Facebook Twitter Appstore
Page d'accueil > Résultats de la recherche

§ YOUNG et JAMES c. ROYAUME-UNI

Imprimer

Type d'affaire : Decision
Type de recours : Struck out of the list

Numérotation :

Numéro d'arrêt : 7601/76;7806/77
Identifiant URN:LEX : urn:lex;coe;cour.europeenne.droits.homme;arret;1977-07-11;7601.76 ?

Analyses :

(Art. 14) DISCRIMINATION, (Art. 9-1) LIBERTE DE RELIGION


Parties :

Demandeurs : YOUNG et JAMES
Défendeurs : ROYAUME-UNI

Texte :

APPLICATION/REOUETE N° 7601/7 6 I .M . YOUNG and N .H . JAMES v/the UNITED KINGDO M I .M . YOUNG et N .H . JAMES c/ROYAUME-UN I
DECISION of 11 July 1977 on the admissibility of the application DÉCISION du 11 juillet 1977 sur la recevabilité de la requéte
Article 11 of the Convention : Does this provision guaranree the righr not to join a rrade-union ? Application declared admissible .
Article 11 de la Convention : Cette disposition garantit-elle un droit de ne pas s'affilier B un syndicat ? Requête déclarée recevable.
Ifrancais : voirp . 146 1
THE FACTS The facts of the case may be summarised as,follow
s Both applicants are citizens of the United Kingdom The first applicant wa s born in 1953 and is presently residing in Surrey . The second applicant was born in 1928 and now resides in Havant . They are represented by Mr Mitchell-Heggs of the law firm Boodington and Yturbe in Paris, acting under powers-of-attorney dated 14 July 1976 .
With regard to the first applicant, Mr Young From the statements and documents submitted by the applicants lawyer it appears that the first applicant commenced employment with British Rail on 2 October 1972 where he worked until he received his dismissal notice on 27 May 1976, effective as of 26 June 197 6 In August 1975 notices were published on each floor of the premises known as Southern House where the applicant was working at the time which drew the attention of staff to a change in their contracts of employment as a result of an agreement between the management and trade unions, dated July 1975 . The notice stated that as from 1 August 1975 membership of a recognised trade union was to be a condition of employment for the staff covered by the said agreement
- 126 -
In September 1975 the applicant had a meeting with his immediate super'visor who was also a representative of the Transport and Salaried Staff Association . `t_,•,Ai this meeting the applicant was told that "closed shop" agreements had been màde`between British Rail and the three railway unions : i .e . The National Union ',~ofRailwaymen (N .U .R .) ; The Transport and Salaried Staff Association (T .S .S .A . :The Associated Society of Locomotive Engineers and Firemen IA .SL .E .F ).1 . and -`s!i Under the agreement the applicant was required to join the T .S .S .A . with -_'•an option of joining the N .U .R . The applicant was informed that he could obtain ;r,,± --; .Çezemption from this requirement if he genuinely objected on grounds of religiou s A belie( to being a member of any trade union whatsoever or on any reasonable ground to being a member of a particular trade union . He was also informed that z` .ifhewished to make a claim for exemption then a written application would have to-be submitted by 17 October 1975 . :~-. On 19 September a further notice was published on each floor of the -^~'`~. . ~prémises stating that it had been agreed that the acceptance of exemption on Y'4~~"-"aréligious giounds would apply only to those religious dominations which specifically i ::,• : :. . -, proscribed members from joining a trade union . The notice further stated that ,-_ çontinuingexemption only on religious grounds depended upon the passin g through Parliament of the Trade Union and Labour Relations (Amendment) Bill --~` éna ïhât-employees would be advised further on this point . .. i
,_ .
côrdingly on 17 October 1975 the applicant submitted a written claim for .~~exémption n_d o1301A_prils197,6 he received a letter from British Rail for exemptio n
•Union and Labour Relations (Amendment) by Section I(e) repealed the words of the Dloyee the right to claim exemption "on any )er,of a particular trade union" . Thenceforth e exempted from a condition of employment iuld befounded only on grounds of religiou s tiori ^ongrounds of religious belief to being a idhe object on any grounds to being a member rthéless ; he did object for a number of other i,and the reasons stated in his written claim for m be suinmarisedas follows
AJJJJ a . Money from thetiL i~U~ idn' Fûnd is usédto produce a monthly news7a
papeç which-.is grossly~politically biased in fâvour of the Labour Party and the WIll -. . âpplicant had not received sufficient assurances that the Fund was not used for other political purposes . Furthermore, the applicant did not subscribe to the political views of the T .S .S .A . and did not wish to give financial support to their •Y,'~ propagation . —
5~'-' . ..: ;- . .
. .
127 ;~_~.i~r . .
b . By seeking to enforce a"closed shop" the T .SS .A . showed itself intolerant of the expression of individual freedom . c By forcing large pay awards, T .S .S .A . increases inflation and therefore instead of increasing real wealth, it reduces it . d . T .S .S .A . supports nationalisation of industry per se whereas the applicant believes that nationalised industries are economic white elephants . In general, the applicant is in favour of private enterprise . e . The applicant disagreed with the increased control which the T .S .S .A . now has over "hiring and firing" of employees which results from the "closed shop" agreemen t f The applicant objected to the fact that in order to be a full-time official of T .S .S .A . he would have to furnish details of his past work in the Labour and Trade Union movements . g . Should TS .S .A . decide to go on strike, the applicant would be obliged to withdraw his labour along with his colleagues ; the applicant felt that such collective withdrawal of labour in a key service industry is collective blackmail on the country as a whole, and he did not wish to participate in such action or still further to be forced to do so . On 5 May 1976 the applicant's claim for exemption was considered by an "Appeal Body" consisting of a representative of British Rail, a representative of the T .S .S .A . and a representative of the National Union of Railwaymen . By letter of 27 May 1976 British Rail informed the applicant that his claim for exemption was disallowed and gave him one month's notice of dismissal to which his Contract of Employment entitled him, expiring on 26 June 1976 . The applicant also submitted thewritten opinion of John Hall, D .F .C ., Uueen's Counsel and Barrister-at-Law . The Counsel expressed the opinion that whereas the applicant has the right to apply to the Industrial Tribunal to allege that he was unfairly dismissed by British Rail, such an application would be bound to fail . The effective date of termination of the applicant's employment was 5 April 1976 at which time the relevant legislation regarding dismissal was to be found in Schedule I, Part 2, of the 1974 Act, as amended by the 1976 Act, which came into force on 25 March 1976, Paragraph 4 (1), which provided "in every employment to which this paragraph applies, every employee shall have the right not to be unfairly dismissed by his employer, and the remedy of an employee so dismissed for breach of that right shall be by way of complaint to an Industrial Tribunal under Part 3 of this Schedule and not otherwise" . Paragraph 6 (5) of the 1976 Act provides : dismissal of an employee by an employer shall be regarded as fair for the purposes of this Schedule if (a) it is the practice in accordance with a Union Membership Agreement for all employees of that employer or all employees of the same class as the dismissed employee to belong to a specified independent trade union, or to one of a number ot specifie d
- 128-
_.~`•ihdependent trade unions ; unless the employee genuinely objects on the grounds "o.freligious belief to being a member of any trade whatsoever . . . in which case - : the : dismissal shall be regarded as unfair" . -`,The Counsel came to the conclusion that any appeal by the applicant x•'IA,égainst a decision of the Industrial Tribunal would be equally bound to fail . In his .,'opinion the applicant had, therefore, in effect no remedy under English law i n esbéct of his dismissal, and in these circumstances, and in this sense, it could - - çcûratelÿ and properly be stated that any domestic remedies open to the applicant :•_~=, .
had,been exhausted .
'~%Witharegard to the second applicant, Mr Jame s -' .'•ï'----. .On 27 March 1974 the applicant was employed by British Rail as a leading . - •-a .,xs . "" .railwayman Ihe had already been employed by British Rail for two periods of sorrié yearsl .
~7T~Some time in July/August 1975 a similar notice as mentioned above was cp ôlished inihe premises where the applicant was employed drawing the attentio n Vôf téfftito°`change in their contractsas a result of an agreement between the ~~~ ;~•-. .J . . , manement andtrade unions dated July 1975 . As already set out above the .a g
hotÎce stated that as from 1 August 1975 membership of a recognised trade union wasto be a condition of employment for the staff covered by agreements listed in 'thé'notic e . -.
.' As far as existing em ployees ,were.. concerned, the notice stated that agree. ent on the dëtailéd rrangements•=tobe applied, including the provision fo r claiming exemption from mémbership .of a trade union had been concluded only .and"Conciliation staff covered by the Machinery in respect of a Railway Salaried~ Negotiation dated 28 May 1956.."~`= . • ~ The applicant falling into~••thécategory of conciliation staff was therefore allegedly bound by the new cQndition of employment .
On 16 October 1975 the~ap'plicant had a meeting with his immediate superior
$,Y i Q and a representatrve of the Ioéa1 3 N .Ü .R .Branch . At this meeting he learnt that he was obliged to join the N!U .R~â a result of the unilateral change in his contract 3K . . of employment and that no=otheÿ -,union membership was open to him . The applicant told his superior and t-é,N .U .R . representative that he was willing to . w• r ._ .. .
join the N .U .R . However tFié=appliçant's final decision was put into abeyance f~) ; '
pending clarification from--the=N~ :U'.Ras to the computation of his salary . The b :. applicant was particuÎarl ytcôncé rned that although he was working the same i: . -_ . . r hours as a colleag~e ~,t~e~e~appeared•tobe a difference in their respective wages . Before :actuallÿ 8pplying for membership to the N .U .R . the applicant wished to seethe outcome of the pay query by his colleague as he wanted to see how the N .U .R . dealuwith a problem of one of its members . As the N .U .R . replied to the pplicant's colleague's que ry that his pay had been correctly calculated withou t N ;•stating :on what basis they had arrived at this conclusion, it failed, in the opinion
129 -
. . ~ .: :_
.
of the applicant, to carry out its duties, i .e . an examination in detail and a full explanation of the conclusions reached .
In a letter dated 18 December 1975 the applicant refused to join the union as the management or the union had failed to reply to his own query over his hours of work . On 23 February 1976 the applicant received a dismissal notice which state d that by reason of his non-compliance with the terms of the agreement on Trade Unions' Membership, dated July 1975, his services would no longer be required as from 5 April 1976 . On 8 April 1976 the applicant submitted a claim to the Industrial Tribunal claiming unfair dismissal . On 18 June 1976 the applicant appeared before the Industrial Tribunal who reserved their decision . On about 6 July 1976 the applicant received a copy of the Tribunal's decision stating that his claim was rejected . The grounds for the tribunal's finding indicated that the applicant, when raising objections to joining the union, did at no time apply for exemption in accordance with the exemption procedure set out in the Agreement . It was further said that as the applicant had clearly refused to join the appropriate union in accordance with the Union membership agreement the applicant's claim had to be considered under Paragraph 6 151 of the 1976 Act . As the applicant at no time had said that his grounds for refusal were religious it had to follow that the law required the tribunal to find that the dismissal was fair . The applicant further submitted that he did not object in principle the trade unions and, indeed, previously had been a member of the N .U .R . and was willing to acquiesce to the request of his manager and the N .U .R . representative to take up membership . He was, however, not yet convinced that doing so would be an advantage to him He further believed that an individual should have freedom of choice to join or not to join a trade union no matter what his personal reasons for such a choice may be . Complaints Both applicants now complain that the United Kingdom enforced the aforesaid provisions of the Parliamentary Act and so far failed to amend this Act, in order to enable British subjects to exercise their freedom of thought, conscience, expression and association with others and failed to provide adequate remedies for wrongful dismissal in particular with regard to British subjects who lose their employment through abstaining from joining one of the trade unions recommended by the employers . They further complain that in a situation as the present application wherein the applicants have no genuine objection based on religious belief but rather have a genuine objection based on reasonable grounds and, or, alternatively, based o n
_13p_
the .grounds of exercising his freedom of expression and association as provided -- : by Arts . 9, 10 and 11 of the Convention, such enforcement is tantamount to a -violation of the aforesaid Convention and, in particular, against the spirit expressed inM Arts : 9, 10, 11 and 13 . ï - PROCEEDINGS - .~F1, . On 11 December 1976 the Commission decided that notice of the application shôuÎd~-tiegiven to the Government of the United Kingdom which should be -,.askèd,to submit to the Commission their observations in wriong on its admissibility . - The Government submitted such observations on 22 March 1977 and the applicants' lawyer replied on 14 June 1977 .
SUBMISSION OF THE PARTIES i A. j- -•[h+,
_
:Respondent Government obse rv ations .
..
r1, $eckgroun d
1-. 1, .Domestic Law and Practice 1945-77 _- , -The respondent Government stated that during the period from 1945 to .--1971 ; .`the legislation in force in England and Wales contained nothing about closed shop agreeménts or arrangements . Such agreements or arrangement s --°weré , however, wides pé d-pciic`uÎaily in certain industries and others of long standing Recenn~t research~hâsssïiggested that possibly more than 40% of the total number of British T,rade Ûni istswork in closed sh op of one sort and another (in the 1960s, 40%1 . In pursuançé ôfthe agreements and arrangements which as widely recognised could also have advantages, particularly in contributing to strong and orderly bargainirng-âriangements and helping to reduce the risks of disputes between unions-and•bëfpvéên groups of workers and thus contribute to the protection of theirrin ierests, industrial or managerial action to force nonmembers to join or facedism sâl occurred from time to time . As termination of acontract•,of employment prior to the enactment of the r 'a Indus tnal Relations Act 197.1 ;-wa ssnot'gubject toany special statutory restriction lapart from the Contracts of EmpÎôyrriént Act 1963 providing for a statutory minimum period of noticel tiùt~für~aFié most part governed by common law an employee could be lawfullÿ~dismissed ; on due notice being given regardless of whether the dismissal was orwâs,noGfor reasons assodiated with non-membership of the union,in a élos~ed sRôp Ifwrongfully dismissed without notice, an em.-. pÎbyéé s rediëdÿ was merely to sue for the balance of the wages which would have,been payable during a valid notice period .
s, .~ . The Industrial Relations Act 1971 changed the position radically by creating -_~- new statutory restrictions on an employer's right to dismiss an employee and, at the same time, giving individual employees a statutory right not to belong to a
-
.. -
---
._..' . .
.
-131
-
trade union . In principle all employees were given the right not to be "unfairly dismissed" even if due contractual notice was given . Industrial Tribunals to which employees could complain if allegedly unfairly dismissed could order the employer to pay compensation to the employee or re-engage him if he could not satisfy the tribunal that one or more of the specified grounds for dismissal existed (conduct, capability, redundancy, etc) and that it was reasonable in the circumstances to treat that ground as a reason for dismissal . . Although, by giving individual employees a statutory right not to belong to a trade union, the Act of 1971 thereby made closed shop agreements unenforceable, the Act also contained provision s a . allowing employers and unions to enter into "agency shops" agreements which could make it a condition of employment either to belong to one of the unions in question or make an appropriate contribution to the union funds . Empioyees with conscientious objections to belonging or contributing to the union were allowed to pay an equivalent sum to charity ; b . allowing the establishment of approved closed shops in certain narrowly defined circumstances . In these cases conscientious objectors were only allowed to contribute to charity instead of joining the union . The Act of 1971 was repealed by the Trade Union and Labour Relation Act 1974 which, in the context of the closed shop, sought broadly to return to the position existing before 1971 : thus the right not to belong to a trade union and the consequent restriction on the establishment of closed shops were removed . In addition, the Act provided (paragraph 6 (5), schedule 1) that in general dismissal for not being a member or refusing to remain a member of a union where a "union membership agreement" IUMAI as it is described in the Act was in force was only to be regarded unfair if "the employee genuinely objected on grounds of religious belief to being a member of any trade union whatsoever or on any reasonable gounds to being a member of any pa rt icular trade union (the words underlined were included by Parliament as a result of an amendment against the wishes of the Government) . The Trade Union and Labour Relations (Amendment) Act 1976 removed the "any reasonable grounds" exception, leaving only the exception in respect of religious belief . In the Government's opinion, under the Acts of 1974 and 1976, the employees were no less well protected now than they were before 1971 and, since the creation of the right not to be unfairly dismissed went beyond the United Kingdom's obligation under the Convention, the restriction of that right in specified circumstances could not constitute a breach of existing obligations . The Government concluded this review of domestic law and practice by stating that it might be noted that in practice closed shops also existed in certain industries in several member States of the Council of Europe .
- 132 -
1 .2 As to the employment and dismissal of the applicants the Government submitted that they had no official knowledge of these matters . But it was understood that the British Rail Board's closed shop agreement was brought into operation at the end of 1975 as a revival of a dormant agreement dating from 1970 . The Board was subsequently faced with a small number of employees who refused to joint any of the trade unions specified in the agreement . During the summer of 1976 most of thisgroup were dismissed . Some appealed to industrial tribunals and several were held to have been unfairly dismissed because lunlike Messrs . Young and James) and contrary to British Rail's views, they were found to have genuine religious objections to trade union membership .
2 . The position of the respondent Governmen t The Government then set out their position vis-8-vis the British Rail . Under the provisions of the Transport Act 1962, the British Railways Board was constituted as a public authority . The Board was not part of the Government ot the United Kingdom, but rather a separate statutory corporation . It had the task of running the railways although Section 27 of the Act confered on a Minister of the Government certain powers in relation to the Board's work and Section 28 required the Minister's consent before the Board might exercise certain powers . In the matters of personal management, relationships with the trade unions and the conditions of employment, the Board was autonomous . Both the decisions to employ the two applicants and to conclude the Union Membership Agreement of 1975 were those of the Board, as well as the decision to dismiss them . The Government submitted that on the question whether or not there should be a closed shop in a particular place of work, their policy was one of neutrality . The one new legislative provision which was introduced by the Act of 1974 and modified by the Act ot 1976 lon closed shop agreements in relation to unfair dismissalsl was considered necessary in order to define the way in which the unfair dismissal provisions were to apply in the case of a person dismissed for failure to join or remain a member of a union in pursuance of a closed shop agreement . Before the Commission, the position of a respondent government in respect of statutory corporations or other public bodies had been considered in a number of cases . The Commission had twice leftopen the question of the responsibility of the Government of the United Kingdom for the BBC (Collection of Decisions 29, p . 89 ; Yearbook 14, pp . 538 and 549) . Similarly, the position of the Irish Government in regard to the Irish Electricity Supply Board had been left open 114Yearbook 198 at 2181 . In considering application No . 2413/65, the Commission had reached the conclusion that the Government of the Federal Republic of Germany was not responsible for the acts of German press, radio and television companies IColl . of Dec . 23 p . 7) . The European Court of Human Rightshad had occasion to consider the position o f
- 133 -
the Swedish Government and the Swedish Railways in the Swedish Engine Drivers' Union Case . The Court had found that : "Article 11 is accordingly binding upon the 'State as employer', whether the latter's relations with its employees are governed by public or private law" (judgment of 6 February 1976, page 10) . In the Government's opinion, the relationship between them and British Rail was different from that between the Swedish Government and Swedish State Railways . Moreover, the relationship between British Rail and its employees was different from that between the Swedish State Railways and its employees . In the United Kingdom, the State was not the employer of railwaymen and there was no equivalent of the National Collective Bargaining Office . The Government submitted that for the foregoing reasons the application should be rejected as being incompatible with the Convention rarione personae .
3 . Admissibility of the complaint under A rtic% 9 The Government then turned to the applicânt's statement that "The United Kingdom enforced . . . . . provisions of the Parliamentary Act and so far failed to amend this Act in order to enable British subjects to exercise their freedom of thought, conscience . . . . ." . In the Government's opinion the application did not make clear in what way the applicants considered that their freedom of thought and conscience had been violated . They held that they had not intervened or imposed restrictions in this regard and that this matter of dismissal was not directly connected with the applicants' freedom of thought or conscience . They were free under the Convention in force in the United Kingdom to hold (and to express) the opinion that the closed shop should be made illegal or subject to greater restrictions than now existed . Read in its context land in particular with Articles 10 and 11), Article 9 protected religious and other beliefs based on thought and conscience . Such other beliefs included agnosticism and atheism . Beliefs which were not so based were not protected by Article 9, although their expression was protected by Article 10 . In other words, they were not "beliefs" within the meaning of Article 9, but rather opinions, etc . "Conscience" and "belief/conviction" .outside the area of religious belief was difficult to define . Guidance as to the common understanding of the member states in regard to Article 9 might be derived from Resolution 337 adopted in 1967 by the Consultative Assembly, concerning the Rights of Conscientious Objection . Basic Principle No . 1 was worded as follows "Persons liable to conscription for military service who, for reasons of conscience or profound conviction arising from religious, ethical, moral, humanitarian, philosophical or similar motives, refuse to perform armed service shall enjoy a personal right to be released from the obligation to perform such service" . (Collected Texts, page 907 . 1
- 13y1 -
That wording indicated that a"conscientious" objection could not be taken to exist in a case where the objection arose from political , economic or similar motives . • In the light of the foregoing arguments, the Government submitted that on `+â üûe construction of Article 9 "belief" meant an opinion akin to but not Ycônss,s~tisg .of a religion ; hence manifesting such a belief involved something of the_natitre of religious worship, teaching, practice and observance . Even if the ~ mission were to take the view that the terms "belief" and "manifesting his eÎiéf" _ shoUld be given a wider meaning, it could not possibly be so wide that the "---• u.., ~ was required to refrain from stopping a person doing anything he wanted State regardless•of the objections of others, on the basis of that person's claim to be ? manifesting a belief ; still less that the State was required to take positive actio n -=-Cd;ensürésucli a person such a freedom . For the above reasons, the applicants objection to joining a trade union would not appear to be based on the sort of îeligiqûs or other similar belief protected by Article 9 . Nor, even if it were held by thè Commission that the applicants' views constituted a belief, did the Unite d - ~- ;Kïrigdom's legislation directly prevent them from manifesting it (see Section 1 . 1
The respondent Government submitted that, for the above reasons the pplicâtion was manifestly ill-founded on the facts or in the alternative was compâtible-with the Convention because their respective beliefs are not ones 'otected by :Article9 ;: 4. A_ dmissibrlirylo/ théxo mp int under Article 10 the applicants had failed to produce any Dm of expression and that complaint shoul d
under Article 1 1 then stated that the applicants had complaine d
ed the (Trade Union and Labour Relations 3r failed to amend this Act in order to enable freedom of . . . . association with others . . ." ;
ezact way in which the applicants considered with otheis has been violated was not mad e If'the applicants were comptaining that they had been dismissed by British •~"~~_:~8. .Roil, the complaint should be considered incompatible with the provisions of the ~.'°~~',Lonvéütion as the right not to be dismissed was not protected by it . : j;,_ .
135 -
The respondent Government then turned to the statement of one of the applicant s "that an individual should have freedom to choose to ioin or not to ioin a trade union no matter what his personal reasons tor such a choice may be" . They submitted that if the applicants were complaining that Article 11 (1) provided not only the right to join a trade union but also the right not to join a trade union, they would like to state the following : 5 .2 As to the effect of the legislation on the applicants it was held that the legislation concerned did not provide any statutory mechanism to enable a union to secure a closed shop agreement from an employer, but rather provided rules about fair and unfair dismissal in circumstances where such an agreement had been concluded and was being implemented . In the Government's opinion the applicants' complaint stemmed directly from their dismissal by British Rail and the terms of their contracts, indirectly from the Union Membership Agreement and less directly still from the legislation . 5 .3 The respondent Government then described at length the negotiating history of Article 11 in the light of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights of 10 December 1948 and the early drafts of what became the European Convention . The Government stated that, although in early drafts a reference to a right not to join trade unions was included, the final draft did not mention this right anymore as it was considered inopportune to introduce such right in view of the difficulties the "closed shop" system introduced in some countries could cause . As the Governments when signing the Cônvention had agreédto an Article 11 which deliberately did not refer to a right not to join trade unions, the Government of the United Kingdom, if they had thought differently when signing and ratifying the Convention, could and would have made a reservation as permitted by Article 64 . 5 .4 The Government also mentioned the similar approach adopted in drafting the United Nations Covenant on Civil and Political Rights as a proposal to add the sentence "No one may be compelled to join an association" was . not accepted . IUN document A/2929 of 1 July 1955 .) In reliance upon that approach they had ratified the Covenant without making a reservation in this respect, while the instrument of ratification was deposited on 20 May 1976, i .e . after the entry into force of the Act of 1976 . 5 .5 The Government then stated that no ideological, textual and contextual interpretation allowed a different view . If any ambiguity in the wording of Article 11 (1) would exist, it would suffice to refer to the preparatory work of the Convention in this respect . They further held that it did not follow that because Article 11 111 protected the right to join trade unions it also protected the right not to join as the express protection of a positive right did not imply protection of the negative or "converse" right .
- 1 36 -
- 5 :6 The Government then referred to the ILO Conventions 87 and 98, as well as to the Social Cha rt er, as the Commission and the European Court of Human Rights had both found it appropriate to consider Article 11 together with these instruments In the Government's opinion no right not to join a trade organisation or a trade union was mentioned in these instruments . 57 Théy finally submitted that the issue under consideration had not been the ~'•sûpject bf anyfinding by the European Court of Human Rights . It was however a ~.~rlëvant factor in the case that in more than one case the Court had held mor e ~générally that Article 11 did not secure any pa rt icular treatment o( trade unions, ~ -=__'or`.their members, by the State ( Swedish Engine-Drivers Union case) and, in 1_ -- -`paiucular, that the implementation of governmental policies designed to restrict -_ = the number of trade unions in a particular sector did not amount to an infringement of the freedom to join a union INational Union of Belgian Police and - - -: Swedish Engine-Drivers' Union case) . fT 3
58•Asregards the applicants' complaint that they had a right protected by Anicle 11 not to join a trade union and that legislation in force in the United _~`~'~7~•King"dom violated this right the Government submitted that for the reasons give n âtibvé Article 11 was not intended to and did not now protect any right not to join a, trade union . Article 11 imposed a duty on the State to protect the right to ~ . . "lo~and form rrade unions : Employers and employees might legitimately take ih e r•:.u " wew~hâ~~he_p~ro,tection of the workers in a particular indust ry or employment reuired•that âll^workérs - should j oin a union The State was entitled to enable them without risk of b ç~'.Sof+the law, to act accordingly . There was nothing in Artlcle 11 ( 1) which gaVéTa ;iight to anindividual not to associate with others or not to join a trade union ~éitheiat all or if he did not consider it necessary for the protection of his interests'1t ' shduld therefore be assumed that the Convention did not recognise the right ôf ân Findividual to twart that which his fellow-employees s• , consideredna n to be necessary,fqr~the protection of their interests, that was to say, the maintece of_a 100 % _hlôh m embership . It was not relevant to this issue whether 100% membersip ;;wâs necessa ry for this purposes the State was en. titled to take steps which}recognised the belief of employers and employees tha t Turning to the -recènt~ legislation enacted in the United Kingdom, the Government emphasiséd`Üïatiit concerned the right not to be unfairly dismissed . This right had been sùpiiriposed upon existing law regarding dismissal . In other words, a particulardisrïmi~fat. lhe present time might not breach an employee's . .~c ~: , . common law rights, (ore xam ple because the employer gave due noUCe in accordance with terms o.f the,ço ractof employment, but yet constituted an "unfair ~`•di'smissalwitHintfié meaning of the recent legislation . Where a case of "unfai r dismissal" arose, the employee was given certain statutory rights . The right not to bé unfairly dismissed was not one of those rights which were protected by the Convention . Viewed in this light, the rights given to employees by the recen t Jégislation could be regarded as something of a "bonus" for the employee over and above his riahts as orotected bv the Convention and as protected by the law 1". {
k
-137-
in force in England and Wales regarding the termination of contracts of employment . The "bonus" introduced into the law in force in the United Kingdom was subject to an exception in the case of termination of employment arising out of the refusal of the employee to join a trade union (other than on religious grounds) . The grant of this "bonus" subject to the above limitation could, in the Government's view, not be considered to be a violation of the Convention by reason of the existence of the qualification . In so far as the applicants complained about an infringement of their freedom of association, the Government held that in the light of the foregoing the application was manifestly ill-founded on the facts and that as to the alleged infringement of the freedom not to join a trade union, the application was incompatible with the Convention because the right was not one of those protected by the Convention . 6 The Government lastly submitted that as neither a violation of the Articles 9, 10 and 11 had been shown, nor the right not to be dismissed was guaranteed by the Convention the applicants' complaint under Article 13 that the United Kingdom had failed to provide adequate remedies for wrongful dismissal was bound to fail . In summarising their conclusions the Government requested the Commission to declare the application to be incompatible with the Convention ratione personae and, in the alternative, in so far as the applicants complained of a violation of - Article 9, the application was manifestly ill-founded or incompatible with the Convention ratione materiae and so inadmissible ;
- Article 10, the application was manifestly ill-founde d - Article 11, the application was manifestly ill-founded or incompatible with the Convention ratione materiae ; - Article 13, no issue could arise . B . The applicants' obse rvations The applicants in their written observations of 14 June 1977 first submitted that the question which was raised by the present application should be examined in the context of the whole Convention and above all in the light of the rights and freedoms of the individual which the Convention seeked to identify and made plain to all . In this context they stated that those who framed the Convention intended that the citizen should be free to work at any lawful trade or calling he pleased, which he was capable of performing, without being subjected to any requirement which was incompatible with the spirit of the Convention as the price for being allowed to do his work . The position of the Government on the other hand, was that, while it acknowledged the right of the citizens of the United Kingdom to freedom of person, thought, conscience, assembly and association, it would no t
-13g-
intervene to prôtect those citizens from being compelled, as the price of pursuing their trade or calling, to enter into an association with others, even though that association might be hostile to their most deeply held opinions, their conscience or their beliefs . After these general remarks the applicants dealt in more detail with the points ai issue . They stated that as under the present laws of the United Kingdom the closed shop was permitted (and indeed encouraged) this concept was incompatible with the rights to freedom of thought, conscience and religion, freedom ot expression and freedom of association specified in Arts . 9 10 and 11 of the Convention . In the applicants' opinion the freedom guaranteed by Art . 11 should involve freedom not to associate with others . If there was no freedom to decline to associate, there could not be freedom to associate . An individual might wish to associate with others for an almost infinite variety of reasons, but an individual who was forced into an association with others against his will was unlikely to share the aims or beliefs of those with whom he had been compelled to associate . If he did not share their aims or beliefs he had not merely been deprived of his freedom not to associate with others . The very fact of association might do violence to his own freedom of thought or conscience . The fact of association might also inhibit or stifle his freedom of expression . A trade union was an association within the meaning of that word in Art . 11 of the Convention . The applicants submitted that if an individual was compelled by the existence of a closed shop to join a trade union contrary to his own thought, conscience or belief, his rights under Articles 9, 10 and 11 of the Convention were thereby violated . The applicants furfher submitted that it would clearly be contrary to the Convention if an Act of Parliament were to provide that every employed person should join a trade union . In their view the Government appeared tacitly to acknowledge that this would be so when they pointed out that the Act of 1976 did not make Union Membership Agreements compulsory . If the law provided no protection against dismissal for refusal to join a union, then, whenever an employer and a trade union combined to impose a closed shop, the individual employee who did not wish to join the union would nevertheless in all probability be compelled to do so for tear of being dismissed if he did not . Thus, the consequence of the failure of the Government to make the closed shop illegal was to render it possible for an employer and a trade union to impose upon citizens of the United Kingdom a limitation on their freedom which it would be contrary to the Convention for the Government to impose by Act of Parliament . As to the Government's interpretation of Art . 11 in the light of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the applicants held that this was inconsistent with the Recital to the Convention which referred to that Declaration . They could no t
- 139 -
accept that the negotiating history of Art . 11 as set out by the Government could frustrate in one way or another the true construction of the terms of the Convention . In dealing with the background of the present case, the applicants agreed to the Government's submissions that prior to 1971 the rights and liabilities of the parties to a contract of employment under English law were for the most part governed only by common law . They also referred to and quoted from the Report of a Royal Commission on Trade Unions and Employers' Association published in 1968 which, in general, was sympathetic to the trade union point of view and which suggested that the closed shop should not be prohibited as, inter alia, that prohibition could not be made effeciive . Therefore, according to the said Commission, redress should be given to an employee who, for one reason or another, lost his job because of the introduction of the closed shop . The applicants then set out the situation when the Industrial Relations Act 1971 was introduced, the consequences of the enforcement of the Trade Union and Labour Relations Act 1974 which repealed the 1971 Act, and the amendments brought about by the Trade Union and Labour Relations (Amendment) Act 1976 . In summarising these submissions, the applicants held that, prior to the 1971 Act an employer could terminate a contract of employment by notice for any reason, including the employee's insistence upon joining a union or his refusal to do so . While the 1971 Act was in force, it would, in general, have constituted an unfair dismissal to terminate an employee's employment on either of these grounds . Now, it would constitute an unfair dismissal to terminate an employment on the ground that the employee had joined or wished to join a union, but a "fair" dismissal to terminate an employment for refusing to join a union, except on grounds of religious belief . Further, as was pointed out by Leading Counsel in his Opinion on exhaustion of domestic remedies, the ordinary courts of the land were no longer available in the case of actions for unfair dismissa l The applicants stressed that in these circumstances they did not accept the Government's contention that employees dismissed for refusing union membership "were no less well protected now than they were before 1971" . Nor did they accept the argument that since the creation of the right not to be unfairly dismissed went beyond the obligations of the Government under the Convention the restriction of that right could not constitute a breach of existing obligations . The applicants submitted that they did not complain herein of any restriction of the right not to be unfairly dismissed but of breaches by the Government of the United Kingdom of Ans . 9, 10 and 11 of the Convention With regard to the Government's statement that in practice closed shops also existed in certain industries in several member States of the Council of Europe the applicants stated that, even if this was the case, it did not justify the breaches of the Convention alleged in their application . Further, in numerous member States of the Council of Europe the closed shop was unlawful
- 140 -
--` .Asto the Government's submission that the application was incompatible with the Convention ratione personae, the applicants challenged this contention upon two grounds . In the first place they said that, having regard to the nature of the legislation under which the British Railways Board carried out its functions , -and having regard to the nature and degree of the powers of direction, control and supervision exercised by the responsible Minister over the activities of the Board ; the adoption by British . Rail of a closed shop policy was an act for which the°Gôvernment of the United Kingdom was answerable . Further, and secondly, theystated that in so far as the domestic law of the United Kingdom permitted them to be dismissed for refusal to join a trade union and failed to provide either of the applicants with an adequate remedy against such dismissal the Government was liable under the Convention by reason of the fact that the domestic law of the United Kingdom did not protect rights and freedoms guaranteed by the Convéntion that the applicants' rights had been infringed, and that the domestic "'-1awo1 the United Kingdom did not provide an adequate remedy . i As tô the nature and extent of the control exercised over the Board by the responsi6le Minister under the provisions of the 1962 . 1968 and 1974 Acts, the _ . . :applicants were of the opinion that there could be no doubt that the Minister ha d tRenecessary powers under the legislation to have prevented the adoption of the closed shop, if he had chosen to do so . They stated that they did not accept that the Board was autonomous in the matters of personnel management, relationships with,the trade unions or conditions of employment . If the decision to conclude ;heUnion Membership Agreement of July 1975 was that of the Board, then the ~a r. ±
applicantssserted thatjhaving regârd'to the relationship between the responsible Mi~ ér ând the Boa d as lai-d down,by statute, the responsible Minister had to be taken to haveâapproved ôradopted such decision . Further the applicants contended that, havingBrégârd7 Îo . theConvention, the Government was not . entitled to adopt a poliçyzdf~~rieütrality on the question whether or not there ~~. . _ should be a closed âhop i-nva~-particular place of work . The applicants noted the Government's contention -that?iewas up to the parties in each case (the trade union and the employerÎ io`=f :dec'idé';whether or nota closed shop should be established and observed thaitZhis_côntention involved the proposition that in such a case the terms of an=indi Îdûal employee's contract of employment were p not ~P a matter to be decided - bynëgotiation between him and the employer but were a matter to be decided6bétween .his employer or prospective employer and a ~: third party, without neçeÇslly3r e~fér:ring the matter to the employee concerned . The applicants th'en~séi°ôût4thé respective powers and functions of the responsible Minister n'the oar":inmore-detail by referring to specific provisions of the-1962„1968. .a . 19Z4Acts, in~order toshow the ministerial responsibility for the .~w.` .,,, and . , .i .
ailwaÿs Board contrary to the Government's submission that the Board was âutonomous, independent of State responsibility . . ~'
-~, :•~ ' Accordingly, the applicants pointed out that, having regard to the very extensive and detailed powers of direction and control exercised by the Minister -~ --,1now the Secretary of State) over the Railways Board, the decision lif such it was) of
141 -
the Railways Board to enter into a closed shop agreement with the trade unions concerned was an act for which the Government of the United Kingdom had to accept responsibility . The applicants further submitted that the objection of the Government 2rione personae should be rejected also upon the ground that the Government owed a duty to the applicants to protect the rights and freedoms guaranteed by the Convention, and that the domestic law of the United Kingdom did not and does not protect such rights and freedoms in that it permitted the British Railways Board to establish a closed shop, permitted the Board to dismiss the applicants on the ground of their refusal to join a trade union and failed to provide any or any adequate remedy or redress . As to the admissibility of the complaint under A rt s 9-1 1 The applicants added some further submissions to that which they had already stated above in this respect . They maintained that it was recognised that every individual should be free to associate and that they had already advanced reason why such a freedom should include a freedom not to associate . If an individual was compelled, by fear of losing his job, to join an association of which he disapproved, some loss of freedom, ihough and conscience, and of expression . was inevitable . The applicants averred that their freedom of association had been violated by the fact of being faced with an unacceptable choice between joining a union and losing their jobs . They did not complain, except in this context, of infringement of a "right not to be dismissed" . The applicants drew attention to the statements of the Government that it was for the employer and the trade union or unions representing employees to decide whether to adopt a closed shop and that the employee's contract should have allowed for the possibility of such action before the legislation had an impact upon an individual employee .ln their opinion the first of these statements underlined the employee's loss of personal freedom of choice . With regard to the second of these statements, when the applicants joined Btitish Rail their contracts did not insist upon the closed shop . The terms of their contrects were purportedly varied, without consulting them, by agreement between British Rail and the unions . As to the Government's observations concerning the negotiating history of Art . 11 . the applicants submitted that it was clear from the history set out therein that the provision about the freedom not to associate was omitted from the Convention for reasons which might be broadly described as "political" in character and was probably unnecessary . They stressed that freedom to associate should include freedom not to associate and referred in this respect to the Commission's case-law (Application No . 4072/69) . As to paragraph 5 .8 of the Government's observations, the applicants noted that, in contrast to references earlier in the Government's observations to "employers and trade unions" the references here were to "employers and employees", The applicants presumed that when the Government referred to employers and employees legitimately taking the view that the protection of the workers required that all workers should join a union, and to fellow employee s
- 142 -
who considered it to be necessary for thé protection of their interests to maintain a 100% union membership, the Government intended to refer to a majority of employees and fellow employees . In the applicants' opinion the argument appeared to be that if a majority of employees considered that something should be done then they should have their way . This could not be right, it having their way involved, as the applicants claimed it did, infringing the fundamental rights of others . The Government also claimed that the right given to employees by recent legislation not to be unfairly dismissed was "something of a bonus" . The applicants however submitted that this "bonus" was irrelevant to and did not excuse or palliate the diminution of individual rights brought about by the 1974 and 1976 Acts . The applicants finally stated that the concern of the Convention on Human Rights was with individual freedom, while the closed shop constituted a diminution of individual freedom and conferred great power on the employer and greater power still on the union . The price paid for these powers was the diminution in the freedom of the individual employee . In the submission of the applicants, to face them with the choice of joining a trade union or giving up their employment constituted a violation of their rights as individual human beings and they requested the Commission to so declare .
THE LA W The applicants have originally complained that the United Kingdom enforced the legislation complained of and so far failed to amend it, in order to enable British subjects to exercise their freedom of thought, conscience, expression and association with others, and failed to provide adequate remedies for wrongful dismissal in particular with regard to British subjects who lose their employment through abstaining from joining one of the trade unions recommended by the employers . They further complained that in a situation as the present one where the applicants have no genuine objection based on religious belief but rather have a genuine objection based on reasonable grounds or, alternatively, based on the grounds of exercising their freedom of expression and association as provided by Articles 9, 10 and 11 of the Convention, such enforcement was tantamount to a violation of the Convention and, in particular, against the spirit of the aforesaid Articles . The Commission first observes that the applicants, in their original complaints, asserted that the respondent Government had violated the rights and freedoms at issue vis-A-vis British subjects . However, since the Convention does not provide for applications in the form of an actio popularns, the Commission, while accepting that the issues raised in the present application affect a number of persons, is considering it only insofar as the applicants themselves are concerned
- 143 -
The Government of the United Kingdom have submitted that the application is incompatible with the provision of the Convention ratione personae . They maintained that the British Railways Board which was responsible for the dismissal of the applicants was an autonomous body and did not involve any State responsibility . The Commission notes that the Government, in their observations, pointed out that under the provision of the Transport Act 1962 the British Railways Board was constituted as a public authority and had the task of running the railways although certain powers were conferred on the Minister of the Government . Whatever the division of rights and duties between the Board and the respective Minister may be, in the Commission's opinion, there can be no doubt that the Government of the United Kingdom is responsible for their public authorities and thus for the acts of the British Railways Board . As the British Railways Board employed and dismissed both applicants, these acts must be considered as acts by the "State as employer" . In this respect the Commission refers to the Court's finding in the Swedish Engine Drivers' Union case where it stated that the Convention nowhere makes an express distinction between the functions of a Contracting State as holder of public power and its responsibilities as employer . IPara . 37 of the Judgment of 6 February 1976, Publication of the European Court of Human Rights, Series A, No . 20, at p . 14 .1 In this opinion, the same argumentation is applicable mutatls mutandis in the present case . It follows that the acts of the British Railways Board of which the applicants complain engage the responsibility of the United Kingdom under the Convention . The application cannot, therefore, be rejected as being incompatible with the provisions of the Convention . In the alternative, the Government contended that insofar as the application alleged violations of Articles 9 . 10, 11 and 13, it was inadmissible on several other grounds . In the Government's opinion, the applicants' objection to joining a trade union would not appear to be based on the sort of religious or other similar belief protected by Article 9 nor, even if it were held by the Commission that the applicants' views constituted a beliet, did the United Kingdom's legislation directly prevent them from manifesting it . The applicants' complaint under Article 9, was, therefore, incompatible with the Convention, or in the alternative, manifestly ill-founded . Furthermore, as the applicants had failed to produce any evidence of a violation of their freedom of expression the Government have submitted that the complaint under Article 10 should be considered as manifestlv ill-founded . Also the applicants' complaint under Art . 11 that the legislation concerned interfered with their freedom of association and their freedom not to join a trade union would, in the Government's submission be bound to fail, as the first part of this complaint was manifestly ill-founded on the facts and the second incompatibl e
- 144 _
with the Convention because this right was not protected by it . The Government finally stated that as no violation of any of the Articles invoked by the applicants had been shown, no issue could arise under Article 13 . The applicants, however, maintained that the application was admissible for the various reasons indicated in their original submissions . In the Commission's opinion it is now sufficiently clear that the interpretation of Art . 11 of the Convention, in particular whether it protects also the right not to join a trade union, appears to be the main issue in the case . This issue has been raised in earlier cases which did not, however, on the facts presented in those cases, call for a decision by the Commission squarely on that point Isee, inter alia, Application No . 4072-69, Yearbook 13, p . 708) . In the present case the issue is clearly before the Commission and both parties have advanced various arguments for and against such an interpretation . Article 27 121 in requiring the Commission to declare inadmissible any application from an individual, a non-governmental organisation or group of individuals which it considers to be manifestly ill-founded, does not permit the Commission at the stage of admissibility to reject a complaint which cannot so be described Isee, for example, decisions on the admissibility of Applications No . 5100 to 5102/71, 5354/72, 5370/72, Five Soldiers v . the Netherlands, Yearbook 15, pp . 508, 556 with further references, and Times Newspapars Ltd . et al v . United Kingdom, DR 2/90,97 . 1 In the present case the Commission has carried out a preliminary examination of the information and arguments submitted by the parties . The Commission finds that these raise substantial issues of interpretation and application of the Convention, in particular of Article 11, which are of such complexity that their determination should depend upon an examination of their merits . For these reasons, the Commissio n DECLARES ADMISSIBLE and retains the application, without in any way prejudging the merits of the case .
- 145 -
(TRADUCTION) EN FAIT Les faits de la cause peuvent se résumer comme sui t Les deux requérants sont des ressortissants du Royaume-Uni . Le premier, né en 1953, est actuellement domicilié dans le Surrey . Le second, né en 1928, est actuellement domicilié é Havant . Ils sont représentés par M . Mitchell-Heggs, du cabinet juridique Boodington et Yturbe à Paris, agissant en vertu d'une procuration datée du 14 juillet 1976 . Pour ce qui est du premier requérant, M . Youn g Des déclarations et documents présentés par le représentant des requérants il ressort que le premier d'entre eux a été embauché par les Chemins de fer britanniques le 2 octobre 1972 et a travaillé pour cet employeur jusqu'à ce que son licenciement lui soit notifié, le 27 mai 1976, avec effet au 26 juin de la méme année . En août 1975, fut affichée à chaque étage du bâtiment dit "Southern House", où le requérant travaillait à l'époque, une note attirant l'attention du personnel sur une modification intervenue dans les contrats de travail à la suite d'un accord conclu en juillet 1975 entre la direction et les syndicats . La note indiquait qu'à dater du 1 - aoùt 1975, l'appartenance à un syndicat reconnu ferait partie des conditions requises pour l'emploi du personnel auquel s'appliquait ledit accord . En septembre 1975, le requérant rencontra son supérieur hiérarchique direct qui était par ailleurs délégué de l'Association du personnel des transports (Transport and Salaried Staff Association) . A cette occasion, le requérant apprit que des accords instaurant un monopole d'embauche syndical I"closed shop") avaient été conclus entre les Chemins de fer britanniques et les trois syndicats de cheminots, à savoir l'Union nationale des cheminots INational Union of Railwaymen - NUR) ; l'Association des personnels des transports (Transport and Salaried Staff Association - TSSA) ; et l'Association des mécaniciens et chauffeurs de locomotive IAssociated Society of Locomotive Engineers and Firemen - ASLEF) . Aux termes de l'accord, le requérant était tenu d'adhérer à la TSSA ou, à son choix, à la NUR . Il fut informé qu'il pouvait être dispensé de cette obligation s'il avait des objections spéciales d'ordre religieux à l'appartenance syndicale en général ou s'il avait des raisons spéciales de refuser d'appartenir à un syndicat déterminé . On lui indiqua également que s'il souhaitait obtenir cette dispense il devrait en faire la demande par écrit avant le 17 octobre 1975 . Le 19 septembre, une autre note fut affichée à chaque étage du bâtiment, précisant qu'il avait été convenu que les dispenses pour des motifs d'ordre religieux ne seraient accordées qu'à ceux à qui leur confession interdisait spécifiquement d'adhérer à un syndicat . La note indiquait de plus que la prolongation ,
- 146 -
pour des motifs religieux uniquemént, dépendait de l'adoption par le Parlement du projet d'amendement à la Loi sur les syndicats et les relations du travail et que le personnel serait informé en temps utile . En conséquence, le 17 octobre 1975 le requérant déposa une demande écrite de dispense et le 30 avril 1976 les Chemins de fer britanniques l'informaient ; par lettre que sa requête serait examinée le 5 mai 1976 . -,- La Loi portant amendement à la Loi sur les syndicats et les relations du travail entra en vigueur le 25 mars 1976 . L'alinéa lel de son arlicle 1• r annulait les _ dispositions de la loi de 1974 donnant à un salarié le droit de demander « pou r tout motif raisonnable » à être dispensé de l'obligation d'adhérer à un syndicat donné . . Dorénavant toute demande d'un salarié déjÀ embauché désireux d'étre '!A`~=°dégagé dé l'obligation de s'affilier é'un syndicat pour garder son emploi ne ; .. pôuvait plus s'appuyer que sur des motifs d'ordre religieux . 1 . .r._~c-T+. j •--" `i" e requérant n'avait pas d'objection d'ordre religieux é adhérer àvn syndica ~ il . n'avait pas non plus d'objection particuliére à l'égard de tel ou tel syndicat . tToutefois, - pour plusieurs autres raisons, il se refusait à adhérer A un syndicat, quel .qu'il soit, et les motifs exposés dans sa demande é crite du 17 octobre 1975 peuvent être résumés comme suit :
. {
a . L'argent du principal Fonds syndical sert à financer une publication mensuelle qui n'est qu'un organe de propagande en faveur du Parti travailliste et le s uffisantes que le fonds n'était pas utilisé à requérant n' a pas reçu d'assu~ranc :p`Îus'lé requérant ne partage pas les opinions politiques 1 d'autres finsipoÎitiques . .,D,é de la TrSSA et ne shâitéTôâs_contribuer à en financer la diffusion . tn. monopole d'embauche, la TSSA montre :lë-. .liberté individuelle . ientâtions de salaire, la TSSA aggrave l'inflaIle au lieu de l'augmenter . ment favorable à la nationalisation des indusiére les industries nationalisées comme des 3-aénérale il est favorable à la libre entreprise . _ mainmisè croissante de la TSSA sur le te de l'accord de monopole d'embauch e
/ . Le requérant n'acceptèa`s'~obligâtlon :dans laquelle il serait, pour deve;délégué à plein temps TSSA, de donner des détails sur ses activités nir, sées au sein des mouvements travailliste et syndicaliste . pâ g Si'la TSSA décidait de (aire grève, le requérant serait contraint de cesser le travail en même temps que ses collégues ; il estime qu'une telle interruption = générale du travail dans un service-clef équivaut à un chantage collectif sur l e
147-
pays tout entier et il ne souhaite pas participer à une telle action, surtout pas sous la contrainte . Le 5 mai 1976, la demande de dispense du requérant a été examinée par une « Commission de recours » composée d'un représentant des Chemins de fer britanniques, d'un représentant de la TSSA et d'un représentant de la NUR . Par lettre du 27 mai 1976, les Chemins de fer britanniques informaient le requérant que sa demande de dispense n'était pas acceptée et lui signifiaient son licenciement à l'expiration, le 26 juin 1976, du délai de préavis d'un mois auquel son contrat lui donnait droit . Le requérant a également soumis une consultation de John Hall, O .C . et avocat . Celui-ci estimait que, si le requérant avait effectivement le droit de faire valoir auprès du Tribunal du travail qu'il avait été injustement licencié par les Chemins de fer britanniques, ce recours resterait sans effet . La cessation effective d'emploi du requérant était intervenue le 5 avril 1976, date à laquelle les dispositions applicables au licenciement étaient celles de la 2• partie de l'Annexe I, à la loi de 1974, modifiée par la loi de 1976, entrée en vigueur le 25 mars 1976, dont le paragraphe 4 111 prévoit que a dans tout emploi tombant sour le coup du présent paragraphe, tout salarié a le droit de ne pas être injustement licencié par son employeur et le recours d'un employé licencié en violation de ce droit consiste à saisir un tribunal du travail en application de la troisième partie de la présente annexe et uniquement dans ces limites rr . Le paragraphe 6 (5) de la loi de 1976 dispose que le licenciement d'un salarié par un employeur est considéré comme justifié aux fins de la présente annexe si lal conformément à un accord en matiére d'affiliation syndicale IUnion Membership agreement), la pratique est que tous les salariés de cet employeur ou tous les salariés de la même catégorie que le salarié licencié appartiennent à un syndicat indépendant déterminé ou à l'un de ces syndicats si plusieurs sont spécifiés ; à moins que le salarié ne soit sincérement opposé, pour des raisons de croyance religieuse, à l'affiliation à un syndicat quel qu'il soit, . . auquel cas le licenciement sera considéré comme injustifié r r L'avocat est parvenu à la conclusion que tout recours du requérant contre une décision du tribunal du travail serait également voué à l'échec . A son avis le requérant n'avait donc en pratique aucun recours en droit anglais contre son licenciement et, dans ces conditions et dans ce sens, l'on était fondé à dire que toutes les voies de recours ouvertes au requérant avaient été épuisées .
Pour ce qui est du deuxiéme requérant, M . James : A la date du 27 mars 1974, le requérant était employé par les Chemins de fer britanniques en qualité de chef d'équipe (il avait déjà été employé par les Chemins de fer britanniques à deux reprises pendant plusieurs annéesl . Vers juillet/août 1975, une note analogue à celle mentionnée plus haut fut affichée sur le lieu de travail du requérant afin d'attirer l'attention du personnel su r
- 148 _
une modification apportée aux contrats de travail à la suite d'un accord intervenu en juillet 1975 entre la direction et les syndicats . Comme on l'a déjà dit plus haut, la note indiquait qu'é dater du 1• 1 ao0t 1975, l'affiliation à un syndicat reconnu devenait une condition d'emploi du personnel auquel s'appliquait les accords énumérés dans la note . Pour ce qui était du personnel déjB en poste, la note indiquait qu'un accord sur le détail des arrangements, y compris les dispositions relatives aux demandes de dispense d'affiliation à un syndicat, n'avait été conclu que pour une catégorie de personnel IRailway Salaried and Conciliation Staff) visée par la négociation du 28 mai 1956 . Le requérant relevant de cette catégorie de personnel était donc censé tomber sous le coup des nouvelles dispositions en matiére d'emploi . '" Lé 16 octobre 1975, le requérant rencontra son supérieur hiérarchique immédiatainsi qu'un délégué de la section locale de la NUR . II apprit à cette occasion qû'il'était obligé d'adhérer à la NUR à la suite d'une modification unilatérale de son contrat et qu'il n'avait pas le choix d'autres syndicats . Le requérant indiqua à son supérieur et au délégué de la NUR qu'il avait l'intention d'adhérer à ce syndicat . Sa décision définitive restait toutefois en suspens dans l'attente d'une mise au point de la NUR quant au calcul de son salaire . Le requérant était particuliérement préoccupé par le fait que, bien qu'il travaillât le méme nombre dheures qu'un de ses collégues, il semblait que leurs salaires respectifs n'étaient pas égaux . ;Avant de demander officiellement son inscription à la NUR le requérant souhaitait attendre de-cônnâPÎrélâ'réponse faite à son collégue sur cette question de salaire car il désir é it '--v4ii-comment la NUR traitait les problémes de ses adhérents . Lorsque laÙR répônditau collégue du requérant que son salaire avait été calculé correctem, enty sâns préciser les bases sur lesquelles on était parvenu à cette conclusion ;~lé~r, quérant-estima que ce syndicat avait manqué à ~.. son devoir de procéder,-à, un examen détaillé et de donner une explication compléte de ses conclûsioris : :. .. ._ embre 1975, le requérant refusa d'adhérer n'ayant répondu à sa propre demande d e
~ieqdérant reçut un avis de licenciement indiquant que pecté les termes de l'accord de juillet 1975 sur l'affiliane seraient plus requis à compter du 5 avril 1976 . Le 8 avril 1976, le requérant porta plainte auprés du Tribunal du travail pour licenciement injustifié . Le 18 juin 1976, le requérant comparut devant le Tribunal du travail, qu i
réserva sa décision .
- 149 -
Vers le 6 juillet 1976, le requérant reçut copie du jugement du tribunal le déboutant de sa demande . Les attendus du jugement indiquaient que le requérant, tout en soulevant des objections à l'affiliation au syndicat, n'avait à aucun moment demandé à en être dispensé conformément à la procédure prévue par l'Accord Par ailleurs, le requérant ayant clairement refusé d'adhérer au syndical comme prévu par l'accord sur l'affiliation syndicale, sa plainte devait être examinée à la lumiére du paragraphe 6 (5) de la loi de 1976 . Etant donné que le requérant n'avait à aucun moment indiqué que les raisons de son refus étaient d'ordre religieux, il s'ensuivait que le tribunal était tenu, aux termes de la loi, de conclure qu'il ne s'agissait pas d'un licenciement arbitrair e Le requérant a fait valoir encore qu'il n'avait pas d'objection de principe contre les syndicats, qu'il avait d'ailleurs précédemment appartenu à la NUR et qu'il était disposé à s'y affilier à nouveau à la demande de son supérieur et du délégué de ce syndicat . Il n'était toutefois pas encore persuadé que cela serait à son avantage . Il estimait de plus que chacun devrait pouvoir en toute liberté décider d'adhérer ou non à un syndicat, quelles que soient les raisons personnelles de ce choix .
Griefs Les deux requérants font valoir que le Royaume-Uni applique les dispositions susmentionnées de la loi, qu'il ne les a pas jusqu'ici modifiées de maniére 9 permettre aux citoyens britanniques d'exercer leur droit à la liberté de pensée et de conscience, d'expression et d'association, et n'a pas prévu de moyens de recours adéquats en cas de licenciement arbitraire, notamment pour les citoyens britanniques qui perdent leur emploi pour avoir omis d'adhérer à l'un des syndicats recommandés par leur employeur . Ils font de plus valoir que dans une situation telle que celle qui fait l'objet de la présente requéte, où les requérants n'ont pas d'objection spécialement fondée sur des motifs religieux, mais plutôt une objection sérieuse reposant sur des motifs raisonnables ou sur la volonté d'exercer le droit à la liberté d'expression et d'association prévue aux articles 9, 10 et 11 de la Convention, l'application de la loi en quesuon équivaut à une violation de la Convention et se trouve, notamment, en contradiction avec l'esprit des articles 9, 10, 11 et 13 .
PROCÉDUR E Le 11 décembre 1976, la Commission décida de communiquer la requête au Gouvernement du Royaume-Uni et d'inviter celui-ci à soumettre à la Commission ses observations écrites sur la recevabilité de ladite requête . Le Gouvernement a fait parvenir ses observations le 22 mars 1977 et le représentant des requérants y a répondu le 14 juin 1977 .
- 150-
ARGUMENTATION DES PARTIE S Observations du Gouvernement défendeu r 1
Historiqu e
1 1 : Droit et pratique internes de 1945 à 197 7 Le Gouvernement défendeur a indiqué que dans la période de 1945 à 1971, la législation en vigueur en Angleterre et au Pays de Galles ne contenait aucun e : disposition relative à d'éventuels accords sur le monopole syndical d'embauche 1'•clôsed shop") . De tels accords étaient toutefois courants dans certains secteurs, particûliérement dans les industries anciennes . Une étude récente donne à penser que probablement plus de 40 % des syndiqués britanniques travaillent dans l e _ .âadre ;d ;accords de ce type (40 % dans les années 60) . Ces accords, du fait qu'ils ~étaient largement reconnus, pouvaient également présenter des avantages notam" • : mént~enrenforçant .la position des syndicats dans les négociations et en contrir bûant~@ réduiréreles risquésde conflits entre syndicats et entre groupes de travail_'- leûis ; protégeânt ainsi aû mieux les intér@ts de ces derniers . Mais leur application donnait parfois lieu à des interventions des syndicats ou de la direction pour coniraindre les non-syndiqués à adhérer sous peine d'@tre licenciés . Etant donné qu'avant l'entrée en vigueur de la Loi de 1971 sur les relation s = du travail, la,rupture,d'un contrat de travail ne faisait l'objet d'aucune restriction dâns lesd textës ~ I excépuontr,de la Loi de 1963 sur les contrats de travail prévoyant un préavis mihimumlImâis était pour l'essentiel régie par le droit coumlier Icommon law ;un empÎiiÿ "pouvait @tre licencié légalement à condition que les délaie soient PesetÀst~=que les, motifs du licenciement soient ou non liés au refus d'appartenir au!,syndiçat détenant le monopole d'embauche . Le seul recours pour un employé arbiirâirémeni licencié sans préavis était de poursuivre ~ €: 1lem leur pour obten i aè~paiement du salaire qui lui aurait été d0 pendant le
La Loi de 1971 sur lésrélâtions-du travail a modifié radicalement la situation en imposant de nouvelles~résïrictons au droit de l'employeur de licencier un employé et en donnant sir_riultâ ëméni a ce dernier le droit de ne pas appartenir à un syndicat . En principe, tousuÎes .êmployés jouissaient ainsi du droit de ne pas ëtre tr arbitrairement licenciés, ;_,méâvec le préavis requis . Les tribunaux du ~,^.,,, . .. . travail auxquels les emplqy_éslpouvaienC avoir recours s'ils estimaient leur licencie. ment injustifié pouva ient :ordonn erà I;employeur de dédommager l'employé ou de le,,.réembaucher, A .moinsYdé pôtïvoir prouver au tribunal l'existence d•un ou de plûsieurs des motifs de licenciement admis (conduite, compétence, double emploi, -etc .) et convaincre celui-ci que ces motifs, en l'occurrence, justifiaient raisonnablement un licenciement .
- 151 -
Bien que, en donnant à tout employé te droit de ne pas appartenir à un syndicat, la Loi de 1971 rendit inapplicables les accords sur le monopole syndical d'embauche, elle contenait également des dispositions : a permettant aux employeurs et aux syndicats de conclure des accords dits « agency shops », aux termes desquels l'appartenance à l'un des syndicats en question ou la contribution à son financement pouvait être une condition d'embauche . Les employés objectant, pour des motifs de conscience, à l'appartenance à un syndicat ou au paiement de la cotisation étaient autorisés à verser une somme équivalente à des oeuvres de bienfaisance ; b . autorisant à conclure des accords instaurant un monopole d'embauche dans des conditions bien définies . Dans ces cas les objecteurs de conscience n'étaient autorisés qu'à verser des contributions à des muvres de bienfaisance . La Loi de 1971 a été abrogée par la Loi de 1974 sur les syndicats et les relations du travail qui, pour ce qui est du monopole syndical d'embauche tendait à revenir à la situation antérieure à 1971 : c'est ainsi que le droit de ne pas appartenir à un syndicat et les restrictions qui en découlaient pour l'instauration de monopoles d'embauche ont été supprimés . La loi disposait en outre I§ 6 151, Annexe 1) que d'une manière générale le licenciement pour non-appartenance ou refus de continuer à appartenir à un syndicat lorsqu'un accord à cet effet la Union Membership agreement sl était en vigueur ne pouvait être considéré comme arbitraire que si « l'employé avait de véritables objections, pour des raisons de convictions religieuses, contre l'appartenance à un syndicat quel qu'il soit ou avait des objections raisonnables contre l'affiliation à tel ou tel syndicat » (les mots soulignés ont été ajoutés par le Parlement à la suite d'un amendement contraire aux vmux du Gouvernementl . La Loi de 1976 portant amendement à la Loi sur les syndicats et les relations du travail supprima l'exception prévue pour des motifs « raisonnables », laissant uniquement celle touchant les convictions religieuses . Aux yeux du Gouvernement, les salariés ne sont pas moins bien protégés par les lois de 1974 et 1976 qu'ils ne l'étaient avant 1971 et, puisque l'instauration du droit de ne pas être injustement licencié va au-delA des obligations que la Convention implique pour le RoyaumeUni, la restriction de ce droit dans des conditions bien définies ne peut constituer une violation desdites obligations . Le Gouvernement conclut cette présentation du droit et de la pratique internes en rappelant que le monopole syndical d'embauche existe, pour certaines industries, dans plusieurs Etats membres du Conseil de l'Europe .
1 .2 Pour ce qui est de l'embauche et du licenciement des requérants, le Gouvernement a fait valoir qu'il n'avait pas eu officiellement connaissance de ces affaires . Mais, qu'à ce qu'il savait, l'Office (Board) des Chemins de fer britanniques avait appliqué l'accord sur le monopole syndical d'embauche à la fin de 1975, remettant ainsi en vigueur un accord resté en sommeil depuis 1970 . L'Office s'était alors trouvé en face d'un petit nombre d'employés qui refusaient d'adhérer à l'un ou à l'autre de s
- 152 -
syndicats spécifiés dans l'accord . Au cours de l'été 1976, la plupart de ces personnes turent licenciées . Certaines eurent recours à des tribunaux du travail, qui considérérent dans plusieurs cas que ces licenciements étaient injustifiés car, lé la différence de MM . Young et James) et contrairement à l'opinion des Chemins de fer britanniques, on estima qu'ils avaient de sérieuses objections d'ordre religieux à l'adhésion à un syndicat .
2 . Position du Gouvernement défendeur Le Gouvernement a ensuite exposé sa position par rapport aux Chemins de fer britanniques . Conformément à la Loi sur les transports de 1962, les Chemins de fer Britanniques assurent un service public . L'Office ne fait pas partie du Gouvernement du Royaume-Uni ; il s'agit plutôt d'un organisme distinct, responsable de l'exploitation du réseau ferré, bien que l'article 27 de la loi confére à un ministre du Gouvernement certains pouvoirs touchant l'activité de l'Office et que l'article 28 soumette l'exercice de certains pouvoirs de l'Office à l'autorisation du ministre . Pour ce qui concerne la gestion du personnel, les relations avec les syndicats et les conditions d'embauche, l'Office est autonome . La décision d'embaucher les deux requérants et celle de conclure l'accord (Union membership agreementl de 1975 ont toutes deux été prises par l'Office, tout comme celle de les licencier . Le Gouvernement a indiqué que sur la question de savoir s'il devait ou non y avoir un monopole d'embauche dans tel ou tel endroit il avait opté pour une politique de neutralité . L'unique disposition nouvelle introduite par la loi de 1974 et modifiée par celle de 1976 Isur les accords pour le monopole d'embauche en liaison avec les licenciements arbitraires) répondait à la nécessité de définir la maniére dont les dispositions relatives aux licenciements arbitraires devraient être appliquées dans le cas d'une personne licenciée pour refus d'adhérer à un syndicat ou de maintenir son adhésion à la suite d'un accord instaurant un monopole d'embauche . La Commission s'est déjé penchée à plusieurs reprises sur la question de la position d'un gouvernement défendeur face à des organismes publics . La Commission a par deux fois laissé indécise la question de la responsabilité du Gouvernement du Royaume-Uni pour la BBC IRecueil de décisions 29, p . 89 : Annuaire 14, pp . 539-549) . La Commission ne s'est pas non plus prononcée sur la position du Gouvernement irlandais face à la Compagnie irlandaise d'électricité (Irish Electricity Supply Board) (Annuaire 14, pp . 199 à 219) . En examinant la requête N° 2413/65, la Commission est parvenue à la conclusion que le Gouvernement de la République Fédérale d'Allemagne n'était pas responsable des actes des sociétés allemandes de presse, de radio et de télévision (Recueil de décisions 23, p . 7) . La Cour européenne des Droits de l'Homme a eu l'occasion d'examiner les responsabilités respectives du Gouvernement suédois et des Chemins de fer suédois dans l'Affaire des conducteurs de locomotive . La Cour a conclu qu e « L'article 11 s'impose par conséquent à l' 'Etat employeur', que les relations de ce dernier avec ses employés obéissent au droit public ou au droit privé » farrèt du 6 février 1976 , p . 10) . - 153 -
Le Gouvernement estime qu'il n'a pas avec les Chemins de ter britanniques les mémes liens que ceux qui existent entre le Gouvernement suédois et les Chemins de fer nationaux suédois . De plus, la relation entre les Chemins de fer britanniques et leurs employés est différente de celle des Chemins de fer nationaux suédois avec les leurs . Au Royaume-Uni, l'Etat n'est pas l'employeur des cheminots et il n'existe pas d'équivalent de l'Office national pour les négociations col lectives . Le Gouvernement a fait valoir que pour les raisons ci-dessus la requète devait être rejetée pour incompatibilité avec la Convention ratione personae .
3
Recevabilité du grief fondé sur l'article 9
Le Gouvernement passe ensuite à l'examen de la déclaration des requérants affirmant que « le Royaume-Uni applique les dispositions . . . de la loi et qu'il ne les a pas jusqu'ici modifiées de maniére à permettre aux citoyens britanniques d'exercer leur droit à la liberté de pensée, de conscience . . . rr . De l'avis du Gouvernement, la requête ne fait pas clairement apparaPtre en quoi les requérants estiment que leur liberté de pensée et de conscience n'a pas été respectée . Le Gouvernement maintient qu'il n'y a eu de sa part ni intervention ni restriction à cet égard et que la question du licenciement n'a pas de lien direct avec la liberté de pensée ou de conscience des requérants . Ceux-ci sont libres, aux termes de la Convention, qui est appliquée au Royaume-Uni, d'avoir (et d'exprimerl l'opinion que le monopole syndical d'embauche devrait être interdit par la loi ou soumis à des restrictions plus sévéres que ce n'est le cas actuellement . Lu dans son contexte (et notamment en liaison avec les articles 10 et 111 , l'article 9 protège les convictions religieuses ou autres fondées sur la pensée et la conscience . Ces dernières incluent l'agnosticisme et l'athéisme . Les conclusions ne reposant pas sur ces bases ne sont pas protégées par l'article 9, bien que leur expression soit protégée par l'article 10 . En d'autres termes, il ne s'agit plus alors de « convictions u, au sens de l'article 9 , mais plutôt d'opinions, etc . « La conscience n et les a convictions n (beliefs) ne relevant pas du domaine des convictions religieuses sont difficiles à définir . La Résolution 337 relative au droit à l'objection de conscience, adoptée par l'Assemblée Consultative en 1967, donne une indication de l'interprétation de l'article 9 commune aux Etats membres . Le principe de base N° 1 est rédigé comme sui t « Les personnes astreintes au service militaire qui, pour des motifs de conscience ou en raison d'une conviction profonde d'ordre religieux, éthique, moral, humanitaire, philosophique ou autre de même nature, refusent d'accomplir le service armé, doivent avoir un droit subjectif à être dispensées de ce service . » (Recueil de textes, p . 907 ) Il ressort de ce texte que l'on ne saurait considérer au'il existe une obiection a de conscience n dans le cas où l'obiection tient à des motifs Dolitioues . économiques ou d'ordre analoaue .
- 1Fv1-
S'appuyant sur les .arguments ci-dessus, le Gouvernement a fait valoir que dans une interprétation correcte de l'article 9, le terme « conviction n désigne une opinion de nature voisine d'une opinion religieuse .mais ne constituant pas une croyance religieuse ; et la manifestation d'une telle conviction implique quelque chose de nature comparable àu culte, à l'enseignement, aux pratiques et à l'accomplissement des rites . Même si la Cor :mmission devait estimer qu'il convient de donner un sens plus large aux mots « conviction » et « manifester sa conviction », ce sens ne pourrait être élargi au point que l'Etat soit tenu de s'abstenir d'empêcher une personne de faire tout ce qu'elle veut en dépit des objections des autres pour la raison que cette personne prétendrait manifester ainsi une conviction ; el moins encore aü point que l'Eta4 soit tenu de prendre des mesures pour assurer à cette personne une telle liberté . II ne semble donc pas que l'objection des requérants à l'adhésion à un syndicat repose sur le type de convictions religieuses ou analogues protégées par l'article 9 . Même si la Commission devait estimer que les opinions des requérants équivalent à une conviction, la législation du Royaume-Uni n'a pas dirééfernent empéché ceux-ci de manifester ces opinions Ivoir 4 1 1 ci-dessusl . Le Gouvernement défendeur soutient que pour les raisons ci-dessus la requête est manifestement mal fondée en fait ou, alternativement, incompatible avec la Convention, les convictions respectives des requérants ne faisant pas partie de celles que protège l'article 9 .
4 . Recevabilité du grief fondé sur l'article 1 0 De l'avis du Gouvernement, les requérants n'ont apporté aucune preuve d'une violation de leur liberté d'expression et ce arief doit donc être considéré comme manifestement mal fondé . 5 . Recevabilité du grief fondé sur l'article 1 1 5 .1 Le Gouvernement défendeurrappelle ensuite que les requérants s'étaient plaints que : « Le Royaume-Uni applique les dispositions susmentionnées de la loi, qu'il ne les a pas jusqu'ici modifiées de maniére à permettre aux citoyens britanniques d'exercer leur droit à la liberté . . . d'associalion » et qu'ils ont invoqué l'article 11 de la Convention .
.
Du point de vue du Gouvernement, la requête ne fait pas apparaître clairement en quoi les requérants estiment qu'il a été porté atteinte à leur liberté d'association . Si les requérants se plaignent .d'avoir été licenciés par les Chemins de fer britanniques, ce grief doit étre considéré comme incompatible avec les dispositions de la Convention, puisque celle-ci ne garantit pas le drolt de ne pas étre licencié .
1hb-
Le Gouvernement défendeur se référe ensuite à la déclaration de l'un des requérants selon laquelle : « chacun doit pouvoir en toute liberté décider d'adhérer ou non à un syndicat quelles que soient les raisons personnelles de ce choix » . Le Gouvernement, pour le cas où les requérants prétendraient que l'article 11 111 prévoit non seulement le droit d'adhérer à un syndical mais aussi celui de ne pas y adhérer, ferait observer ce qui suit : 5 .2 Pour ce qui est des effets de la législation sur les requérants, celle-ci ne fournit pas un mécanisme permettant à un syndicat d'obtenir d'un employeur un accord instaurant le monopole d'embauche, mais comporte plutBt des règles relatives au licenciement justifié ou non dans les cas où un tel accord existe et est appliqué . De l'avis du Gouvernement, le grief des requérants dérive directement de leur licenciement par les Chemins de fer britanniques et des termes de leurs contrats, indirectement de l'Accord sur l'affiliation syndicale et moins directement encore de la législation . 5 3 Le Gouvernement défendeur a ensuite retracé longuement l'historique des négociations concernant l'article 11, à la lumiére de la Déclaration universelle des Droits de l'Homme du 10 décembre 1948, et décrit les premiers projets de ce qui devait devenir la Convention européenne . Il a fait observer que, bien que les premiers projets fissent mention du droit de ne pas adhérer à un syndicat, celui-ci n'apparaissait plus dans le texte final car on avait estimé inopportun de l'y inclure, considérant les difficultés que pourrait entrainer le systéme du monopole syndical d'embauche ("closed shop") adopté par certains pays . Etant donné que les gouvernements ont, en signant la Convention, accepté un article 11 dans lequel on avait délibérément évité de mentionner le droit de ne pas se syndiquer, le Gouvernement du Royaume-Uni, s'il avait eu un point de vue différent lorsqu'il a signé et ratifié la Convention, aurait pu formuler une réserve comme l'y autorise l'article 64 et n'aurait pas manqué de le faire . 5 .4 Le Gouvernement a par ailleurs rappelé qu'une optique analogue avait prévalu lors de la rédaction du Pacte des Nations Unies sur les droits civils et politiques, puisque la proposition d'ajouter une phrase précisant que nul ne pouvait être contraint à adhérer à une association n'a pas été acceptée (Document UN A /2929 du 1^ 1 juillet 19551 . C'est dans cette optique que le Gouvernement a ratifié le Pacte sans formuler de réserve à cet égard, alors que l'instrument de ratification a été déposé le 20 mai 1976, c'est-à-dire aprés l'entrée en vigueur de la Loi de 1976 . 5 .5 Le Gouvernement a fait ensuite valoir qu'aucune interprétation idéologique, textuelle et contextuelle ne permettait des conclusions différentes . Si le libellé de l'article 11 111 laissait subsister la moindre ambiguïté, il suffirait de se référer aux travaux préparatoires de la Convention sur ce point .
- 156-
.
.
.~ .~
.
. En outre, du fait que l'article 11 (1) protége le droit d'adhérer à un syndicat il ne s'ensuit pas qu'il protége également celui de ne pas y adhérer car la protection explicite d'un droit positif n'implique pas la protection du droit négatif ou « inverse » .
5 .6 Le Gouvernement se référe é galement aux Conventions 87 et 98 de l'o .I .T . ~_- ainsi qu'A la Charte sociale, car la Commission et la Cour européennes des Droits de l'Homme ont toutes deux estimé devoir considérer l'article 11 en liaison avec ces instruments . De l'avis du Gouvernement, ces instruments ne font pas mention d'un droit de ne pas adhérer à une organisation professionnelle ou syndicale . 5 .7 II est vrai que la Cour européenne des Droits de l'Homme n'a jamais statué sur ce point . Mais il n'est pas inopportun de rappeler qu'à plusieurs reprises la Cour a considéré de maniére plus générale que l'article 11 n'assurait pas au x
-`,ïsyndicais ou à leurs membres un traitement précis de la part de l'Etat (Affaire du
. -,nr . 1. -_~-,Syndicat suédois des conducteurs de locomotives) et plus particuliérement que la mise en ~uvre de politiques gouvernementales tendant à restreindre le nombre ss-=?`-•'-'~dés syndicâts dans un secteur donnA ne po rtait pas atteinte à la liberté syndicale
IAffâires du Syndicat national de la police belge et du Syndicat suédois des conducteurs de locomotives) . "58 Pour ce qui est du grief des requérant selon lequel l'a rt icle 11 leur garantit le droii de ne pas se syndiquer et selon lequel la législation en vigueur au RoyaumeUni porte atteinte à ce droit, le Gouvernement a fait valoir que, pour les raisons données ci-dessus, l'article 11 ne vise pas et n'assure pas la protection d'un ~,. --~qüelconque droit de nepa5 ra dhérer à un syndicat . L'article 11 fait à l'Etat obligation de protéger leioitrdeyconstituer des syndicats et d'y adhérer . Employeurs et employés peûvent_Îégitimement estimer que la protection des travailleurs dans un secteur our-ûn`-feü_donné exige que tous ces travailleurs adhérent à un syndicat . L'Etat a le tl rrit _deçleur permettre d'agir en conséquence sans risquer d'enfreindre la loi . Rien~dansl:article 11 (1) ne donne le droit à un particulier d e ~-.:--_°- : ne pas s'associer à d'autres-ou .de ne pas adhérer à un syndicat, que ce soit pa r principe ou parce quéil,néït'estime pas nécessaire à la protection de ses intéréts . Il faut donc en dédùi7e-ü e~ la Convention ne reconnaît pas le droit pour un particulier de faire obstaclé -çe que ses collégues considèrent comme nécessaire à la protection de leurs_ intr ê ts, en l'occurrence le maintien d'une pa rt icipation syndicale à 100 % . La~qûéstion de savoir si cette participation à 100 % est nécessaire à cette :fin"est .sansrapport avec le point qui nous occupe ; l'Etat est en droit de prendre des•mësûres tenant compte du fait que les employeurs et les employés sont convâincùs de .cette nécessité .
Duantà lalégi âtiôn~écemment entrée en vigueur au Royaume-Uni, le - :`~~ ~G6uvernement a souligné qu'elle concernait le droit de ne pas ètre arbitrairemen t - licencié . Ce droit a été en quelque sorte superposé à une législation préexistante . En d'autres termes, un licenciement donné intervenant à l'heure actuelle peut ne pas Atre contraire aux droits de l'employé en droit coutumier Icommon law), parce que, par exemple, l'employeur aura donné le préavis prévu par le contrat d e
157 -
travail, et constituer néanmoins un « licenciement arbitraire », au sens de la nouvelle législation . Lorsqu'un cas de « licenciement arbitraire » se présente, la loi donne à l'employé certains droits . Celui de ne pas étre injustement licencié ne fait pas partie de ceux que garantit la Convention Vu sous cet angle, les droits donnés aux employés par la nouvelle législation peuvent être considérés comme une sorte de a bonus », allant au-delé des droits protégés par la Convention et par le droit appliqué en Angleterre et au Pays de Galles en matière de rupture des contrats de travail . Ce « bonus » introduit dans la législation en vigueur au Royaume-Uni peut faire l'objet d'une exception dans le cas où il est mis fin à un contrat à la suite du refus de l'employé d'adhérer à un syndicat Ipour des motifs autres que religieux) . L'octroi de ce e bonus n, assorti de la limitation ci-dessus, ne peut, de l'avis du Gouvernement, être considéré comme une violation de la Convention du fait de l'existence de cette limitation . Dans la mesure où les requérants se plaignent d'une violation de leur liberté d'association, le Gouvernement estime qu'à la lumiére de ce qui précéde la requéte est manifestement mal fondée et, dans la mesure où ils allèguent une violation de la liberté de ne pas adhérer à un syndicat, la requête est incompatible avec la Convention, puisque ce droit ne figure pas au nombre de ceux que protége ladite Convention . 6 Le Gouvernement a fait valoir enfin que, aucune preuve d'une violation des articles 9, 10 et 11 n'ayant été rapportée et le droit de ne pas être licencié n'étant pas garanti par la Convention, le grief des requérants tiré de l'article 13, selon lequel le Royaume-Uni n'a pas mis à leur disposition les recours adéquats contre un licenciement arbitraire, ne peut étre retenu . Résumant ses conclusions, le Gouvernement demande à la Commission de déclarer que la requéte est incompatible avec la Convention ratione personae et que, par ailleurs, dans la mesure où les requérants se plaignent d'une violation - de l'article 9, la requéte est manifestement mal fondée ou incompatible ratione materiae avec la Convention, et donc irrecevable ;
- de l'article 10, la requête est manifestement mal fondé e - de l'article 11, la requête est manifestement mal fondée ou incompatible ratione materiae avec la Convention ; - de l'article 13, aucun probléme ne se pose sous l'angle de cet articl e B . Observations des requérant s Dans leurs observations écrites datées du 14 juin 1977, les requérants ont fait valoir tout d'abord que la question soulevée par la présente requête devait être examinée dans le contexte de la Convention prise dans son ensemble et surtout au regard des droits et libertés de l'individu que ladite Convention tend à définir et à rendre évidents aux yeux de tous .
- 158 -
Ils estiment, à ce propros, que,j'intention de ceux qui ont conçu la Convention était que tout citoyenfOt libre de se livrer à toute activité professionnelle licite de son choix, à condition d'en avoir la capacité, sans ètre soumis, pour ètre autorisé à faire ce" travail, 8des conditions incompatibles avec l'esprit de la Convention . La position du Gouvernement, par contre, est que, lout en reconnaissant aux citoyens du Royaume-Uni la liberté de leur personne, la liberté de pensée, de conscience, de réunion et d'association, il n'interviendrait pas pour empêcher ces mêmes citoyens d'être contraints, pour pouvoir poursuivre leurs activités professionnelles, à se joindre à une association, même dans le cas où celle-ci irait à l'opposé de leurs convictions les plus profondes, de leur conscience ou de leurs croyances . Après ces observations de caractére général, les requérants ont traité plu s en détail les différents points en litige . Ils ont fait valoir que si, dans l'actuelle législation du Royaume-Uni, le monopole syndical d'embâuche("closed shop") était autorisé let même encouragé), ce principe étiit incompatible .avec le droit à la liberté de pensée, de conscience et de religion, à la liberté d'expression et à la liberté d'association mentionnées aux articles 9, 10 et 11 de la Convention . De l'avis des requérants, la liberté garantie parl'article 11 doit comprendre la liberté de ne pas s'associer à d'autres personnes . S'il n'y a pas de liberté de refuser l'association, il ne peut y avoir non plus de liberté d'association . Un individu peut souhaiter s'associeYA d'autres pour une infinité de raisons, mais il est peu probable qu'une p&sonne contrainte à s'associer à d'autres contre sa volonté partage les objectifs ou les convictions de ceux àqui elle aura dù se joindre . Si elle ne partage pas leurs objectifs ou convictions, elle est non seulement privée de sa liberté de ne pas s'associer à d'autres, mais lé fait même de cette association risque de faire violence à sa liberté de pensée ou de conscience . Cette association peut aussi entraver ou étouffer sa liberté d'expression . Or un syndicat est une association au sens donné à ce mot à l'article 11 de la Convention . Les requérants ont fail valoir que si une personne était contrainte par l'existence d'un monopole d'embauche à adhérer à un syndicat contre sa propre pensée, conscience ou conviction, les droits que lui garantissent les articles 9, 10 et 11 de la Convention se trouvent ainsi violés . Les requérants ont fait valoir, de plus, qu'il serait à l'évidence contraire à la Convention qu'une loi dispose que tout salarié doit appartenir à un syndicat . A leur avis, le Gouvernement lui-même semble l'avoir tacitement reconnu en faisant observer que la loi de 1976 ne rend pas obligatoires les accords sur l'affiliation syndicale . Si la loi ne prévoit pas de protection contre le licenciement pour refus d'adhére r à un syndicat, chaque fois qu'un employeur et un syndical s'entendront pour imposer un monopole d'embauche, l'employé qui ne souhaite pas ètre syndiqué sera, selon toute probabilité, obligé de le .devenir de crainte d'être licencié . Le fait que le Gouvernement n'a pas interdit le monopole syndical d'embauche a donc pour conséquence de permettre à un employeur et à un syndicat d'imposer à des citoyen s
- 159-
du Royaume-Uni une limitation de leurs libertés pour laquelle le Gouvernement se trouverait en opposition avec la Convention s'il l'imposait par la voie législative . Quant à l'interprétation que le Gouvernement donne de l'article 11 à la lumière de la Déclaration universelle des Droits de l'Homme, les requérants estiment qu'elle n'est pas conforme au Préambule de la Convention, qui se référe à cette Déclaralion . Ils voient mal en quoi l'histoire de négociations de l'article 11, telle qu'elle est présentée par le Gouvernement, pourrait en quoi que ce soit influer sur l'interprétation correcte des termes de la Convention . En traitant des origines de la présente affaire, les requérants ont indiqué que, comme le Gouvernement l'a exposé, il est vrai qu'avant 1971 les droits et responsabilités des parties à un contrat de travail étaient pour l'essentiel régis uniquement par le droit coutumier Icommon lawl . Ils ont également cité le rapport d'une Commission royale sur les syndicats et les associations d'employeurs, publié en 1968, qui était d'une maniére générale assez favorable au point de vue des syndicats et conseillait de ne pas interdire la pratique du monopole d'embauche considérant, entre autres, qu'il ne serait pas possible de faire respecter cette interdiclion . Cette commission estimait qu'en conséquence il fallait accorder réparation à l'employé qui pour une raison ou une autre perdait son travail à la suite de l'instauration d'un monopole d'embauch e Les requérants ont ensuite décrit la situation au moment de l'entrée en vigueur de la Loi de 1971 sur les relations industrielles IIndustrial Relations Actl, ainsi que les conséquences de l'application de la loi de 1974 (Trade Union and Labour Relations Actl abrogeant celle de 1971, et les modifications apportées par la loi de 1976 (Trade Union and Labour Relations IAmendmentl Act) . Résumant leur argumentation, les requérants ont maintenu qu'avant la loi de 1971, un employeur pouvait mettre fin à un contrat de travail pour n'importe quelle raison, y compris la décision de l'employé d'adhérer à un syndicat ou son refus de le faire . Tant que la loi de 1971 était en vigueur, un licenciement pour l'un de ces motifs aurait été considéré comme injustifié . Actuellement, il serait considéré comme injustifié de mettre fin à un contrat de travail pour la raison que l'employé a adhéré ou souhaitait adhérér à un syndicat, mais il ne serait par contre pas "injustifié" de licencier un employé refusant d'adhérer à un syndicat, sauf pour des motifs d'ordre religieux . De plus, comme l'avocat principal fait observer dans son opinion sur l'épuisement des recours internes, il n'est plus possible de recourir aux tribunaux ordinaires en tentant une action pour licenciement arbitraire . Les requérants ont souligné que dans ces conditlons ils ne peuvent souscrire à l'affirmation du Gouvernement selon laquelle les employés licenciés pour refus de se syndiquer « ne sont pas moins bien protégés à l'heure actuelle qu'ils ne l'étaient avant 1971 » . Ils rejettent aussi l'idée que, puisque lareconnaissance d'un droit à ne pas étre injustement licencié va au-delà des obligations du Gouvernement aux termes de la Convention, la limitation de ce droit ne peut constituer une violation des obligations existantes . Les requérants ont souligné qu'ils n'alléguaien t
- 160 -
oas ici une limitation du droit de ne pas étre injustement licencié, mais la violation par le Gouvernement du Royaume-Uni des articles 9, 10 et 11 de la Convention . Quant à l'araument par leauel le Gouvernement fait valoir que le monopole syndical d'embauche existe également, en pratique, dans certaines industries de plusieurs Etats membres du Conseil de l'Europe, les requérants maintiennent que même si tel est le cas cela ne justifie pas les violations de la Convention dont Ils font état dans leur requête . De plus, dans de nombreux Etats membres du Conseil de l'Europe, la pratique du monopole d'embauche est illégale . Les requérants contestent pour deux raisons que la requéte soit, comme l'a affirmé le Gouvernement, incompatible ratione personae avec la Convention Tout d'abord, compte tenu de la nature de la législation régissant les activités de l'Office et considérant la nature et le degré des pouvoirs de direction, de contrôle et de supervision exercés par le ministre responsable des activités de l'Office, l'adoption par les Chemins de fer britanniques d'une politique favorable au monopole syndical d'embauche est un acte qui engage la responsabilité du Gouvernement du Royaume-Uni . Ils font valoir en second lieu que dans la mesure où la législation interne du Royaume-Uni a permis qu'ils soient licenciés pour avoir refusé d'adhérer à un syndicat, sans mettre à leur disposition un recours adéquat contre ce licenciement, le Gouvernement est responsable aux termes de la Convention pour la raison que le droit interne du Royaume-Uni ne protège pas les droits et libertés garantis par la Convention, que les droits des requérants n'ont pas été respectés et que le droit interne du Royaume-Uni ne fournit pas de recours adéquat . Quant à la nature et à la portée du contrôle exercé sur l'Office par le Ministre responsable en vertu des lois de 1962, 1968' et 1974, les requérants estiment qu'il ne faisait pas de doute que le Ministre eût également les pouvoirs nécessaires pour empêcher l'instauration du monopole d'embauche s'il avait décidé de le faire . Il n'est pas exact, aux yeux des requérants, que l'Office soit autonome pour ce qui concerne la gestion du personnel, les relations avec les syndicats ou les conditions d'embauche . Si la décision de conclure l'Accord sur l'affiliation syndicale de juillet 1975 a été prise par l'Office, les requérants affirment que, compte tenu de la situation de celui-ci par rapport au Ministre responsable, telle que la définit la loi, il faut considérer que le Ministre compétent a approuvé ou fait sienne cette décision . Les requérants affirment par ailleurs qu'eu égard à la Convention, le Gouvernement n'est pas en droit d'adopter une politique de neutralité sur la question de savoir s'il devait ou non y avoir un monopole syndical d'embauche 1"closed shop") dans telle ou telle entreprise . Les requérants ont noté l'affirmation du Gouvernement selon laquelle "c'était aux parties Isyndicat et employeur) qu'il revenait de décider s'il convenait ou non d'instaurer un monopole d'embauche et font observer que ce point de vue implique qu'en pareil cas les termes du contrat d'un employé ne dépendent pas d'une négociation entre celui-ci et l'employeur mais sont laissés à la décision de l'employeur ou du futur employeur et d'une tierce partie sans que l'intéressé soit nécessairement consulté .
- 161 -
Les requérants ont ensuite exposé de maniére plus détaillée les fonctions et pouvoirs respectifs du Ministre compétent et de l'Office, en se référant aux dispositions pertinentes des lois de 1962, 1968 et 1974, afin de montrer que le Ministre était largement responsable des activités de l'Office, contrairement aux affirmations du Gouvernement présentant l'Office comme un organe échappant à la responsabilité de l'Etat . En conséquence, les requérants font observer que, vu les pouvoirs de direction et de contrôle trés larges et détaillés que le Ministre lactuellement un Secrétaire d'Etat) exerce sur l'Office, la décision Is'd s'agit bien d'une décisionl de cet organe de conclure avec les syndicats intéressés un accord sur le monopole était un acte dont le Gouvernement du Royaume-Uni doit accepter la responsabilité . Les requérants ont fait valoir, de plus, que l'objection du Gouvernement ratione personae doit étre rejetée pour la raison supplémentaire que le Gouvernement a le devoir à l'égard des requérants de protéger les droits et libertés garantis par la Convention et que le droit interne du Royaume-Uni ne protégeait pas à l'époque et ne protège pas ces droits et libertés, en ce sens qu'il a permis aux Chemins de fer britanniques d'établir un monopole d'embauche et de licencier les requérants parce qu'ils avaient refusé de se syndiquer, sans leur fournir de voies de recours ou de réparations adéquates .
Quant à la recevabilité du grief fondé sur les articles 9-1 1 Sur ce sujet, les requérants ont ajouté quelques observations complémentaires à celles déjà présentées plus haut . Ils ont réaffirmé qu'il était reconnu que toute personne devait ètre libre de s'associer à d'autres et qu'ils avaient déjà donné les raisons pour lesquelles cette liberté devait impliquer celle de ne pas se joindre à une association . Si une personne est contrainte, de peur de perdre son emploi, à adhérer à une association qu'elle désapprouve, il s'ensuit inévitablement une certaine atteinte à sa liberté de pensée, de conscience et d'expression . Les requérants affirment que leur liberté d'association a été violée par le fait qu'ils ont été placés devant un choix inacceptable entre l'adhésion à un syndicat et la perte de leur emploi . Ils ne se plaignent pas, sauf dans ce sens, d'une atteinte au "droit de ne pas être licencié" . Ils attirent l'attention sur la déclaration du Gouvernement affirmant que c'est à l'employeur et au(x) syndicatlsl représentant les employés qu'il revient de décider d'instaurer ou non un monopole d'embauche ("closed shop"I et que le contrat de travail devait prévoir cette possibilité avant le stade de l'application de la loi . A leur avis, la premiére de ces déclarations montre bien que l'employé a perdu sa libené de choix personnel . Quant à la seconde de ces déclarations, lorsque les requérants ont été embauchés par les Chemins de fer britanniques leur contrat ne spécifiait pas la nécessité du monopole d'embauche . Les termes de leur contrat ont été - leur a-t-on dit - modifiés, sans qu'ils aient été consultés, par accord entre les Chemins de fer britanniques et les syndicats . Ouant aux observations du Gouvernement à propos de l'historique des négociations pour la rédactlon de l'article 11, les requérants font valoir qu'i l
- 162-
ressort clairement de cet exposé que la disposition relative à la liberté de ne pas s'associer à d'autres personnes avait été omise de la Convention pour des raisons que l'on pourrait qualifier de "politiques'", au sens large, et qu'elle était probablement superflue . Ils ont souligné que la liberté de s'associer devait inclure celle de ne pas le faire et se sont référés'à cet égard à la jurisprudence de la Commission Irequéte N° 4072/69) . Quant au § 5 .8 des observations du Gouvernement, les requérants ont noté que celui-ci s'y référe aux « employeurs et employés » alors que dans les observations précédentes il parlait des a employeurs et syndicats » . Les requérants supposent que lorsque le Gouvernement dit que les employeurs et les employés sont parfaitement en droit de considérer que la protection des travailleurs nécessite que ceux-ci soient tous syndiqués et parle de « collégues n estimant nécessaire à la protection de leurs intéréts de maintenir une participation syndicale à 100%, le Gouvernement veut parler d'une majorité desdits employés et collégues . II a donc semblé aux requérants que l'argument é tait le suivant : si une majorité des employés estiment telle ou telle action nécessaire, ils doivent pouvoir agir à leur guise . Ce qui ne peut ètre juste si cela entraîne - comme l'alléguent les requé rants - une atteinte aux droits fondamentaux d'autres personnes Le Gouvernement a prétendu par ailleurs que le droit de ne pas être arbitrairement licencié, que la nouvelle législation a donné aux employés, était « une sorte de bonus rr . Les requérants maintiennent que ce a bonus » est sans rapport avec la restriction des droits individuels entrainée par les lois de 1974 et de 1975 et n'excuse ni ne compense cette restriction . Les requérants ont fait observer enfin que la Convention des Droits de l'Homme se préoccupe de la liberté individuelle, alors que le monopole d'embauche entraine une limitation de cette liberté et donne un grand pouvoir à l'employeur et un pouvoir plus grand encore aux syndicats . Ce pouvoir est acquis au prix d'une réduction de la liberté personnelle des employés . Les requérants ont maintenu que le fait de les contraindre à choisir entre l'adhésion à un syndicat ou la perte de leur emploi constituait une violation des droits de la personne humaine et ils ont demandé à la Commission de déclarer qu'il en é tait bien ainsi .
EN DROI T Les requérants se sont plaints initialement que le Royaume-Uni appliquait la législation incriminée et ne l'avait pas jusqu'ici modifiée de maniére à permettre aux citoyens britanniques d'exercer leur droit à la liberté de pensée, de conscience, d'expression et d'association, et n'avait pas prévu de voie de recours adéquate en cas de licenciement arbitraire, particuliérement pour les citoyens britanniques qui perdent leur emploi du fait de leur refus d'adhérer à l'un des syndicats recommandés par les employeurs . Ils se sont plaints en outre que dans une situation-telle que la leur, alors qu'ils n'ont pas d'objection pour des motifs d'ordre spécifiquement religieux, mais plutôt une objection sérieuse pour des motifs raisonnables ou pour le motif qu'il s
- 163 -
entendent exercer la liberté d'expression et d'association garantie par les articles 9, 10 et 11 de la Convention, l'application d'une telle législation constituait une violation de la Convention et était, notamment, contraire à l'esprit desdits articles . La Commission observe tout d'abord que les requérants, dans leurs griefs initiaux, ont soutenu que le Gouvernement défendeur avait porté atteinte aux droits et libertés en question pour ce qui est des citoyens britanniques . Toutefois, étant donné que la Convention ne prévoit pas de requête sous forme d'actio popularis, la Commission, tout en étant consciente que les points soulevés dans la présente requête concernent de nombreuses personnes, ne prend celle-ci en considération que dans la mesure où les requérants eux-mêmes se trouvent visés . Le Gouvernement du Royaume-Uni a soutenu que la requéteétait incompatible ratione personae avec les dispositions de la Convention . Il a fait valoir que l'Office des Chemins de fer britanniques responsable du licenciement des requérants était un organe autonome dont les décisions n'engageaient pas la responsabilité de l'Etat . La Commission relève que le Gouvernement a indiqué dans ses observations qu'aux termes de la Loi de 1962 sur les transports, l'Office était une entreprise publique chargée de l'exploitation du réseau ferré, encore que certains pouvoirs soient confiés à un Ministre du Gouvernement . Quelle que soit la répartition des droits et des devoirs entre l'Office et le Ministre compétent, la Commission estime qu'il ne fait pas de doute que le Gouvernement du Royaume-Uni est responsable de ses services publics et donc des actes de l'Office des Chemins de fer britanniques . L'Office a embauché, puis licencié les deux requérants et ces actes doivent être considérés comme des actes de « l'Etat employeur » . La Commission renvoie à ce propos à la conclusion de la Cour dans l'Affaire du Syndicat suédois des conducteurs de locomotives, où il est dit que la Convention ne fait nulle part de distinction expresse entre les attributions de puissance publique des Etats Contractants et leurs responsabilités d'employeurs 14 37 de l'arrêt du 6 février 1976, Publications de la Cour européenne des Droits de l'Homme, série A N° 20 p 14) . De l'avis de la Commission, la même argumentation est applicable en l'espèce, mutatis murandis. Il s'ensuit que les actes de l'Office des Chemins de fer britanniques incriminés par les requérants engagent la responsabilité du Royaume-Uni aux termes de la Convention . La requète ne peut donc être rejetée pour incompatibilité avec les dispositions de la Convention . Le Gouvernement a fait valoir à titre subsidiaire que dans la mesure où la requête alléguait des violations des articles 9, 10, 11 et 13, elle était irrecevable pour divers autres motifs . De l'avis du Gouvernement, l'objection des requérants à l'adhésion à un syndicat n'apparaissait pas comme fondée sur les convictions religieuses ou d'autres convictions analogues protégAes par l'article 9 et, même s i
- 164_
la Commission devait considérer que les opinions des requérants constituaient une conviction, la législation du Royaume-Uni ne les avait pas directement empéchés de manifester celle-ci . Les griefs des requérants sur le terrain de l'article 9 seraient donc soit incompatibles avec la Convention, soit manifestement mal fondés . De plus, le Gouvernement soutient que, puisque les requérants n'ont pas apporté la preuve d'une violation de leur liberté d'expression, le grief fondé sur l'article 10 devrait Atre considéré comme manifestement mal fondé . De même le grief des requérants tiré de l'article 11, grief selon lequel la législation en question oorterait atteinte à leur liberté d'association et à leur liberté de ne pas adhérer à un syndicat, ne saurait ètre retenu, de l'avis du Gouvernement, puisque la premiére partie en est manifestement mal fondée en fait et la seconde incompatible avec la Convention, qui ne protége pas ce droit . Le Gouvernement a conclu que puisqu'aucune violation de l'un des articles invoqués par les requérants n'avait été démontrée, il n'y avait pas lieu de faire intervenir l'article 13 . Les requérants ont maintenu, toutefois, que la requête était recevable pour les diverses raisons indiquées dans leur argumentation initiale . De l'avis de la Commission, il est désormais suffisamment clair que le litige porte essentiellement sur l'interprétation de l'article 11 de la Convention, notamment sur le point de savoir si celui-ci protège aussi le droit de ne pas adhérer à un syndicat . Cette question a déjà été soulevée dans des affaires antérieures sans toutefois que les faits exigent que la Commission se prononce spécifiquement sur ce point Ivoir, entre autres, la requête N° 4072/69, Annuaire N° 13 page 709) . La question est, en l'espèce, clairement posée devant la Commission et les deux parties ont avancé divers arguments pour et contre cette interprétation . L'article 27 121, qui dispose que la Commission déclare irrecevable toute requète émanant d'un particulier, d'une organisation non gouvernementale o ud'ngropeaticulsq'emanifst lodée,n'autrise pas ladite Commission, au stade de la recevabilité, à rejeter une requète qui ne peut être ainsi qualifiée Ivoir, par exemple, les décisions sur la recevabilité des requêtes Nos . 5100 à 5102/71, 5354/72, 5370/72, Cinq militaires contre les PaysBas, Annuaire 15, pp . 509 à 557 et références, et Times Newspapers Ltd . et autres contre Royaume-Uni, D .R . 2 p . 90, 97) . Ayant procédé à un examen préliminaire des exposés en fait et en droi t présentés par les parties, la Commission considère que ceux-ci soulévent, quant à l'interprétation et à l'application de la Convention, notamment de l'article 11, des questions importantes et d'une complexité telle qu'il ne saurait être statué à leur sujet qu'aprés un examen au fond . Par ces motifs, la Commissio n
DÉCLARE RECEVABLE et retient la requète, tout moyen de fond réservé .
- 165-

Origine de la décision

Formation : Commission (plénière)
Date de la décision : 11/07/1977

Fonds documentaire ?: HUDOC

HUDOC
Association des cours judiciaires suprêmes francophones Organisation internationale de la francophonie

Juricaf est un projet de l'AHJUCAF, l'association des cours judiciaires suprêmes francophones,
réalisé en partenariat avec le Laboratoire Normologie Linguistique et Informatique du droit (Université Paris I).
Il est soutenu par l'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie et le Fonds francophone des inforoutes.