Facebook Twitter Appstore
Page d'accueil > Résultats de la recherche

§ AGEE c. ROYAUME-UNI

Imprimer

Type d'affaire : Decision
Type de recours : Partly admissible ; partly inadmissible

Numérotation :

Numéro d'arrêt : 7729/76
Identifiant URN:LEX : urn:lex;coe;cour.europeenne.droits.homme;arret;1976-12-17;7729.76 ?

Analyses :

(Art. 14) DISCRIMINATION, (Art. 9-1) LIBERTE DE RELIGION


Parties :

Demandeurs : AGEE
Défendeurs : ROYAUME-UNI

Texte :

APPLICATION/REQUÉTE N° TP29/7 6 Philip Burnett Franklin AGEE v/the UNITED KINGDOM Philip Burnett Franklin AGEE c/ROYAUME-UN I DECISION of 17 December 1976 on the admissibility of the application DÉCISION du 17 décembre 1976 sur la recevabilité de la requêt e
Article 3 of the Convention : a) The fact that a Member of the Government gave brief details in Parliament of the considerations which led to the decision to deport a person, cannot be said to have involved degrading treatment . b) In normal circumstances, deportation of an alien on grounds of State security cannot be looked on as a penalty, in particular as a penalty contrery to Article 3 . Article 5 of the Convention : In order to safeguard the individual's right to "Security of person", every decision taken within the sphere of Article 5, must be in conformity with the procedural and substantive requirements laid down by an afreedy existing law. Article 6, parograph I of the Convention : a) In a State which recognises parfianrentary immunity, which is an attribute of a democratic society, there is no "civil right" to protection of reputation against statements by a parfiamentarian . b) Article 6, para. (1) does not appty to the decision to deport an alien, since it does not relate to the determination of civil rights and obligations or of a criminaf charge . Article 6 paregreph 1 of the Convention : The deportation of an individuaf does not interfere with his family life when the spouse has the possibility to follow him . Article 10, paragraph I of the Convention : In case of deportation of a journafist or a writer : Article 10 does not protect the right to reside on the territory of a State of which he is not a national. Article 11, paragraph I of the Convention : This provision does not forbid a State from deporting an alien on the ground that he has been in contact with foreign intelligence officers. Article 14 of the Convention, in conjunction with Artfcfes 5, 6 B, 10 and 11 of the Convention : The status of an afien would, in itseff, provide objective and reasonable justification for a treatment different from that applied to nationals . Article 26 of the Convention : The possibifity of requesting an authority to reconsider a decision taken by it or the possibility of making representations to a body of an advisory character, cannot be considered as effective remedies.
- 164 -
Article 3 de ie Convention : a) tl n'y a pas de traitement dégradant dans le fait qu'un membre du Gouvernement a indiquA briévement devant le Parlement sur quels motifs se fondait la décision d'expulser une personne . b) Dans des circonstances normales, l'expulsion d'un étranger pour des motifs touchant à la sécurité nationale ne saurait étre considérée comme une peine, notamment comme une peine contraire à l'article 3. Article 5 de la Convention : Pour garantir la « sOreté u de la personne, toute dAcision prise dans la sphére d'application de l'article 5 doit être conforme aux exigences procédurales et de fond d'une loi préexistante. Article 6, paragraphe 1, de la Convention : e) Dans un Etat qui connait le principe de l'immunité partementaire, qui est un attribut de la rr société démocratique n, il n'existe pas un « droit de caractére civii u à la protection de la réputation contre les déclarations d'un partementaire . b) L érticte 6, par. 1, ne s'applique pas é la décision d'expulser un étranger, celle-ci ne portent ni sur des droits et obligations de caractére civil ni sur le bien-fondé d'une accusation en matiére pénaie. Article 8, paregraphe 1, de la Convention : L'exputsion d'une personne ne porte pas atteinte à se vie familiale lorsque son conjoint a la possibilité de la suivre. Article 10, paragrephe 1, de fe Convention : Dans le cas de l'expulsion d'un journaliste ou auteur : l'article 10 ne protége pas le droit de séjourner sur le territoire d'un Etat dont on n'est pas ressortissant. Article 11, peragrephe 1, de I. Convention : Cette disposition n'interdit pas à un Etat d'expulser un étranger au motif qu'il a eu des contacts avec des agents de renseignement étrangers .
Article 14 de la Convention, combiné avec les articles 5, 6, 8, 10 et 11 de la Convention : Le statut d'étranger peut, en lui-méme, fournir la justification objective et raisonnable d'un traitement différent de celui appliqué aux nationaux . Article 26 de la Convention : Ne constituent un recours efficace ni la possibitité de demander é l'autorité de reconsidérer fe décision rendue par elle, ni la possibilité de faire des représentations è un organe de ceractére consultatif .
I franpais : voir p. 176)
THE FACTS
The facts of the case as submitted on behalf of the applicant may be summarised as follows : The applicant was born in 1935 and is a citizen of the United States of America . He has been resident in the United Kingdom since October 1972 and is currently resident in Cambridge . The applicant lives with his common-law wife who is a Brazilian national who ha s lived in the United Kingdom since 1973 . The renewal of her residence permit has been under review by the Home Office since June 1976 . It is alleged that she is unable to return to Brazil for fear of persecution for political reasons, having previously been shot at, tortured under interrogation and detained for two years by the present regime in Brazil . It is believed that she is entitled to refugee status under the UN Conventio n
- 165-
on the Status of Refugees of 1951, as amended by the 1967 Protocol thereto . The applicant's two sons, who are United States citizens, also live with him . The applicant was employed for twelve years as an agent of the United States' Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) . He resigned in 1969 as a result of growing disillusionment with its practices and, it is stated, he has not since been employed by it or any other intelligence agency . He has allegedly been disenchanted with aspects of the nature and modus operandi of the CIA (in particular "covert operations" techniques of infiltration and destruction of institutions) and has come to believe them to be "detrimental to the true interests of the United States and dangerously subversive of Western democratic principles" .
According to the applicant he was at no time engaged in activities involving United States-United Kingdom intelligence collaboration and did not at any time gain knowledge of United Kingdom intelligence services . To his knowledge he has no information which could plausibly jeopardise the security of the United Kingdom in any manner . In about January 1975 a book by the applicant entitled "Inside the Company CIA Diary" was published . A copy has been submitted to the Commission . The applicant described therein his work for the CIA in South America . The applicant believes that its publication caused political embarrassment to the CIA, and that this and similar publications, some written by him, provoked critical debate in the United States legislature and elsewhere about certain CIA activities, and widespread censure of the CIA for such parts of its activities . The applicant states that he has subsequently started to research and write a second book on covert CIA activity in such countries as Guatemala, the Congo, Indonesia, Brazil, Chile and in connection with the 1967 coup in Greece and subsequent events there, some of which had formed an important element in the Commission's enquiries in the "Greek case" . The applicant has allegedly been widely consulted by reputable journalists, researchers, academics and other commentators of many nationalities concerning the methods of the CIA . He insists, however, that he has never divulged information bearing upon any activities of the CIA or other Western intelligence services relating to the security of the United Kingdom or other Western European democracies . Nor is he conscious of knowing of any such activities . Since 1975 the applicant has, he states, made periodical visits abroad for the purposes of research, interviews and publishing arrangements . At times during these visits and in the United Kingdom he has been conscious of coming under surveillance . It is stated moreover that this might have been expected and that the applicant has been prudent as to the kinds of contact he has made . At no time in the past eight years, it is said, has he knowingly had contact with any member of "Soviet or allied intelligence services" . On arrival in the United Kingdom the applicant was granted leave to enter for a three-month period . He subsequently received a number of extensions of stay . A further extension was refused by letter from the Home Office dated 15 November 1976 . The letter stated inter alia that the Secretary of State had decided that the applicant's departure from the United Kingdom "would be conducive to the public good as being in the interests of national security" . The Secretary of State had accordingly decided to refuse the application for a further extension of stay and for the same reason t o
- 166-
make a deportation order against the applicant by virtue of S . 3 (5) (b) Immigration Act 1971 .
of the
The grounds for this decision are indicated in a note annexed to the letter which stated that the Secretary of State had considered information that the applicant : "'la) has maintained regular contacts harmful to the security of the United Kingdom with foreign intelligence officers , (b) has been and continues to be involved in disseminating information harmful to the security of the United Kingdom ; and Icl has aided and counselled others in obtaining information for publication which could be harmful to the security of the United Kingdom . " The letter also informed the applicant that he was not entitled to appeal against the refusal of an extension of stay or against the decision to make a deportation order . He could, however, make representations against the decision to deport him to an advisory panel . He could appear before the panel but could not be represented . To such extent as the advisers might sanction he might be assisted by a friend or arrange for third parties to testify on his behalf . He could also make representations to the Home Secretary .
The letter also pointed out that, if a deportation order were made, the applicant would have a right of appeal against removal to the country specified in the removal directions on the ground that he ought to be removed to a different country specified by him . On 29 November 1976 the applicant gave notice to the Home Secretary that he denied the allegations made against him and that he wished to appear before the advisory panel . On 30 November 1976 in a further letter he expressed concern about the value of the hearing and the apparent lack of elementary safeguards of justice . He stated that if he were to be in a position to defend himself against the allegations, he must be given further details and asked for certain specific details of the allegations and of the procedure at the hearing .
The hearing was fixed for 11 January 1977 . By letter of 2 December 1976, the Home Office stated that the Secretary of State was not prepared to add to thE statement of grounds already given . It was also said that it was implicit in the nature of the procedure, which was not adversarial, that the applicant could neither be crossexamined on behalf of the Secretary of State nor be able to conduct a crossexamination . The Advisers' advice would be communicated to the Secretary of State and would not be communicated to third parties . The allegations against the applicant were repeated in Parliament by the Home Secretary on 18 November 1976 . The case has also attracted considerable publicity in the press, and a number of press-cuttings have been submitted . It is stated that the applicant vigorously denies the allegations against him, which are said to be highly damaging to him in his professional capacity by reason of their imprecise yet defamatory nature . The applicant believes that, if deported, he would not only have to bear the stigma of deportation but would also be identified as a person who had been involved in pro-Soviet (as opposed to anti-CIA) activities . Referring to a press cutting from "The Guardian" it is suggested that he might also be identified as a person associated with the IRA or other unlawful Irish organisations . A plethors of unfounded and damaging rumour of a similar kind had been engendered by the Home Secretary's statement .
- 167 -
The applicant has been advised that no action for defamation could have any chance of success because the Minister's publication of the allegations was covered by absolute privilege . The applicant alleges that deportation may prove damaging to him especially as it is not clear whether there may be an intention to prosecute him because of his writing if he were returned to the United States . He has no other nationality by virtue of which he would have a legal right to enter a third country . It is further alleged that it may prove damaging to his family life as his wife may have difficulty in entering the United States . It was not clear whether, as an alien associated with the applicant, and as one who might be deemed actively hostile to the Government of Brazil, she would be granted an entry visa with him .
Complaints The applicant submits that the treatment to which he has been subjected and which he was undergoing at the time of introduction of his application was in breach ot Arts . 3, 5, 6, 8, 10 and 11 of the Convention whether considered in isolation or in conjunction with Art . 14 . Article 3 He submits that to subject an individual to public defamation in a manner which seriously jeopardises his career and livelihood, without possibility of domestic legal redress, constitutes degrading treatment within the meaning of Art . 3 as interpreted by the Commission in the "Greek Case" (Yearbook Xll, p . 186) . Moreover, an act of deportation might, in aggravated circumstances such as those in question, in itself be degrading treatment contrary to Art . 3 in that it amounted to an arbitrary, unjustified or disproportionate penalty (Fawcett, Application of the European Convention, p . 38) . (b) Artic% 5 Deportation also constituted so grave and arbitrary an interference with liberty and security of person, that in particular circumstances it might constitute a breach of Art . 5 . Such circumstances might include those in which a long-resident alien was subjected to removal or threat of removal by discretionary administrative decision without benefit of judicial hearing or other form of due process . The possibility of such sudden removal would, if not contained by the concept of liberty and security of person, largely if not entirely undermine the protection afforded by Art . 5 . Any other interpretation would enable governments to circumvent the rather precise protection of Art . 5 by making the very kind of order now served upon the applicant . (a)
So to interpret away the protection of this entrenched and fundamental right, afforded to alien and national alike, would, in the applicant's submission, not only provide carte blanche to a Government determined to use administrative discretion to avoid the perils of having to employ due process of law but would fly in the face of the principle of equality before the law . This principle was not only expressed in Art . 14 of the Convention . It was also one of the "general principles of law recognised by civilised nations" alluded to in Art . 38 (1) Ic) of the Statute of the International Court of Justice, by reference to which all treaties bearing upon human rights should be interpreted . The applicant refers in this context to the Opinion of Judge Tanaka, in S . W. African Cases, Second Phase, lCJ Reports 196 6, p. 248 et seq.
-168-
Icl
Article 6
The applicant further submits that the case raises grave issues for the rule of law and concept of due process in relation to Art . 6 of the Convention, such as have had to be confronted by the courts of most countries pretending to democratic standards . The applicant has in this context referred to and quoted from judgments given in the United States Supreme Court in the cases of Jay v. Boyd (351 U.S . 345) ( 1955), Greene v. McElroy (360 U.S. 474) 119591 and Kwong Hei Chew v. Colding 1344 U.S . 590) (1952) as showing the approach of that tribunal to such issues . A report of the judgment in the latter case where the Supreme Court held that a resident alien could not be refused entry to the country by the executive . on•"public interest" grounds without due process of law, has been submitted . The question in the present case is, the applicant submits, whether the nature of the deportation proceedinps attracts the protection of "due process" as set out in Art . 6 of the Convention . They could not be described as the hearing of a "criminal charge" in strict terms of English law but this was clearly not conclusive . It was for the Convention organs to determine the character of the proceedings . It was clearly penal, the protection of Art . 6 was engaged and the proceedings were in breach of the Convention . The applicant referred in this respect to the judgment of the European Court of Human Rights in the case of Engel and others v. the Netherlands . The applicant submits that, whilst he has not been criminally charged, the three allegations made against him provide the basis for criminal charges under the Official Secrets Acts or otherwise. He refers in this connection to Archbold, Criminal Pleading etc ., 39rh Ed. paras. 3209-3222. However, a hearing before the Advisory Panel, without detail of the allegations, without legalrepresentation, without the opportunity to cross-examine the witnesses and without binding character for its determination of the issues, clearly breached the most fundamental canons of natural justice . Moreover deportation might, and in the present case would be, penal being a consequence of and in the nature of a punishment for, committing the three series of acts summarised by the allegations of the Home Secretary .
The deportation process must thus attract the protection of Art . 6 of the Convention, although no charge had been brought under municipal law . The applicant would indeed prefer that such a charge were brought, thereby enabling him to defend and clear himself . The applicant also refers to paras . 80-82 of the Judgment of the Court in the Engel case, and in particular the following passage : "However, supervision by the Court does not stop there . Such supervision would generally prove to be illusory if it did not also take into consideration the degree of severity of the penalty that the person concerned risked incurring . In a society subscribing to the rule of law, there belong to the "criminal" sphere deprivations of liberty liable to be imposed as a punishment, except those which by their nature, duration or manner of execution cannot be appreciably detrimental . The seriousness of what is at stake, the traditions of the Contracting States and the importance attached by the Convention to respect for the physical liberty of the person all require that this should be so . " The applicant submits that the submissions advanced by him are necessitated by the principle of effectiveness in treaty interpretation, since otherwise, as the Court had noted in para . 81 of the Engel judgment "the operation of the fundamental clauses o f
_16g_
Articles 6 and 7 would be subordinated to the (Contracting States') sovereign will" . By choosing an administrative circumvention, rather than the due process of criminal law laid down by statute, a State might set these fundamental protections at naught . It is also submitted that the applicant has been defamed by official statements and that his right to defend his reputation is a "civil right" within the meaning of Art . 6 . However, no hearing of any kind would be available because of the defence of absolute privilege . (d)
Article 8
With reference to Art . 8 of the Convention the applicant firstly refers to Art . 17 of the UN Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, which provides inter alia that no one shall be subjected to "unlawful attacks on his honour and reputation" . He also observes that Velu, in Privacy and Human Rights (ed . Robertson, Manchester 1973) has persuasively suggested that the Convention also protects against attacks on honour and reputation and similar torts . It is submitted that the applicant's honour and reputation have been severely attacked without his having an effective remedy and that such attacks are in breach of Art . 8 (1) of the Convention . Secondly the applicant submits that his deportation would in the circumstances outlined by him adversely affect his family life within the meaning of Art . 8 111 .
(e)
Article 10
The applicant further submits that the action of the United Kingdom authorities is in breach of Art . 10 of . the Convention since it is in the nature of the Home Secretary's allegations against him that the deportation order is to be made because of his professional activities in receiving and imparting information . Deportation would constitute an "interference" with the applicant's freedom of expression since it could hardly be maintained that the threat of deportation as a penalty would not severely inhibit an individual's exercise of the protected right .
(f)
Article 1 1
The authorities' action was also in breach of Art . 11 in that the allegation that he had "maintained regular contacts harmful to the security of the United Kingdom with foreign intelligence officers" constituted, in association with the penalty of deportation, a restriction unjustified by the Convention . The applicant maintains that his activities have in no way related to the security of the United Kingdom but have been concerned with aspects of the workings of the CIA and the publication and re-publications of his writings . He denies that the second paragraphs of Arts . 8, 10 and 11 apply to him . He had done nothing which would threaten national security, no action of his could be said to necessitate the particular restriction imposed on his Art . 10 freedom, namely deportation, or to necessitate the arbitrary form of restriction imposed . It is submitted that the application raises the issue of the nature and effectiveness of the Convention control over a Governmental proclivity to raise the issue of "State security" to override human rights . A Government could not evade its duties under Arts. 8, 10 and 11 by the exercise of executive discretion without possibility of judicial control or review . This would make a mockery of Convention protection .
(g)
Article 1 4
Finally the applicant submits that the authorities' action also breaches Art . 14 of the Convention in conjunction with Arts . 3, 5, 6, 8, 10 and (apparently) 11 . The basis
- 170 -
of this complaint is that the authorities have acted against him with discrimination on the grounds of political opinion or national origin . (h)
Article 16 It is submitted that A rt . 16 is not applicable since it contemplates the possibility of general and prospective limitations and does not permit limitations imposed selectively or ex post facto . Any other interpretation would, it is submitted, infringe the conceptions of A rt s . 7 and 14 of the Convention . (i) Artic%26 The applicant submits that the Home Office letter of 15 November 1976 is a "final decision" and that neither the Advisory Panel nor the right to make representations to the Home Secreta ry constitutes a"domestic remedÿ' within the meaning of Art . 26 . Alternatively he submits that they are not sufficient remedies . No remedy thus lay between the notice of intention to depo rt and the making of a depo rt ation order . The notice of intention to depo rt might thus be deemed to be the order itself and thus the "final decision" . The applicant requests that, in view of the urgency of the matter the Commission should give the application such expedited treatment as may be appropriate under its Rules of Procedure .
THE LA W 1 . The applicant has made a number of complaints connected with the decision of the United Kingdom authorities to deport him . He alleges the violation of Arts . 3, 5, 6, 8, 10 and 11 of the Convention both in isolation and in conjunction with Art . 14 . In particular he complains that defamatory allegations have been made against him without possibility of legal redress, contrary to Arts . 3 and 8 . He complains that his deportation as such would in the circumstances involve the violation of Arts . 3 and 5. He maintains that the authorities' action in deporting him has or would involve the violation of Arts . 8, 10 and 11 of the Convention . He also complains that Art . 6 has been violated in that he has no possibility of obtaining legal redress in respect of the allegedly defamatory statements and in that the decision to deport him in essence involved the determination of criminal charges against him in respect of which he will not receive a hearing in accordance with Art . 6 .
2 . The Commission observes that the decision of the United Kingdom authorities to deport the applicant was communicated to him on 15 November 1976 . The Commisssion does not consider that the right to make representations to the advisory panel (a body with no power to decide the matter) or to the Home Secretary (the authority responsible for the decision) can be seen as effective and sufficient remedies which the applicant is required to exhaust under Art . 26 of the Convention . It has accordingly dealt with the case on the basis that the decision communicated to the applicant was the "final decision" in relation to his deportation and that the requirements of Art . 26 have been complied with . 3 . The Commission will deal in turn with each aspect of the applicant's complaints, namely his allegations that he has been defamed or slandered, his complaints as to his impending deportation itself and its consequences, and his complaint that he has been denied a fair hearing in connection with these matters .
- 171 -
(a) The complaint that the applicant has been subjected to public defamation 4. The applicant alleges that he has been subjected to public defamation severely jeopardising his career and livelihood without possibility of legal redress and that this amounts to degrading treatment contrary to Art . 3 . He also submits that such an attack on his honour and reputation violates Art . 8 . 5 . The commission observes that the purported ground for the decision to deport the applicant is that the Home Secretary considers his departure from the United Kingdom would be in the interests of national security . A brief statement of the nature of certain information which apparently led the Home Secretary to this conclusion was given to the applicant and repeated in Parliament, on 18 November 1976, by the Home Secretary in response to a Parliamentary question . The authorities appear to have given no other material publicity to the grounds for deportation, ahhough the case has attracted considerable attention in the press .
6 . The Commission does not consider that the statements made by the Home Secretary in Parliament, in which he gave brief details in an objective and neutral manner of the considerations which led to his decision, can be said to have involved degrading treatment of the applicant within the meaning of Art . 3, or to have violated his right to respect for his private life as guaranteed by Art . 8 . Accordingly, insofar as the applicant complains of the allegedly defamatory statements as such, his complaints are manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Art . 27 (2) of the Convention . (b) The complaints as to the decision to deport the applicant and its consequences 7 . The applicant has submitted that the act of deportation might in itself amount to degrading treatment contrary to Art . 3, as being an arbitrary, unjustified or disproportionate punishment . He has also submitted that in particular circumstances such as those present in his case it might involve the violation of his right to liberty and securiry of person under Art . 5 . He also alleges that it would in the circumstances involve interference with his family life, contrary to Art . 8 of the Convention . He submits that it is implicit that the deportation order is being made because of his professional activities in receiving and imparting information and that would involve a violation of his rights under Art . 10 . He also submits that his freedom of association with others, as guaranteed by Art . 11, is violated in that the allegation that he had "maintained regular contacts with foreign intelligence officers" constituted, in association with the penalty of deportation, a restriction unjustified by the Convention . (i) The complaints under Arts . 3 and 5 8. The applicant submits that his deportation would be contrary to the Convention in that it would violate Arts . 3 and 5 . 9 . The Commission observes firstty that it has constantly held that the right of an alien to reside in the territory of a High Contracting Party is not as such guaranteed by the Convention . Furthermore it is clearly implied by Art . 5 (1) (f) of the Convention and Arts. 3 and 4 of Procotol No . 4 thereto that the High Contracting Parties intended to reserve to themselves the power to deport aliens from their territory . On the other hand the Commission has held that deportation may in exceptional circumstances involve violation of the Convention, for example where there is serious fear of treatment contrary to Art . 3 in the receiving State . The High Contracting Parties thus have a discretionary power to decide whether to expel an alien present in their territory bu t
- 172 -
this power must be exercised in such a way as not to infringe the rights under the Convention of the person concerned . 10 . No question appears to arise in the present case of the applicant being in danger of suffering treatment in violation of Art . 3 in the country of destination if, for instance, he is deported to the United Slates, although he may face prosecution there . Nevertheless the applicant has suggested that in the particular circumstances of this case the deportation would be contrary to Art . 3 as being an arbitrary, unjustified or disproportionate punishment . However, deportation of an alien on grounds of state security cannot, in normal circumstances at least, be looked on as a penalty, and it has not been shown in the present case that the authorities' intention was to punish the applicant, as he has suggested, rather than to protect national security . Such deportation cannot be considered as contrary to Art . 3 in itself . There is therefore no indication of a violation of Art . 3 . 11 . With reference to the complaints under Art . 5, the Commission observes firstly that the applicant has not been deprived of his liberty at least as yet . The question is therefore only whether the decision to deport the applicant nevertheless involves any . other infringement of his right to "liberty and security of person" under Art . 5(1) . 12 . The Commission considers that the protection of "security" of person guaranteed by Art . 5 is concerned with arbitrary interference by a public authority with an individual's personal "liberty" . Accordingly any decision taken within the sphere of Art . 5 must, in order to safeguard the individual's right to "security of person" conform to the procedural and substantive requirements laid down by an already existing law .
In the present case the decision to deport the applicant has been taken under certain provisions of the Immigration Act 1971 and there is no indication that the requirements of this Act have not been met . S . 3 (5) of the 1971 Act provides for deportation on grounds that it is conducive to the public good, and S . 15 (4) clearly implies that this may include grounds of national security . The Home Office statement indicates the reasons why it was considered that national security required the applicant's departure . Furthermoré, there is no evidence that the applicant is being prevented from departing from the United Kingdom and travelling to the country of his choice . 13 . The Commission therefore finds no indication of a violation of Art . 5 of the Convention either and concludes that insofar as the applicant complains that his deportation would as such violate the Convention, the application is manifestly illfounded . liil
The complaint of inten'erence with the applicant's famify life contrary to Art. 8
14 . The applicant alleges that his deportation would also involve an interference with his family life contrary to Art . 8 of the Convention . 15 . The applicant and his common-law wife, who have apparently been living together in England since 1973, are both aliens and are of different nationality . They have been resident in the United Kingdom on a temporary basis and it has not been shown that they will be unable to make reasonable arrangements to live together outside the United Kingdom, even if they would prefer to remain . 16 . Where in such circumstances the wife has the possibility of following her husband out of the country, this does not in the Commission's opinion constitute a n
- 173 -
inte rference with family life contra ry to A rt . 8 ( 1) (see e .g . Application No. 5269/71, X . and Y . v . the United Kingdom, Yearbook XV, p . 564, Collection of Decisions 39, p . 104) . 17 . Accordingly, whilst some disturbance in the applicant's family life will inevitably result from his depo rtation, the Commission considers that it has not been shown that it would in the circumstances involve a violation of his right to respect therefo re within the meaning of A rt . 8 . This complaint is also, therefore, manifestly ill-founded . (iii) The complaint of interference with the applicant's freedam of expression contrary to A rt. 10 18 . The applicant submits that it is in the nature of the allegations made by the Home Secreta ry ( and in pa rticular the allegations that he has been involved in disseminating information harmful to the security of the United Kingdom and that he had aided and counselled othe rs in obtaining such information for publication), that the deport ation order is to be made because of his professional activities in receiving and impa rting information . He submits that this involves the violation of A rt . 10 . 19 . A rt . 10 (1) of the Convention provides inter elie that eve ry one has the right to freedom of expression and that this right includes freedom "to receive and impart information and ideas without interference by public authority . . . . . . . ." . However, A rt . 10 does not in itself grant a right of asylum or a right for an alien to stay in a given count ry . Depo rtation on security grounds does not therefore as such constitute an inte rfe re nce with the rights guaranteed by A rt . 10 . It follows that an alien's rights under A rt . 10 are independent of his right to stay in the count ry and do not protect this latter right . In the present case the applicant has not, whilst in the jurisdiction of the United Kingdom, been subjected to any restrictions on his rights to receive and impa rt imformation . Nor has it been shown that the depo rtation decision in reality cons ti tuted a penalty imposed on the applicant for having exercised his rights under A rt . 10 of the Convention, rather than a proper exercise on security grounds of the discretiona ry power of deportation reserved to States . 20 . The Commission finds accordingly that there is no indication of any inte rf erence with the applicant's right to freedom of expression as guaranteed by A rt . 10 (1) and this complaint is therefore also manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of A rt . 27 (2) . (iv) The complaint of interfe rence with the epp/icent's right to freedom of association under A rt. 1 1 21 . The applicant submits that the action of the authorities has been in violation of A rt . 11 in that the allegation that he had "maintained regular contacts harmful to the securiry of the United Kingdom with foreign intelligence officers " constituted, in association with the penalty of deport ation, a restriction on his freedom of association with others unjustified by the Convention . 22 . However the Commission does not consider that A rt . 11 can be interpreted as forbidding a State from depo rt ing an alien on the ground that he has been in contact with foreign intelligence officers even if, under A rt . 11, he were entitled to have contact with such persons whilst in the jurisdiction of the State concerned . There is no indication that the applicant's freedom to associate with others has been inte rf ered with whilst he has been in the United Kingdom . The Commission therefore considers this complaint also manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of A rt. 27 (2) . (v) The complaints that the applicant has been denied a fair hearing
- 174 -
23 . The applicant has alleged that Art . 6 of the Convention has been violated in respect that he has been denied a fair hearing in connection firstly with the allegedly defamatory statements made in Parliament and secondly with the decision to deport him . 24 . Art . 6 111 provides inter alia that : "In the determination of his civil rights and obligations or of any criminal charge against him, everyone is entitled to a fair and public hearing . . . . . . . . . by an independent and impartial tribunal established by law . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 . The Commission has first considered the complaint in relation to the statements made in Parliament . The applicant has submitted that he has no redress in respect of these allegedly defamatory statements . He submits that the right to defend his reputation is a"civil right" within the meaning of Art . 6 but that no hearing will be available to him because of the defence of absolute privilege . 26 . However, the Commission has already held in Application No . 3374/67, X . v . Austria (Yearbook XII, p . 246, Collection of Decisions 29, p . 29) that Art . 6 ( 1) must be interpreted with due regard to parliamentary immunity as traditionally recognised in the States parties to the Convention . The principle of immunity in respect of such statements is generally recognised as a consequence of an "effective political democracy" within the meaning of the Preamble to the Convention . In the present case the applicant cannot complain in the United Kingdom courts of the statements made in Parliament in view of the doctrine of Parliamentary privilege, which forms part of United Kingdom law . This affords absolute protection to persons making such statements . Although a person's rights under domestic law to protection of his reputation generally constitute "civil rights" within the meaning of An . 6(1 ) , the applicant does not have any right in United Kingdom law to protection of his reputation insofar as it may be affected by the statements complained of . Art . 6 111 does not therefore guarantee the right to take proceedings in respect of these statements, since the applicant has no "civil right" to protection of his reputation against them . It follows that the Commission has no competence to examine this complaint and must reject it as incompatible with the Convention ratione materiae under Art . 27 121 of the Convention .
27 . The Commission has next considered the applicant's complaint that he has been denied a fair hearing in respect of the decision to deport him . The applicant has submitted that the decision in essence involved the determination of criminal charge since the allegations made against him "provide the basis for criminal charges" under the Official Secrets Act or otherwise . The Commission has also considered ex officio whether the decision involved a determination of his civil rights or obligations . 28 . However, the Commis .sion observes that the right of an alien to reside in a particular country is a matter governed by public law . It considers that where the public authorities of a State decide to deport an alien on grounds of security, this constitutes an act of state falling within the public sphere and that it does not constitute a determination of his civil rights or obligations within the meaning of Art . 6 . Accordingly, even though the decision to deport the applicant may have consequences in relation to his civil rights, in particular his reputation, the State is not required in such cases to grant a hearing conforming to the requirements of Art . 6 111 . 29 . The question remains, however, whether in the present case the decision involved the determination of a criminal charge against the applicant . Whilst no specifi c
- 175 -
allegations of criminal conduct have been made against him, it is implied at least that the Home Secreta ry 's decision is based on information that he has been guilty of criminal conduct. However this does not, in the Commission's opinion, bring the decision within the penal sphere, since depo rtation constitutes a procedure completely separate from criminal prosecution or conviction . It cannot, as the Commission has already observed, normally be looked on as a penalty . The Commission the rf ore conside rs the applicant's complaints that he has bee n .30 denied a fair hearing in respect of the depo rt ation decision, contrary to Art . 6, to be incompatible with the Convention retione materiee on the ground that the decision to depo rt him did not involve the determination of his civil rights or obligations or of any criminal charge against him . (c) The complaint under Art . 1 4 The applicant has alleged that, in addition to being a victim of a violation of Arts . 3, 5, 6, 8, 10 and 11 in themselves, he has also been the victim of a violation of Art . 14 in conjunction with these A rt icles . However, the Commission finds no indication that he has been discriminated against in his enjoyment of any of the rights in question contra ry to Art . 14 . His status as an alien would in itself provide objective and reasonable justification for his being subject to di ff erent treatment in the field of immigration law to persons holding United Kingdom citizenship . The Commission therefore considers this complaint man'rfestly ill-founded . For these reasons, the Commissio n DECLARES THE APPLICATION INADMISSIBLE .
(TRADUCTION ) EN FAI T Les faits de la cause tels qu'ils ont été exposés par le requérant peuvent se résumer comme suit : Le requérant est né en 1935 et il est ressortissant des Etats-Unis d'Amérique . II réside au Royaume-Uni depuis octobre 1972 et il vit actuellement à Cambridge . Le requérant vit avec sa femme', une ressortissante brésilienne qui réside au Royaume-Uni depuis 1973 . Une demande de renouvellement du permis de séjour de sa femme est en instance au Ministére de l'Intérieur depuis juin 1976 . II lui serait impossible de retourner au Brésil de peur d'être persécutée pour des motifs politiques, étant donné que, dans le passé, elle a essuyé des coups de feu, qu'elle a été torturée au cours d'interrogatoires et emprisonnée pendant deux ans par le régime actuel du Brésil . Le requérant estime qu'elle a droit au statut de réfugiée conformément à la Convention des Nations Unies de 1951 sur le statut des réfugiés, amendée par le Protocole de 1967 . Les deux fils du requérant, qui sont des ressortissants des Etats-Unis, vivent également avec lui . Le requérant a été employé pendant douze ans en qualité d'agent de la Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) des Etats-Unis . II a donné sa démission en 1969, de plus en plus déçu par les méthodes utilisées et, depuis lors, il n'a plus, selon ses dires, été employé par cette Agence ni par aucun autre service de renseignements . II déclare ' Common law wife, i .e . femme avec lequelle il n'eat oes marié selon la loi .
- 176 -
avoir été déçu par certains aspects de la nature et des procédés de la CIA (en particulier par les techniques secrètes d'infiltration et de destruction d'institution) et il en est venu à penser que ces méthodes « portent préjudice aux intérêts véritables des Etats-Unis et qu'elles risquent d'ébranler les principes démocratiques occidentaux» . Le requérant prétend qu'il n'a jamais exercé d'activités impliquant une collaboration entre les services de renseignements des Etats-Unis et ceux du Royaume-Uni et qu'il n'a é aucun moment disposé d'informations sur les services de renseignements du Royaume-Uni . Il ne possède à sa connaissance aucune information qui serait de nature à compromettre d'une manière quelconque la sécurité du Royaume-Uni . En janvier 1975 environ, un livre du requérant intitulé « Inside the Compagny CIA Diary » a été publié . Un exemplaire de ce livre a été soumis à la Commission . Le requérant y décrit le travail qu'il a accompli pour la CIA en Amérique du Sud . Il pense que la publication de ce livre a mis la CIA dans l'embarras sur le plan politique et que cette publication et d'autres publications similaires, dont certaines étaient écrites par lui, ont suscité, au Parlement des Etats-Unis et ailleurs, une controverse au sujet de certaines activités de la CIA et de nombreuses critiques sur ces aspects de ses activités . Le requérant indique qu'il a ensuite entrepris de faire des recherches et d'écrire un second livre sur l'activité secréte de la CIA dans des pays tels que le Guatémela, le Congo, l'Indonésie, le Brésil, le Chili et sur le coup d'Etat de 1967 en Gréce et les événements ultérieurs dans ce pays ; certaines parties de ce livre ont constitué un élément important lors de l'enquête de la Commission dans l'Affaire grecque . Le requérant déclare qu'il a été beaucoup consulté par d'éminents journalistes, chercheurs, un'rversitaires et autres commentateurs de nombreuses nationalités au sujet des méthodes de la CIA . 11 affirme cependant qu'il n'a jamais divulgué d'informations portant sur des activités de la CIA ou sur d'autres services de renseignements occidentaux ayant trait à la sécurité du Royaume-Uni ou d'autres démocraties de l'Europe occidentale . Il ne pense pas non plus être au courent d'activités de ce genre .
Depuis 1975, le requérant dit avoir effectué périodiquement des séjours é l'étranger à des fins de recherches, d'interviews et de publications . Au cours de ces séjours, ainsi qu'au Royaume-Uni, il a parfois eu l'impression de faire l'objet d'une surveillance . Il reconnait d'ailleurs que l'on pouvait s'y attendre et qu'il a été prudent en ce qui concerne la nature des contacts qu'il a établis . II indique qu'à aucun moment au cours des huit dernières années il n'a eu sciemment des contacts avec un membre des « Services de renseignements soviétiques ou apparentés » . A son arrivée au Royaume-Uni, le requérant s'est vu accorder un permis de séjour valable pour trois mois . Il a obtenu par la suite un certain nombre de prolongations de séjour . Une nouvelle prolongation lui a été refusée par lettre du Home Office datée du 15 novembre 1976 . II est dit, notamment dans cette lettre, que le Secrétaire d'Etat a décidé que le départ du requérant du Royaume-Uni « contribuerait au bien public puisqu'il serait dans l'intérêt de la sécurité nationale » . Le Secrétaire d'Etat a décidé par conséquent de rejeter la nouvelle demande de prolongation de séjour et, pour le même motif, de prendre une ordonnance d'expulsion contre le requérant en vertu de l'article 3 (5) (b) de la loi relative à l'immigration de 1971 . Les motifs de cette décision sont indiqués dans une note annexée à la lettre, qui indique que le Secrétaire d'Etat a pris en considération des informations selon lesquelles le requérant :
-1n-
« a . a entretenu des contacts réguliers préjudiciables à la sécurité du Royaume-Uni avec des agents de renseignements étrangers , b . s'est occupé et continue à s'occuper de diffuser des informations préjudiciables é la sécurité du Royaume-Uni ; et c . a aidé et conseillé des tiers à obtenir des informations en vue de publications qui pourraient être préjudiciables à la sécurité du Royaume-Uni . » Cette lettre informait aussi le requérant qu'il n'avait pas la faculté de recourir contre le refus de prolongation de séjour ou contre la décision de prendre une ordonnance d'expulsion . Il pouvait cependant adresser é une commission consultative des représentations au sujet de la décision relative à son expulsion . Il pouvait comparaitre devant la commission mais non y étre représenté . Dans la mesure oii les commissaires y consentiraient, il pouvait étre assisté par un ami ou faire en sorte que des tiers viennent témoigner en sa faveur. Il pouvait aussi adresser des représentations au Home Secretary . La lettre faisait aussi observer que, si une ordonnance d'expulsion était prise, le requérant aurait le droh de recourir contre son transfert dans le pays indiqué dans l'ordonnance et de demander à étre transféré dans un autre pays spécifié par lui . Le 29 novembre 1976, le requérant a informé le Home Secretary qu'il niait les allégations forrnulées contre lui et qu'il souhaitait comparaitre devant la commission consultative . Le 3D novembre 1976, dans une nouvelle lettre, il exprimait sa préoccupation au sujet de la valeur de l'audience et de l'absence manifeste des garanties élémentaires de justice . Il indiquait que, s'il devant être en mesure de se défendre contre les allégations, il fallait que d'autres détails lui soient communiqués et il demandait à être informé de certains détails spécifiques concernant les allégations et de la procédure lors de l'audience . L'audience a été fixée au 11 janvier 1977 . Par lettre du 2 décembre 1976, le Home Office a indiqué que le Secrétaire d'Etat n'était pas disposé à ajouter d'autres précisions é l'énoncé des mot'rfs déjé communiqué . Il a indiqué aussi que la nature de la procédure, qui n'était pas contradictoire, impliquait que le requérant ne pouvait ni subir de contre-interrogatoire au nom du Secrétaire d'Etat ni procéder à un contreinterrogatoire . L'avis des membres de la commission serait communiqué au Secrétaire d'Etat mais non à des tiers . Les allégations formulées contre le requérant ont été réitérées au Parlement par le Home Secretary le 18 novembre 1976 . L'affaire a d'autre part été largement commentée dans la presse et un certain nombre de coupures de presse ont été produites par le requérant . Le requérant nie énergiquement les allégations formulées contre lui, qui lui sont, dit-il, extrémement préjudiciables dans sa profession en raison de leur caractére imprécis et cependant diffamatoire . Le requérant estime que, s'il est expulsé, non seulement il sera marqué des stigmates de l'expulsion mais, de plus, il sera identifié comme une personne qui a été impliquée dans des activités pro-soviétiques (par opposition à des activités anti-CIA) . Se référant à une coupure de presse du « Guardian », il suggère qu'il pourrait aussi être assimilé à une personne associée avec l'IRA ou avec d'autres organisations irlandaises illégales . Une foule de rumeurs infondées et préjudiciables du même genre ont été suscitées par la déclaration du Home Secretary .
- 178 -
Le requérant a été informé qu'aucune action en diffamation n'avait la moindre chance d'aboutir, parce que la révélation des allégations par le Ministre était couverte par une immunité absolue . Le requérant allègue que l'expulsion peut lui porter tort, notamment parce qu'il se peut que des poursuites soient engagées contre lui en raison de ses écrits s'il retourne aux Etats-Unis . Il n'a pas d'autre nationalité en vertu de laquelle il aurait un droit légal à pAnétrer sur le territoire d'un pays tiers . Le requérant allègue en outre que l'expulsion peut porter préjudice à sa vi e familiale étant donné que sa femme pourrait avoir des difficuhés à pénétrer sur le territoire des Etats-Unis . Il n'est pas certain qu'en tant qu'étrangére ayant des liens avec le requérant et en tant que personne pouvant être considérée comme activement hostile au Gouvernement du Brésil, elle se verrait accorder un visa d'entrée avec lui.
Griefs Le requérant prétend que le traitement auquel il a été soumis et était soumis à l'époque de l'introduction de sa requête port e a tteinte aux a rticles 3, 5, 6, 8, 10 et 11 de la Convention, qu'ils soient considérés isolément ou en liaison avec l'a rticle 14.
a . Article 3 Il allègue que le fait de diffamer publiquement un individu d'une maniére qui compromet gravement sa carrière et ses moyens d'existence, sans qu'il y ait possibilité de recours juridique interne, constitue un traitement dégradant au sens de l'erticle 3, tel qu'il est interprété par la Commission dans « l'Affaire grecque » (Annuaire XII, page 186) . En outre, dans les circonstances aggravantes telles que celles dont il est question, une mesure d'expulsion pourrait constituer en elle-même un traitement dégradant po rtant a tteinte à l'a rt icle 3, dans la mesure où elle équivaut à une peine arbitraire, injustifiée ou dispropo rt ionnée (Fawcett , Application of the European Convention, pagé 38) .
b . Article 5 L'expulsion constitue aussi une ingArence si grave et si arbitroire dans la libe rté et la sécurité d'une personne que, dans des circonstances pa rt iculiéres, elle pourrait• constituer une violation de l'article 5 . Des circonstances de ce genre pourraient inclu re celles où un étranger qui réside depuis longtemps dans le pays est expulsé ou menacé d'être expulsé par une décision administrative arbitreire, sans bénéficier d'une audience judiciaire ou d'une qutre forme de procédu re réguliére . Si elle n'est pas contrôlée par le concept de la libe rté et de la sécurité de la personne, la possibilité de procéder à une expulsion soudaine de ce genre aurait pour effet de saper dans une large mesure sinon complétement la protection offe rte par l'a rticle 5 . Toute autre interprétation permettrait aux gouvernements de ne pas appliquer la protection assez précise de l'a rt icle 5 en prenant précisément le type d'ordonnance qui est à présent signifiée au requérant . Selon le re quérant, en interprétant ainsi restrictivement la protection que ce droit essentiel et fondamental garantit aux étrange rs comme aux nationaux, on laisserait ca rt e blanche à un gouvernement déterminé à avoir recou rs à l'arbitraire administratif pour éviter les risques inhérents à l'obligation d'employer une procédure légal e
- 179 -
réguliére, mais aussi on violerait le principe de l'égalité devant la loi . Ce principe n'est pas seulement exprimé dans l'a rticle 14 de la Convention, il est aussi l'un des « principes généraux de droit reconnus par les nations civilisées » dont il est question à l'a rt icle 38 (1) ( c ) du Statut de la Cour internationale de justice, par référence auquel tous les trahés concernant les droits de l'homme devraient être interprétés . Le requérant se référe dans ce contexte à l'avis du juge Tenaka, in Alfaire du Sud-Ouest Africain, deuxiéme partie, Rapports de la CIJ, 1966, page 248 et suivantes. c . Article 6 Le requérant allègue en outre que l'affaire soulève de greves problémes concernant la prééminence du droit et le concept de procédure régulière sous l'angle de l'a rt icle 6 de la Convention, problémes du genre de ceux auxquels se sont heu rtés les tribunaux de la plupa rt des pays qui prétendent avoir des normes démocratiques . Dans ce contexte, le requérant mentionne et che des arrêts rendus par la Cour suprême des Etats-Unis dans les affaires Jey c/Boyd 1351 U.S . 3451 119551, Greene c/McElroy (360 U .S. 474) 119591 et Kwong Hai Chew c/Colding (344 U.S. 5901 (1952), qui montrent de quelle manière ce tte juridiction aborde les problèmes de ce genre . Le requérant a produit un extrait du jugement prononcé dans la derniére a ff aire, où la Cour suprême soutient qu'un résident étranger ne peut se voir refuser par l'exécutif, pour des motifs « d'intérêt public » l'entrée sur le territoire du pays sans procédure légale réguliére . Le requérant soutient que, en l'espéce, la question est de savoir si la nature de la procédure d'expulsion entratne la garantie du droit é une procédu re régulière dont il est question é l'a rt icle 6 de la Convention . Cette procédure d'expulsion ne saurait être qualifiée comme po rtant sur « une accusation en metiére pénale » selon les termes stricts du droit anglais, mais cela n'est manifestement pas concluant . Il appa rt ient aux organes de la Convention de déterminer le caractére de la procédure . Il s'agit manifestement d'une procédurepénale, la protection de l'article 6 est requise et la procédure po rte att einte à la Convention . Le requérant se référe à cet égard à l'arrêt de la Cour européenne des Droits de l'Homme dans l'affaire Enge1 et autres contre les Pa ys-Bas. Le requérant fait valoir que, elors qu'aucune accusation pénale n'a été po rt ée contre lui, les trois allégations formulées à son égard fournissent la base d'accusations pénales se fondant notamment sur les « Official Secret Acts »(Lois sur les secrets officiels) . Il se réfère à ce propos à Archbold, Crimina/ P/eeding etc. . . 39éme édition §§ 3209-3222 . Cependant, le fait que, é l'audience de la commission consultative, les griefs ne sont pas exposés en détail, que le requérant n'a pas de représentation juridique, qu'il n'a pas la possibifrté de procéder au contre-interrogatoire des témoins et que l'avis rendu n'a pas de caractère obligatoire pour la détermination des problémes soulevés po rte manifestement att einte aux normes les plus fondamentales de la justice naturelle . En outre, l'expulsion pourrait constituer une sanction pénale et, en l'espèce, ce serait le cas, puisqu'elle résulterait du fait que le requérant a commis les trois genres d'actes résumés par les motifs du Home Secreta ry et qu'elle aurait le caractère d'une sanction . Le processus de l'expulsion requie rt la protection de l'a rt icle 6 de la Convention, bien qu'aucune accusation pénale n'ait été formulée en droit national . Le requérant préférerait en fait qu'une telle accusation fùt formulée, ce qui lui perme tt rait de se défendre et de se disculper .
-1g0_
Le requérant se référe également aux 44 80-82 de l'arrBt de la Cour dans l'aNaire Engel et en pa rticulier au passage suivan t « Là ne s'arrête pas le contrôle de la Cour . Il se révélerait en général illusoire s'il ne prenait pas également en considération le degré de sévérité de la sanction que risque de subir l'intéressé . Dans une société attachée à la prééminence du droit, ressortissent à la « matière pénale » les privations de liberté susceptibles d'être infligées à titre répressif, hormis celles qui par leur nature, leur durée ou leurs modalités d'exécution, ne sauraient causer un préjudice important . Ainsi le veulent la gravité et l'enjeu, les traditions des Etats contractants et la valeur que la Convention attribue au respect de la liberté physique de la personne . » Le requérant fait valoir que les thèses qu'il a énoncées découlent du principe de l'efficacité dans l'interprétation d'un traité car, sinon, comme l'a noté la Cour au § 81 de l'arrêt Engel, cr le jeu des clauses fondamentales des a rt icles 6 et 7 se trouverait subordonné à la volonté souveraine (des Etats contractants) » . En choisissant une procédure administrative détournée plutôt que le déroulement régulier d'un procès pénal réglé par la loi, un Etat pourrait réduire à néant cette protection fondamentale . Le requérant allégue aussi qu'il a été diffamé par des déclarations officielles et que son droit à défendre sa réputation est un a droit de caractère civil », au sens de l'article 6 . Or, aucune espèce de recours judiciaire ne lui est accessible en raison de l'argument de l'immunité absolue . d . A rtic% 8 En ce qui concerne l'article 8 de la Convention, le requérant se référe tout d'abord à l'article 17 du Pacte des Nations Unies sur les droits de caractère civil et politique, qui stipule notamment que nul ne sera l'objet x d'a tt eintes illégales à son honneur et à sa réputation n . Il fait aussi observer que Velu, dans Privacy and Human Rights (édition Robertson, Manchester 1973) suggère de façon convaincante que la Convention protége aussi contre les a tteintes à l'honneur et à la réputation et les préjudices similaires . Le requérant allégue que son honneur et sa réputation ont subi un grave préjudice sans qu'il dispose d'un recours effectif et que les atteintes de ce genre contreviennent à l'article 8 de la Convention . En second lieu, le requérant fait valoir que, dans les circonstances qu'il a décrites, son expulsion serait de nature A compromettre sa vie familiale au sens de l'article 8 (1) . e . Article 10 Le requérent allégue en outre que la mesure prise par les autorités du RoyaumeUni viole l'article 10 de la Convention parce qu'il est dans la nature des allégations portées contre lui par le Home Secretary que l'ordonnance d'expulsion doit être rendue en raison des activités professionnelles qu'il a exercées en recevant et en communiquant des informations . L'expulsion constituerait une « ingérence » dans la liberté d'expression du requérant, étant donné que l'on peut difficilement soutenir que la menace d'expulsion en tant que sanction n'entraverait pas gravement l'exercice par l'individu du droit protégé . f . Article 1 1 La mesure prise par les autorités po rt e aussi atteinte à l'a rt icle 11, dans la mesure où l'allégation selon laquelle il a entretenu des contacts réguliers préjudiciables à la sécurité du Royaume-Uni avec des agents de renseignements étrange rs » constitue, e n
- 181 -
association avec la sanction de l'expulsion, une restriction qui n'est pas justifiée par la Convention . Le requérant soutient que ses activités n'avaient aucun rapport avec la sécurité du Royaume-Uni, mais qu'elles avaient trait à certains aspects du travail de la CIA et à la publication et la réédition de ses écrits . Il nie que les seconds paragraphes des paragraphes 8 . 10 et 11 lui soient applicables . II n'a rien fait qui soit de nature à menacer la sécurité nationale, on ne peut dire d'aucun de ses actes qu'il entraPne la nécessité de soumettre la liberté qui lui est garantie par l'article 10 8 une restriction particuliére, à savoir l'expulsion, ou qu'il requiert la fortne arbitraire de restriction à laquelle il est soumis .
Le requérant allègue que la requête souléve la question de la nature et de l'efficacité du contrôle de la Convention sur une propension gouvernementale à invoquer l'argument de la « sécurité de l'Etat » pour fouler aux pieds les droits de l'homme . Un gouvernement ne peut se soustraire par l'exercice d'un pouvoir exécut'rf arbitraire aux obligations qui lui incombent au titre des articles 8, 10 et 11, sans qu'il y ait possibilité de contrôle ou de révision par le pouvoir judiciaire . Dans le cas contraire, la protection de la Convention ne serait qu'une dérision . g . Article 14 Enfin, le requérant allègue que la mesure prise par les autorités viole aussi l'article 14 de la Convention en liaison avec les articles 3, 5, 6, 8, 10 et (semble-t-il) 11 . Son grief se fonde sur le fait que les autorités ont agi contre lui de maniére discriminatoire en raison de ses opinions politiques ou de son origine nationale . h . Article 1 6 Le requérant allègue que l'article 16 n'est pas applicable puisqu'il envisage la possibilité de restrictions générales et futures mais n'autorise pas des restrictions imposées de façon sélective ou ex post facto . Toute autre interprétation porterait atteinte aux principes contenus dans les articles 7 et 14 de la Convention . i . Article 26 Le requérant allègue que la lettre du Home Office du 15 novembre 1976 est une « décision définitive e et que ni la possibilité de comparaître devant la commission consultative ni le droit d'adresser des représentations au Home Secretary ne constituent une a voie de recours interne » au sens de l'article 26 . Subsidiairement, il soutient que ce ne sont pas des voies de recours suffisantes . Ainsi, il n'existe aucun recours entre la notification de l'intention de procéder à l'expulsion et la prise d'ordonnance d'expulsion . La notification de l'intention de procéder à l'expulsion pourrait donc btre considérée comme étant l'arrêté lui-même et, par conséquent, la « décision définh'rve a . Le requérant demande qu'étant donné l'urgence de la question, la Commission fasse bénéficier la requête du trehement repide qu'elle jugera approprié, aux termes de son Règlement .
EN DROIT 1 . Le requérant formule un certain nombre de griefs liés à la décision des autorités du Royaume-Uni relative à son expulsion . Il allégue la violation des articles 3, 5, 6, 8, 10 et 11 de la Convention, pris tant isolément qu'en combinaison avec l'article 14 . II se plaint en particulier que des allégations diffamatoires ont été formulées contre lui sans qu'il y ait possibilité de recours judiciaire, en violation des articles 3 et 8 . II allègu e
-182-
qu'en l'espéce son expulsion en tant que telle impliquerait la violation des articles 3 et 5 . II soutient que la mesure prise par les autorités en vue de son expulsion implique ou impliquerait la violation des articles 8, 10 et 11 de la Convention . Il allégue aussi que l'article 6 a été violé dans la mesure où il n'a aucune possibilité d'obtenir un recours judiciaire pour les déclarations prétendument diffamatoires et dans la mesure où la décision relative à son expulsion correspond en substance à une décision sur des accusations en matiére pénale dirigées contre lui, qui aura été prise sans procés devant un tribunal, comme l'exige l'article 6 . 2 . La Commission fait observer que la décision des autorités du Royaume-Uni d'expulser le requérant a été communiquée à ce dernier le 15 novembre 1976 . La Commission n'est pas d'avis que le droit d'adresser des représentations à la commission consultative (organe qui n'a pas le pouvoir de prendre une décision sur la question) ou au Home Secretary lautorité responsable de la décision) peut btre considéré comme une voie de recours efficace et suffisante que le requérant est tenu d'exercer d'après l'anicle 26 de la Convention . En conséquence elle a examiné l'affaire en partent de l'hypothése que la décision communiquée au requérant était la a décision définitive a en ce qui concerne son expulsion et que les exigences de l'article 26 étaient satisfaites . 3 . La Commission examinera successivement chaque aspect des griefs du requérant, c'est-à-dire ses allégations selon lesquelles il a été diffamé ou calomnié, ses griefs relatifs à son expulsion imminente elle-même et à ses conséquences et son grief selon lequel sa cause n'a pas été entendue équitablement .
a . Grief selon lequel le requérent a AtA diffamé publiquemen t 4 . Le requérant allégue qu'il a été dHfamé publiquement, ce qui a compromis gravement sa carriére et ses moyens d'existence, sans qu'il y ait possibilité de recours judiciaire et que cela équivaut à un traitement dégradant qui viole l'article 3 . II allègue aussi qu'une telle atteinte à son honneur et à sa réputation contrevient à l'article B . 5. La Commission fait observer que le motif sur lequel se fonde la décision d'expulser le requérant est que le Home Secretary estime que son départ du RoyaumeUni serait dans l'intérBt de la sécurité nationale . Une bréve déclaration relative à la nature de certaines informations qui ont apparemment amené le Home Secretary à cette conclusion a été communiquée au requérant et réitérée devant le Parlement le 18 novembre 1976 par le Home Secretary, en réponse à une question parlementaire . Les autorités ne semblent pas avoir donné d'autre publicité matérielle aux motifs de l'expulsion, bien que la presse ait accordé une attention considérable à cette affaire . 6 . La Commission ne trouve pas que les déclarations faites par le Home Secretary au Parlement, dans lesquelles il a donné, de façon objective et neutre, de brefs renseignements sur les considérations qui l'ont amené à prendre sa décision, peuvent étre considérées comme ayant impliqué un traitement dégradant du requérant, au sens de l'article 3, ou comme ayant porté atteinte à son droit au respect de sa vie privée, tel qu'il est garanti par l'article 8 .
En conséquence, dans la mesure où le requérant se plaint de déclarations prétendument diffamatoires en tant que telles, ses griefs sont manifestement mal fondés au sens de l'article 27 (2) de la Convention . b . Griefs concernent la décision d'expulser le requérant et ses conséquence s 7 . Le requérant allègue que la mesure d'expulsion pourrait en elle-même équivaloir à un traitement dégradant violant l'article 3, du fait qu'il s'agit d'une sanction arbitraire, injustifiée ou disproportionnée . Il allégue aussi que, dans des circonstances particu-
-183_
liéres telles que celles qui se présentent dans son affaire, cette mesure pourrait impliquer la violation de son droit à la liberté et à la sùreté personnelle, garanti par l'article 5 . II allégue aussi que, en l'espéce, ladite mesure représenterait une ingérence dans sa vie familiale, qui serait contraire à l'article 8 de la Convention . Il allègue qu'il est implicite que l'ordonnance d'expulsion est prise en raison des activités professionnelles qu'il a exercées en recevant et en communiquant des informations et qu'il en résulterait une violation des droits qui lui sont garantis par l'article 10 . II soutient aussi que la liberté d'association, qui lui est garantie par l'article 11, est violée, dans la mesure où l'allégation selon laquelle il a « entretenu des contacts réguliers avec des agents de renseignement étrangers » constitue, puisqu'elle est liée à la sanction de l'expulsion, une restriction non justifiée par la Convention . i . Griefs relevant des articles 3 et 5 8. Le requérent allégue que son expulsion serait contraire à la Convention en ce qu'elle violerait les a rt icles 3 et 5 . 9 . La Commission rappelle tout d'abord qu'elle a toujours souligné que le droit pour un étranger de résider sur le territoire d'une Haute Partie contractante n'est pas garanti en tant que tel par la Convention . En outre, l'article 5 (1) (f) de la Convention et les articles 3 et 4 de son Protocole additionnel N° 4 montrent clairement que les Hautes Parties contrectantes ont l'intention de se réserver à elles-mêmes la faculté d'expulser des étrangers de leur territoire . Par ailleurs, la Commission a reconnu que, dans des circonstances exceptionnelles, l'expulsion peut impliquer une violation de la Convention, par exemple lorsqu'il y a un risque sérieux qu'un traitement contraire à l'article 3 soit infligé dans l'Etat de destination . Ainsi, les Hautes Parties contractantes ont un pouvoir discrétionnaire pour décider de l'expulsion d'un étranger qui se trouve sur leur territoire, mais ce pouvoir doit être exercé de telle sorte qu'il ne porte pas atteinte aux droits garantis à l'intéressé par la Convention . 10 . II semble qu'en l'espéce le requérant ne risque aucunement d'étre soumis, dans le pays de aestination, à un traitement contraire à l'article 3, s'il agit par exemple des Etats-Unis, bien que des poursuites puissent y être engagées contre lui . Néanmoins, le requérant a estimé que, dans les circonstances particuliéres de son affaire, l'expulsion serait contraire à l'article 3 car elle constituerait une sanction arbitraire, injustifiée ou disproportionnée . Toutefois, l'expulsion d'un étranger pour des motifs de sécurité nationale ne peut, tout au moins dans des circonstances normales, être considérée comme une peine et, en l'espéce, il n'a pas été démontré que l'intention des autorités était de punir le requérant, comme il l'a suggéré, plutôt que de protéger la sécurité nationale . Une expulsion de ce genre ne peut être considérée comme étant contraire en elle-même à l'article 3 . Par conséquent il n'y a pas d'apparence de violation de l'article 3 . 11 . En ce qui concerne les griefs relevant de l'article 5, la Commission fait observer tout d'abord que le requérant n'a pas été privé de sa liberté, tout au moins jusqu'à présent . Par conséquent, la question se pose seulement de savoir si la décision d'expulser le requérant implique néanmoins une autre atteinte au droit à la « liberté et à la sûreté » qui lui est garanti par l'article 5 111 . 12 . La Commission estime que la protection du droit à la « sOreté » garanti par l'article 5 a trait à l'ingérence arbitraire d'une autorité publique dans la « liberté» personnelle d'un individu . En conséquence, toute décision relevant du domaine de l'article 5 doit se conformer, afin de garantir le droit à la « sûreté » de l'individu, aux conditions de procédure et de fond spécifiées par une loi préexistante .
- 184 -
En l'espèce, la décision d'expulser le requérant a été prise en vertu de certaines dispositions de la loi de 1971 sur l'immigration et rien ne permet de présumer que les conditions posées par cette loi n'ont pas été remplies . L'article 3 (5) de la loi en 1971 prévoit que l'expulsion peut être ordonnée pour le motif qu'elle est dans l'intérét du bien public et l'article 15 (4) laisse clairement entendre que cela peut inclure des motifs de sécurité nationale . La déclaration du Home Office indique les motifs pour lesquels il a été admis que la sécurité nationale exigeait le départ du requérant . En outre, rien n'indique qu'il soit interdit au requérant de quitter le Royaume-Uni et de se rendre dans le pays de son choix . 13 . Par conséquent, la Commission ne constate pas non plus une apparence de violation de l'article 5 de la Convention et elle conclut que, dans la mesure où le requérant se plaint de ce que son expulsion en tant que telle violerait la Convention, la requête est manifestement mal fondée . ii . Grief relarif é% ingérence dans la vie familiale du requérent, en violation de l'article 8 14 . Le requérant allègue que son expulsion impliquerait aussi une ingérence dans sa vie familiale qui serait contraire à l'article 8 de la Convention . 15 . Le requérant et sa femme, qui ont vécu apparemment ensemble en Angleterre depuis 1973, sont tous deux des étrangers, de nationalité différente . lis ont résidé au Royaume-Uni sur une base temporaire et il n'a pas été démontré qu'ils ne seront pas en mesure de prendre des dispositions raisonnables pour vivre ensemble en dehors du Royaume-Uni, alors même qu'ils préféreraient y rester . 16 . Lorsque, dans des circonstances de ce genre, la femme a la possibilité de suivre son mari en dehors du pays, cela ne constitue pas, d'aprés la Commission, une ingérence dans la vie familiale qui sereit contraire à l'article 8 (1) Ivoir par exemple requéte N° 5269/71, X . et Y . c/le Royaume-Uni, Annuaire XV, p . 564, Recueil de décisions 39, p . 104) . 17 . En conséquence, tout en admettant que la vie familiale du requérant sera inévitablement quelque peu perturbée par son expulsion, la Commission estime qu'il n'a pas été démontré que cela impliquerait en l'espéce une violation de son droit au respect de cette vie familiale au sens de l'article 8 . Ce grief est donc aussi manifestement mal fondé . iii . Grief relatif à une ingérence dans la liberté d'expression du requArant qui serait contraire à l'article 10 18 . Le requérant allègue qu'il ressort des allégations formulées par le Home Secretary (et en particulier des allégations selon lesquelles il a été impliqué dans la diffusion d'informations préjudiciables à la sécurité du Royaume-Uni et a aidé et conseillé d'autres personnes à obtenir des informations de ce genre en vue de leur publication lque'ordnacxplsiotêre naisdctvéprofesinl qu'il a exercées en recevant et en communiquant des informations . Il allègue que cela implique la violation de l'article 10 . 19 . L'article 10 11) de la Convention stipule notamment que toute personne a droit à la liberté d'expression et que ce droit comprend la liberté s de recevoir ou de communiquer des infonnations ou des idées sans qu'il puisse y avoir ingérence d'autorités publiques . . . e . Cependant, l'article 10 n'accorde pas en lui-même un droit d'asile ou un droit pour un étranger de séjourner dans un pays donné . Par conséquent, l'expulsion pour des motifs de sécurité ne constitue pas en tant que telle une ingérence dans les droit s
_185 -
garantis par l'article 10. II s'ensuit que les droits garantis à un étranger par l'article 10 sont distincts de son droit à séjourner dans le pays et qu'ils ne possédent pas ce dernier droit . Dans la présente affaire, le requérant n'a pas été soumis, pendant qu'il se trouvait sur le territoire du Royaume-Uni, à la moindre restriction à ses droits à recevoir et à communiquer des informations . Il n'a pas non plus été démontré que la décision relative à l'expulsion constituait en réalité une sanction infligée au requérant pour avoir exercé les droits qui lui étaient garantis par l'article 10 de la Convention, plutdt que l'exercice normal, pour des motifs de sécurité, du pouvoir discrétionnaire réservé aux Etats de procéder à une expulsion . 20 . La Commission estime par conséquent qu'il n'y a aucune apparence d'une ingérence dans le droit à la liberté d'expression du requérant tel qu'il lui est garanti par l'article 10 (1) et que ce grief est donc aussi manifestement mal fondé au sens de l'article 27 (2) . iv . Grief relatif A l'ingérence dans le droit 6/a liberté d'association du requérant geranti par l'artic% 1 1 21 . Le requérant allègue que la mesure prise par les autorités viole l'article 11 dans la mesure où l'allégation selon laquelle il a « entretenu des contacts réguliers préjudiciables à la sécurité du Royaume-Uni avec des agents de renseignement étrangers n constitue, en relation avec la sanction de l'expulsion, une restriction à sa liberté d'association non justifiée par la Convention . 22 . Toutefois, la Commission n'estime pas que l'article 11 peut être interprété comme interdisant à un Etat d'expulser un étranger pour le motif qu'il a été en contact avec des agents de renseignement étrangers même si, d'après l'article 11, il était en droit d'avoir des contacts avec des personnes de ce genre pendant qu'il se trouvait sur le territoire de l'Etat intéressé . Il n'y a aucune indication selon laquelle il y aurait eu ingérence dans la liberté d'association du requérant pendant qu'il se trouvak au Royaume-Uni . La Commission estime par conséquent que ce grief est aussi manifestement mal fondé au sens de l'article 27 (2) . v . Griefs selon lesquels la cause du requérant n aureit pas AtE entendu équitablerrrent 23 . Le requérant a allégué que l'article 6 de la Convention a été violé dans la mesure où sa cause n'a pas été entendu équitablement en ce qui concerne premiérement les déclarations prétendument diffamatoires formulées au Parlement et deuxièmement la décision relative à son expulsion .
24 . L'article 6(1) stipule notamment que : « Toute personne a droit à ce que sa cause soit entendue équitablement, publiquement et dans un délai raisonnable, par un tribunal indépendant et impartial, établi par la loi . . . »
25 . La Commission a examiné tout d'abord le grief relatif aux déclarations formulées au Parlement . Le requérant a allégué qu'il n'a pas de recours en ce qui concerne ces déclarations prétendument diffamatoires . Il allègue que le droit de défendn : sa réputation est un « droit de caractère civil » au sens de l'article 6, mais que sa cause ne sera pas entendue équitablement en raison de l'argument de l'immunité absolue . 26 . Cependant, la Commission a déjà constaté à propos de la requête N° 3374/67, X . c/Autriche IAnnuaire 12, p . 246 ; Recueil 29, p . 29) que l'article 6 (1) doit être interprété compte dûment tenu de l'immunité parlementaire, telle qu'elle est traditionnellement reconnue dans les Etats parties à la Convention . Le principe de l'immunit é
-166_
en ce qui concerne les déclarations de ce genre est généralement reconnu comme un attribut d'un « régime politique véritablement démocratique u au sens du préambule de la Convention . Dans la présente affaire, le requérant ne peut se plaindre devant les tribunaux du Royaume-Uni des déclarations faites au Parlement, en raison du principe du privilége parlementaire, qui fait partie du droit du Royaume-Uni . Ce principe offre une protection absolue aux personnes qui font des déclarations de ce genre . Bien que les droits à la protection de la réputation, qui sont garantis à une personne par le droit national, constituent de façon générale des r droits de caractère civil » au sens de l'article 6 (1), le requérant n'a aucun droit, d'après le droit du Royaume-Uni, à la protection de sa réputation, dans la mesure où cette réputation peut être affectée par les déclarations incriminées. Par conséquent, l'article 6 (1) ne garantit pas le droit d'engager une procédure à propos de ces déclarations, puisque le requérant n'a pas de « droit de caractére civil » à la protection de sa réputation contre ces déclarations . Il s'ensuit que la Commission n'est pas compétente pour examiner ce grief et qu'elle doit le rejeter comme incompatible ratione meteriae avec la Convention, en application de l'article 27 (2) de la Convention . 27 . La Commission a examiné ensuite le grief du requérant selon lequel sa cause n'a pas été entendue équitablement en ce qui concerne la décision relative à son expulsion . Le requérant a allégué que l'ordonnance d'expulsion impliquait en substance une décision relative à une accusation en matiére pénale, puisque les allégations formulées contre lui « constituent la base d'accusations en matiére pénale e, notamment d'après la loi sur les secrets officiels . La Commission a aussi examiné ex officio si l'ordonnance d'expulsion impliquait une décision sur des droits et obligations de caractére civil .
28 . Cependant, la Commission observe que le droit pour un étranger de résider dans un pays particulier est une question qui est régie par le droit public . Elle estime que lorsque les autorités publiques d'un Etat décident d'expulser un étranger pour des motifs de sécurité, cela constitue un acte de l'Etat qui relève du domaine public et que cela ne représente pas une décision relative à des droits et obligations de caractère civil au sens de l'article 6 . II s'ensuit que, bien que la décision d'expulser le requérant puisse entrainer des conséquences à propos de droits de caractère civil, en particulier de sa réputation, l'Etat n'est pas tenu, dans des cas de ce genre d'entendre la cause du requérant conformément aux exigences de l'article 6 (1) . 29 . II reste à déterminer si, en l'espéce, l'ordonnance d'expulsion impliquait une décision sur une accusation en matière pénale dirigée contre le requérant . Bien qu'aucun reproche spécifique relatif à un comportement criminel n'a été formulé contre lui, il est tout au moins implicite que la décision du Home Secretary se fonde sur des informations selon lesquelles il s'est rendu coupable d'un comportement punissable . Cependant, de l'avis de la Commission, cela ne fait pas rentrer la décision dans le domaine pénal, puisque l'expulsion constitue une procédure qui se distingue entiérement de poursuites ou d'une condamnation pénales . Comme la Commission l'a déjé observé, l'expulsion ne peut pas normalement étre considérée comme une sanction . 30 . La Commission estime par conséquent que le grief du requérant selon lequel sa cause, contrairement à l'article 6, n'a pas été entendue équitablement en ce qui concerne la décision relative à son expulsion est incompatible ratione materiae avec la
-1g7-
Convention au mot'rf que l'ordonnance relative à l'expulsion du requérant n'impliquait aucune décision sur ses droits et obligations de caractère civil ni sur le bien-fondé d'une accusation en matiére pénale dirigée contre lui . c . Grief relevant de l'article 1 4 Le requérant a allégué que, outre le fait qu'il a été victime d'une violation des articles 3, 5, 6, 8, 10 et 11, il a aussi été victime d'une violation de l'article 14 pris conjointement avec ces articles . Cependant, la Commission ne discerne aucune raison de penser qu'il a fait l'objet, en violation de l'article 14, d'une discrimination en ce qui concerne la jouissance de l'un des droits en question . Son statut d'étranger fournirait en lui-même une justification objective et raisonnable du fait qu'il est soumis, dans le domaine de la législation en matiére d'immigration, à un traitement différent de celui appliqué aux personnes possédant la nationalité britannique . La Commission considére donc ce grief comme étant manifestement mal fondé . Par ces motifs, la Commission DÉCLARE LA REQUÉTEIRRECEVABLE .
- 188-

Origine de la décision

Formation : Commission (plénière)
Date de la décision : 17/12/1976

Fonds documentaire ?: HUDOC

HUDOC
Association des cours judiciaires suprêmes francophones Organisation internationale de la francophonie

Juricaf est un projet de l'AHJUCAF, l'association des cours judiciaires suprêmes francophones,
réalisé en partenariat avec le Laboratoire Normologie Linguistique et Informatique du droit (Université Paris I).
Il est soutenu par l'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie et le Fonds francophone des inforoutes.