Facebook Twitter Appstore
Page d'accueil > Résultats de la recherche

§ ZAND c. AUTRICHE

Imprimer

Type d'affaire : Decision
Type de recours : Partiellement irrecevable ; partiellement recevable ; requête jointe à la requête n° 6878/75

Numérotation :

Numéro d'arrêt : 7360/76
Identifiant URN:LEX : urn:lex;coe;cour.europeenne.droits.homme;arret;1977-05-16;7360.76 ?

Analyses :

(Art. 14) DISCRIMINATION, (Art. 9-1) LIBERTE DE RELIGION


Parties :

Demandeurs : ZAND
Défendeurs : AUTRICHE

Texte :

APPLICATION/REOUÉTE N° 7360/76 Leo ZAND v/AUSTRIA Leo ZAND c/AUTRICH E DECISION of 16 May 1977 on the admissibility of the application DÉCISION du 16 mai 1977 sur la recevabilité de la requêt e
Article 6, para. I of the Convention : a) Where the law confers to a minister the right to establish a Labour Court where the need arises, are these courts "established by law" ? b) Is a court independent where the judges are appointed and can be removed by decision of an administrative authority ? c) In a dispute concerning civil rights and obligations, do the guarantees ot Article 6, para . I have to be conferred in the first instance if there is the possibility to appeal to a higher jurisdiction that does meet these requirements 7
IApplication declared admissible . ) Article 6, paragraphe 1, de le Convention a) Lorsque la toi confére à un ministre le pouvoir d'instituer des tribunaux du travail t8 où le besoin s'en fait sentir, ces tribunaux sont-ils "établis par la loi" ? b) Un tribunal est-il "indApendant" lorsque les juges sont nommés et peuvent étre révoqués par décision d'une autorité administrative ? c) S'agissant d'une contestation sur des droits et obligations de caractére civil, les garanties de l'article 6, par . 1, doivent-elles être assurées en premiére instance lorsqu'il extste une possibilité d'appel à une juridiction devant qui elles le sont ? (Requête déclarée recevable . ) (français : voir p . 176 )
THE FACTS
The facts of the case as they have been submitted by the applicant's lawyer rnay be summarised as follows : The applicant is an Austrian citizen, born in 1954 and at present resident in Berlin . He had earlier worked as a goldsmith in a workshop in Salzburg and was sued in 1974 by his employer for the compensation of certain damages amounting to a total ot some 36 . 000 Austrian schillings . The competent court in this matter was the Labour Court at Salzburg .
- 167 -
The Labour Courts in Austria have been established in accordance with section 6 of the Labour Coun Act IArbeitsgerichtsgesetz BGBI . 170/1946 as amended'1 . This legal provision empowers the Minister of Justice to establish Labour Courts if a need arises ("nach Bedarf") . The Minister has made use of the above authorisation in the Decree on the Implementation of the Labour Court Act (Verordnung zur Durchführung des Arbeitsgerichtsgesetzes, BGBI . 183/1950 as amended") . Section 1 of the Decree established i .a . a Labour Court in Salzburg and circumscribed its territorial jurisdiction which comprises the districts of the District Courts of Abtenau, Hallein, Neumarkt, Oberndorf, Salzburg, St . Gilgen and Thalgau . The applicant now raised certain objections concerning the constitutionality of these provisions in the above proceedings before the Salzburg Labour Court . In particular he invoked Art . 83 (2) of the Austrian Constitution which guarantees everybody a right that his case be heard before the lawful judge (gesetzlicher Richter) . He also invoked Art . 6 of the European Convention on Human Rights, which in Austria has the rank of a constitutional provision . According to the applicant there were serious doubts whether the Labour Court was a"lawful judge", or "an independent and impartial tribunal established by law", given the fact that it had been created by decree of the Minister rather than by the law itself . He therefore asked the Labour Court to stay the procedure and submit the question to the Constitutional Court for examination (Art . 89 of the Constitutionl .
The Labour Court, however, rejected the applicant's request by a decision of 15 December 1974 . It stated that it did not share the applicant's doubts as to the constitutionality of the legal provisions concerning the establishment of the labour couns . The Constitutional Court had already decided in another case that the competence of a court may be determined by decree on the basis of a law which is sufficiently clear under the standard set by Art . 18 of the Constitution . The applicant appealed from the Labour Court's decision insofar as it confirmed that court's jurisdiction in his case . He now asked the Regional Court to submit, in its turn, to the Constitutional Court the question which he had already raised with the Labour Court . The Salzburg Regional Court, however, rejected the appeal as inadmissible . Nevertheless it included in its decision of 23 April 1975 a statement that it, too, had no doubts as to the constitutionality of the labour courts . On 8 July 1975 the Supreme Court rejected as inadmissible a further appeal brought by the applicant, for the reason that there were two conforming decisions of the lower courts . The Supreme Court dealt, however, with the substance of a new argument which the applicant had raised before it, namely that the Labour Court in question was unlawfully composed in that its President had exercised his office without being appointed to the post in accordance with Art . 88 of the Constitution . This would have had the consequence that the decision of the first instance had to be regarded as a non-act . The Supreme Court, however, found it sufficient that the President of the Labour Court had been appointed judge before being given the function in the Labour Court, and therefore it considered the Labour Court's decision as valid . See 8 G 8 1 . 167/1950 . 197/1965 and 291/1971 . " See BGB1 .208/1950,39/1951,118/1957 .59/1958 .288/1962 and 303/1965 .
- 168 -
Complaint s The applicant now complains that the labour court which dealt with his case was not an "independent and impartial tribunal established by law" as required by the provisions of Art . 6 111 of the Convention . According to him the labour courts are not established by law for the following reasons : ( 1) Their establishment is in conflict with Art . 83 (1) of the Austrian Constitution . The Constitutional Court has interpreted this provision in a recent decision (K II - 1/73) in such a way that any special courts with restricted competence may only be established by a Federal Law. In his appeal to the Supreme Court the applicant mentioned that the principle underlying this decision has superseded the Constitutional Court's earlier interpretation of Art . 83 (1) of the Constitution (relied upon by the lower courts in the present case) . (2) The legal basis of the decree by which the labour courts are established does not determine in a sufficiently clear manner the criteria for the establishment of such courts when it simply refers to a "need" . This is not in conformity with Art . 18 of jhe Austrian Constitution, and therefore unlawful .
131 The labour courts can be established and removed by way of administrative decisions ; this interferes with their independence which is guaranteed by Art . 6 of the Convention . Since the Convention forms part of the Austrian Constitutional law, this is again unlawtul even in the domestic field . In this respect the applicant raised a further argument to the effect that the legal provisions concerning the establishment of the labour courts had been abrogated by the Convention when it became part of the domestic law . If this were true then the labour courts would be lacking any legal basis at all .
(4) The Presidents and the Vice-Presidents of the Labour Courts are not appointed to their posts in accordance with Art . 88 of the Constitution Iby the Federal President, or with his authorisation by the Minister of Justice) . Indeed they are nominated by the President of the Court of Appeal (in this function, an administrative organ), who has also power to remove them . This, too, is an unlawful interference with the judges' independence, as has been stated by Professor Walter in an article written in 1962 ("Die Stellung der Vorsitzenden der Arbeitsgerichte und ihrer Stellvertreter in verfassungsrechtlicher Sicht", Das Recht der Arbeit, Vol . 12 11962) p . 2411 . Submissions by the Partie s A . The Government's Observations on admissibility of 26 November 1976 The Government first remarked that the Commission could only examine the issue raised under item (3) of the applicant's complaints which concerned Article 6 (1) of the Convention, namely "whether the Austrian jurisdiction in labour disputes lies with independent and impartial tribunals established by law" . It was irrelevant to the proceedings before the Commission whether-apart from this-the institution of labour courts raised any problems under the Austrian Constitution . The Government therefore limited its observations to the above-mentioned issue .
- 169 -
(a) As to the independence of the labour court s The jurisdiction in labour disputes is exercised, on the one hand, by professional judges, and on the other hand, by assessors acting as lay judges who are appointed from among both employers and employees . The essential principle of judicial independence laid down in Art . 87, paragraph 1 of the Constitution is applicable to both professional and other judges . They shall be independent in the exercise of their judicial function . This means : laal In performing their judicial functions, judges are bound to follow exclusively the laws rather than instructions and orders by organs of the Government . Ibbl The possibility to influence jurisdiction through the apportionment ot business is excluded by Art . 87, paragraph 3 of the Constitution which provides that business shall be apportioned in advance among the judges of a court for a term designated by the Act on the Organisation of the Courts . Any matter thus assigned to a judge may be taken off his jurisdiction by an administrative decree only in case he should be unable to discharge his functions . Iccl The independence of jurisdiction is further ensured by the principle that judges must not be removed or transferred . This principle is established in Art . 88 of the Constitution in the following manner :
A limit of age has to be fixed by the Act on the Organisation of the Courts upon ttte attainment of which judges shall be permanently retired . In accordance with this constitutional rule, Art . 99 of the Act governing the Services of Judges provides that judges shall be permanently retired by the end of the year when they have completed their 65th year of age . In all other cases, judges may be removed from office, or be transferred against their will to another post, or be retired, only by a formal judicial decision and only in the cases and according to the forms prescribed by law . These provisions, however, do not apply to transfers or retirements which become necessary as a result of changes in the Act on the Organisation of the Courts .
The rules concerning the independence of the judiciary and specifically those providing that judges are not subject to follow instructions apply equally to the jurisdiction in labour disputes . (b) As to the impartiality of the labour court s The impartiality of the labour courts is secured in the same way as in any other proceedings by the rules on the challenge of judges and other judicial organs contained in Section Two of the Law on Jurisdiction IJurisdiktionsnorml . Art . 19 of this law provides that, in civil proceedings, a judge may be challenged on the grounds that (a) in a given case he is excluded by law from exercising judicial functions or (b ) there is a reasonable cause to doubt his impartiality . The grounds of legal exclusion are laid down in Art 20 of the Act . Judges are excluded from cases in which they are themselves parties or have an interest, in cases which concern their relatives up to a certain degree, their adoptive or foster parents etc ., in cases in which they are or were appointed agents of one of the parties, and finally in cases in which they took part at a lower court in the passing of a judgment or decision .
- 170 -
Arts . 21 and 22 of the Act lay down procedural rules on the exercise of the right of challenge, and Art . 23 determines the competence of the court with whom the decision on a challenge shall lie . The challenged judge himself is always excluded from this decision . According to Art . 24, paragraph 1, the decision is taken without an oral hearing, but after the necessary enquiries and examinations have been carried out . According to Art . 24, para . 2, there is no appeal against the grant of a challenge while there is one against its rejection . According to Art . 25 of the Act a challenged judge may continue to exercise certain judicial functions, but he may not render a definite decision before the challenge is rejected by a final decision . If the challenge is granted, the acts performed by him become void .
Arts . 26 and 27 provide for the extension of the rules on the challenge of judges to other judicial organs such as court clerks, record office employees, enforcement officers, etc . (c)
As regards the legal basis of the labour courts
The Government first submitted that the Constitutional Court's decision of 11 October 1973 IKII - 1/73) to which the applicant had referred was irrelevant to the case before the Commission . That decision had the purpose to determine the question whether the establishment of cou rt s of the lowest level whose scope was limited to cert ain matt ers of the administration of justice Isuch as district courts which are competent for matters relating to labour laws) came within the competence of the Federal or the Provincial Legislator . The Constitutional Court decided in favour of the Federal Legislator, but it did not at all deal with the question as to how the Federal Legislator should "rightly" establish such cou rt s . In pa rticular the Constitutional Cou rt found no reason to examine, in this context, the constitutionality of the current A rt . 6, para . 1 of the Act on Labour Courts which concerns the establishment of labour cou rt s .
It was true that the applicant had raised the question of the derogation of Art . 6, para . 1 of the Act on Labour Courts by Art . 6 para . 1 of the Convention in the labour cou rt proceedings in his case which led up to the cited decision of the Supreme Cou rt of 8 July 1975 . However, the tribunals seized with the matter did not subscribe to that view and therefore found no reason to request a decision of the Constitutional Court regarding the lawfulness of the Executive Decree on the Implementation of the Labour Court Act . As regards the substance of this argument, it should be noted that Art . 6, para . 1 of the Convention referred to "a tribunal established by law" . But it was also a law, namely Art . 6 of the Act on Labour Cou rt s, under which the Federal Ministry of Justice issued its Decree of 1 September 1950 concerning the Implementation of the Act on Labour Courts which governs the establishment of labour courts . As the title of the Decree indicated, it was just an executive regulation under that Act . The basis of that regulation was therefore provided by law, namely in A rt . 6, para . 1, of the Act on Labour Courts . This provision was in conformity with the Convention, the more so since A rt . 6, para 1 of the Convention did not prescribe the manner in which the legislator should provide the establishment of courts . Consequently there could not be the question of a substantive derogation from that provision of the law by the said rule of the Convention, which is of the authority of a constitutional provision in Austria, nor could there be the question that, as a result, the Decree would be lacking any legal basis .
- 171 -
The Government further submitted that it was questionable whether the term of "law" as used in the European Convention on Human Rights was identical with what was understood by that term under the Austrian legal system, or whether the requirements of the Convention were generally met by a law in the substantive sense which was understood also to mean a "Verordnung" Idecreel . In view of the integration of this doctrine in Austria's constitutional system such an interpretation appeared quite reasonable . Insofar as the applicant seemed to entertain the idea that the rule of Art . 6, para . 1 of the Act on Labour Courts was not sufficiently clear under the standard set by Art . 18 of the Federal Constitutional Law, he raised a question which did not concern the Convention as such and therefore could not be further examined in a proceeding before the Commission . In reply to a specific question put to it by the Commission in connection with the communication of the application, the Government also stressed that Art . 6, para . 1 of the Act on Labour Courts dealt only with the establishment of the labour courts of the first instance, while the jurisdiction in labour disputes in the second and third instances lay with ihe regional courts and the Supreme Court, that is, tribunals whose constitutionality and conformity with the Convention were not even doubted by the applicant himself . If a matter was decided in the last instance by a tribunal meeting the requiremems of Art . 6, para . 1 of the Convention, it was understood that a breach of that rule of the Convention could not be assumed . Thus the Austrian Constitutional Court had consistently held that the rule of Art . 6, para . 1 of the Convention did not require an immediate court decision on civil rights . The requirements of the European Convention on Human Rights were therefore also fulfilled if only in the last instance the jurisdiction lay with a court (cf . especially the Constitutional Court's judgments, Law Reports Nos . 5100 and 5102) . In matters of labour disputes, appeal was generally possible, with only very insignificant exceptions, at least to a tribunal of the second instance and frequently also to the Supreme Court . In addition, Art . 25, para . 1, sub-para . 3 of the Act on Labour Courts provided that cases concerning labour disputes-to the exception of certain cases relating mainly to formal issues IArt . 471 of the Code of Civil Procedure)-had to be retried before the court of appeal . In that proceeding the parties could submit new facts and new evidence so that before the regional court acting as court of appeal the parties had, in fact, the same possibilities as in the proceedings before the labour court . Consequently, the applicant could in any case assert his claim under civil law before an independent and impartial tribunal established by law as required by Art . 6, para . 1 of the Convention . The Government therefore submitted that the present application was manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Art . 27, para . 2 of the Convention and should therefore be declared inadmissible .
B . The Applicant's Observations in reply of 10 January 197 7 The applicant first observed that the Government, in limiting their observations to the issues raised in item 3 of the applicant's original complaints, overlooked the importance of the question mentioned in item 4 of the original complaints, namely the question of the nomination and removal of the presidents and vice-presidents of the labour courts, for the issue of the independence of these courts .
- 172 -
In the applicant's opinion, the question of the independence of a judge was closely, even inseparably linked to the question of his irremovability, a judge who could be removed from his function outside the procedure envisaged in the Constitution IArt . 88) could not be considered as independent within the meaning of Art . 6 of the Convention . This had already been submitted in the original application in which reference had been made to an article of 1962 by Prof . Robert Walter . The Government's observations did not at all reply to this argument and therefore failed to deal with the main problem in the present case . The Government's submissions concerning the independence of the courts were only applicable to judges of the ordinary courts, that is, judges who had been appointed to their function in accordance with the Constitution by the Federal President or on the basis of a delegation by him by the Federal Minister of Justice . In particular, it was only these judges who were subject to the rule that judges may be removed from office, or be transferred against their will to another post, or be retired, only by a formal judicial decision and only in the cases and according to the torms prescribed by law .
The judges of the labour courts however were not appointed to their function in accordance with the provisions of the Constitution which of course were in conformity with the Convention . The Act on Labour Courts provided that the judges of the labou onrcoutsaemidbyhFeralMinstfoJucrmangsthejudw have been appointed in the ordinary way to serve in other courts . They therefore serve as judges of the labour courts in a kind of secondary function, ancillary to their main function in the ordinary courts . Moreover, the nomination of these judges can be delegated by the Minister to the Presidents of the Courts of Appeal who exercise this function not in their capacity as judges, but as administrative organs IJustizverwaltungsorganel . The law does not prevent that a judge who has been nominated by the competent president of the Court of Appeal to serve in a certain labour court may be removed from that court without any formalities, just by the revocation of his nomination .
A further argument why the judges of the labour courts cannot be considered as independent is the fact that the constitutional provisions on the procedure of nomination âre not applied . This procedure which is designed to further strengthen the independence of judges provides for the nomination of judges from a list of eligible persons to be drawn up by the competent court chambers . Where judges are nominated to exercise judicial functions in a certain domain not by the normal, generally applied procedure, and where they can be removed from these functions by an administrative organ without any formal procedure and without the necessity of a previous court decision, it cannot be maintained that the judges enjoy the guarantees of judicial independence with regard to this area of activities . The applicant concludes that a court presided over by such a judge-such as the labour court of Salzburg in the present case-cannot be considered as an independent and impartial tribunal within the meaning of Art . 6, para . 1 of the Convention . As regards the legal basis of the labour courts in Austria the applicant first replied to the Government's arguments concerning the decision of the Constitutional Court of 11 October 1973 . He admitted that the Constitutional Court had only been seized to determine the competence of the Federal or the Provincial legislator to enact legislation in this field . It was true that in this procedure the Constitutional Court had not been called upon to examine the constitutionality of the existing legislation .
17:3 -
However, the Court had found that a court of first instance in matters of labour disputes had to be established by the Federal Legislator, and that could mean nothing else but by a federal law . Art . 83, para . 1 of the Constitution required unmistakably that the organisation and competence of the courts be determined by a federal law . It followed that Art . 6, para . 1 of the Act on Labour Courts was not in conformity with the provisions of the constitution, and in addition that it was also not in conformity with Art . 6, para . 1 of the Convention . In the final analysis it was irrelevant whether the applicant's theory that Art . 6 of the Convention had abrogated Art . 6 of the Act on Labour Courts on the domestic level was correct . Even if Art . 6 of the Act on Labour Courts was still in force on the domestic level, it was not in conformity with Art . 6 of the Convention and therefore rendered the whole procedure in the applicant's case before the labour court unlawful . The applicant submitted that the phrase "tribunal established by law" in Art . 6, para . 1 of the Convention meant that such tribunal had to be established by an act of the legislator himself . According to the principles of a parliamentary democracy the legislator could only be understood to mean the legislative bodies provided by the Constitution . The applicant therefore opposed the Government's argument that the notion of "law" in the Convention was not identical with the notion of the Austrian legal system . Only a law in the formal sense could meet the requirements of the Convention . The opposite view of the Government was untenable . In this respect, the applicant need not even rely on his arguments concerning the conformity of Art . 6, para . I of the Act on Labour Courts with Art . 18 of the Constitution . These arguments had only been adduced to illustrate the doubtfulness of the establishment of courts "in case of need" . Such a formulation of the legal norms concerning the establishment of independent tribunals was inadmissible, and not inconformity with the requirements of the Convention . As regards the argument that the situation complained of by the applicant concerned only the labour courts of the first instance, and that according to the Government Art . 6, para . I of the Convention did not require an immediate court decision on civil rights, the requirements of the Convention being fulfilled if only in the last instance the jurisdiction lies with a court, the applicant referred to the terms of Art . 6, para . I of the Convention according to which everyone is entitled to a fair and public court hearing "within a reasonable time" . In the applicant's opinion, this provision envisaged first of all the courts of the first instance . A person seeking his right could not be referred to an argument to the effect that it may be that the court of the first instance is not in good order but that in any case the procedure in the second and third instance is up to the required standard . The implication of such an argument was in fundamental contrast with the principle of the Convention according to which the rule of law must be given the widest possible scope . It would force the applicant to seek his right before the higher courts and thus increase the onus and cost of the procedure which Art . 6, para . 1 of the Convention tended to limit by the formulation "within a reasonable time" . It was irrelevant in this context that according to the provisions of the Act on Labour Courts which on this point differed from the rules applicable in the ordinary courts, a case could be newly tried before the Court of Appeal, with the possibility of the submission of new facts and evidence .
The applicant therefore asked the Commission to declare his case admissibl e
- 174 -
THE LA W The applicant complains that a civil action for damages brought against him by his former employer in the labour court of Salzburg was not heard "within a reasonable time by an independent . . . tribunal established by law" as required by Art . 6(1 ) of the Convention .
The applicant alleges that in Austria the labour courts of the first instance do not have all the requisite qualities of tribunals within the meaning of An . 6(1 ) . In his view thay cannot be considered as being established by law because the Act on Labour Courts left the decision on their establishment to the discretion of the Minister "where a need arises" . He further alleges that they cannot be considered as independent since the judges sitting in these courts are not appointed to their function in the same way as other judges, and do not enjoy all the guarantees of irremovability with regard to these functions . The Government contend that Art . 6 11) does not require an immediate court decision on civil rights and that it is sufficient if only in the last instance the jurisdiction lies with a court . The Government furthermore deny that the labour courts of the first instance are not inconformity with the Convention . In their view a court may also be regarded as established by law if it is based on delegated legislation . In their submission the judges in the labour courts enjoy, moreover, all the guarantees of judicial independence . The Commission finds that the case raises important and complex questions as to the interpretation of Art . 6(1) of the Convention . These questions are, in particular, whether in judicial proceedings on the determination of civil rights and obligations already the court of first instance must have all the guarantees of a tribunal within the meaning of that provision ; if so, whether a court can be considered as being established by law where it has been created, and may be disbanded, by decree of the Minister according to "necessity" ; finally, whether a court can be considered as being independent if the judges can be removed from their functions in this court by an administrative act .
The above questions are substantial issues which do not, in the present state of the file, allow the rejection of the applicant's complaints as manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Art . 27 (2) of the Convention . The Commission is satisfied that the other conditions of admissibility are fulfilled . The Commission therefore ,
DECLARES THIS APPLICATION ADMISSIBLE .
- 175-
(TRADUCTION) EN FAI T Les faits de la cause, tels qu'ils ont été exposés par le conseil du requérant, peuvent se résumer comme suit : Le requérant, de nationalité autrichienne, est né en 1954 et réside présentement à Berlin . Il a travaillé à une certaine époque comme orfèvre dans un atelier de Salzbourg et a été poursuivi par son employeur en 1974 en réparation d'un préjudice s'élevant à quelque 36 000 schillings autrichiens au total . Le tribunal compétent dans cette affaire était le tribunal du travail de Salzbourg . Les tribunaux du travail ont été créés en Autriche conformément à l'article 6 de la Loi sur les tribunaux du travail IArbeitsgerichtsgesetzBGBI . 170/1946, modifiée)' . Cette disposition habilite le Ministre de la Justice à créer des tribunaux du travail là où le besoin s'en fait sentir la nach Bedarf W . Sur la base de cette autorisation, le Ministre a pris un dAcret d'application de la Loi sur les tribunaux du travail (Verordnung zur Durchführung des Arbeitsgerichtsgesetzes, BGB I . 183/1950 modifié)" . L'article 1•' de ce décret a créé notamment un tribunal du travail à Salzbourg, dont la compétence territoriale englobe les ressorts des tribunaux de district d'Abtenau, d'Hallein, de Neumarkt, d'Oberndorf, de Salzbourg, de St . Gilgen et de Thalgau .
Devant le tribunal du travail de Salzbourg, le requérant a soulevé certaines objections quant à la constitutionnalité de ces dispositions . Il a invoqué en particulier l'article 83 121 de la Constitution autrichienne, qui proclame le droit pour toute personne de faire entendre sa cause par le juge prévu par la loi Igesetzlicher Richter) . Il a aussi invoqué l'article 6 de la Convention européenne des Droits de l'Homme, qui a rang de disposition constitutionnelle en Autriche . Le requérant a prétendu qu'il est très douteux que le tribunal du travail soit un « juge prévu par la loi a ou encore « un tribunal indépendant et impartial, établi par la loi e, vu qu'il a été créé par un décret ministériel et non par la loi proprement dite . En conséquence, il a demandé au tribunal du travail de suspendre la procédure et de soumettre la question à l'examen de la Cour constitutionnelle (article 89 de la Constitution) . Le tribunal du travail a rejeté la demande du requérant par une décision du 15 décembre 1974 . II a déclaré ne pas partager les doutes du requérant quant à la constitutionnalité des dispositions légales régissant la création des tribunaux du travail . La Cour constitutionnelle avait déjB dit, dans une autre affaire, que la compétence d'un tribunal peut étre déterminée par décret pris sur la base d'une loi suffisamment claire au regard du critére défini à l'article 18 de la Constitution . Le requérant a fait appel de la décision du tribunal du travail pour autant que celui-ci avait confirmé sa compétence en l'espéce . Puis il a demande au tribunal régional de déférer, à son tour, à la Cour constitutionnelle la question qu'il avait déjà soulevée devant le tribunal du travail . Toutefois, le tribunal régional de Salzbourg a jugé l'appel irrecevable et l'a rejeté . Néanmoins, il a déclaré, dans sa décision du 23 avril 1975, qu'il n'avait aucun doute lui non plus sur la constitutionnalité des tribunaux du travail . Cf . BGB 1 . 164/1950, 197/1965 et 291/1971 .
Cf . BGBI . 208/1950, 39/1951, 118/1957 . 59/1958, 288/1962 et 303/1965.
- 176 -
Le 8 juillet 1975, la Cour suprême a déclaré irrecevable et rejeté un autre appel formé par le requérant, au motif que les deux tribunaux inférieurs avaient rendu des décisions concordantes . Toutefois, la Cour suprême a examiné un nouvel argument soulevé devant elle par le requérant, à savoir que le tribunal du travail en question avait une composition irréguliére, du fait que son Président avait exercé ses fonctions sans avoir été nommé à son poste conformément à l'article 88 de la Constitution . Il en serait résulté que la décision en première instance aurait dd étre tenue pour nulle et non avenue . Toutefois, la Cour suprême a jugé que le fait que le Président du tribunal du travail avait été nommé juge avant d'être affecté au tribunal du travail était suffisant et elle a conclu, en conséquence, é la validité de la décision de ce tribunal . GRIEFS Le requérant se plaint que le tribunal du travail qui a statué sur son cas n'était pas « un tribunal indépendant et impartial, établi par la loi n, au sens de l'article 6 11) de la Convention .
Il prétend que les tribunaux du travail ne sont pas criés par la loi, et ce pour les raisons suivantes : 1 . Leur création est en contradiction avec l'article 83 (1) de la Constitution autrichienne . La Cour constitutionnelle a interprété cette disposition, dans un arrét récent (K Il - 1/73 ) , comme signifiant qu'un tribunal spécial à compétence restreinte ne peut être crééque par une loi fédérale . Dans son recours à la Cour suprême, le requérant a fait observer que le principe sous-jacent 8 cet arrét s'était substitué à l'interprétation que la Cour constitutionnelle avait donné jusqu'alors de l'article 83 (1) de la Constitution (et sur laquelle les juridictions inférieures s'étaient fondées en l'espéce) .
2 . La disposition légale à la base du décret qui a porté création des tribunaux du travail ne précise pas assez clairement, lorsqu'elle fait simplement référence à un « besoin », le critére applicable à la création de ces tribunaux, ce qui est contraire à l'article 18 de la Constitution autrichienne et, par voie de conséquence, illégal . 3 . Les tribunaux du travail peuvent être créés et supprimEs par décision administrative, ce qui porte atteinte à leur indépendance, garantie par l'article 6 de la Convention . Comme la Convention fait partie intégrante du droit constitutionnel autrichien, cette procédure est également irréguliére sur le plan interne . A cet égard, le requérant a présenté un argument supplémentaire suivant lequel les dispositions légales régissant la création des tribunaux du travail ont été tacitement abrogées par la Convention, lorsque celle-ci est devenue partie intégrante du droit interne autrichien . S'il en est ainsi, les tribunaux du travail seraient dépourvus de toute base légale . 4 . Les Présidents et Vice-Présidents des tribunaux du travail ne sont pas nommés à leurs postes conformément à l'article 88 de la Constitution (par le Président de la Confédération ou, sur sa délégation, par le Ministre de la Justice) . En réalité, ils sont désignés par le Président de la cour d'appel Iqui exerce, en l'occurrence, les attributions d'un organe administratif) qui a aussi le pouvoir de les révoquer. Il s'agit là encore d'une atteinte illégale à l'indépendance des juges, comme l'a déclaré le Professeur Waher dans un article décrit en 1962 « Die Stellung der Vorsitzenden der Arbeitsgerichte und ihrer Stellvertreter in verfassungsrechtlicher Sicht n (Das Recht der Arbeit . Vol . 12 (1962), p . 241) .
- 177-
ARGUMENTATION DES PARTIE S A . Les observations du Gouvernement sur la recevabilité du 26 novembre 1976 Le Gouvernement a d'abord fait observer que la Commission ne peut examine r que la question soulevée é la troisiéme rubrique des griefs du requArant au titre de l'article 6 111 de la Convention, autrement dit celle de savoir « si les conflits du travail relévent en Autriche de la compétence de tribunaux indépendants et impartiaux, établis par la loi n . Il importe peu, pour la procédure devant la Commission, qu'abstraction faite de ce point, la création des tribunaux du travail souléve ou non des problémes au regard de la Constitution autrichienne . Le Gouvernement a donc limité ses observations à la question susmentionnée . a . Quant à lïndépendence des tribunaux du travail
Les conflits du travail relévent de la compétence, d'une part, de juges professionnels et, d'autre part, d'assesseurs, juges non professionnels, désignés parmi les employeurs et les salariés . Le principe essentiel de l'indépendance des juges, posé à l'article 87 (1) de la Constitution, s'applique à la fois aux juges professionnels et aux autres juges, qui sont indépendants dans l'exercice de leurs fonctions judiciaires . Ce principe emporte les conséquences suivantes :
aa . dans l'exercice de leurs fonctions judiciaires, les juges sont tenus d'appliquer exclusivement les lois, et non des instructions ou des ordres d'organes du Gouvernement . bb . l'article 87 131 de la Constitution écarte la possibilité d'influer sur la jurisprudence par le biais de la répartition des affaires entre les juges ; il stipule, en effet, que les affaires sont distribuées d'avance entre les juges d'un même tribunal pour une durée fixée par la loi d'organisation judiciaire . Toute affaire ainsi confiée à un juge ne peut lui être retirée par une décision de l'administration qu'en cas d'empêchement . . l'indépendance des juges est garantie, en outre, par le principe suivant lequel les cc juges ne peuvent être destitués ou déplacés . Ce principe est énoncé à l'article 88 de la Constitution comme suit : La loi d'organisation judiciaire fixe une limite d'âge, à laquelle les juges doivent étre mis à la retraite . Conformément à cette disposition constitutionnelle, l'article 99 de la loi sur le statut de la magistrature stipule que les juges sont mis à la retraite à la fin de l'année où ils ont 65 ans révolus . Dans tous les autres cas, les juges ne peuvent être destitués, déplacés ou mis à la retraite contre leur gré qu'en vertu d'une décision judiciaire formelle et uniquement dans les cas et les formes prévus par la loi . Ces dispositions ne sont toutefois pas applicables aux déplacements et mises à la retraite que rendraient nécessaires des modifications à la loi d'organisation judiciaire . Les dispositions garantissant l'indépendance des juges, et particuliérement celles stipulant que ceux-ci n'ont d'instructions é recevoir de personne, s'appliquent aussi au juges compétents en matiére de conflits du travail .
b . Quant è l'impartialité des tribunaux du travail L'impartialité des tribunaux du travail est garantie, de la même maniére que dans n'importe quelle autre procédure, par les régles régissant la récusation des juges e t
- 178 -
d'autres organes judiciaires, contenues dans le Titre 2 de la loi sur la procédure civile et l'organisation judiciaire (Jurisdiktionsnonn) . L'article 19 de cette loi stipule que dans les procédures civiles, un juge peut être récusé : a . si, dans une affaire donnée, il est empPché par la loi d'exercer des fonctions judiciaires ou b . s'il existe une raison sérieuse de douter de son impartialité . Les motifs légaux d'empêchement sont définis à l'article 20 de la loi . Il est interdit à un juge de juger (a) une affaire dans laquelle il est lui-méme partie ou dans laquelle il a un intérBt, (b) une affaire qui met en cause ses parents jusqu'à un certain degré, ses parents adoptifs ou nourriciers, etc . . ., (c) une affaire pour laquelle il est ou a été nommé mandataire de l'une des parties, et enfin Idl une affaire qui a fait l'objet d'un jugement ou d'une décision d'un tribunal inférieur, au délibéré desquels il a participé . Les articles 21 et 22 de la loi fixent les régles de procédure régissant l'exercice du droit de récusation et l'article 23 précise quel est le tribunal compétent pour statuer sur une demande de récusation . Le juge récusé est toujours tenu à l'écart de cette décision . Aux termes de l'article 24 111, la décision est prise sans audience contradictoire, mais aprés que les enqubtes et les examens nécessaires ont été effectués . L'article 24 (2) stipule qu'une décision faisant droit à une demande en récusation n'est pas susceptible de recours, tandis qu'une décision rejetant une demande en récusation peut faire l'objet d'un recours . Aux termes de l'article 25 de cette loi, un juge récusé peut continuer d'exercer certaines fonctions judiciaires, mais il ne peut rendre une décision finale tant que la demande en récusation dont il a fait l'objet . n'a pas été rejetée par une décision passée en force de chose jugée . S'il est fait droit à la demande en récusation, les actes de ce juge sont entachés de nullité .
Les articles 26 et 27 prévoient l'extension des règles applicables à la récusation des juges à d'autres organes judiciaires, comme les greffiers, les employés du greffe, les huissiers, etc . c . Quant eu fondement légal des tribunaux du travail Le Gouvernement a d'abord fait valoir que la décision de la Cour constituttionnelle du 11 octobre 1973 IKII-1/731, à laquelle le requérant a fait référence, est étrangére à l'affaire dont la Commission est saisie . L'objet de cette décision était de dire si la création de tribunaux inférieurs, dont la compétence est limitée à certaines affaires judiciaires (comme les tribunaux de district, qui sont compétents pour juger des questions relatives au droit du travail), reléve de la compétence du législateur fédéral ou du législateur provincial . La Cour constitutionnelle s'est prononcée en faveur du législateur fédéral, mais elle n'a absolument pas tranché la question de savoir de quelle manière le législateur fédéral devait créer ces tribunaux . En particulier, la Cour constitutionnelle n'a pas jugé utile, dans ce contexte, de contrôler la constitutionnalité de l'actuel article 6(1 ) de la loi sur les tribunaux du travail, qui traite de la création de ces mêmes tribunaux . Il est exact que le requérant a soulevé la question de savoir si, dans la procédure à laquelle il était partie devant le tribunal du travail et qui a abouti à la décision de la Cour supr@me du 8 juillet 1975, l'article 6(1) de la Convention dérogeait à l'article 6(1) de la loi sur les tribunaux du travail . Toutefois, les tribunaux saisis de l'affaire ne se sont pas ralliés à cette thése et n'ont donc pas jugé utile de solliciter une décision de la Cour constitutionnelle quant à la légalité du décret d'application de la loi sur les tribunaux du travail .
_179_
En ce qui concerne le bien-fondé de cet argument, il convient d'observer que l'article 6 ( 1) de la Convention fait référence à un rt tribunal établi par la loi » . Or, c'est aussi une loi, à savoir l'article 6 de la loi sur les tribunaux du travail, en vertu de laquelle le Ministre fédéral de la justice a pris son décret du 1^ 1 septembre 1950 relatif à l'application de la loi sur les tribunaux du travail, qui régit la création de ces tribunaux . Comme l'intitulé du décret l'indique, il s'agit simplement d'un réglement pris par le pouvoir exécutif en vertu de cette loi . La base de cette réglementation a donc été la loi, à savoir l'article 6 ( 1) de la loi sur les tribunaux du travail . Cette disposition est conforme à la Convention, et ce d'autant plus que l'article 6(1 ) de la Convention ne prescrit pas de quelle maniére le législateur doit pourvoir à la création de tribunaux . En conséquence, il ne saurait étre question d'une abrogation tacite de cette disposition de la loi par ladite règle de la Convention, qui a rang de disposition constitutionnelle en Autriche, pas plus qu'on ne saurait dire que le décret est dépourvu de base légale . Le Gouvernement a fait valoir, en outre, qu'on peut s'interroger sur le point de savoir si le terme de « loi rr désigne la même chose dans la Convention européenne des Droits de l'Homme et dans le systéme de droit autrichien, ou encore sur celui de savoir si les exigences de la Convention sont généralement satisfaites par une loi au sens matériel du terme, qui recouvre aussi la notion de « Verordnung n Idécretl . Comme cette doctrine a été intégrée dans le systéme constitutionnel autrichien, cette inte . rpétaion uàfrsonable Dans la mesure où le requérant semble penser que la régle posée à l'article 6 111 de la loi sur les tribunaux du travail n'est pas suffisamment explicite au regard de la norme définie à l'article 18 de la loi constitutionnelle fédérale, il a soulevé une question qui ne concerne pas la Convention en tant que telle et qui ne peut donc pas être examinée plus avant dans le cadre d'une procédure devant la Commission . En réponse à une question particulière qui lui a été posée par la Commission à l'occasion de la communication de la requête, le Gouvernement a aussi souligné que l'article 6(1 ) de la loi sur les tribunaux du travail ne traite que de la création des tribunaux du travail de premiére instance, alors qu'en deuxième et troisiéme instances les conflits du travail sont de la compétence des tribunaux régionaux et de la Cour supri?me, autrement dit de tribunaux dont la constitutionnalité et la conformité à la Convention ne sont même pas mises en doute par le requérant lui-méme .
Si une question a été tranchée en derniére instance par un tribunal répondant aux critères posés à l'article 6 (1) de la Convention, il ne saurait y avoir violation de cette disposition de la Convention . Ainsi, la Cour constitutionnelle autrichienne a toujours estimé que l'article 6 111 de la Convention ne requiert pas une décision immédiate d'un tribunal sur des contestations relatives à des droits de caractére civil . Les critéres prévus par la Convention européenne des Droits de l'Homme sont donc satisfaits dés lors qu'en dernière instance l'affaire est soumise à un tribunal (cf . particuliérement les arrêts de la Cour constitutionnelle, Recueils de jurisprudence N° 5100 et 5102) . Dans les affaires concernant les conflits du travail, un appel est généralement possible, à quelques exceptions trés mineures prés, au moins devant un tribunal de deuxième instance et, fréquemment aussi, devant la Cour suprême . En outre, l'article 25, par . 1, ch . 3, de la loi sur les tribunaux du travail stipule que les conflits du travail - à l'exception de certains litiges portant principalement sur des questions de forme (art . 471 du Code de procédure civile) doivent étre jugées à nouveau par la cour d'appel . Dans cette procédure, les parties peuvent faire valoir de nouveaux moyens en fait et en droit, de sorte que devant le tribunal régional siégeant comme cour d'appel ,
- 180-
les parties ont effectivement les mêmes possibilités que dans les procédures devant le tribunal du travail . Par voie de conséquence, le requérant pouvait, quoi qu'il en soit, faire valoir sa demande en droit civil devant un tribunal indépendant et impartial établi par la loi, comme l'exige l'article 6 11) de la Convention . Le Gouvernement soutient en conséquence que la présente requète est manifestement mal fondée, au sens de l'article 27 (2) de la Convention, et qu'elle devrait donc étre déclarée irrecevable .
B . Les observations en réponse du requérant en date du 10 janvier 197 7 Le requérant a d'abord fait observer qu'en limitant ses observations aux questions soulevées au point 3 des griefs initiaux, le Gouvernement n'a pas tenu compte de l'importance que revét la question mentionnée au point 4, à savoir W question de la nomination et de la destitution des Présidents et Vice-Présidents des tribunaux du travail, pour ce qui est de la question de l'indépendance de ces tribunaux . Le requérant estime que la question de l'indApendance d'un juge est étroitement et même inséparablement liée à la question de son inamovibilité et qu'un juge qui peut être démis de ses fonctions en dehors du cadre de la procédure prévue par la Constitution (article 88) ne saurait être considéré comme indépendant, au sens de l'article 6 de la Convention . Cette thése avait déjà étA exposée dans la requéte initiale, où référence avait été faite à un article écrit par le Professeur Robert Walter en 1962 . Les observations du Gouvernement ne répondent aucunement à cet argument et ne traitent donc pas du principal problème qui se pose en l'espèce . Les arguments du Gouvernement relatifs à l'indépendance des tribunaux ne valent que pour les juges des tribunaux ordinaires, c'est-â-dire des juges qui ont été nommés, conformément à la Constitution, par le Président de la Confédération ou, sur sa déÎégation, par le Ministre fédéral de la Justice . En particulier, seuls ces juges sont soumis à la régle suivant laquelle les juges ne peuvent étre destitués, déplacés ou mis à la retraite contre leur gré que dans les cas et les formes prescrits par la loi et en vertu d'un arrét de justice formel .
En revanche, les juges des tribunaux du travail ne sont pas nommés conformément aux dispositions de la Constitution qui, évidemment, sont conforrnes à la Convention . La loi sur les tribunaux du travail stipule que les juges des tribunaux du travail sont désignés par le Ministre fédéral de la Justice parmi les juges qui ont été aftectés à d'autres tribunaux suivant la procédure ordinaire . En conséquence, comme juges auprés des tribunaux du travail, ils exercent une fonction pour ainsi dire secondaire, annexe à leurs fonctions principales auprès des tribunaux ordinaires . En outre, ces juges peuvent être nommés, sur délégation du Ministre, par les Présidents des cours d'appel, qui exercent cette attribution non pas en tant que juges, mais comme des « organes administratifs t IJustizverwaltungsorganel . La loi n'empêche pas qu'un juge qui a été affecté à un tribunal du travail par le président compétent de la cour d'appel soit déplacé de ce tribunal sans aucune formalité, simplement par révocation de sa nomination . Une autre raison pour laquelle les juges des tribunaux du travail ne peuvent être considérés comme indépendants réside dans le fait que les dispositions constitutionnelles régissant la procédure de nomination ne sont pas appliquées . Cette procédure, qui est destinée à renforcer l'indépendance des juges, prévoit que les juges sont nommAs sur une liste de personnes réunissant les conditions requises, liste qui doit être établie par les chambres compétentes des tribunaux .
- 181 -
Lorsque des juges ne sont pas désignés suivant la procédure généralement appliquée, pour exercer des fonctions judiciaires dans un domaine déterminé, et lorsqu'ils peuvent étre démis de leurs fonctions par un organe administratif sans aucune procédure formelle et en l'absence d'une décision préalable d'un tribunal, on ne saurait prAtendre que ces juges bénéficient des garanties de l'indépendance judiciaire en ce qui concerne ce domaine d'activité . Le requérant en conclut qu'un tribunal présidé par un tel juge - comme le tribunal du travail de Salzbourg en l'espéce - ne saurait être considéré comme un tribunal indépendant et impartiel, au sens de l'article 6 111 de la Convention . En ce qui concerne le fondement légal des tribunaux du travail en Autriche, le requérant a d'abord répondu aux arguments du Gouvernement concernant la décision de la Cour constitutionnelle du 11 octobre 1973 . II a reconnu que la Cour constitutionnelle n'avait été saisie qu'aux fins de dire si la mise en muvre de la législation dans ce domaine reléve de la compétence du législateur fédéral ou du législateur provincial . Il est exact que dans cette affaire, il n'avait pas été demandé à la Cour constitutionnelle de contrôler la constitutionnalité de la législation en vigueur . Toutefois, la Cour a estimé que dans les conflits du travail, un tribunal de premiére instance doit étre créé par le législateur fédéral, ce qui ne peut vouloir dire que par une loi fédérale . L'article 83 (1) de la Constitution exige à l'évidence que l'organisation et la compétence des tribunaux soient fixées par une loi fédérale .
Il s'ensuit que l'article 6 (1) de la loi sur les tribunaux du travail n'est pas conforme aux dispositions de la Constitution et, de plus, n'est pas conforme à l'article 6 111 de la Convention . Il importe peu, en derniére analyse, que la théorie du requérant selon laquelle l'article 6 de la Convention a tacitement abrogé l'article 6 de la loi sur les tribunaux du travail sur le plan interne, soit correcte . Méme si l'article 6 de la loi sur les tribunaux du travail demeure en vigueur sur le plan interne, elle ne serait pas conforme à l'article 6 de la Convention et rendrait donc irréguliére l'ensemble de la procédure devant le tribunal du travail, à laquelle le requérant a été partie . Le requérant a fait valoir que l'expression « tribunal établi par la loi » figurant à l'article 6 (1) de la Convention signifie que ce tribunal doit être créé par un acte du législateur lui-méme . Selon les principes en vigueur dans les démocraties parlementaires, le mot « législateur n ne peut être interprété que comme désignant les organes législatifs prévus par la Constitution . Le requérant s'oppose donc à l'argument du Gouvernement selon lequel la notion de u loi » ne signifie pas la mème chose dans la Convention et dans le systéme du droit autrichien . Seule une loi, au sens formel du terme, peut répondre aux critéres de la Convention . La thése contraire du Gouvernement n'est pas soutenable . A cet égard, le requérant n'a mPme pas besoin d'invoquer ses arguments sur la conformité de l'article 6 111 de la loi sur les tribunaux du travail à l'article 18 de la Constitution . Ces arguments n'ont été présentés que pour montrer combien est douteuse la base légale de la création de tribunaux « suivant les besoins » . Une telle formulation de normes légales concernant la création de tribunaux indépendants est inacceptable et n'est pas conforme aux critéres de la Convention .
En ce qui concerne la thèse selon laquelle la situation incriminée par le requérant ne se présenterait que pour les tribunaux du travail de premiére instance, et l'argument du Gouvernement selon lequel l'article 6 (1) de la Convention ne requiert pas une décision immédiate d'un tribunal sur les contestations relatives aux droits de caractére civil, les critères de la Convention étant satisfaits dés lors qu'en derniére instanc e
- 182 -
l'affaire est soumise à un tribunal, le requérant fait référence aux termes de l'article 6 ( 1) de la Convention, selon lequel toute personne a droit à ce que sa cause soit entendue équitablement, publiquement et dans un délai raisonnable par un tribunal indépendant et impartial . Selon le requérant, cette disposition vise avant tout les tribunaux de première instance . A une personne cherchant à faire valoir ses droits, on ne peut opposer l'argument selon lequel le tribunal de premiére instance n'est peut-être pas parfaitement régulier, mais qu'en toute hypothése la procédure en deuxiéme et troisiéme instances sera conforme à la norme . La conséquence de cet argument est . fondamentalement contraire au principe de la Convention suivant lequel la régle de droit doit se voir reconnaitre le champ d'application le plus large possible . Le requérant serait alors obligé de faire valoir ses droits devant les tribunaux supérieurs, ce qui augmenterait la charge et le co0t de la procédure, que l'article 6 (1) de la Convention tente justement de limiter grâce à la formule « dans un délai raisonnable n . Il importe peu, dans ce contexte, que conformément aux dispositions de la loi sur les tribunaux du travail, qui d'rfférent sur ce point des régles applicables aux tribunaux ordinaires, une affaire puisse être jugée à nouveau par la cour d'appel, la possibilité étant offerte de faire valoir des moyens nouveaux en fait et en droit . Le requérant demande, en conséquence, 8 la Commission de déclarer sa requête recevable . EN DROI T Le requérant se plaint qu'une action civile en dommages-intéréts intentée contre lui par son ancien employeur devant le tribunal du travail de Salzbourg n'ait pas été jugée « dans un délai raisonnable, par un tribunal indépendant . . ., établi par la loi », comme l'exige l'article 6(1) de la Convention .
Le requérant fait valoir qu'en Autriche, les tribunaux du travail de premiére instance ne présentent pas toutes les caractéristiques nécessaires des tribunaux, au sens de l'article 6 (1) . II estime qu'ils ne peuvent pas être considérés comme créés par la loi, étant donné qu'aux termes de la loi sur les tribunaux du travail, c'est le Ministre qui décide de leur création, « lé où le besoin s'en fait sentir n . Il prétend, par ailleurs, qu'ils ne peuvent pas ètre considérés comme indépendants, étant donné que les juges siégeant dans ces tribunaux ne sont pas nommés de la même maniére que les autres juges et be bénéficient pas, dans l'exercice de ces fonctions, de toutes les garanties d'inamovibilité . Le Gouvernement soutient que l'a rticle 6 (1) ne requiert pas une décision immédiate d'un tribunal sur les contestations po rt ant sur les droits de caractére civil et qu'il suffit qu'en derniére instance l'affaire puisse être jugée par un tribunal . Le Gouvernement conteste en outre que les tribunaux du travail de première instance ne soient pas conformes à la Convention . Il estime qu'un tribunal créé par un réglement peut aussi être considéré comme créé par la loi . Selon le Gouvernement, les juges des tribunaux du travail bénéficient, en outre, de toutes les garanties de l'indépendance judiciaire . La Commission estime que la présente affaire souléve des questions importantes et complexes d'interprétation de l'article 6 (1) de la Convention . Ces questions sont notamment les suivantes : dans les procédures judiciaires visant à décider des contestations sur des droits et obligations de caractére civil, la juridiction de premiére instance doit-elle présenter toutes les garanties d'un tribunal au sens de cette disposition l Dans l'affirmative, un tribunal peut-il être considéré comme établi par la
_1g8_
loi lorsqu'il a été créé et lorsqu'il peut être supprimé par un décret ministériel « en cas de nécessité n? En dernier lieu, le tribunal peut-il ètre considéré comme indépendant lorsque les juges peuvent é tre démis de leurs fonctions par un acte administratif ?
Il s'agit là de questions de fond qui sont d'une impo rtance telle que, dans l'état actuel du dossier, il n'est pas possible de rejeter les griefs du requérant comme manifestement mal fondés, au sens de l'article 27 121 de la Convention . La Commission est par ailleurs d'avis que les autres conditions de recevabilité sont réunies . Par ces motifs, la Commission DECLARE LA REQUÉTEIRRECEVABLE .
_18q_

Origine de la décision

Formation : Commission (plénière)
Date de la décision : 16/05/1977

Fonds documentaire ?: HUDOC

HUDOC
Association des cours judiciaires suprêmes francophones Organisation internationale de la francophonie

Juricaf est un projet de l'AHJUCAF, l'association des cours judiciaires suprêmes francophones,
réalisé en partenariat avec le Laboratoire Normologie Linguistique et Informatique du droit (Université Paris I).
Il est soutenu par l'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie et le Fonds francophone des inforoutes.