Facebook Twitter Appstore
Page d'accueil > Résultats de la recherche

§ AIREY c. IRLANDE

Imprimer

Type d'affaire : Décision
Type de recours : Partiellement recevable ; partiellement irrecevable

Numérotation :

Numéro d'arrêt : 6289/73
Identifiant URN:LEX : urn:lex;coe;cour.europeenne.droits.homme;arret;1977-07-07;6289.73 ?

Analyses :

(Art. 14) DISCRIMINATION, (Art. 9-1) LIBERTE DE RELIGION


Parties :

Demandeurs : AIREY
Défendeurs : IRLANDE

Texte :

APPLICATION/REQUETE N° 6289/73 Johanna AIREY v/IRELAND Johanna AIREY c/IRLAND E
DECISION of 7 July 1977 on the admissibility of the application DECISION du 7 juillet 1977 sur la recevabilité de la requêt e
Article 5, paregraphe 1 Ibl of the Convention : Detention for four days for having failed to pay a fine. Compliance with the requirements of article 5 peragraph 1(b ) of the Convention . Article 6, paragraph I of the Convention ,
Articles 8, 13 and 74 of the Convention : Prohibitive costs of a procedure of a divorce a mensa et thoro which a person of modest conditions wishes to engage . Complaint declared admissible . Article 26 of the Convention : Exhaustion of domestic remedies (Ireland) . Failure to institute civil proceedings against police oHicers by whom, according to the applicant, she has been assaulted . Article 5, paragraphe 1(b ) , de fa Convention : Détention de quatre jours pour avoir omis de payer une amende. Conforme aux conditions de l'article 5, paragraphe 1 (b) . Article 6 paregraphe 1, de la Convention, Articles 8, 13 et 14 de la Convention : CoOt prohibitif d'une procédure en séparation de corps, que désirerait intenter une personne de condition modeste. Grief déclaré recevable . Article 26 de la Convention : Epuisement des voies de recours internes (Irlande) . Omission d'intenter une action civile contre les agents de police par lesquels la requérente prétend avoir été brutalisée . I français : voir p. 501
THE FACTS
1 . The applicant is an Irish national and a married woman . She is represented before the Commission by Messrs Brendan Walsh & Co, Solicitors , Dublin . Her husband is Timothy Airey . There are four children of the marriag e - Ellen, aged 21 years is married and resides at Mayfield, Cork . - Mary Regina, aged 19 years, residing at Schull, Co . Cork . - Noreen, aged 16 years, working in Cork City Market, resides with her mother at 6 McDonagh Road, Ballyphehane, Cork . - Thomas, 12 years old, attending school, resides with his mother .
-q2-
2 . On 20 January 1972, Timothy Airey, the applicant's husband, appeared in the District Court of Cork City, ~ a . charged by the applicant that, on the 30th day of December 1971 he did assault or beat the applicant, an d b. to answer an application by the applicant that he enter into sureties to keep the peace and be of good behaviour towards the applicant . The Court adjudged that the defendant be convicted and ordered to pay for fine the sum of 25 pence with the sum of E3 .15 costs to the applicant . The Court having heard the evidence, declined to order the defendant to enter into the sureties referred to at b . above . This was the only occasion on which the applicant charged her husband in respect of any matter . The applicant alleges that this hearing was wholly inadequate as it lasted only a few minutes . It did not take proper account of the facts and thus did not protect her life from her husband's violence as it failed to detain him for treatment of his alleged alcoholism . 3 . After this case, since about June 1972, the applicant's husband has lived apart from the applicant, leaving possession of the family home to the applicant . The husband, who is a lorry-driver by occupation, has since that date been obliged to pay to the applicant a weekly sum in maintenance . Originally the sum was apparently CB per week, but according to the applicant, it was paid irregularly . The Courts have on two occasions rejected her applications to enforce the payment of maintenance and she has had to manage without any for periods of up to four weeks . The present maintenance order is for E27 per week . 4 . At the beginning ot 1973 Thomas Airey, son of the applicant and residing with her, was not attending school . The school Attendance Officer, who is charged with enforcing the law whereby persons having custody of children must ensure that they attend school or otherwise receive adequate education, prosecuted the applicant for the continuing failure of her son Thomas to attend school .
The applicant failed to attend a Court hearing fixed in April, and the Court therefore issued a warrant ordering the Gardai Ipolicel to arrest the applicant and bring her before it . She refused to come but as she appeared to be ill, the warrant was not executed . The situation remained unchanged . Thomas did not attend school and the applicant refused to come to Court until 12 June 1973, when the Gardai (amongst whom were two policewomen) visited the applicant at her home and when she continued to refuse to come to Court she was arrested and had to be carried, resisting violently, to a car and brought before the Court . The applicant alleges that she was struck by the Gardai on this occasion, that they used obscene language, and that they left her and her son in a filthy cell pending the hearing in the afternoon . The Government state that no more force was used than was necessary to bring the applicant before the Court and she was not assaulted in any way . The applicant complaint of this alleged ill-treatment to the Gardai Commissioner of the Phoenix Park Depot who carried out an investigation of her allegations but found them unsubstantiated . The applicant was fined at the June 1973 hearing for failing to ensure her son's attendance at school . The applicant has claimed that she had to serve four days of a fourteen day sentence of imprisonment in default of paying the E3 .7 8 fine in July 1973 . It appears that as a result of her protests to the prison governor and her member of Parlia-
_43-
ment she was released . She alleges that this detention was unlawful . The Government state that there is no record of any such default or imprisonment . The applicant states that the Irish State has failed to protect her from her allegedly violent alcoholic husband . She has been unable to get a legal separation from him on the grounds of his alleged physical and mental cruelty to both herself and her children as such a remedy is only available from the High Court and would cost her over E1,000 to pursue, free legal aid not being available for such cases . Complaints
The applicant complains that : a. the hearing of her charges against her husband on 20 January 1972 was unjust b . she was ill-treated by the Gardai in June 1973 when they forcibly took her to court to answer the case of her son's non-attendance at school ; c. the imprisonment in default of paying the fine imposed in June 1973 was unlawful d. the State has not protected her against physical and mental cruelty from her allegedly violent and alcoholic husband li) by not detaining him after the hearing in January 1972 for treatment as an alcoholic ; (iil by not ensuring that he paid the maintenance regularly after their separation (iii) by not enabling her to have a legal separation or divorce from him by virtue of the prohibitive cost of High Court Proceedings which do not attract free legal aid . She submit that this last complaint is not based simply on the absence of free legal aid and civil cases in Ireland, but is based on the contention that Ireland must ptovide access to the appropriate Court (Art . 6) without any discrimination or differential treatment (Art . 14) to protect rights under family law (Art . 8), or alternatively, provide some other redress to solve the applicant's current legal problems by an effective remedy (Art .13) .
Procedure before the Commissio n The present application was lodged with the Commission on 14 June 1973 and registered on 19 September 1973 . On 1 October 1975 the Commission decided, in accordance with Rule 42121 ( b) of its Rules of Procedure, to notify the respondent Government of the application and invite the light of Articles 6 ( 1) and 8 of the Convention . The Government submitted the said observations on 3 December 1975 to which the applicant replied on 29 December 1975 .
On 15 July 1976 the Commission decided, in accordance with the aforementioned Rule 42(2) (b) in fine, to invite the parties to submit further written observations on the admissibility of whether the alleged denial of access to the Courts for judicial separation due to prohibitive costs, could raise an issue under Article 611) of the Convention as interpreted by the European Court of Human Rights in the Go/dercase . The Government submitted their observations on 28 August 1976 . The applicant, after being granted legal aid by the Commission on December 1976, submitted her observations through her solicitors, Messrs Brendan Walsh & Co, Dublin, on 20 December 1976 .
-44-
The Commission held an oral hearing on the admissibility and merits of the application in Strasbourg on 7 July 1977 and deliberated on the admissibility of the case the same day, reaching the present decision on the whole application . Observations of the Partie s Submissions of the respondent Governmen t The Government first set out the facts of the case according to their information, the main points of which are mentioned in the summary of "The Facts" . They then set out the legal situation in Ireland . There are summary legal remedies available for assault, non-molestation, barring the spouse from the family home and "keeping the peace" which could be, and in first case has been, pursued by the applicant to protect her and her children from her husband's alleged violence . At the same jurisdictional level she may, and has, obtained a maintenance order against her husband and she may easily enforce that order . These procedures are simple, do not require legal assistance and cost very little . The Government submit that these summary procedures in eHect satisfy the applicant's claim . Legal separation or divorce can only be obtained from the High Court . The costs of proceedings, although not attracting legal aid may, however, be awarded against the defendant on a successful application . They state that "it is not unusual for a solicitor to bring a petition on behalf of a wife who is without means if the merits of her case are clear" . Concerning the maintenance payments, the Government state that, in addition to the accessible enforcement procedure, social security benefits would be available for the applicant if her husband defaulted on payments .
The Government has considered the admissibility of the application under several aspects of the rights apparently claimed by the applicant under Article 6111 and 8 : a . They submit that "the right to live separately from her husband and have privacy from him", is not contained in the Convention ; that this is a matter between the the private individuals, not involving the State . In any event there are satisfactory legal remedies for the protection of one spouse against from other, both in the criminal and civil law . These remedies fully comply with the requirements of Article 6111 . b . Similarly the Government submit that there is no right under the Convention to be maintained by a husband . Moreover there are satisfactory summary and High Court procedures available under Irish law, concerning maintenance . c. The Government classify the applicant's allegations concerning the Gardai as a claim to the "right to privacy as against the Police" . As the Gardai acted lawfully in enforcing a court order it is contended that this matter falls within the exceptions provided for in Article 812) . d. Finally the Government point out that the Commission has constantly held that there is no right to free legal aid in civil cases guaranteed by the Convention . e. Insofar as the applicant complains that she has been denied access to the High Coun for a divorce a mensa et thoro because of the prohibitive legal costs involved, the Government state that the applicant's right of access to the court under Article 611) is in no way denied by the State . The mere fact that she ha s
- 45 -
insufficient means to pay normal legal costs is not the responsibility of the Government, pa rticularly in view of the fact that they are not required under the Convention to provide free legal aid .
The applicant's submissions in repl y The applicant's original submissions were an elaboration of the facts of her allegations . Her solicitors have submitted further detailed observations on her behalf : The applicant reiterates the facts of her case which illustrate her allegations that her husband was violent and an alcoholic and from whom she alleges that she and the children of the family required protection . She sought various remedies which would protect her from the constant threat that her husband might try to return and live with her in the family home but the only effective remedy is that of a divorce a mensa et thoro, or judicial separation . She complains, however, that because of the prohibitive cost of taking these matrimonial proceedings in the High Court she cannot pursue this remedy . She contends that the costs involved deny her right of access to the courts as ensured by Article 6111 of the Convention as interpreted by the European Court of Human Rights in the Golder case .
In respect of Art . 8 the applicant submits that by interfering with family life in the creation of regulations which, in turn, create civil rights and obligations, the State is bound to take full responsibility for having embarked on such a course and therefore should provide effective accessible legal remedies to protect those rights and obligations . Failure to do so, as in the present case, constitutes a failure to respect family life and the home . The applicant also alleges a violation of Art . 14 in conjunction with Art . 6 of the Convention in that she is denied access to the courts because of the lack of legal aid for, or other alternative remedy to, High Court proceedings . Thus there is discrimination in the respect for her rights on the basis of property as only those who have money can afford to pursue proceedings for a divorce a mensa et thoro . Furthermore the applicant contends that the denial of access to the courts thereby denies her an effective remedy before a national authority, contrary to Art . 13 of the Convention . By this submission the applicant is not necessarily demanding free legal aid for High Court proceedings as there are other less costly ways of dealing with the kind of family law problems she has . In respect of Art . 26 the applicant states that she is not bound by the requirement to exhaust domestic remedies, for she contends that she has in fact been denied access to the only available remedy . She has unsuccesstully consulted several solicitors, a confidential list of whom she provides . She submits, therefore, that the Commission should adjourn its decision on remedies until it considers the merits of the case (i .e . the Art . 26 question should be joined to the merits of the case) . As the denial of access to the High Court is a continuing situation, she submits that the operation of the six months' rule has no relevance to her case . The applicant seeks just satisfaction of her complaints and the hardship she has suffered because of them . Comments on observations of Government The applicant submits that the Government acknowledge that the only remedy under Irish law giving full legal separation is a judicial separation or divorce a mensa e t
-46_
thoro which must be commenced in the High Court . The summary remedies cited by the Government would not achieve this . It is true that if the applicant succeeded in her application to the High Court for a divorce a mensa et thoro costs could be awarded against her husband but as he is of limited means a solicitor would not wish to take the risk of not having his costs reimbursed at the end . Finally, insofar as the Government contend that there is no right under the Convention to civil legal aid, the applicant submits that her case "is not based simply on the absence of free legal aid in civil cases in Ireland, but is based on the submission that Ireland must provide access to the appropriate court (Art . 6) without any discrimination or differential treatment (Art . 14) to protect rights under family law (Art . 8), or alternatively, provide some other redress to solve the applicant's accute legal problem by an effective remedy (Art . 13 ) . " General observations on the remedy of legal separation under Irish la w The applicant cites Mr Justice John Kenny, one time judge of the High Court and now of the Supreme Court, who considers that the absence of a quick, cheap method of hearing separation cases and the heavy consequential financial burden for the parties is a serious failing under Irish law . Other writers on family law generally acknowledge the highly unsatisfactory state of separation proceedings under Irish family law because of the prohibitive costs involved . She submits affidavits from the President of the Legal Costs Accountants Association and a solicitor with extensive family law experience who swear to the very high costs of matrimonial proceedings for a divorce a mensa et thoro before the High Court and the prohibitive nature of such costs for poorer persons . It is submitted that the fact that some solicitors take on poor clients for charitable motives even though there is no hope of recovering costs from the impecunious parties to the separation proceedings does not satisty the question of principle raised by the applicant . Statistics show that very few people can afford and are therefore able to avail themselves of High Court proceedings le .g . 43 divorces a mensa et thoro in 1975) .
The applicant also submits the 19th Interim Report of the Committee on Court Practice and Procedure on Desertion and Maintenance which calls for a radical change in the law concerning maintenance payment by defaulting spouses which would include a deserting spouse or someone using such ill-treatment as would reasonably justify the other in leaving the matrimonial home . "Marital Desertion in Dublin-An Explanatory Studÿ" by Kathleen O'Higgins is a further document enclosed by the applicant in her observations . This book refers, inter alia, in its Section V, to the prohibitive costs of High Court proceedings for a divorce a mensa et thoro which is the only effective remedy for dealing with a marriage which has broken down . THE LA W 1 . The applicant had complained that the hearing of the criminal charges which she brought against her husband in January 1972 was unjust as it did not take proper account of the serious allegations she made and evidence she wished to present . Accordingly, it did not sentence her husband in an appropriate manner : for example it failed to detain her husband for treatment as an alcoholic .
_47-
However, under Art . 25 (1) of the Convention, it is only the alleged violation of one of the rights and freedoms set out in the Convention that can be the subject of an application presented by an individual . Art . 6 (1) of the Convention secures a fair hearing to everyone in the determination of his civil rights and obligations or of any criminal charge against him . This provision protects the right of a fair hearing for the defendant and is not applicable to the prosecution witness or the offended party . Hence the applicant's complaint falls outside the scope of this Article . It follows that this part of the application is incompatible ratione materiae with the provisions of the Convention within the meaning of Art . 27 (2) .
2 . The applicant has next complained that she was assaulted and abused by the Gardai in June 1973 when they arrested her and has invoked Art . 3 of the Convention which prohibits inhuman or degrading treatment . However, the Commission is not required to decide whether or not the facts alleged by the applicant disclose any appearance of a violation of this provision as, under Art . 26 of the Convention, it may only deal with a matter after all domestic remedies have been exhausted according to the generally recognised rules of international law . In the present case the applicant did not attempt to institute any civil proceedings against the officers concerned for assault, trespass to person, and cannot therefore be considered to have exhausted the remedies available to her under Irish law . Moreover, an examination of the case as it has been submitted does not disclose the existence of any special circumstances which might have absolved the applicant, according to the generally recognised rules of international law, from exhausting the domestic remedies at her disposal . The Commission concludes, therefore, that the applicant has not complied wit h the condition as to the exhaustion of domestic remedies and her application must in this respect be rejected under Art . 27 (3) of the Convention . 3 . The applicant has complained that she was unlawfully imprisoned for 4 days as she failed to pay a fine imposed upon her in June 1973 . However, the Government state that there is no record of such detention of the applicant . It is true that Art . 5(1 ) of the Convention secures to everyone the right to liberty and security of person . However, the Commission is of the opinion that if the applicant was imprisoned it would appear that she was lawfully detained for noncompliance with the lawful order of the Court to pay a fine and accordingly the detention complied with Art . 5(1) (b) of the Convention . An examination by the Commission of this complaint as it has been submitted, including an examination made ex officio, does not therefore disclose any appearance of a violation of the rights and freedoms set out in the Convention and in particular in the above Article . It follows that this part of the application should be deemed manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Art . 27 12) of the Convention .
4 . The Commission has then considered the applicant's main complaint that the State has failed to protect her from an allegedly alcoholic and violent husband . The facts as originally alleged by the applicant were that her husband had been living with her, was "battering" her, was not maintaining the family and there was no way of ensuring a legal separation apart from costly High Court proceedings .
_4g-
However the applicant's circumstances have changed since the introduction of the application . Since June 1972 the applicant's husband has lived apart from the applicant, leaving possession of the family home to her . She is living in a council house of which she is the sole tenant . She has obtained a Court Order against her husband obliging him to pay her maintenance which at present is fixed at E27 per week . It appears that the applicant is no longer in fear that her husband will return to or molest the family .
The applicant's problem as it stands, therefore, is to formalise her relations with her husband by obtaining a full judicial separation from him, a divorce a mensa et thoro . This is available from the High Court . However, the applicant has complained of a denial of access to this High Court remedy because of the prohibitive costs of proceedings . The applicant submits that her complaint is not based simply on the absence of free legal aid in civil cases in Ireland, but that the Irish Government should provide a cheap, effective, accessible remedy to her serious family law problems in order to ensure that her family rights under Art . 8 of the Convention are respected . She claims that the inaccessibility of the High Court procedure constitutes a breach of her right of access to the Courts ensured by Art . 6 ( 1) of the Convention as interpreted by the European Court of Human Rights in the Golder case . That this remedy is available to wealthier people she contends constitutes discrimination contrary to Art . 14 and the absence of any other effective remedy constitutes a breach of Art . 13 of the Convention . The Government, on the other hand, submit that the applicant is not denied access to the High Court remedy of a judicial separation . This remedy is available to anyone and the mere fact that the applicant has insufficient means to pay normal legal costs, which anyway may be awarded against the defendant to a successful application, is not the responsibility of the Government . They refer to the Commission's constant jurisprudence that there is no right to free legal aid in civil cases guaranteed by the Convention . As regard the applicant's right to respect for family life ensured by Art . 8 of the Convention, the Government contend that the applicant's rights are fully respected by the High Court remedy as well as various cheap, simple and effective summary court remedies under civil and criminal law which are available to the applicant and which do not require legal assistance . They contend that the applicant has not availed herself of the remedies at her disposal and that, therefore, her application is inadmissible for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies within the meaning of Art . 26 of the Convention .
The Commission finds that the summary remedies put forward by the respondent Government do not relate to the marital status of the applicant but concern the conduct of parties to a marriage . They are not therefore in the same category of remedies as that of the judicial separation desired by the applicant and could not be considered as a suitable alternative . The only equivalent to the High Court procedure would be an agreed private separation deed between Mr and Mrs Airey . However, the applicant's efforts to obtain such an agreement have failed . The Commission concludes, therefore, that the applicant has exhausted all domestic remedies available to her, even assuming that of a separation deed, not being a judicial remedy, could be deemed to be an effective remedy within the meaning of Art . 26 of the Convention . The application cannot therefore be rejected for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies within the meaning of Art . 26 .
- 49 -
However, the Commission has carried out a preliminary examination of the information and arguments submitted by the parties on the issue of the alleged inaccessibility of the High Court remedy, because of the prohibitive costs involved . It finds that this part of the application raises substantial issues of law and fact under Arts . 6, 8, 13 and 14 of the Convention, whose determination require an examination on the merits . It follows that in the circumstances of the case, this aspect of the application cannot be regarded as manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of An . 27 (2) of the Convention and must therefore be declared admissible, no other ground for declaring it inadmissible having been established .
For these reasons, the Commissio n 1 . DECLARES ADMISSIBLE and retains the application without in any way prejudging its merits, insofar as the applicant complains of the inaccessibility of . the remedy of a judicial separation .
2 . DECLARES INADMISSIBLE the remainder of the application .
I TRADUCTION I EN FAI T 1 . La requérante, ressortissante irlandaise, est représentée devant la Commission par MM . Brendan Walsh Er Cie, solicitors à Dublin . Elle est mariée à Timothy Airey . Quatre enfants sont issus du mariage : - Ellen, 21 ans, mariée, réside à Mayfield, Cork - Mary Regina, 19 ans, réside à Schull, Co . Cork - Noreen, 16 ans, travaille au marché de Cork City, habite avec sa mère au 6 McDonagh Road, Ballyphahane, Cor k - Thomas, 12 ans, écolier, habite avec sa mére . 2 . Le 20 janvier 1972, Timothy Airey, mari de la requérante, comparut devant le tribunal d'arrondissement de Cork City , a . la requérante s'étant plainte d'avoir été brutalisée le 30 décembre 1971 e t b . celle-ci ayant demandé au tribunal de lui faire prendre l'engagement formel de respecter la paix du ménage et de s'abstenir de violence . Le tribunal condamna le défendeur à une amende de 25 pence et au remboursement des frais encourus par la requérante, soit 3 ;15 livres . Ayant entendu les témoignages, le tribunal refusa d'ordonner au défendeur de prendre l'engagement solennel indiqué sous b . ci-dessus . Ce fut la seule occasion à laquelle la requérante porta une accusation contre son mari . La requérante prétend que cette audience fut tout à fait insuffisante, car elle ne dura que quelques minutes . Le tribunal ne tint pas compte des faits comme il l'aurait dti et fut en défaut de protéger la requérante contre la violence de son mari en ne l'obligeant pas à se soumettre à un traitement de désintoxication alcoolique .
-50_
3 . Depuis les environs du mois de juin 1972, le mari de la requérante vit séparé d'elle, lui ayant laissé la disposition du domicile conjugal . Exerçant le métier de conducteur de camion, il est depuis cette date tenu de lui verser une pension alimentaire hebdomadaire . A l'origine, celle-ci était, semble-t-il, de huit livres par semaine mais, selon la requérante, elle était payée irréguliérement . Les tribunaux ont refusA à deux reprises d'obliger le mari, comme la requérante le demandait, à verser effectivement cette pension et elle a dû vivre sans ressources parfois pendant quatre semaines . Le montant actuellement fixé pour cette pension est de 27 livres par semaine . 4 . Au début de 1973, Thomas Airey, fils de la requérante, habitant avec elle, manqua l'école . L'agent de surveillance chargé de faire respecter la loi faisant obligation à toute personne ayant la garde d'un enfant de lui faire fréquenter l'école ou à défaut de lui faire donner un enseignement approprié, fit poursuivre la requérante, reprochant à celle-ci de négliger, de façon persistante, d'envoyer son fils Thomas à l'école . La requérante ne s'étant pas présentée à une audience du tribunal fixée en avril, celui-ci ordonna à la Gardai (police) de l'arrêter et de l'amener devant lui . Elle refusa de se déplacer, mais en raison apparemment de son état de santé, le mandat d'amener ne fut pas exécuté . La situation demeura inchangée, Thomas n'allant pas à l'école et la requérante refusant de comparaître devant le tribunal, jusqu'au 12 juin 1973, date à laquelle la Gardai (qui comptait deux agentes féminines) se rendit au domicile de la requérante et, devant son refus réitéré de comparaitre devant le tribunal, l'arri'ta . Celle-ci opposant une vive résistance, il fallut la porter jusqu'à une voiture pour la conduire devant le tribunal . La requérante prétend que les agents de ta Gardai la frappérent à cette occasion, qu'ils employ8rent un langage obscéne avec elle et qu'ils les laissérent, elle et son fils, dans une cellule malpropre en attendant de les conduire devant le tribunal au cours de l'aprésmidi . A noter que le Gouvernement a déclaré que, si la force a été utilisée à l'endroit de la requérante, elle ne l'a été que dans la mesure où c'était nécessaire pour l'amener devant le tribunal et que celle-ci n'a en aucune façon été victime de violence .
La requérante se plaignit de ces prétendus mauvais traitements auprés du commissaire de la Gardai de la prison de Phoenix Park . Celui-ci procéda à une enquête au terme de laquelle les allégations de la requérante apparurent non fondées . A l'audience de juin 1973, la requérante fut condamnée à une amende pour avoir négligé d'envoyer son fils à l'école . Elle a prétendu avoir subi quatre jours d'une peine de prison de quatorze jours pour n'avoir pas payé l'amende de 3,78 livres imposée en juillet 1973 . II semble qu'elle ait été rel8chée par suite de ses protestations auprés du directeur de la prison et d'un parlementaire . Elle allégue l'illégalité de cette détention . De son côté, le Gouvernement a déclaré qu'il n'existait pas trace d'un tel défaut de paiement ou d'un tel emprisonnement .
La requérante déclare que l'Etat irlandais a été en défaut de la protAger contre le componement violent de son mari prétendument alcoolique . Elle n'a pas été en mesure d'obtenir une séparation légale en invoquant sa cruauté physique et mentale, tant à son égard qu'8 l'égard de ses enfants, car cette sAparation ne peut i'tre prononcée que par la High Court et cette action en justice lui aurait co0té plus de 1 000 livres, l'assistance judiciaire gratuite n'étant pas prévue en pareil cas .
- 51 -
GRIEFS La requérante formule les griefs ci-aprés : . l'audition de ses griefs contre son mari, le 20 janvier 1972, a été injust e a b . elle a été maltraitée par la Gardai, en juin 1973, lorsque celle-ci l'amena de force au tribunal pour répondre du fait que son fils manquait l'école ; c . l'emprisonnement subi pour n'avoir pas payé l'amende imposée en juin 1973 était illégal ; d. l'Etat ne l'a pas protégée contre la cruauté physique et mentale de son mari, prétendument violent et alcoolique : i . en n'obligeant pas celui-ci, aprés l'audience désintoxiquer ;
de janvier 1972, à
se faire
ii . en n'assurant pas le paiement régulier de sa pension alimentaire après leur séparation ; iii . en ne lui permettant pas d'obtenir la séparation légale ou le divorce en raison du coùt prohibitif de ces procédures devant la High Court, pour lesquelles l'assistance judiciaire gratuite n'est pas prévue . Elle estime que ce dernier grief n'est pas fondé simplement sur l'absence d'une assistance judiciaire gratuite en matière civile en Irlande, mais sur la considération que l'Irlande doit lui permettre de saisir le tribunal approprié ( a rticle 6) sans aucune discrimination ni différence de traitement (article 14), afin de garantir le droit au respect de la vie privée et familiale (article 8) ou, à défaut, mettre à sa disposition quelque autre voie de recours lui permettant de résoudre effectivement (article 13) les problèmes juridiques devant lesquels elle se trouvé placée . PROCEDURE DEVANT LA COMMISSIO N La présente requète a été introduite auprés de la Commission le 14 juin 1973 et enregistrée le 19 septembre 1973 . Le 1- octobre 1975, la Commission décida, conformément à l'article 42 § 2 b) de son Règlement intérieur, de porter la requéte à la connaissance du Gouvernement mis en cause et de l'inviter à présenter ses observations é crites sur la recevabilité de celle-ci à la lumibre des articles 6 § 1 et 8 de la Convention . Le Gouvernement présenta ses observations le 3 décembre 1975, et la requérante y répondit le 29 décembre 1975 . Le 15 juillet 1976, la Commission décida conformément à l'article 42, § 2 b) in fine précité, d'inviter les pa rt ies à présenter des observations écrites complémentaires sur la recevabilité quant au point de savoir si la prétendue impossibilité de saisir un tribunal pour obtenir la séparation judiciaire, en raison du coùt prohibitif de la procédure, pouvait soulever un problème sous l'angle de l'a rt icle 6§ 1 de la Convention, tel qu'il a été interprété par la Cour européenne des Droits de l'Homme dans l'Affaire Golder . Le Gouvernement présenta ses observations le 28 aoùt 1976 . La requérante, aprés que la Commission lui eut accordé l'assistance judiciaire le 17 décembre 1976, présenta ses observations par l'intermédiaire de ses représentants, MM . Brendan Walsh & Cie à Dublin, le 20 décembre 1976 .
- 52 -
La Commission a tenu une audience contradictoire sur la recevabilité et sur le tond de la requête à Strasbourg le 7 juillet 1977 et en a délibéré le même jour, parvenant à la présente décision sur l'ensemble de la requéte .
ARGUMENTATION DES PARTIE S Observations du Gouvernement défendeu r Le Gouvernement expose tout d'abord les faits de la cause selon les renseignements en sa possession, les points principaux étant mentionnés dans un résumé intitulé « En fait n .
Il rappelle ensuite la situation juridique en Irlande . Il existe des voies de recours sommaires accessibles en cas de mauvais traitements, permettant l'exclusion de l'époux violent du domicile familial et a garantissant la paix du ménage », que la requérante pouvait utiliser - et qu'elle a utilisées dans le premier cas pour se protéger, elle et ses enfants, contre la violence alléguée de son mari . Au même niveau juridictionnel, elle pouvait obtenir et a obtenu qu'une ordonnance soit rendue à l'encontre de son mari concernant le paiement d'une pension alimentaire et en assurer aisément l'exécution . Ces procédures sont simples, n'exigent pas l'assistance d'un homme de loi et sont trés peu onéreuses . Le Gouvernement estime que ces procédures sommaires satisfont effectivement la revendication de la requérante . La séparation légale ou le divorce ne peuvent être prononcés que par la High Court . Les frais de procédure, bien que l'assistance judiciaire gratuite ne soit pas prévue dans ce cas, peuvent toutefois étre mis à la charge du défendeur si celui-ci est reconnu en tort . Le Gouvernement indique qu'« il n'est pas inhabituel qu'un solicitor introduise une demande de divorce au nom d'une femme qui est sans ressources si le bien-fondé de sa demande est évident a . En ce qui concerne le paiement de la pension, le Gouvernement indique que, non seulement la requérante dispose d'un recours pour en assurer l'exécution mais qu'en outre elle bénéficierait de prestations de sécurité sociale si son mari s'abstenait de la payer .
Le Gouvernement a examiné la recevabilité de la requête sous divers aspects des droits apparemment invoqués par la requérante au titre des articles 6(1 ) et 8 : a.
Il considére que « le droit de vivre séparée de son mari, sans ingérence de celui-ci dans sa vie privée e, n'est pas inscrit dans la Convention ; il s'agit-lé d'une matiére entre deux particuliers, dans laquelle l'Etat n'est pas en cause . Quoi qu'il en soit, il existe des voies de recours judiciaires satisfaisantes pour assurer la protection d'un époux contre l'autre, tant en droit pénal qu'en droit civil . Ces voies de recours satisfont pleinement aux exigences de l'article 6 111 .
b . De même, le Gouvernement considère qu'il ne figure dans la Convention aucun droit d'étre à la charge de son mari . En outre, il existe en droit irlandais des procédures sommaires, ou devant la High Court, satisfaisantes concernant la pension alimentaire . . Le Gouvernement considére les allégations de la requérante concernant la Gardai c comme un grief visant la « protection de la vie privée contre la police n . Etant donné que la Gardai a agi légalement en exécution d'une décision du tribunal, le Gouvernement estime que cette matière rentre dans le cadre des exceptions prévues à l'article 8 (2) .
- 53 -
b . Enfin, le Gouvernement signale que la Commission a constamment considéré que la Convention ne garantit aucun droit à l'octroi de l'assistance judiciaire gratuite en matiére civile . e . Dans la mesure où la requérante se plaint de s'être vu refuser l'accés à la High Court pour y entamer une procédure de divorce « a mensa et thoro n, en raison des frais prohibitifs qui s'y rattachent, le Gouvernement déclare que l'Etat n'a nullement refusé à la requérante le droit d'accès aux tribunaux garanti par l'article 6111 . Le Gouvernement ne peut être tenu pour responsable du fait qu'elle n'ait pas les moyens de payer les frais de justice normaux, compte tenu en particulier de ce qu'il n'est pas tenu, aux termes de la Convention, de fournir A l'intéressée l'assistance judiciaire gratuite .
Observations en réponse de la requérant e Les premiéres observations de la requérante consistaient en des précisions sur les faits à la base de ses allégations . Ses représentants ont présenté des observations complémentaires détaillées en son nom : La requérante fait à nouveau l'exposé des faits qui illustrent ses allégations selon lesquelles son mari était violent et alcoolique et dont elle infére qu'elle-méme et ses enfants avaient besoin d'être protégés . Elle a cherché divers moyens d'échapper à la menace que son mari tente de revenir habiter avec elle au domicile conjugal, mais le seul moyen efficace est la séparation a mensa et thoro ou séparation judiciaire . Elle se plaint toutefois qu'en raison du coùt prohibitif d'une telle procédure devant la High Court cette solution lui soit inaccessible . Elle considére que ce coût aboutit à lui dénier son droit d'accés aux tribunaux, garanti par l'article 6(1 ) de la Convention, tel qu'il est interprété par la Cour européenne des Droits de l'Homme dans l'Affaire Golder . En ce qui concerne l'article 8, la requérante estime que, dans la mesure où il intervient dans la vie familiale en édictant des règlements qui, à leur tour, créent des droits et des obligations de caractére civil, l'Etat doit assumer l'entière responsabilité des conséquences de son action et donc offrir des moyens de recours judiciaires accessibles et effectifs afin de protéger ces droits et obligations . L'absence de telles voies de recours, comme c'est le cas dans la présente affaire, constitue une atteinte au droit au respect de la vie familiale et du domicile . La requérante allégue également une violation de l'article 14 combiné avec l'article 6 de la Convention en ce qu'elle se voit refuser l'accés aux tribunaux en raison de l'absence d'une assistance judiciaire, ou d'une autre forme d'aide appropriée, pour la procédure devant la High Court . Il y a donc, pour ce qui est de ses droits, une discrimination fondée sur les ressources, car seules les personnes aisées peuvent se permettre d'entamer une action en divorce devant la High Court . En outre, la requérante fait valoir que l'impossibilité d'accéder aux tribunaux équivaut pour elle à être privée de la possibilité d'un recours effectif devant une instance nationale, droit garanti par l'article 13 de la Convention . Par cette observation, la requérante n'exige pas nécessairement l'assistance judiciaire gratuite pour une procédure devant la High Court, car on pourrait trouver d'autres moyens moins onéreux de régler les problémes de droit familial du genre de ceux qui sont les siens . En ce qui concerne l'article 26, la requérante déclare qu'elle n'est pas liée par la condition relative à l'épuisement des voies de recours internes, n'ayant pu, en effet, avoir accès, selon elle, à la seule voie de recours existante . Elle a consulté sans succès plusieurs hommes de loi dont elle a produit une liste confidentielle . Elle considère don c
_ryy_
que la Commission devrait ajourner sa décision sur la question des voies de recours jusqu'é ce qu'elle ait examiné le fond de l'affaire (autrement dit, la question relative à l'article 26 devrait être jointe à l'examen du fond de l'affaire) . Etant donné qu'elle n'a toujours pas accés à la High Court, la requérante estime que la disposition relative au délai de six mois ne s'applique pas en l'espéce . La requérante demande qu'il soit fait droit à ses griefs, de méme qu'une juste réparation pour les difficultés qu'elle a endurées à cause d'eux . Commentaires sur les observations du Gouvernemen t La requérante estime que le Gouvernement reconnaît que la seule procédure, en droit irlandais, aboutissant à la séparation légale complète, est la procédure de séparation judiciaire, laquelle doit être entamée auprés de la High Court . Les procédures sommaires citées par le Gouvernement n'auraient pas cet effet . Il est vrai que si la requérante gagnait son action en séparation auprés de la High Court, les frais de procédure pourraient étre mis à la charge de son mari, mais comme ses ressources sont limitées, quel avocat prendra le risque de ne pas être remboursé de ses frais en fin de compte 7 Enfin, dans la mesure où le Gouvernement fait valoir que la Convention ne mentionne pas le droit à l'assistance judiciaire en matiére civile, la requérante estime que son affaire it n'est pas fondée simplement sur l'absence d'une assistance judiciaire gratuite en matiére civile en Irlande, mais sur la considération que l'Irlande doit lui permettre d'avoir accés au tribunal approprié (article 6) sans aucune discrimination ou différence de traitement (article 14) pour garantir ses droits en matiére familiale (article 8) ou, à défaut, prévoir telle autre voie de recours lui permettant de résoudre effectivement ses graves problémes juridiques (article 13) .
Observations générales sur la procédure de séparetion légale en droit irlandais La requérante cite le juge John Kenny, à une certaine époque juge de la High Court et actuellement de la Supreme Court, qui estime que l'absence d'un moyen rapide et peu onéreux pour régler les affaires de séparation, de méme que la lourde charge financiére qui en résulte pour les parties constituent une sérieuse lacune du droit irlandais . D'autres auteurs traitant du droit de la famille reconnaissent généralement l'état très peu satisfaisant de la procédure de séparation en droit de famille irlandais, en raison du coût prohibitif qu'elle entraine . La requérante présente des déclarations du président de l'Association des comptables de justice et d'un solicitor ayant une vaste expérience du droit de famille, qui attestent par serment le coût trés . élevé de la procédure de divorce devant la High Court et son caractére prohibitif pour les personnes à faibles ressources . Ils considérent que le fait que certains solicitors acceptent des clients pauvres pour des raisons charitables, même sans espoir d'être remboursés de leurs frais par les parties impécunieuses, ne répond pas à la question de principe soulevée par la requérante . Les statistiques montrent que très peu de personnes peuvent se permettre et sont donc en mesure d'entamer une procédure devant la High Court (ainsi, 43 séparations seulement ont été prononcées en 1975) . La requérante présente également le 19• rapport intérimaire de la Commission sur la pratique et sur la procédure devant les tribunaux en matière d'abandon et de pension alimentaire, rapport qui recommande une modification radicale de la loi relative au paiement de la pension alimentaire par l'époux défaillant, afin qu'elle s'applique, notamment, à tout époux abandonnant son foyer ou ayant à l'égard de l'autre u n
- 55 -
comportement tel que celui-ci serait raisonnablement fondé à quitter le domicile conjugal . « Etude explicative de l'abandon de foyer à Dublin » (« Marital Desertion in Dublin - An explanatory Study ») de Kathleen O'Higgins, est un autre document joint par la requérante à ses observations . Cet ouvrage se référe, notamment, dans son chapitre V, au co0t prohibitif de la procédure de séparation devant la High Court, qui constitue le seul moyen effectif de régler le probléme d'un mariage malheureux . EN DROI T 1 . La requérante s'est plainte de ce que l'audition des accusations qu'elle portait contre son mari en janvier 1972 aurait été inéquitable car il n'aurait pas été dûment tenu compte des graves allégations qu'elle avait formulées et des moyens de preuve qu'elle souhaitait présenter . En conséquence, la peine prononcée à l'encontre de son mari n'aurait pas été appropriée : par exemple, sa détention aux fins de désintoxication n'avait pas été ordonnée . Toutefois, selon l'article 25 (1) de la Convention, seule la violation alléguée de l'un des droits et libertés reconnus dans la Convention peut faire l'objet d'une requête présentée par un individu .
L'article 6 111 de la Convention garantit à toute personne le droit à ce que sa cause soit entendu équitablement par un tribunal qui décidera soit des contestations sur ses droits et obligations de caractère civil, soit du bien-fondé de toute accusation en matiére pénale dirigée contre elle . Cette disposition garantit à l'accusé le droit à un procés é quitable et ne s'applique ni aux témoins à charge ni à la partie lésée . Par conséquent, le grief de la requérante tombe en dehors du champ d'application de cet article . Il s'ensuit que cette partie de la requête est incompatible ratione materiae avec les dispositions de la Convention, au sens de l'article 27 (2) . 2 . La requérante s'est ensuite plainte d'avoir été brutalisée par la Gardai en juin 1973, lors de son arrestation, et elle a invoqué l'article 3 de la Convention qui interdit les traitements inhumains ou dégradants . Toutefois, la Commission n'est pas appelée à se prononcer sur la question de savoir si les faits allégués par la requérante révélent l'apparence d'une violation de cette disposition car, aux termes de l'article 26 de la Convention, elle ne peut étre saisie qu'aprés l'épuisement des voies de recours internes tel qu'il est entendu selon les principes de droit international généralement reconnus . En l'espéce, la requérante n'ayant pas essayé d'entamer une action civile contre - les fonctionnaires en question pour coups et blessures, elle ne peut être considérée comme ayant épuisé les voies de recours qui lui étaient ouvertes en droit irlandais . En outre, un examen de l'affaire telle qu'elle a été présentée ne révéle l'existence d'aucune circonstance spéciale ayant pu dispenser la requérante, selon les principes de droit international généralement reconnus, d'épuiser les voies de recours internes qui étaient à sa disposition . La Commission en conclut donc que la requérante n'a pas satisfait à la condition relative à l'épuisement des voies de recours internes et que sa requête doit, sur ce point, être rejetée conformément à l'article 27 (3) de la Convention . 3 . La requérante s'est plainte d'avoir été illégalement emprisonnée pendant quatre jours pour n'avoir pas payé une amende qui lui avait été imposée en juin 1973 . De son côté, le Gouvernement déclare qu'il n'y a pas trace d'une telle détention subie par la requérante .
_ 56 -
Il est vrai que l'article 5 (1) de la Convention garantit à toute personne le droit à la liberté et à la sùreté . Toutefois, la Commission est d'avis que, si la requérante a été emprisonnée, elle l'a été apparemment pour avoir refusé de payer l'amende à laquelle la condamnait l'ordonnance rendue conformément à la loi par le tribunal et que, par conséquent, la détention satisfaisait aux conditions prévues à l'article 5(1) b) de la Convention . L'examen de ce grief tel qu'il a été soumis, ne permet donc de déceler, même d'office, aucune apparence de violation des droits et libertés énoncés dans la Convention, et en pa rt iculier dans l'a rt icle précité . Il s'ensuit que cette partie de la requ8te doit àtre considérée comme manifestement mal fondée au sens de l'article 27 (2) de la Convention . 4 . La Commission a ensuite examiné le principal grief de la requérante, selon lequel l'Etat a été en défaut de la protéger contre un mari prétendument alcoolique et violent .
Les faits, tels qu'initialement allégués par la requérante, étaient que son mari habitait avec elle, la a battait », ne subvenait pas aux besoins du ménage et qu'il n'y avait aucun moyen de parvenir à une séparation légale en dehors de la procédure coùteuse devant la High Court . Toutefois, les conditions de vie de la requérante ont changé depuis l'époque où elle a introduit sa requête . Depuis juin 1972, le mari de la requérante vit séparé d'elle, lui ayant laissé la disposition du domicile conjugal . Elle habite un logement à caractére social dont elle est la seule occupante . Elle a obtenu une ordonnance du tribunal à l'encontre de son mari, qui oblige celui-ci à lui verser une pension alimentaire, actuellement fixée à 27 livres par semaine . Il semble que la requérante ne vive plus dans la crainte d'un retour ou de nouvelles brutalités de son mari .
Le probléme de la requérante, tel qu'il se pose actuellement, est donc d'entériner officiellement la situation de ses relations avec son mari en obtenant une séparation judiciaire compléte d'avec lui, c'est-é-dire une séparation a mensa et thoro . Celle-ci ne peut être prononcée que par la High Court . Toutefois, la requérante se plaint de ne pouvoir accéder à ce tt e instance en raison du coùt prohibitif de la procédure . La requérante a fait valoir que son grief n'est pas fondé simplement sur l'absence d'assistance judiciaire gratuite en matiére civile en Irlande, mais sur la considération que le Gouvernement irlandais doit prévoir une voie de recours peu onéreuse, effective et accessible, apte à résoudre ses graves problémes de droit de famille, afin d'assurer le respect des droits familiaux que lui reconnaît l'a rt icle 8 de la Convention . Elle prétend que l'inaccessibilité de la procédure devant la High Court constitue une violation de son droit d'accés aux tribunaux garanti par l'a rt icle 6 (11 de la Convention, tel qu'il a été interprété par la Cour européenne des Droits de l'Homme dans l'Affaire Go/der. Le fait que ce recours soit accessible aux citoyens fortunés constitue, selon elle, une discrimination contraire à l'article 14 et l'absence de tout autre recours effectif, une violation de l'article 13 de la Convention . Le Gouvernement, d'autre part, estime que la requérante ne se voit nullement refuser l'accés à la High Court pour intenter action en séparation de corps et que cet accés est libre à tout le monde . 11 ne saurait être tenu pour responsable du fait que la requérante n'a pas les moyens de payer les frais de la procédure, lesquels d'ailleurs, seraient mis à la charge du défendeur si elle gagnait son procés . Il rappelle la jurisprudence constante de la Commission, selon laquelle la Convention ne garantit aucun droit à l'assistance judiciaire gratuite en matiére civile . Quant au droit de l a
- 57 -
requérante au respect de sa vie familiale, prévu à l'article 8 de la Convention, le Gouvernement maintient qu'il est pleinement assuré par la possibilité de saisir la High Court, de même que par les possibilités qu'offrent diverses procédures sommaires, civiles ou pénales, simples et efficaces, dont la requérante pourrait faire usage sans ètre représentée par un homme de loi . Il maintient que la requérante n'a pas fait usage des moyens dont elle disposait et que, par conséquent, sa requéte est irrecevable pour non-épuisement des voies de recours internes, au sens de l'article 26 de la Convention . La Commission constate que les procédures sommaires mentionnées par le Gouvernement défendeur ne se rapportent pas au statut marital de la requérante, mais qu'elles concernent le comportement des époux . Elles n'appartiennent donc pas à la même catégorie de procédures que celle de la séparation de corps souhaitée par la requérante et ne peuvent être considérées comme constituant une solution de remplacement convenable . Le seul équivalent à la procédure devant la High Court serait un acte de séparation passé entre M . et Mme Airey . Toutefois, les efforts déployés par la requérante afin d'obtenir un tel accord ont échoué .
La Commission conclut donc que la requérante a épuisé toutes les voies de recours internes qui étaient à sa disposition, à supposer même qu'un acte de séparation, qui n'est pas un moyen judiciaire, puisse étre considéré comme un recours effectif au sens de l'article 26 de la Convention . La requête ne peut donc être rejetée pour non-épuisement des voies de recours internes au sens de l'article 26 . De plus, la Commission a procédé à un premier examen des informations et des arguments présentés par les parties sur la question de la prétendue inaccessibilité de la procédure devant la High Court en raison de son coût prohibitif . Elle conclut que cette partie de la requête soulève d'importantes questions de droit et de fait sous l'angle des articles 6, 8, 13 et 14 de la Convention, questions dont l'éclaircissement requiert un examen au fond . II s'ensuit que, dans les circonstances de la cause, cette partie de la requéte ne peut 0tre considérée comme manifestement mal fondée au sens de l'article 27 (2) de la Convention et qu'elle doit donc étre déclarée recevable, aucune raison de la déclarer irrecevable n'ayant été établie . Par ces motifs, la Commissio n 1 . DECLARE LA REQUETE RECEVABLE, tout moyen de fond étant réservé, dans la mesure où la requérante se plaint de l'inaccessibilité de la procédure de séparation judiciaire .
2 . LA DECLARE IRRECEVABLE pour le surplus .
-58-

Origine de la décision

Formation : Commission (plénière)
Date de la décision : 07/07/1977

Fonds documentaire ?: HUDOC

HUDOC
Association des cours judiciaires suprêmes francophones Organisation internationale de la francophonie

Juricaf est un projet de l'AHJUCAF, l'association des cours judiciaires suprêmes francophones,
réalisé en partenariat avec le Laboratoire Normologie Linguistique et Informatique du droit (Université Paris I).
Il est soutenu par l'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie et le Fonds francophone des inforoutes.