations et, si elle l'a mal compris le 28 février 1973 en croyant qu'il s'était plaint au ministère de l'intérieur, cela ne fait qu'illustrer les grosses difficultés qu'il a en langue anglaise, difficultés qui ont aussi compliqué la procédure disciplinaire contre lui le 15 mars 1973 . Le raquérent persiste donc à alléguer que la procédure disciplinaire a été injuste, non seulement en raison de ses difficultés linguistiques mais aussi en raison de témoignages prétendument mensongers de gardiens qui n'ont pas été témoins de l'incident et de l'atmosphére solennelle et oppressante de l'audience, le requérant étant entouré de gardiens pour des motifs de sécurité . 2 . Le refus d'autoriser le requérant é Intenter une action en justic e Aux yeux du requérant, la distinction faite par le Gouvernement entre une demande d'autorisetion de constituer avocat pour intenter une action en justice et un e
-6B -
.demande d'autorisation d'engager cette action en personne, est sans pertinence . Il soutient qu'il e demandé é plusieurs reprises de pouvoir confier ses intéréts à un avocat et le fait que ces termes ne figurent pas dans ses requêtes au ministère de l'intérieur tient peut-étre é ce que, étant presque analphabéte, il a d0 demander à une autre personne d'écrire pour lui et cette personne a peut-être paraphresé ses expressions . Quoi qu'il en soit, constituer avocat fait souvent partie intégrante de l'engagement d'une action en justice. Lorsqu'il souhaitait intenter une action en justice, le requérant visait à se blanchir, à ce qu'un tribunal établisse la vérité de ses allégations quant aux voies de fah auxquelles s'était livré un gardien de prison, ce qui aurait contraint le ministre de l'intérieur à rétablir la remise de peine perdue . Le requérant soutient en premier lieu que le refus du ministére de l'intérieur l'a privé du droit d'accéder aux tribunaux en vue d'engager une procédure civile, droit garanti par l'article 6, § 1, de la Convention, tel que l'a interprété la Cour européenne des Droits de l'Homme dans l'affaire Golder . Comme dans cette affaire, le requérant prétend donc être victime d'une violation de la Convention . En outre, selon lui, la modHication du règlement pénitentiaire et le fait qu'il puisse encore engager une telle procédure n'enlève rien au motif de sa doléance, puisqu'il ne pourra pas regagner les 60 jours supplémentaires d'emprisonnement qu'il doit purger . En second lieu, le requérant soutient que le refus du ministère de l'intérieur l'a privé du droit d'accéder aux tribunaux en vue d'engager une action pénale contre le gardien . A première vue, cet argument peut paraître incompatible avec les dispositions de l'article 6, § 1, de la Convention . Cependant, le requérant affirme qu'il se préoccupe essentiellement de son droit, qui est de caractère civil, à ne pas être attaqué, c'est-àdire de son droit à la sécurité de la personne . Il peut être statué sur ce droit dans le cadre d'une procédure aussi bien civile que pénale . La procédure elle-méme ne change rien é la véritable nature du diffArend - la détermination d'un droit de caractére civil . Le requérant soutient donc que les principes de l'affaire Golder s'appliquent également à cet aspect de sa pWinte . En conséquence, le refus du ministre de l'intérieur de l'autoriser 8 engager une action pénale a, lui aussi, enfreint l'article 6, 4 1, de la Convention . 3 . Appllcablllté de l'artlcle 6 à une procédure dlsciplinalre devant la Commission des visiteurs Le requérent soutient que la procédure disciplinaire le concernant devant la commission des visiteurs portait sur une accusation en matière pénale au sens de l'article 6, § 1, de la Convention, tel que celui-ci a été interprété par la Cour européenne des Droits de l'Homme dans l'affaire Engel et autres . Le Gouvernement a fait une distinction entre l'affaire Engel et la présente requête parce que la première avait trait é une procédure disciplinaire militaire . Le requérant estime quant à lui qu'une telle distinction ne peut étre d'aucune utilité car, si l'on admet que le contexte d'une procédure disciplinaire a une importance, le fait qu'elle se déroule dans le cadre d'institutions pénales rend plus probable, et non moins, que les procédures disciplinaires internes sont de caractére pénal . En examinant les critères énoncés par la Cour dans l'affaire Engel bt autres pour déterminer le caractére pénal d'une accusation, le requérent déclare que l'accusation d'avoir formulé une allégation mensongère et malveillante contre un gardien va plus loin que l'équivalent le plus proche du droit pénal anglais, l'accusation de diffamation criminelle . Toutefois, en examinant l'élément essentiel d'une infraction, il faut considé-
-69-
rer ses effets sur la société : en l'espèce, l'infraction dont le requérant était accusé intéressait la discipline pénitentiaire . La discipline est la clé de voûte des institutions pénales et donc de l'efficacité du système pénal . En outre, il existe une analogie entre cette infraction et d'autres crimes graves comportant une responsabilité morale manifeste, par exemple les blessures volontaires . Le requérant conclut donc que l'infraction consistant à formuler une allégation mensongére et malveillante, vu son analogie avec la notion traditionnelle d'infraction pénale en droit anglais, pouvait être rangée parmi les infractions pénales . Le requérant s'est alors étendu sur la nature de la sanction consistant en une perte de remise de peine, infligée pour cette infraction . Bien que la perte de la remise de peine ne puisse à proprement parler être considérée comme une privation de liberté, la remise de peine constituant un simple privilège, il ne s'agit pas moins en réalité d'une privation de liberté, sans quoi une telle sanction serait ineffirace . De nos jours, un détenu a pratiquement droit à une remise de peine d'un tiers, méme si ce n'est pas une régle imposée par la loi . La plupart des détenus en jouissent . En conséquence, l'existence de ce droit donne à la sanction de perte de remise de peine son poids et son efficacité, cette sanction devenant en fait une nouvelle privation de liberté . Selon le requérant, il faut non seulement examiner la sànction infligée, à savoir 80 jours de perte de remise de peine, mais aussi la sanction que le contrevenant encourt . La commission des visiteurs peut infliger au maximum 180 jours de perte de remise de peine, soit six mois supplémentaires d'incarcération . Le requérant fait valoir que le degré de sévérité que la punition peut atteindre fait des infractions dont connait la commission des visiteurs des infractions pénales . Pour ce qui est de la question de principe mentionnée par le Gouvernement et selon laquelle la Commission devrait faire preuve de prudence avant de conclure que l'article 6 s'applique à la procédure disciplinaire dans les prisons, en raison de la prétendue nécessité de maintenir des procédures internes rapides et peu formalistes, le requérant soutient qu'une procédure plus ouverte, soumise à un contrôle extérieur présenterait de plus grand avantages vu le mécontentement et le désordre régnant dans les prisons ces derniers temps . Il estime que la vie pénitentiaire serait mieux tolérée par les détenus s'ils étaient essurés de pouvoir obtenir un traitement équitable de leurs doléances et des accusations disciplinaires graves devant une autorité extérieure impartiale n'ayant pas de lien avec les prisons . - Le requérent conclut que l'infraction dont il était accusé relevait de la matière pénale, que la sanction infligée était elle aussi de nature pénale, puisqu'il s'agissait d'une privation de liberté, que la procédure devant la commission des visiteurs avait donc pour objet une décision sur une accusation en matiére pénale, au sens de l'article 6, § 1 et que les dispositions dudit article auraient donc d0 être respectées par cette commission . Cependant, le requérant soutient que celle-ci ne les a pas respectées, que la procédure n'était donc pas équitable et il se prétend victime d'une autre violation de l'article 6 de la Convention . EN DROI T 1 . Le requérant a prétendu avoir subi des voies de fait de la part d'un gardien de prison et donc avoir été makraité en violation de l'article 3 de la Convention, qui interdit les traitements inhumains et dégradants . Toutefois, la Commission estime que l'incident en cause était relativement mineur puisque, s'il s'est vraiment produit, le gardien n'a fait que heurter le requérant, qui a renversé son thé sur son petit déjeuner .
- 70 -
Il n'y a aucune preuve de dommages corporels . Le traitement incriminé ne constitu . edoncpasuviltde'rc3aConvti Le requérant s'est plaint d'autres formes de mauvais traitement, à savoir de soins médicaux insuffisants . Toutefois, un examen de ce grief n'a révélé aucun élément de preuve d'une négligence de la part du personnel médical de la prison . Il n'y a donc pas d'apparence de violation des droits et libertés garantis par la Convention et en particulier par son article 3 . II s'ensuit que cette partie de la requête est manifestement mal fondée, au sens de l'article 27, § 2, de la Convention . 2 . Le requérant s'est plaint ensuite d'avoir fait l'objet d'une procédure disciplinaire inéquitable devant la commission des visiteurs des prisons le 15 mars 1973, en violation de l'article 6, § 1, de la Convention, qui garantit un procès équitable en vue d'une décision sur toute accusation en matiére pénale . Bien que la Commission ait décidé dans le passé que les dispositions de l'article 6 ne s'appliquent pas, en principe, à une procédure disciplinaire, le requérant soutient que, vu l'arrêt de la Cour européenne des Droits de l'Homme dans l'affaire Engel et autres, la Commission doit prendre en considération la véritable nature de la procédure et conclure qu'en fait la procédure disciplinaire portait sur une accusation en matiére pénale, donc que les dispositions de l'article 6 auraient dû étre respectées . Le requérant soutient en particulier que l'accusation portée contre lui d'avoir formulé une allégation mensongére et malveillante, bien qu'elle n'ait pas d'équivalent précis en droit pénal anglais, n'en comporte pas moins les éléments constitutifs de la notion traditionnelle d'infraction en droit pénal anglais . En outre, la punition de 80 jours de perte de remise de peine infligée pour cette infraction constituait une peine grave entrainant une privation de liberté, une véritable extension de sa peine, et donc une sanction pénale . Le requérant conclut que la procédure disciplinaire, vu l'infraction dont il était accusé et la peine infligée, revêtait manifestement un cerectére pénal et que les dispositions de l'article 6 auraient dû être respectées et ne l'ont pas été . Le Gouvernement répond à cette argumentation en soutenant qu'une accusation mensongère et malveillante contre un gardien de prison ne présente d'intérét qu'au point de vue de la discipline pénitentiaire et ne se rapproche d'aucune disposition pénale du droit anglais . Il soutient en outre que la remise de peine n'est qu'un privilège accordé par l'Exécutif confonnément à la loi . Un détenu est obligé de purger toute la peine prononcée par un tribunal lors de sa condamnation . Toutefois, s'il se conduit bien, on envisage habituellement de l'élargir après qu'il a purgé au minimum deux tiers de sa peine . A l'inverse, s'il se conduit mal et se rend coupable de graves manquements à la discipline, il peut perdre une partie de ce privilége, cest-é-dire plusieurs jours de remise de peine, la sanction maximale pouvant être prononcée par la commis . Le Gouvernementi-sondevturéa180josdeprt mi en prétend que la perte de remise de peine ne prolonge nullement le durée de la peine et ne constitue donc pas la sanction pénale qu'est une privation de liberté . Le Gouvernement conclut que la procédure dirigée contre le requérant était une procédure purement disciplinaire, à laquelle les dispositions de l'article 6 ne devaient pas s'appliquer . Le Gouvernement soutient pour le surplus que le requérant a bénéficié d'un examen complet et équitable de son cas devant la commission des visiteurs, organe impartial et indépendant .
- 71 -
La Commission a examiné la recevabilité de ce grief, suivant la même méthode que celle employée par les parties, en tenant compte de la notion d'accusation en matiére pénale développée par la Cour dans l'affaire Engel et autres . Dans cette affaire, la Cour, een se limitant au domaine du service militaire », a déclaré qu'un Etat Contractant est libre en principe d'ériger en infraction pénale une action ou une omission, ce choix échappant au contrôle de la Cour . En revanche, lorsqu'un Etat qualifie une infrection de disciplinaire, la Cour a compétence pour s'assurer que les dispositions de l'article 6 n'ont pas été éludées et que « le disciplinaire n empiéte pas indOment sur le pénal n(Cour eur . D .H ., affaire Engel et autres, arrét du 8 juin 1976, § 81) . La Cour a énoncé trois critères permettant de déterminer si une accusation disciplinaire relève en réalité de la matière pénale . Bien que la Cour ait limité sa décision au domaine du servicemilitaire, la Commission estime que lesdits critères sont applicables à la présente affaire, .qui a trait à une infraction é la discipline pénitentiaire . Ces critères étaient les suivants : 111 « le ou les textes définissant l'infraction incriminée appartiennent-ils, d'après la technique juridique de l'Etatdéfendeur, au droit pénal, au droit disciplinaire ou aux deux à la fois 7 n ; (2) examen de « la nature mBme de l'infraction » (3) considération du « degré de sévérité de la sanction que risque de subir l'intéressé a (ibid ., § 821 . La Commiseion prend donc pour point de dépert la question de savoir si l'infraction incriminée appartenait, d'après la technique juridique de l'Etat défendeur, au droit pénal, au droit disciplinaire ou aux deux à la fois . Elle relève que dans la présente requête, l'accusation d'avoir forrnulé une allégation mensongére et malveillante contre un gardien de prison constitue en droit anglais une infraction disciplinaire dans le systéme pénitentiaire . On ne sait toutefois pas exactement si l'accusation pouvait aussi constituer l'infraction de diffamation criminelle au regard du droit pénal anglais, et il n'est donc pas utile d'examiner de manière plus approfondie cet aspect du probléme . La Commission a ensuite examiné la nature même de l'infraction . Elle note que l'infraction consistant à formuler des allégations mensongères et malveillantes peut avoir de sérieuses répercussions dans le systéme pénitentiaire . Un fonctionnement efficace de celui-ci dépend de la discipline . Cette derniére est assurée par les gardiens et peut être sapée par les attaques injustifiées contre l'autorité ou la direction . De telles allégations faites en dehors des -établissements pénitentiaires ont des conséquences moins graves . La Commission conclut donc que cette infraction est, é premiére vue, de nature disciplinaire et qu'une procédure disciplinaire se justifiait . La Cour, étant parvenueé une conclusion semblable darus l'affaire Engel et autres, a ensuite considéré le degré de sévérité de la sanction que M . Engel et ses camarades risquaient de subir pour des manquements à la discipline militaire . Elle a estimé que la sanction d'affectation é une unité disciplinaire pour trois ou quatre mois, que trois des requérants risquaient de subir, était une punition grave entraînant une privation de liberté . Les accusations portées contre eux relevaient donc de la matière pénale, ce qui obligeait les autorités à entourer des garanties de l'article 6 la procédure disciplinaire dont ils faisaient l'objet . La Commission a donc considéré le degré de sévérité de la peine infligée à M . Kiss, à savoir 80 jours de perte de remise de peine, en tenant aussi compte du fait qu'il encourait une sanction maximale de 180 jours de perte de remise de peine . La Commission estime que la perte de remise de peine ne
_72_
constitue pas une privation de liberté . Un détenu, contrairement à quelqu'un effectuant son service militaire, est privé de sa liberté pour toute la durée de sa peine ; toute remise de cette peine pour bonne conduite est un simple privilége et la perte de celui-ci ne modifie en rien la justification initiale de la détention . La Commission remarque en outre qu'on ne peut dire que la sévérité de la peine soit sans aucun rapport avec l'infraction consistant à formuler des allégations mensongères et malveillantes contre un gardien, en raison des répercussions possibles que de telles allégations peuvent avoir sur la cerriére du gardien mis en cause ainsi que sur le bon ordre et la discipline pénkentiaires . Au surplus, la Commission estime que la seule sévérité de la sanction ne fait pas entrer l'infraction incriminée dans le domaine pénal . La Commission conclut donc que la procédure en cause sortait du domaine d e l'article 6 de la Convention et que le Gouvernement n'était pas tenu d'accorder au requérant les garanties de l'article 6 de la Convention lors de la procédure disciplinaire devant la commission des visiteurs . Cette partie de la requête est donc manifestement mal fondée . 3 . Enfin, le requérant s'est plaint que le refus du ministre de l'intérieur de l'autoriser é intenter une action en justice violait son droit d'accès aux tribunaux, droit garenti par l'article 6, § 1, de la Convention, tel que la Cour européenne des Droits de l'Homme l'a interprét0 dans l'affaire Golder . L'article 6, § 1, de la Convention reconnait à toute personne le droit à ce que sa cause soit entendue équitablement par un tribunal impartial qui décidera, soit des contestations sur ses droits de caractère civil, soit du bien-fondé de toute accusation en matiére pénale dirigée contre elle . La Cour a affirmé dans son arrét dans l'affaire Golder que le droit d'accès é un tribunal impartial est inclus dans cette disposition . Le grief du requérant revêt trois aspects : le requérant aurait-il d0 demander expressément l'autorisation de constituer avocat comme dans l'affaire Golder, le requérant avait-il l'intention d'engager une procédure pénale et avait-il l'intention d'engager une procédure civile t Le Gouvernement soutient que le contenu essentiel de l'arrêt Golder est la reconnaissance du droit de constituer avocat en vue d'engager une procédure civile . Le requérant soutient avoir demandé verbalement au directeur de la prison l'autorisation de consulter un avocat sur une éventuelle action en justice . Le Gouvernement le nie, en précisant qu'aucune demande en ce sens n'a été formulée dans la requête du requérant au ministre de l'intérieur . Il soutient que ce grief doit donc 9tre déclaré manifestement mal fondé . La Commission estime que l'on ne peut faire de distinction significative entre l'engagement d'une action en justice en personne et l'engagement par l'intermédiaire d'un avoué, encore que cette derniére manière soit peut-être la pratique courante . Le principe posé est celui de l'accès aux tribunaux . Le refus du ministre de l'intérieur d'autoriser l'engagement d'une action en justice a eu pour effet de dénier au requérant ce droit d'accés . A en croire le requérant, il aurait souhaité engager une procédure civile, une procAdure pénale ou les deux contre le gardien de prison pour voies de fait . Cependant, selon la jurisprudence constante de W Commission, l'article 6 ne garantit aucun droit é engager une procédure pénale (voir, par exemple, requéte N° 2942/66 X . contre République Fédérale d'Allemagne, Recueil de décisions, Vol . 23, p . 64) . Cet aspect du grie f
- 73 -
est donc incompatible avec les dispositions de la Convention, au sens de l'article 27, § 2. En revanche, le requérant avait le droit, au regard de l'article 6, § 1, de la Convention, d'engager une procédure civile contre le gardien pour le délit civil d'atteinte à la personne . Il en a été emp0ché à cause du refus d'autorisation que le ministre de l'intérieur lui a opposé . Le fait qu'à son éWrgissement, le requérant n'était pas forclos pour engager une procédure contre le gardien ne présente que peu d'intérét . A la date de l'introduction de sa requête auprès de la Commission, le requérant avait épuisé la seule voie de recours interne qui lui était ouverte, celle consistant à demander au ministére de l'intérieur l'autorisation d'engager une action en justice .
Cet aspect de la plainte soulève donc une importante question de droit sur le terrain de l'article 6, § 1, de la Convention, tel que la Cour l'a interprété dans l'affaire Golder . Une décision sur cette question appelle donc un examen au fond . Par ces motifs, la Commissio n 11 DECLARE RECEVABLE LE GRIEF DU REQUÉRANT CONCERNANT LE REFUS DE L'AUTORISATION D'ENGAGER UNE PROCEDURE CIVILE (article 6, § 11 : 2) DÉCLARE LA REQUETE IRRECEVABLE POUR LE SURPLUS .
_7q_

Origine de la décision

Formation : Commission (plénière)
Date de la décision : 16/12/1976

Fonds documentaire ?: HUDOC

HUDOC
Association des cours judiciaires suprêmes francophones Organisation internationale de la francophonie

Juricaf est un projet de l'AHJUCAF, l'association des cours judiciaires suprêmes francophones,
réalisé en partenariat avec le Laboratoire Normologie Linguistique et Informatique du droit (Université Paris I).
Il est soutenu par l'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie et le Fonds francophone des inforoutes.