Facebook Twitter Appstore
Page d'accueil > Résultats de la recherche

§ WIGGINS c. ROYAUME-UNI

Imprimer

Type d'affaire : Decision
Type de recours : Partiellement irrecevable ; partiellement recevable ; requête jointe à la requête n° 6878/75

Numérotation :

Numéro d'arrêt : 7456/76
Identifiant URN:LEX : urn:lex;coe;cour.europeenne.droits.homme;arret;1978-02-08;7456.76 ?

Analyses :

(Art. 14) DISCRIMINATION, (Art. 9-1) LIBERTE DE RELIGION


Parties :

Demandeurs : WIGGINS
Défendeurs : ROYAUME-UNI

Texte :

APPLICATION/REQUETE N° 7456/76 Paul Henry WIGGINS v/the UNITED KINGDOM ' Paul Henry WIGGINS c/ROYAUME-UNI '
DECISION of 8 February 1978 on the admissibility of the application DECISION du 8 février 1978 sur la recevabilité de la requét e
Article 8, paragraph 1 of the Convention : A dwelling house, legally acquired by a person and occupied for several years does not cease to be his "home" within the meaning of Article 8 (1) merely because due to unforeseen circumstances, this person is no longer authorized to reside therein. Article 8, paragraph 2, of the Convention : Measure necessary for the economic well-being of the country and for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others. Examination of whether in the case in point the measure was proportionate to the aim pursued. Article 14 of the Convention, in conjunction with Article 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of the First Protocol : Objective and reasonable justification, proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realized. Article 26 of the Convention : When an applicant claims to have exhausted all domestic remedies, it is for the Government who claims that domestic remedies have not been exhausted to demonstrate that the applicant did not make use of a remedy at his disposal . Article 63, paragraph 3, of the Convention : No significant social or cultural differences between Guernsey and the United Kingdom . Article 1, paragraph 1, of the First Protocol :"Possessions", referred to in the first sentence, includes movables and immovables . A requirement not to use a possession is an interference with the exercise of the right to respect for possessions . ' The applicant was reoresented before the Comm'ssion by Mr Cedric Thornberry, barrister et lew, London . ' Le reouérant 0tau reprAsenté devant la Commission par M• Cedric Thornbeny, evocat A Londres .
- 40 -
Article 1, paragraph Z, of the First Protocof : The States are the sofe judges of the necessity of an interference in the exercise of the right to the use of possessions. The supervisron of the Commission is limited to the legality and the object of the interference. Article 8, paragraphe 1 de la Convention : Une maison qu'une personne a réguliérement acquise et habitée durant plusieurs années ne cesse pas d'être son «domicile», au sens de l'article 8, paragraphe 1, du seul fait que, pour des raisons imprévues, cette personne n'est plus autorisée é y habiter . Article 8, paragraphe 2 de la Convention : Mesure nécessaire au bien-être économique du pays et 9 la protection des droits et libertés d'autrui. Examen du point de savoir si, en l'espèce, la mesure était proportionnée au but visé . Article 14 de la Convention, combiné avec l'article 8 de la Convention et l'a rticle 1 du Protocole additionnel : Justification objective et raisonnable proportionnalité entre les moyens employés et le but visé . Article 26 de la Convention : Lorsqu'un requérant prétend avoir épuisé les voies de recours internes, il appartient au Gouvernement qui soulève une exception de non-épuisement d'établir que le requérant disposait effectivement d'un recours qu'il n'a pas exercé . Article 63, paragraphe 3, de la Convention : Absence de différences notables d'ordie social et culturel entre l'ile de Guernesey et le Royaume-Uni . Article 1, paragraphe 1, du Protocole additionnel : Les «biens» visés B la premiére phrase sont les biens meubles et immeubles . L'interdicubn de faire usage d'un bien est une ingérence dans l'exercice du droit au respect des biens . Article 1, paragraphe Z du Protocole additionnel : Les Etats sont seuls juges de la nécessité d'une ingérence dans l'exercice du droit A f'usage des biens . Le contrôle de la Commission se limite 8 celui de la légalité et de l'objet de l'ingérence.
I françats : voir p . 49 1
Summary of the facts
In order to meet the housing crisis in Guernsey, legislation was enacted in 1970 which stated that the occupation of a/l dwelling houses, with the exception of a smafl number of expensive dwellings, was to be subject to licence . Persons who satisfied the residential qualifications in Guernsey before 30 June 1957, as well as spouse and children of any such person, were exempt from the obligation to apply for a licence. - 41 -
The applicant moved to Guernsey in 7960, together with his parents and they lived in an open market dwelling . In 1970, he married a gir/ born in Guernsey who therefore did not require a licence to acquire property . Shortly after he bought a house called "The Haven" in St . Sampson's which was in a dilapidated and uninhabitable condition . lt was listed as a controlled dwelling and therefore a licence was required if a "non exempt" person were to occupy it . He renovated the house which consisted of one medium-size and two smaller units. The applicant went to live there with his wife, thus benefiting from her exempt status. The couple separated in 1973. The wife /eft "The Haven" where the applicant remained alone. He filed a petition for divorce in 1975. The Housing Authority then asked the applicant to app/y for a housing licence, which he did. The licence was not granted to him because of the adverse housing situation . The applicant lodged an appeal with the Royal Court but the appeal was dismissed in January 1976 . In May 1976, upon rhe expiry of a temporary licence, the applicant went ro live in a tent in his garden . His application to the Commrssion was introduced in February 1976. In May 1977 the authorities informed the applicant's lawyer that they were prepared to grant him the smaller units of "The Haven", two habitable rooms being considered as sufficient for a single person, on condition that he undertook to let the two other units to persons wirh licences or the necessary residential qualification . At the beginning of February 1978 the Housing Authoriry declared that they were prepared to allow the applicant to occupy the main unit, provided that he carried out certain alterations .
THE LA W The applicant has complained that, after having separated from his wife, he was ordered out of his dwelling-house and refused a housing licence by the Housing Authority which would have enabled him to inhabit his house . He has alleged violations of Article 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No . 1 either separately or in conjunction with Article 14 of the Convention . 1 . The Commission has first examined the question whether or not the applicant has exhausted the remedies available to him under the domestic law and has therefore complied with the conditions of Article 26 of the Convention . In this respect the Government submitted that the applicant shoul d have appealed to the Court of Appeal against the decision given on 29 January 1976 by the Royal Court, sitting as Ordinary Court . By virtue o f
_42_
Section 13, Sub-section (1) of the Court of Appeal IGuernseyl Law of 1961, the appellate jurisdiction of the former "Cour des Jugements et Records" was now vested in the Court of Appeal . The "Cour des Jugements et Records" had a common law right to hear appeals at large from the Ordinary Court . Where it was a matter of reviewing, the Court of Appeal had that jurisdiction conferred upon it as successor to the "Cour des Jugements et Records" . The applicant submitted in reply that there was no further avenue of appeal open to him after the decision of the Royal Court by which it declined to hold the decision of the Housing Authority unreasonable . He stated inrer alia that the issue of unreasonableness was a pure question of fact and in the absence of a statutory provision no right to appeal on a question of fact accrued under general law . Since 1961 there had moreover been no appeal to the Court of Appeal on any matter concerning housing . Under Article 26 of the Convention the "Commission may only deal with the matter after all domestic remedies have been exhausted according to the generally recognised rules of international law . . ." The Commission has previously decided that, in order to comply with the requirements of this provision an applicant is obliged to make "normal use" of remedies "likely to be effective and adequate" to remedy the matters of which he complains Icf . e .g . Application No . 788/ 60, Austria v . Italy, Yearbook IV, p . 172 Application No . 4330/69, Simon-Herold v . Austria, Yearbook XIV, p . 352 Applications Nos . 5577-5583/72, Donnelly and others v . the United Kingdom, Decisions and Reports 4, p . 64) . However, in accordance with the abovementioned generally recognised rules of international law it is also, as stated by the applicant, the duty of the Government claiming that domestic remedies have not been exhausted, to demonstrate the existence of such remedies (cf . e .g . Application No . 299/57, Greece v . the United Kingdom, Yearbook II, p . 190) . In the present case the applicant's right to appeal to the Royal Court against the decision of the Housing Authority followed from Section 24 of the Housing Control (Guernsey) Law of 1969 . However, there was no statutory provision explicitly providing for a further appeal to the Court of Appeal in matters of housing or housing control . According to the Government the alleged right of the Court of Appeal to hear an appeal in the applicant's case derived from a common law right appertaining to its predecessor, the "Cour des Jugements et Records" . The Commission notes, however, that the respondent Government have not disputed the applicant's statement that, ever since it was set up in 1961, the Court of Appeal has not dealt with a single appeal regarding housing problems . The Government have moreover not shown that the "Cour des Jugements et Records" itself has ,
- 43 -
on any occasion, heard an appeal relating to housing control legislation or any other housing matter . In these circumstances the Commission is not satisfied that an appeal to the Court of Appeal constituted an effective and adequate remedy in Guernsey which was capable of providing redress for the applicant's complaints under the Convention and its Protocol No 1 . These complaints cannot therefore be rejected for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies . 2 The Commission has next examined the applicant's complaints under Article 8 of the Convention which in its first paragraph provides inter alia that "Everyone has the right to respect for . . . his home . . ." . In this respect the question first arises whether "The Haven" can be considered as the applicant's "home" for the purposes of Article 8 and, if so, whether the measures taken by the Housing Authority amount to an interference with his right under that provision . The Commission notes that the applicant lawtully bought the dwelling in 1970 . He immediately started to renovate the house and then lived in it together with his wife . The spouses continued inhabiling the house during their marriage . The Commission is of the view that it must thus be considered as having been their "home" within the meaning of Article 8(1 ) of the Convention . The Commission is moreover satisfied that "The Haven" remained the applicant's home also after his separation from his wife . Her leaving their common household gave rise to no changes in that respect . As regards the question whether or not there has been an interference with the applicant's rights, the respondent Government have submitted that, since the applicant's occupancy of "The Haven" was conditional on his being a member of his wife's household, the refusal of the Housing Authority to permit him to live in the house after her departure did not amount to an interference with his right to respect for his home . The Commission does not share this view of the Government . It notes that the applicant held a legal title to "The Haven" which moreover, as already stated, remained his home even after the separation from his wife . It is true that under Guernsey law his lawful occupancy of the house was conditional on his living with his wife or his having a licence . In the Commission's view, however, it cannot reasonably be expected that the applicant, when buying the house in 1970, should have foreseen the breaking-up of his marriage and thereby also the precariousness of his future housing situation . When requested to move out of his house in 1975 the applicant had been living there for over five years . The Commission therefore finds that the refusal of the Housing Authority to grant the applicant a licence and their order that he should vacate his premises interfered with his right to respect for his home as guaranteed by Article 8 (1) .
- 44 -
The Commission has next examined whether this interterence can be justified on any of the grounds enumerated in the second paragraph of Article 8 of the Convention which reads as follows : "2 .There shall be no interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except such as is in accordance with the law and is necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security, public safety or the economic well-being of the country, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health and morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others . " The decision of the Housing Authority to refuse the applicant a housing licence was in accordance with the law, namely, the Housing Control (Guernsey) Law 1969 as extended by the Housing Control IExtensionl IGuernseyl Law of 1974 . This was one in a series of laws which had been introduced after the Second World War in order to prevent over-population harmful to Guernsey's economy which depends to a large extent on agriculture and horticulture . This legislation made it possible for people born on the island or otherwise closely connected with it, to settle down there . The Commissiôn accepts that the social and economic difficulties caused by an increasing population necessitated the enactment of certain protective legislation . The Housing Control (Guernsey) Law of 1969 was thus pursuing a legitimate aim which was necessary for the economic well-being of Guernsey and for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others . Referring, mutaris mutandis, to the opinion expressed by the European Court of Human Rights in its judgment in the "Handyside Case" (judgment of 7 December 1976, para . 49), the Commission considers, however, that it must also examine whether the measures taken against the applicant were proportionate to the legitimate aim pursued . In so doing, the Commission has had regard to the fact that the second paragraph of Article 8 of the Convention leaves to the High Contracting Parties a considerable discretion in choosing the ways which appear to them to be the most adequate in order to achieve this aim . In this respect the Commission accepts generally that a licence system like that existing in Guernsey, which reserves all dwellings below a certain rateable value for people either born on the island or having otherwise close connections with it, and which moreover takes into account the size of a dwelling in relation to the number of persons occupying it, can be considered as an adequate system . As to the applicant's particular situation, the Commission is concerned about the refusal to let him inhabit the main unit of "The Haven" and finds it difficult, at first sight, to regard this refusal as being proportionate to the legitimate aim pursued by the Housing Control Law for the following reasons : The applicant bought a dilapidated house, inhabited by no-one, and he made three housing units thereof . In that respect it would seem that h e
- 45 -
made in fact a positive contribution to the housing situation in Guernsey . With its area of approximately 52 square metres, the unit concerned does not either appear to be excessively large even for one person . However, the Commission attaches particular importance to the fact that by letter of 11 March 1977 the Housing Authority informed the applicant about the possibility of his being granted a licence for occupancy of one of the smaller units of "The Haven" if he applied for such a licence . The applicant chose for various reasons not to do so . Furthermore, by letter of 6 February 1978, the Housing Authority then informed the applicant that they were prepared to grant him a licence to occupy the main unit, provided that certain conditions were satisfied by him . Taking into account the position thus recently adopted by the Guernsey Housing Authority towards the applicant, the Commission concludes that the measures taken by them can be considered as justified under Article 8 121 of the Convention as they did not exceed the discretion which is left to them in determining whether or not the measures were necessary for the economic well-being of the island and for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others . In these circumstances the Commission finds that an examinaion of this complaint, as it has been submitted, does not disclose any appearance of a violation of the rights and freedoms set forth in the Convention and in particular in Article 8 . It follows that this part of the application is manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 27 (2) of the Convention . 3 . The applicant has also complained that, by reason of the decision of the Housing Authority not to grant him a housing licence, he has been deprived of his right to use his property . In this respect he has alleged a violation of Article 1 of Protocol No . 1 to the Convention . The Commission has examined this complaint under the first sentence of the first paragraph of that Article which provides that every person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions . It is the view of the Commission that the ruling of the Housing Authority indeed deprived the applicant of the right to use his property . The Commission furthermore does not accept the view of the Government that the term "possessions" within the meaning of that provision should be limited to moveable property only . The French text is clear in this respect . It refers in both paragraphs of Article 1 to "biens", which clearly means both moveable and immoveable property . The respondent Government have again argued that since the applicant's lawful occupancy of his house was conditional in that it depended on his living with his Guernsey-born wife, it did not amount to an interference wit h
- 46 -
his right to peaceful enjoyment of his possessions to refuse him permission to inhabit the house once this condition no longer existed . The Commission considers, however, that, since the applicant has the exclusive title as owner to "The Haven", his being deprived of his possibilities to use his property amounts to an interference within the meaning of the first sentence of the first paragraph of Article 1 . The Commission has consequently to determine whether the interference can be justified under the second paragraph of Article 1 which authorises the Contracting States to enforce such laws as they deem necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest . Unlike Article 8 121 of the Convention, the second paragraph of Article 1 sets up the Contracting States as sole judges of the "necessity" for an interference . Consequently, the Commission's supervisory function is here limited to the lawfulness and the purpose of the restrictions in question (cf . European Court H .R ., judgment of 7 December 1976, "Handyside Case", para . 62) . The decision not to grant the applicant a housing licence was in accordance with the law, namely the Housing Control (Guernsey) Law of 1969 . The Commission furthermore accepts the submission of the respondent Government that the aim of the enforcement of the Law concerned was in order to control the use of property for the interests of the people of Guernsey, including the social and economic interests of the island . The interference by the Housing Authority is therefore justified under paragraph 2 of Article 1 of Protocol No . 1 as being in accordance with the general interest . It follows that this complaint, examined under Article 1 of Protocol No . 1, is also manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 27 (2) of the Convention . 4 . The applicant has further alleged a violation of Article 14 of the Convention in conjunction with Article 8 of the Convention and of Article 1 of Protocol No . 1 . He has complained that the classification of those persons exempt from housing control was arbitrary and unreasonable . There was in his view also a discrimination based on "property" since a person without any connections at all with the island could come over and buy one of the more expensive houses which are not subject to any control . Article 14 prohibits discrimination in the enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in the Convention "on any ground such as . . . property, birth or other status" . The Commission refers in the first place to the jurisprudence of the European Court of Humari Rights in the "Belgian Linguistics Case" which laid down criteria for consideration of differences in treatment : the objective and reasonable justification of a measure and the reasonable relationship o f
_47_
proponionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised (cf . judgment of 23 July 1968, Series A, p . 34, para . 10 ) In the present case the purpose of the Housing Control Law of 1969 as well as the measures taken by the Housing Authority to enforce the Law was, as previously stated, to secure that accomodation would be available to persons with a recognised connection with Guernsey . The Commission considers that this aim is both objective and reasonable . It is true that, in so far as the "property" aspect is concerned, about 9"/o of the houses in Guernsey are accessible to all persons irrespective of their relationship with the island since these houses exceed a certain rateable value . However, having considered the housing legislation as a whole from this aspect, the Commission finds that there is no indication that it is discriminatory in this regard either, but that on the contrary it appears to be favourable to the people in Guernsey . Considering, finally, the fact that the applicant will be granted a licence for a smaller unit of his house, if he applies for one, and that, on certain conditions, he would apparently be given a licence for occupancy of the main unit of "The Haven", the Commission concludes that there was in this case also a reasonable relationship of proportionality between the means employed and the aim sought to be realised . Therefore, the treatment of the applicant in the present case does not disclose any appearance of a violation of Article 14 of the Convention . It follows that the applicant's complaint, examined under Article 14 of the Convention in conjunction with Article 8 of the Convention and Article 1 of Protocol No . 1, is equally manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 27 (2) . 5 . Finally, in regard to An . 63 of the Convention, and in particular as to the local requirements mentioned in Article 63 (3), the Commission does not consider it necessary to make any separate findings in this case other than to say that it does not find any significant social or cultural differences between Guernsey and the United Kingdom which could be relevant to the application of the Articles invoked in the present case .
For these reasons, the Commissio n DECLARES THE APPLICATION INADMISSIBL E
-48-
Résumé des faits Pour parer à la crise du logement dans l'1/e de Guernesey, la législation en vigueur depuis 1970 soumet les logements, à l'exception d'un petit nombre de logements de prix é/evé, é une réglementation aux termes de laquelle leur habitation est soumise à autorisation. Les personnes qui avaient leur domicile à Guernesey avant le 30 juin 1957, ainsi que leurs descendants au premier degré, sont dispensées de solliciter une autorisation . Le requérant s'est établi à Guernesey en 1960 en même temps que ses parents et vécut avec eux dans un logement non réglementé . En 1970, il a épousé une fille née à Guernesey, qui était dispensée d'autorisation de logement . Peu après, il fit l'acquisition d'une maison nommée RThe Havenr, à St Sampson's, qui était délabrée et inhabitable, mais figurait au nombre des habitations réglementées . ll restaura la maison, comprenant un logement moyen et deux petits logements et s'y installa avec son épouse, au bénéfice du statut de celle-ci. Les époux se séparérent en 1973 ; l'épouse quitta n The Haven », où le requérant demeura seul . 1/ introduisit une demande en divorce en 1975. L'administ2tion invita alors le requérant à solliciter un permis d'habiter sa maison, ce qu'il fit . Le permis lui fut refusé en raison de la situation générale trés tendue sur le marché du logement. Le requérant recourut auprés du tribunal (Royal Court) mais le recours fut rejeté en janvier 1976 . Dés l'échéance d'une autorisation provisoire, valable jusqu'en mai 1976, le requérant vécut sous tente dans son jardin . Sa requête à la Commission avait été introduite en février 1976 . En mars 1977, l'administration fit savoir à l'avocat du requé2nr qu'elle était prête à lui accorder un permis d'habiter l'un des petits logements sis dans la maison nThe Haven», deux pièces habitables étant jugées suffisantes pour une personne seule, à condition qu'il accepte de louer les deux autres logements é des personnes munies de permts. Au début de février 1978, l'administration se déclara disposée é autoriser le requérant à occuper le logement principal, à condition qu'il exécute certains travaux de transformation .
(TRADUCTION)
EN DROI T Le requérant s'est plaint qu'aprés s'être séparé de sa femme, il lui a été ordonné de quitter sa maison et que le Service du logement a refusé de lui délivrer un permis grâce auquel il aurait pu continuer de vivre dans sa maison . Il a allégué la violation de l'article 8 de la Convention et d e
- 49 -
l'anicle 1 - du Protocole additionnel, soit considérés isolément, soit combinés avec l'article 14 de la Convention . 1 . La Commission a recherché, tout d'abord, si le requérant avait épuisé les voies de recours qui lui étaient ouvertes en droit interne, et s'il avait ainsi satisfait aux dispositions de l'article 26 de la Convention . A cet égard, le Gouvernement a fait valoir que le requérant aurait dû faire appel devant la cour d'appel (Court of Appeal) de la décision rendue le 29 janvier 1976 par le tribunal royal (Royal Court), statuant comme tribunal ordinaire IOrdinary Court) . En vertu de l'article 13 (1) de la loi de 1961 sur la cour d'appel de Guernesey, celle-ci a remplacé l'ancienne «Cour des jugements et recordsn comme juridiction d'appel . La «Cour des jugements et records» était compétente, en vertu de la «common lawn, pour connaître de tous les recours contre les décisions du Tribunal ordinaire . En tant que successeur de la «Cour des jugements et records», la cour d'appel s'est vu conférer cette compétence dans les cas où le recours tend à taire réformer un jugement . Le requérant a fait valoir, en réponse, qu'aprés la décision du tribunal royal refusant de considérer comme déraisonnable la décision du Service du logement, aucune autre voie de recours ne lui était ouvene . Il a déclaré, notamment, que la question du caractère déraisonnable était une question de pur fait et qu'en l'absence de dispositions législatives, aucun droit de recours sur un point de fait ne pouvait être puisé dans le droit général . En outre, aucun appel n'avait été interjeté devant la cour d'appel dans une affaire de logement depuis 1961 . Aux termes de l'article 26 de la Convention, la «Commission ne peut étre saisie qu'après l'épuisement des voies de recours internes, tel qu'il est entendu selon les principes de droit international généralement reconnus . . .» . La Commission a déjé décidé que pour satisfaire aux exigences de cette disposition, un requArant est tenu de faire un «usage normal» des recours «vraisemblablement efficaces et suffisants» pour faire redresser ses griefs (cf . par exemple Requête N° 788/60, Autriche contre l'Italie, Annuaire 4, p . 173, Requête N° 4330/69, Simon-Herold contre l'Autriche, Annuaire 14, p . 353 ; Requêtes N° 5577-5583/72, Donnelly et autres contre le RoyaumeUni, Décisions et Rapport 4, p . 64) . Toutefois, selon les principes de droit international généralement reconnus qui ont été mentionnés ci-dessus et comme le requérant l'a relevé, il incombe aussi au Gouvernement qui souléve l'exception de non-épuisement des voies de recours internes de démontrer l'existence de ces voies de recours (cf . par exemple la Requéte N° 299/57, Gréce contre le Royaume-Uni, Annuaire 2, p . 191) . En l'espéce, le droit du requérant de recourir contre la décision du Service du logement devant le Tribunal royal découle de l'article 24 de la loi de 1969 sur la réglementation du logement à Guernesey . Toutefois, aucune -
50
-
disposition légale ne prévoit expressément un recours supplémentaire devant la cour d'appel dans les affaires de logement ou de réglementation du logement . Selon le Gouvernement, la compétence de la cour d'appel de statuer dans le cas du requérant découle d'une compétence prévue par la acommon law» et qui appartenait à son prédécesseur, la «Cour des jugements et records» . La Commission observe, toutefois, que le Gouvernement défendeur n'a pas contesté la déclaration du requérant selon laquelle, depuis sa création en 1961, la cour d'appel n'a pas connu d'un seul recours portant sur des questions de logement . De plus, le Gouvernement n'a pas établi que la «Cour des jugements et recordsn avait connu elle-méme d'un seul recours portant sur une affaire de réglementation du logement ou sur toute autre question de logement . Dans ces conditions, la Commission n'est pas convaincue qu'un recours à la cour d'appel constituait, à Guernesey, un recours efficace et suffisant, capable de redresser les griefs du requérant tirés de violations de la Conventioi, et du Protocole additionnel . En conséquence, ces griefs ne peuvent pas @tre rejetés pour non-épuisement des voies de recours internes . 2 . La Commission a examiné ensuite les griefs du requérant tirés de l'article 8 de la Convention, qui dispose en son premier paragraphe, notamment, que atoute personne a droit au respect . . . de son domicile . . .u . A cet égard, la question se pose d'abord de savoir si «The Haven» peut être considéré comme le «domicile» du requérant sous l'angle de l'article 8 et si, dans l'affirmative, les mesures prises par le Service du logement équivalent à une ingérence dans l'exercice du droit garanti par cette disposition . La Commission constate que le requérant a réguliérement acquis ce logement en 1970 . II a immédiatement entrepris de rénover la maison, dans laquelle il a ensuite vécu avec sa femme . Les conjoints ont continué d'habiter cette maison pendant leur mariage . La Commission estime que cette maison doit donc être considérée comme ayant été leur «domicile» au sens de l'article 8 (1) de la Convention . En outre, la Commission admet que «The Haven» est demeuré le domicile du requérant après sa séparation d'avec sa femme . Le fait que celle-ci ait quitté leur habitation commune n'a rien changé à cet égard . Sur le point de savoir s'il y a eu ingérence dans l'exercice des droits du requérant, le Gouvernement défendeur a soutenu que puisque le requérant ne pouvait occuper «The Haven» que s'il faisait partie du ménage de sa femme, le refus du Service du logement de l'autoriser à vivre dans la maison après le départ de sa femme n'a pas représenté une ingérence dans l'exercice de son droit au respect de son domicile . La Commission ne partage pas cette opinion . Elle reléve que le requérant était propriétaire en droit de «The Haven», maison qui de surcroit ,
- 51 -
comme il a déjà été dit, est demeurée son domicile méme aprés qu'il se fût séparé de sa femme . Il est exact qu'aux termes de la législation en vigueur à Guernesey, il ne pouvait occuper réguliérement cette maison que s'il y vivait avec sa femme ou que s'il était titulaire d'un permis . Selon la Commission, toutefois, on ne pouvait raisonnablement attendre du requérant qu'en achetant ladite maison en 1970, il ait prévu la dissolution de son mariage et, par là-méme, la précarité de sa situation future sur le plan du logement . Lorsqu'il a été invité à quitter sa maison en 1975, le requérant y vivait depuis plus de cinq ans . La Commission estime, en conséquence, que le refus du Service du logement de lui délivrer un permis, et l'ordre qu'il lui a donné de quitter les lieux, ont entravé l'exercice de son droit au respect de son domicile, garanti par l'article 8, paragraphe 1 . La Commission a recherché ensuite si cette ingérence peut se justifier pour l'un quelconque des motifs énoncés au second paragraphe de l'article 8 de la Convention, ainsi libellé : «2 . II ne peut y avoir ingérence d'une autorité publique dans l'exercice de ce droit que pour autant que cette ingérence est prévue par la loi et qu'elle constitue une mesure qui, dans une société démocratique, est nécessaire à la sécurité nationale, à la sOreté publique, au bienétre économique du pays, à la défense de l'ordre et la prévention des infractions pénales, à la protection de la santé ou de la morale, ou à la protection des droits et libertés d'autrui . n La décision du Service du logement de ne pas délivrer de permis de logement au requérant a été prise conformément à la loi, à savoir la loi de 1969 sur la réglementation du logement à Guernesey, prorogée par la loi de 1974 portant prolongation de la réglementation du logement . à Guernesey . Cette loi fait partie d'une série de lois qui ont été adoptées aprés la seconde guerre mondiale pour empêcher un surpeuplement préjudiciable à l'économie de Guernesey, fondée dans une large mesure sur l'agriculture et l'horticulture . Cette législation a permis aux personnes nées dans l'ile ou ayant des rapports trés étroits avec elle de s'y établir . La Commission admet que les difficultés économiques et sociales dues à un accroissement de la population exigeaient l'adoption de certaines lois de protection . La loi de 1969 sur la réglementation du logement à Guernesey poursuivait donc un but légitime et nécessaire au bien-être économique de l'île et à la protection des droits et libertés d'autrui . Se fondant, par analogie, sur l'avis exprimé par la Cour européenne des Droits de l'Homme dans son arrêt relatif à l'affaire Handyside larrét du 7 décembre 1976, paragraphe 49), la Commission estime, toutefois, qu'elle se doit aussi de rechercher si les mesures prises à l'encontre du requérant étaient proportionnées au but légitime poursuivi . Ce faisant, la Commission a tenu compte du fait que le second paragraphe de l'article 8 de la Convention laisse aux Hautes Parties Contractantes une trés grande latitude dans le choi x
- 52 -
des moyens qui leur paraissent les meilleurs pour parvenir à ce but . A cet égard, la Commission admet, d'une maniére générale, qu'un systéme d'autorisation, comme celui qui existe à Guernesey, qui réserve toutes les habitations d'une valeur imposable inférieure à un certain montant aux personnes nées dans l'ile ou ayant des rapports étroits avec elle, et qui tient compte, en outre, de la dimension de l'habitation par rapport au nombre des occupants, peut ètre tenu pour adéquat . En ce qui concerne la situation particuliére du requérant, la Commission est préoccupée par le refus de le laisser habiter la partie principale de «The Haven», et trouve difficile, à premiére vue, de considérer que ce refus était proportionné au but légitime poursuivi par la loi sur la réglementation du logement, et ce pour les raisons suivantes : Le requérant a fait l'acquisition d'une maison délabrée et inhabitée et en a fait trois logements . Il semblerait, à cet égard, qu'il a apporté une contribution positive à la situation du logement à Guernesey . Avec une surface de 52 m' environ, le logement en question ne parait pas excessivement grand, méme pour une seule personne . Ceci étant, la Commission attache une importance particuliére au fait que, par lettre du 11 mars 1977, le Service du logement a fait part au requérant de la possibilité de lui délivrer un permis d'occuper l'un des petits logements de aThe Haven», s'il en faisait la demande . Pour diverses raisons, le requérant a choisi de ne pas le faire . En outre, par lettre en date du 6 février 1978, le Service du logement a avisé ultérieurement le requérant qu'il était disposé à lui délivrer un permis d'occuper le logement principal, pourvu qu'il remplisse certaines conditions . Eu égard à l'attitude ainsi prise récemment par le Service du logement de Guernesey vis-à-vis du requérant, la Commission conclut que les mesures adoptées par ce Service peuvent être considérées comme justifiées sous l'angle de l'article 8 (2) de la Convention, du fait qu'elles n'ont pas excédé la marge d'appréciation qui lui est laissée pour déterminer si les mesures étaient nécessaires au bien-étre économique de l'ile et à la protection des droits et libertés d'autrui . Dans ces conditions, la Commission estime qu'un examen de ce grief, tel qu'il a été formulé, ne révéle aucune apparence de violation des droits et libertés énoncés dans la Convention et en particulier dans son article 8 . Il s'ensuit que cette partie de la requête est manifestement mal fondée au sens de l'article 27 121 de la Convention . 3 . Le requérant s'est également plaint d'avoir été privé de son droit de faire usage de ses biens par suite du refus du Service du logement de lu i
- 53 -
délivrer un permis de logement . Il a allégué, à cet égard, une violation de l'article 1- du Protocole additionnel . La Commission a examiné ce grief sous l'angle de la premiére phrase du premier paragraphe de cet article, qui dispose que toute personne a droit au respect de ses biens . La Commission estime que la décision du Service du logement a effectivement privé le requérant du droit de faire usage de ses biens . En outre, la Commission ne souscrit pas à la thése du Gouvernement selon laquelle le terme «biens», au sens de cette disposition, ne devrait viser que les biens meubles . Le texte français est clair à cet égard : le terme de «biens», figurant aux deux premiers paragraphes de l'article 1^1, vise, à l'évidence, les biens meubles et immeubles . Le Gouvernement défendeur a fait valoir derechef qu'étant donné que le requérant ne pouvait occuper réguliérement sa maison que s'il y vivait avec son épouse née à Guernesey, le fait de lui refuser l'autorisation d'habiter la maison dès lors que cette condition n'était plus remplie n'équivalait pas à une ingérence dans l'exercice de son droit au respect de ses biens . La Commission considére, toutefois, que puisque le requérant était propriétaire exclusif de «The Haven», le fait d'avoir été privé de la possibilité de faire usage de ses biens équivaut à une ingérence dans l'exercice du droit énoncé à la premiére phrase du premier paragraphe de l'article 1^1 . La Commission doit donc rechercher si cette ingérence peut se justifier sous l'angle du second paragraphe de l'article 1er, qui autorise les Etats Contractants à mettre en vigueur les lois qu'ils jugent nécessaires pour réglementer l'usage des biens conformément à l'intérêt général . Contrairement à l'article 8 (2) de la Convention, le second paragraphe de l'article 1^1 érige les Etats Contractants en seuls juges de la «nécessité» d'une ingérence En conséquence, la fonction de contrôle de la Commission porte ici uniquement sur la légalité et l'objet des restrictions en question Icf . Cour européenne des Droits de l'Homme, arrêt du 7 décembre 1976, affaire Handyside, paragraphe 62) . La décision de ne pas délivrer un permis de logement au requérant était conforme à la loi, à savoir la loi de 1969 sur la réglementation du logement à Guernesey . Par ailleurs, la Commission souscrit à la thése du Gouvernement défendeur selon laquelle la mise en vigueur de la loi susmentionnée avait pour objectif de réglementer l'usage des biens dans l'intérèt de la population de Guernesey, y compris les intérêts économiques et sociaux de l'île . L'ingérence du Service du logement se justifiait donc sous l'angle du second paragraphe de l'article 1- du Protocole additionnel, comme étant conforme à l'intérét général . Il s'ensuit que ce grief, examiné sous l'angle de l'article 1^1 du Protocole additionnel est lui aussi manifestement mal fondé, au sens de l'article 27 (2) de la Convention . -
54
-
4 Le requérant a allégué, en outre, une violation de l'article 14 de la Convention combiné avec l'article 8 de la Convention et l'article 1• 1 du Protocole additionnel . Il s'est plaint de ce que la classification des personnes non soumises à la réglementation du logement était arbitraire et déraisonnable . Il existe aussi, selon lui, une discrimination fondée sur les «biens», vu qu'une personne n'ayant aucun lien avec l'ile pouvait venir sur celle-ci et faire l'acquisition d'une des maisons co0teuses échappant à la réglementation . Aux termes de l'article 14, la jouissance des droits et libenés reconnus par la Convention doit être assurée, sans distinction aucune, «fondée notamment sur . . la fortune, la naissance ou toute autre situation» . La Commission se référe d'abord à la jurisprudence de la Cour européenne des Droits de l'Homme dans l'Affaire linguislique belge, qui a posé les critéres suivants pour l'examen des différences de traitement : la justification objective et raisonnable d'une mesure et le rapport raisonnable de proportionnalité entre les moyens employés et le but visé (cf . Arrêt du 23 juillet 1968 . Série A, p . 34, paragraphe 10) . En l'espéce, l'objectif de la loi de 1969 sur la réglementation du logement ainsi que les mesures prises par le Service du logement pour l'application de cette loi êtaient, comme il a déjA été dit, de veiller à ce que des logements soient disponibles pour les personnes ayant des liens reconnus avec Guernesey . La Commission estime que ce but est é la fois objectif et raisonnable . Il est exact qu'en ce qui concerne la question des «biens», 9"/o environ des habitations de Guernesey sont accessibles à toutes les personnes, quels que soient leurs liens avec l'île, étant donné que ces logements ont une valeur imposable supérieure à un certain montant . Toutefois, aprés avoir examiné sous cet angle l'ensemble de la législation sur le logement, la Commission constate que rien n'indique qu'elle soit discriminatoire à cet égard, mais qu'au contraire elle parait favorable é la population de Guernesey . Eu égard, en dernier lieu, au fait que le requérant se verra délivrer un permis d'occuper un petit logement dans sa maison, s'il en fait la demande, et que dans certaines conditions il lui sera accordé, semble-1-il, un permis d'occuper le logement principal de «The Haven», la Commission conclut qu'ici également, il existe un rapport raisonnable de proportionnalité entre les moyens employés et le but visé . En conséquence, le traitement réservé au requérant en l'espéce ne révéle aucune apparence de violation de l'article 14 de la Convention . Il s'ensuit que le grief du requérant examiné sous l'angle de l'article 1 , d 4u1adelaConvticmbéel'r8dConvetil'arc^
--55-
Protocole additionnel est lui aussi manifestemeni mal fondé, au sens de l'article 27 121 . 5 . En dernier lieu, sur le terrain de l'article 63 de la Convention et particuliérement en ce qui concerne les nécessités locales visées à l'article 63 131, la Commission ne juge pas nécessaire un examen séparé, sauf à dire qu'il n'existe pas de différences sociales ou culturelles notables, entre Guernesey et le Royaume-Uni, qui pourrareni être prises en considération pour l'application des articles invoqués dans la présente affaire . Par ces motifs, la Commission DÉCLARELA REOUETEIRRECEVABLE .
- 56 -

Origine de la décision

Formation : Commission (plénière)
Date de la décision : 08/02/1978

Fonds documentaire ?: HUDOC

HUDOC
Association des cours judiciaires suprêmes francophones Organisation internationale de la francophonie

Juricaf est un projet de l'AHJUCAF, l'association des cours judiciaires suprêmes francophones,
réalisé en partenariat avec le Laboratoire Normologie Linguistique et Informatique du droit (Université Paris I).
Il est soutenu par l'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie et le Fonds francophone des inforoutes.