Facebook Twitter Appstore
Page d'accueil > Résultats de la recherche

§ X. c. ROYAUME-UNI

Imprimer

Type d'affaire : Décision
Type de recours : Partiellement recevable ; partiellement irrecevable

Numérotation :

Numéro d'arrêt : 7525/76
Identifiant URN:LEX : urn:lex;coe;cour.europeenne.droits.homme;arret;1978-03-03;7525.76 ?

Analyses :

(Art. 14) DISCRIMINATION, (Art. 9-1) LIBERTE DE RELIGION


Parties :

Demandeurs : X.
Défendeurs : ROYAUME-UNI

Texte :

APPLICATIDN/REQUETE N° 7525/76 X . v/the UNITED KINGDO M X . c/ROYAUME-UN I DECISION of 3 March 1978 on the admissibility of the applicatio n DECISIQN du 3 mars 1978 sur la recevabilitA de la requêt e
Article 8 of the Convention : The effect of the repression of homosexuality on the private life of a homosexuel (Complaint declared admissible) . The repression of outrage to public morals or outrage to public decency do not seem to affect private life. Article 11 of the Convention : The repression of outrage to public morals or outrage to public decency do not affect in particular the freedom of association of homosexuals. Article 14 in conjunction with Article 8, paragraph 2 of the Convention : Does any discrimination lie in the fact that firstly, male homosexuality but not female homosexuality (nor heterosexuality) is repressed and secondly male homosexuality is not repressed identically in all parts of the United Kingdom ? (Complaint declared admissible) . Article 25 of the Convention : Can the homosexual, who has never been convicted for that reason, but who states that he lives in fear in view of the existence of repressive laws and because he has been questioned by the police, be considered as "victim" within the meaning of Article 25? (Question not pursued) . Competence ratione materiae of the Commission : The fact that thè Commission does not have the power to oblige a Government to end a violation of the Convention and to award compensation to the injured party is no reason, as such, to dismiss an application whose author claims that that is the aim he seeks .
Article 8 de la Convention : L'influence de la répression de l'homosexualité sur la vie privée d'un homosexuel (Grief déclaré recevable) . Il n'apparatt pas que la répression des atteintes 9/a morale publique ou des outrages publics aux mceurs affectent la vie privée .
- 117 -
Article 11 de la Convention : La répression des atteintes à la morale publique ou des outrages publics aux mceurs n'affecte pas particuliérement la liberté d'association des homosexuels . Article 14 combiné avec l'article 8, paragraphe 2, de la Convention : Y a-t-il discrimination dans le fait, d'une part que l'homosexualité masculine est réprimée mais non l'homosexualité féminine (ni l'hétérosexualité) et, d'autre part, que l'homosexualité masculine n'est pas réprimée de manière identique dans toutes les parties du Royaume-Uni? (Grief déclaré recevable). Articfe 25 de la Convention : L'homosexue/ qui n'a jamais été condamné de ce fait, mais qui déclare vivre dans la crainte vu l'existence de lois répressives et parce qu'il a été entendu par la police peut-il être considéré comme « victime » au sens de l'article 25 ? (Question non résotue ) Compétence ratione materiae de la Commission : Le fait que la Commission n'a pas le pouvoir d'obliger un Gouvernement à faire cesser une violation de la Convention et d'accorder une indemnité au /ésé ne permet pas, par lui-méme, de rejeter une requête dont l'auteur indique que tel est son but.
I françals : voir p . 732 1
THE FACTS
The facts of the case as submitted by the applicant in his original application may be summarised as follows : The applicant, who was 30 years old as al the introduction of his application, is a shipping clerk resident in Belfast, Northern Ireland . He is represented by Mr Francis Keenan, solicitor and Mr Kevin Boyle, barrister-at-law, Belfast . The applicant stated that he had been consciously homosexual from the age of 14 years and that he had been aware since adolescence of severely disapproving social attitudes towards homosexual behaviour . He had also become aware of the fact that homosexual behaviour infringed the criminal law in Northern Ireland, since the age of legal consent for heterosexual relationships . From the onset of homosexual consciousness he had experienced tear, which was augmented by the lack of guidance available and caused him suffering and distress . His fear had increased through adulthood and was directly caused by the existence of offences against homosexual behaviour in the criminal law . As a result of the criminal law he had permanently suffered prejudice including psychological distress, and fear of harassment, blackmail, prosecution and resultant exposure . Relationships within his family had been affected by parental fears that his homosexual status might become known and lead to exposure and the destruction of normal parental arrangements has caused constant psychological upset and retarded his motivation to advance himself in life . He alleged that he had therefore suffered direct economic prejudice from "the criminalising of my status as a homosexual person" .
- 118 -
The applicant stated that he had also been involved in attempts to reform this aspect of the criminal law in Northern Ireland . He submitted copies of correspondence, pamphlets and other material showing steps taken, by various organisations in which he was involved, with a view to obtaining reform of the law . He stated that these efforts had not been successful and that membership of the groups involved had caused him considerable fear of prosecution under the law of criminal conspiracy . The applicant also alleged that in January 1976 he had been questioned by the police concerning homosexual relationships and informed that the criminal law was to be enforced, from which he had understood that a prosecution might follow . Diaries and papers had been taken from his residence and held by the police . The applicant complained in particular of the following offences in the criminal law of Northern Ireland : 1 . under SS 61 and 62 of the Offences against the Person Act 1861 - the offences of buggery (maximum penalty life imprisonment) and attempted buggery ; 2 . under S 11 of the Criminal Law Amendment Act 1885 - the offence of gross indecency between males (maximum penalty two years' imprisonment) ; 3 . under the common law - attempts to commit the above offences (punishable with the same maximum penalties) and the offences of conspiracy to corrupt public morals and conspiracy to outrage public decency (penalty at the discretion of the court) . The applicant also referred to the provisions of the Sexual Offences Act 1967 under which, in England and Wales only, a homosexual act committed in private between consenting parties over twenty-one years of age does not constitute an offence . COMPLAINT S The applicant complained that, being homosexual, offences in the criminal law of Northern Ireland were enforceable against him by way of criminal prosecution . He also complained that the possibility of prosecution caused him fear and distress . He alleged the violation of Article 8 of the Convention in this respect . The applicant also complained of having been questioned by the police about his homosexual status, attitudes and behaviour in January 1976 and complained that the homosexual reform organisation of which he was a member had been subject to harassment by the police since then and that he personally had experienced fear and psychological upset because of such harassment . The applicant also complained that, being homosexual, he suffered unjustifiable discrimination on grounds of sex and residence in contravention of Article 14 of the Convention because offences in the criminal law of Norther n
- 119 -
Ireland were not part of the law in other regions of the United Kingdom and, therefore, if being homosexual he resided in such other regions, he would not suffer fear and distress of prosecution . The applicant sought the following relief : an examination by the Commission of his complaint to require the respondent Government to end the violations of the Convention and compensation for pain and sutfering . SUBMISSIONS OF THE APPLICANT IN SUPPORT OF THE APPLICATIO N In support of his application the applicant submitted that he was a "victim" within the meaning of Article 25 of the Convention in so tar as he suffered prejudice by reason of the fear of prosecution and in that : the penal laws had a chilling or restraining effect on the free expression of his sexuality ; he had suffered psychological injury and harm ; the prohibitions and legal restraints on his homosexual status caused social stigma and loss of self-esteem and respect ; the existence of serious criminal offences left him open to blackmail, intimidation and harassment ; finally he suftered a discriminatory status as a citizen of the United Kingdom, on grounds of residence and sex . He submitted that Article 8 of the Convention was violated in that as a homosexual he had suffered injurious infringements in respect of his private life . It was clear from the Commission's case-law that the right to respect for private life included respect for the right to privacy of the homosexual person . The applicant referred to a number of previous decisions of the Commission in support of this submission' . It was for the respondent Government to show that restrictions imposed by the criminal law of Northern Ireland on the rights guaranteed under Article 8, paragraph 1 were necessary in a democratic society, in addition to showing that they were necessary for the protection of morals or other purposes specified in Article 8, paragraph 2 . The Government was estopped from relying on Article 8, paragraph 2 to justify the infringement of the applicant's rights under Article 8, paragraph 1 since the restrictions in question were not part of the criminal law in other pans of the United Kingdom and therefore were not required in such other regions as being necessary in a democratic society for any purpose specified in Article 8, paragraph 2 . Article 14 of the Convention was violated in that restrictions were imposed through the criminal law of Northern Ireland on homosexual acts committed by males in circumstances where they would not constitute offences under the criminal law in other parts of the United Kingdom . The applicant was therefore a victim of discrimination on grounds of residence . The applicant also submitted that "the existence of the said offences on homosexual behaviour is discrimination against him on sexual grounds . "
' E .g . AVOlicetion No . 1 04 / 55, Yearbook 1, p . 718 .
- 120-
There was no domestic forum in which the applicant could plead violation of his rights under Articles 8 and 14 of the Convention . Furthermore he and others had taken steps by petition and other constitutional means to have his rights respected . In this respect the applicant referred to copies of correspondence with Members of Parliament and other material relevant to steps taken by himself and others to obtain a reform of the relevant laws . He submitted that since the Convention could not be pleaded in the domestic law of Northern Ireland and all other domestic remedies had been exhausted, Article 26 of the Convention was no bar to the admissibility of the application .
PROCEEDINGS BEFORE THE COMMISSIO N The Commission examined the question of admissibility of the application on 10 December 1976 and decided in accordance with Rule 42, paragraph 2 Ibl of its Rules of Procedure, to give notice of it to the respondent Government and invite them to submit written observations on its admissibility . The Government's observations were submitted on 22 February 1977 and the observations of the applicant in reply were submitted on 7 April 1977 . The Commission again considered the application on 18 May 1977 and decided to request the Government to submit further written observations on admissibility . The Government's supplementary observations on admissibility were submitted on 23 August 1977 . In submitting these observations the Government suggested that there would be little purpose in proceeding with the application until proposals for new legislation in Norihern Ireland concerning homosexuality had been published . It appeared that this legislation might meet the objectives of the application, and it seemed convenient if, after having had the opportunity to comment on them, the applicant were to indicate to the Commission whether their implementation would enable him to withdraw his application . Supplementary observations by the applicant were submitted on 22 September 1977 . The applicant also commented on the question of future procedure, indicating that he was not prepared now to withdrawn his application and that he wished to press on with it . On 28 November 1977 the applicant further stated that no date had been given as to when the proposal for legislative retorm was to be published or might be passed into law . Recent official pronouncements suggested that the undertaking to change the law might be abandoned or unduly delayed . The applicant therefore asked that his case be now considered .
SUBMISSIONS OF THE PARTIE S Initial observations of the respondent Governmen t The respondent Government gave details of relevant facts and laws . They set out SS 61 and 62 of the Offences against the Person Act 1861 and S 11 of the Criminal Law Amendment Act 1885 and explained the relevant offences . The maximum penalties prescribed were not to be understood as likely . The actual penalty would depend on the circumstances . The Sexual Offences Act 1967 ,
- 121 -
which applied only to England and Wales provided that buggery or acts of gross indecency in private between two consenting males aged 21 or more should not be offences . In Scotland the practice was not to prosecute for homosexual acts in private between consenting males over 21, although these were prohibited by law . The Government reserved their position as to the effect of the authorities on the common law offences of conspiracy mentioned in the application They did not appear central to the applicant's complaints . He could presumably not contend that if the legislative provisions in question were consistent with the Convention, the common law provisions were nevertheless contrary theret o It was not clear in which respects the applicant considered the Northern Irish provisions of which he complained to be contrary to the Convention . However in his application he had stated that the laws put pressures on him "to emigrate to other parts of the United Kingdom to which changes in the law have been extended" . It therefore seemed reasonable to assume that his complaints related to the provisions in question only to the extent that they applied to homosexual acts in private between consenting males aged 21 or ove r Legislation on homosexuality in Northern Ireland was under consideration and the views of the people in Northern Ireland, including those of the Standing Advisory Commission on Human Rights, were being obtained . IThe Commission, in their Report published on 19 July 1977, had recommended that the law in Northern Ireland be brought into line with that in England and Wales . The Government submitted a copy of this Report and stated that the Secretary of State hoped, later in 1977, to publish proposals in the form of draft legislation to give effect to this recommendationl . ' On the question of admissibility the Government first reserved their position on the issue whether the applicant should, on the basis of the evidence he had produced, be regarded as a victim within the meaning of Article 25 . The Government recognised that the provisions complained of, in so far as they might affect the applicant, could in principle constitute an interference with his private life within the meaning of Article 8, paragraph 1 . However in each of the cases reterred to by the applicant (No . 104/55 etc .l the Commission had declared complaints of the same nature inadmissible on the ground that creation of homosexual offences was justified under Article 8, paragraph 2 . The present complaint under Article 8 was likewise inadmissible . The applicant had emphasised the requirement in Article 8, paragraph 2 that restrictions must be "necessary" . In this respect the Government referred to passages in the Judgment of the European Court of Human Rights in the Handyside case, to the effect that Article 10, paragraph 2 left a margin of appreciation to the State" . The weight which the word "necessary" carried in the context of Article 8, paragraph 2 was similar to that which it carried in Article 10, paragraph 2 . The legal provisions complained of were within the margin of appreciation under Article 8, paragraph 2 . ' The submissions in brackete are contained in the Government's supplementery observations and summarised here for convenience .
" Judgment of 7 December 1976, series A, No . 24, para . 48 .
- 122-
The applicant had also referred to the absence of similar offences in other parts of the United Kingdom . However similar arguments had been made in Handyside and the Court had emphasised lat para . 48) that the laws on moral requirements would vary from place to place . It had dealt with these arguments in paragraph 54 of the Judgment, to which the Government referred . The Court stated inter alia that in no case did Article 10, paragraph 2 compel the authorities to impose "restrictions" or "penalties" in the field of freedom of expression . It was clear, the Government submitted, that the Court had not attached any particular importance to the different practices which had been adopted fin different areas) on the matters in question in that case, and the same considerations applied in this case . The applicant also alleged, in relation to Article 14, that the legal provisions in question amounted to discrimination on grounds of sex . It was assumed that this complaint arose because certain of the provisions applied only to homosexual acts between males . However in the cases referred to by the applicant, the Commission had rejected similar complaints . The Government referred to a passage in the decision on Application No . 104/55, to the effect that Article 14 did not exclude the possibility of differentiating between the sexes in measures taken with regard to homosexuality for the protection of health or morals under Article 8, paragraph 2 . The present complaint under Article 14 should be declared inadmissible for similar reasons . The applicant had also alleged that the provisions in question discriminated against him on grounds of residence . The provisions concerned did not depend on residence in Northern Ireland but applied to any person committing an act there which infringed them . It was true that much criminal law in force in any territory was inherently likely to affect most frequently persons residing there . It did not follow that it discriminated against such residents . Such an argument would have serious implications for the exercise of criminal jurisdiction which was traditionally based primarily on the territorial character of the criminal law . Further, Article 14 did not require that in a State comprised of more than one legal system, the laws touching on the rights and freedoms set forth in the Convention must apply uniformly throughout . Each system of law must be examined separately and an issue could arise under Article 14 only if the laws applicable within that system created differences in treatment . In the Handyside case, it was significant that the Court had not, when reviewing the issues under Article 14 ex officio, considered it necessary to examine the applicant's arguments based on different practices in different parts of the United Kingdom . The Government therefore requested that the application be declared inadmissible under Article 27, paragraphe 2 of the Convention and, in any event, in so far as the Commission had no power to grant the relief sought, that the application be dismissed in that respect as incompatible with the Convention .
- 123 -
2 . Initial observations of the applican t The applicant referred to two decisions of the House of Lords' the effect of which was, he submitted, to confirm the existence of an offence of conspiracy to corrupt public morals and an offence of conspiracy to outrage public decency . These offences had a potentially wider scope in Northern Ireland in their application to homosexual conduct than in England and Wales . They made potentially criminal advocacy of changes in homosexual laws . Explicit association in groups, clubs or societies by homosexual persons could be indictable . Counselling activities, befriending agencies and the like, so far as relating to homosexual persons, were of uncertain legal status . The applicant's case was principally addressed to the statutory offences . However these offences and the common law offences combined to give rise to incompatibility with the Convention in so far as they produced the adverse consequences claimed by the applicant in his original application and an affidavit (filed with his observationsl giving further details of the occasion in January 1976 when he was questioned by police, and of subsequent events . In this affidavit the applicant alleged that he had been questioned on 21 January 1976 at a police station, under caution, concerning homosexualoffences . Humiliating remarks had been made by police officers concerning material in his correspondence . Between January and June 1976 twenty members of the Gay Liberation Society had been questioned concerning homosexual offences . One person had been arrested under S 61 of the 1861 Act . Since January 1976 the applicant had suffered anxiety about prosecution In February 1977, after having learned that the Director of Public Prosecutions had recommended prosecution, he had been informed that a decision had been taken not to prosecute . Property taken from him by the police had then been returned . Concerning Article 8, the applicant submitted that any restrictions by public authority on the private sexual life of male homosexuals had to be justified under Article 8, paragraph 2 . The onus of proof that a restriction was necessary in a democratic society was on the Government . By referring to Application No . 104/55, the Government appeared to be justifying the homosexual laws in Northern Ireland on the ground that they were necessary for "the protection of health and morals" . That decision was twenty-two years old . The evaluation of what restrictions were necessary could not be an absolute one for all time .- The Commission migh take into account advances in knowledge concerning the nature of homosexual behaviour and changes in moral opinion . The applicant produced and referred to a Conspectus on Homosexual Laws in Europe, as evidence of the change of opinion in Europe . So far as necessity for "protection of health" was concerned, medical opinion was virtually unanimous that homosexuality could not be calegorised as a disease . In this respect the applicant referred to the Report of the Committee on ' Shsw v . Director of Public Prosecution 119611 2 All E .R . 44e ; Knuller Led r . Director of Public Prosecutions 119721 2 All E .R . 848.
- 124 -
Homosexual Offences and Prostitution' and to a recent decision of the Americar. Psychiatric Association to cease classifying homosexuality as a mental disorder . He submitted that far from protecting the health of homosexual persons, the restrictions in the penal law were themselves a source of psychiatric injury to the health of homosexuals, in so far as they involved the suppression of sexual parts of the personality and left them vulnerable to fear of blackmail and discovery . There was no cogent evidence of danger to the health of persons other than homosexuals if the restrictions in question were lifted . In this respect the applicant referred to Chapter V of the Wolfenden Report (sup . cit .) . "Protection of health" might mean the health of society . There was no evidence that the health of society in England and Wales had deteriorated since the Sexual Oftences Act 1967 was passed . In considering a justification based on the protection of morals, it was relevant that such an argument had not prevented passage of the Sexual Offences Act 1967 nor the undertaking that prosecutions would not be instituted in Scotland . In Northern Ireland a Government grant of L750 had been given to Cara-Friénd, a counselling and befriending agency for homosexuals run by homosexuals . It was inconsistent to maintain that restrictions were necessary on grounds of public morals while authorising expenditure on services which encouraged homosexuals to associate with other homosexuals . The Commission could take note of the change in moral climate towards homosexual conduct throughout Europe . It could also take into account that, Northern Ireland being a region where values were still strongly based on religious foundations, restriction by the law on homosexual conduct was less necessary to protect morality . The applicant accepted that the concept of a "margin of appreciation" could be applied to Article 8 as it applied to Article 10 . However, each Article of the Convention must first be considered on its own terms and each set of circumstances on its own merits . The margin of appreciation was subject to supervision by the Commission and Court (Handyside Judgment, Sup . cit., para . 49) . The principles laid down by the Court in that respect under Article 10, paragraph 2 applied muraris mutandls to Article 8, paragraph 2 . The Handyside case had involved executive acts Iseizure of books and criminal prosecution), whereas in the present case legislation was under consideration . The applicant accepted that the Convention imposed no obligation to restrict or limit the rights and freedoms it set forth, but the existence of legislation required greater scrutiny as being necessary in a democratic society than the failure uniformly to prosecute the book in question in Handyside . Concerning Article 14, the applicant referred to the general principles established in the Grandrath Case"and in the Belgian Lingu/stics Case" '
• The'1Nolfenden Repon", 1957, Cmnd . 247, pare . 26 . •' Applicetion No . 2299/64, Veerbook X p . 626 . '' Eur . Coun . H .R ., Judgment of 23 July 1968 ISeriea A, Vol . 8), in perticuler paras . 8-10 at pp . 33-35 .
- 125 -
In relation to the question of sex discrimination he submitted that if restrictions on homosexual conduct were justitiable, there was no logical basis within the terms of Article 8, paragraph 2 for distinguishing between male and female homosexual conduct . The illogicity of the existing differentation was underlined by the adoption of an increasing number ot provisions outlawing sex discrimination . Throughout the United Kingdom these provisions applied equally between men and women . The restrictions in the criminal law of Northern Ireland, aimed solely at male homosexual conduct, had no objective or reasonable justitication under Article 8, paragraph 2 . The applicant was therefore a victim of a violation of Article 8 in conjunction with Article 14 . The applicant referred to the penalties available at common law for conspiracy offences, and under the relevant statutory provisions, including in particular the maximum penalty of life imprisonment under S . 61 of the Offences Against the Person Act 1861 . On considering the aim for the protection of health or morals and the sanctions used to advance that aim, there was a lack of a reasonable relationship of proportionality and thus a violation of Article 8 in connection with Article 14 for this reason . If for either reason the restrictions imposed on his conduct were in violation of Article 8 in conjunction with Article 14, he was entitled under Article 8, paragraph 1 to the same respect for his private sexual life as was afforded to heterosexuals and female homosexuals . Northern Ireland law properly restricted heterosexual conduct within certain limits leg . as to the age of consent), but such restrictions only should be applied to the applicant as a homosexual person . The Government's argument concerning the applicant's complaint of discrimination based on residence was without substance . The fact that visitors to Northern Ireland, in addition to residents, were subject to the restrictions in question aggravated the position and served to emphasise the double standards applying in the United Kingdom . Whether a State comprised a single or different legal systems, it was obliged by Article 1 to secure minimum standards, including Articles 8 and 14, io all its citizens whatever region they resided in . The question of uniform minimum standards within different parts of the State had not been dealt with in the Handyside case . In support of his argument the applicant referred to the separate opinion of Judge Mosler in the Handyside case (Series A ., Vol 24, p . 32 ai p . 34) . The applicant was theretore a victim of a violation of Article 8 in conjunction with Article 14 since there was no objective and reasonable justification for the difference in treatment between homosexual persons in Northern Ireland and in other parts of the United Kingdom, or alternatively because the legislative means employed lacked proportionality . Finally the applicant submitted that he was entitled to the relief he sought, and in the light of Article 13 and the Commission's powers within Article 28 of the Convention, the relief he sought did not render the application incompatible with the Convention .
- 126 -
3 . Supplementary obse rvations of the respondent Government The Government referred to the applicant's submissions on the law of conspiracy to corrupt public morals and outrage public decency . The relevance of the cases he had cited was not clear . Even if his submissions as to the reach of these offences were correct (and at least the suggestion that advocacy of changes in homosexual laws could be criminal appeared without any foundation), it was not clear how the applicant considered that the activities he had referred to affected his private life . The decision in Knuller (sup . cit .) had been based on the fact that the advertisements concerned in the case were intended to assist or encourage other persons to take part in homosexual activities . Such activities did not fall within the scope of Article 8, paragraph 1 and in any event the reasons for prohibiting homosexual conduct as such applied a/ortiori to activities designed to assist or encourage such conduct and were justifiable under Article 8, paragraph 2 As to the suggestion that these offences had a wider scope in Northern Ireland than in England and Wales, it was to be noted that in Knuller the law had already been amended by the 1967 Act, and the decision on the charge of conspiracy to corrupt public morals was on the basis that the practices in question were no longer themselves criminal . h was also to be noted that the conviction in that case for conspiracy to outrage public decency had been quashed . As to the applicant's allegations concerning police conduct, the Government staled that on 21 January 1976 police went to his address to execute a warrant under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 . Another resident at his address had subsequently been convicted of offences under that Act . As a result of papers found, the applicant had been asked to go to a police station . He had been interviewed and taken back home . The papers had been retained . A complaint about police conduct had been investigated but did not reveal any improper conduct . The question whether the applicant should be prosecuted had been referred to the Director of Public Prosecutions for Northern Ireland who had decided on 25 January 1977 that he should not . This decision had been notified to the applicant on 23 February 1977 and his papers had then been returned . Two grants had been made to the organisation Cara-Friend . They were not intended to promote the commission of criminal offences but to support an organisation which appeared to act responsibly in giving advice and support to people with personal problems arising from homosexuality . They reflected the Government's view that legislation alone was not a sufficient solution to the problems homosexuality presented . The Government had not sought to take up a position on the question (argued by the applicant) whether homosexuality was a disease . Whilst since the decision on Application No . 104/55 (sup . cit .) there had been advances in knowledge and changes in moral opinion about homosexuality, the advance in knowledge had plainly not reached the stage where it could be determined how particular individuals would react to homosexual behaviour and such behaviour also raised moral issues on which many sections of society held strong views, o n
- 127 -
religious and other grounds . The considerations which led the Court to conclude in Handyside that States must be left a margin of appreciation in determining what measures were necessary ior the protection of morals, applied a fortiori to issues such as were raised in the present application, which largely concerned matters of ethical judgment The fact that las the applicant stated) Northern Ireland was a region where values were strongly based on religious foundations, provided a substantial argument for retention of legislative provisions calculated to reinforce and maintain those value s The Government attached the highest importance to securing the broad conseni of the people of Northern Ireland before legislating in such a sensitive and personal area . Possible changes in the law had to be approached with circumspection for several reasons . Public opinion in this field was, in general, more conservative in Northern Ireland than in England No benefit was conferred on homosexual persons by creating a hostile climate of opinion through excessive speed in developments in the law . Until 1972 the matter had been within the responsibility of ihe devolved Government and Parliament of Norlhern Ireland . Since direct rule the Government had made considerable endeavours to establish permanent constitutional arrangements for Northern Ireland and had naturally been hesitant to introduce measures about which many people there might have reservations . Articles 13 and 28 of the Convention were not relevant to the relief the Commission could grant . The Government repeated their request that the application be declared inadmissible . 4 . Supplementa ry obse rv ations of the applican t The applicant observed thal the Standing Advisory Commission on Human Rights had recommended that the law in Northern Ireland be brought into line with the Sexual oifences Act 1967 . However they had not recommended that iuture amendments to the Act should apply automatically in Northern Ireland but that public reaction in Northern Ireland should be obtained so that if there was no "contraindication" such amendment should apply to Northern Ireland . Regional discrimination might therefore remain . Further, the extension of the 1967 Act to Northern Ireland would not answer the applicant's argument that he was discriminated against on sexual grounds, contrary to Article 14 with Article 8 The applicant otherwise relied on his initial observations .
THE LA W The applicant, who states that he is a homosexual, complains that laws in I force in Northern Ireland prohibiting male homosexual activity have involved and continue to involve an interference with his right to respect for his private life, contrary to Article 8 of the Convention . He complains in this respect of the eifeci of SS . 61 and 62 of the Offences against the Person Act 1861, S . 11 of the Criminal Law Amendment Act 1885 and the common law offences of attempting to commit acts prohibited by these statutory provisions . He also submits tha t
- 128 -
these laws discriminate against him, firstly on sexual grounds in that his private sexual life, as a male homosexual, is thereby subject to greater restrictions than Ihat of (a) female homosexuals and (b) heterosexuals and secondly on grounds of his residence (or presencel in Northern Ireland, in that male homosexuals elsewhere in the United Kingdom are not subject to the same restrictions . He submits thal these differences in treatment show that the restrictions on his conduct imposed by the above-mentioned laws are not "necessary" and are Iherefore without justification under Article 8, paragraph 2 and that they also involve a violation of his rights under Article 14 in conjunction with Article 8 . Whilst the applicant has not been convicted or prosecuted for any offence contained in the above-mentioned laws, he alleges that he has suffered fear of prosecution and psychological upset as a result of the existence of these offences and as a result of various police action in connection with Ihem . In particular he alleges that he has himself been questioned by the police about homosexual olfences . The respondent Government have reserved their position on the question whether the applicant should, on the basis of the evidence he has produced, be regarded as a"victim" within the meaning of Article 25 of the Convention . They have submltled, referring to previous case-law of the Commission and Court, that any interference with the applicant's private life which may have occurred was justifled under Article 8, paragraph 2 and that the provisions in question fall within the margin of appreciation left to states thereunder . They have submitted that Article 14 does not exclude the possibility of differentiating between the sexes in nieasures taken with regard to homosexuality under Article 8, paragraph 2 . They have further submitted that in a state with different legal systems, an issue could arise under Article 14 only if the laws applicable within a particular system created differences in treatment . They have requested that the application be declared inadmissible under Article 27, paragraph 2 of the Convention . Articles 8 and 14 of the Convention are in the following terms :
Article 8 "1 . Everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, his home and his correspondenc e 2 . There shall be no interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except such as is in accordance with the law and is necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security, public safety or the economic well-being of the country, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and lreedoms of others . " Article 1 4 "The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in this Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour ,
- 129-
language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, properly, birth or other status . " The Commission, having carried out a preliminary examination of the parties' submissions concerning this part ot the application, finds that they raise important issues concerning the interpretation and application of the Convention, and in particular of the above Articles . The issues arising under Article 8 in itself, and in particular paragraph 2 thereof, and those arising under Article 14 in conjunction with Article 8 are closely linked and fall to be examined together Icf . Application No . 7215/75v . the United Kingdom, Decision of 5 October 19771 .• This part of the application cannot therefore be described as manifestly ill-founded in any respecl . No other ground of inadmissibility appears and it must therefore be declared admissible and retained for examination on its merits . 2 . The applicant has also complained ot the existence in Northern Ireland of the common law offences of conspiracy to corrupt public morals and conspiracy to outrage public decency . He has submitted that in Northern Ireland these offences have a potentially wider scope in relation to homosexual conduct than in England and Wales He has suggested that they make advocacy of changes in homosexual laws potentially criminal, that explicit association in groups, clubs or societies by homosexual persons could be indictable and that counselling activities, befriending agencies and the like, so far as relating to homosexual persons, are of uncertain legal status . The respondent Government have suggesled that the relevance of these oftences to the present application is not clear and that activities such as those mentioned in lhe domestic authorities cited by the applicant••do not fall within the scope of Article 8, paragraph 1 . The Commission notes that the only Articles of the Convenlion invoked by the applicant in the present application are Article 8, paragraph 1, insofar as it guarantees the right to respect for private life and Article 14 which he invokes in conjunction therewith . However the applicant has not shown how the existence of these oftences, which appear by their very nature to concern public activily, could be said to have affected his private life . The Commission accordingly finds no appearance of a violation of these provisions in this respect . However in view of the applicant's submissions concerning the scope of these offences, the Commission has considered ex officio whether this part of the application discloses any appearance of a violation of the applicant's right to freedom of expression, as guaranteed by Arlicle 10, or of his right to freedom of association with others, as guaranteed by Article 11 . The Commission first observes, as a general matter, that the applicant's suggestion thai the scope of these offences is wider in Northern Ireland, in view of the homosexuality laws lhere, than it is in England and Wales is unsubstantiated • See P . 36 . •' Shew v . Director ot Public Prosecutions, Prosecutions, 119721 2 AII ER 888 .
( 1961) 2 AII ER 446. Knuller Ltd . v . Director of Public
-1 30 -
by reference to any authority . The case of Knuller, to which the applicant has referred, appears to contradict this suggestion . The Commission notes that that case involved charges of conspiracy to corrupt public morals and outrage public decency arising from the publication in England of advertisements inviting males to take part in homosexual activity . A majority of the House of Lords held that although homosexual acts between consenting adult males in private were no longer, by virtue of the Sexual Offences Act 1967, criminal offences, it was open to a jury to say that to assist or encourage persons to take part in such acts might be to corrupt them . Similarly it does not appear to have been suggested that the legality of the acts which the advertisements invited persons to participate in negatived the possibility that the advertisements would outrage public decency . The Commission therefore finds no reason to suppose, from the material submitted to it, that the applicant's suggestion is correct . The Commission finds no indication whatsoever that the scope of these offences is such that they could render illegal advocacy of changes in homosexual laws and thus restrict the applicant's freedom of expression . Furthermore whilst the applicant suggests that "explicit association" in groups, clubs or societies by homosexuals could be illegal and that counselling activities, befriending agencies and the like are of uncertain legal status, the Commission finds that the material submitted does not disclose that the scope of the offences is in fact such that their mere existence could restrict the exercise of the applicant's freedom of association in a manner contrary to Article 11 . It follows, in the Commission's opinion, that this part of the application is manifestly ill-founded and must be considered inadmissible under Article 27, paragraph 2 of the Convention . 3 . In his application the applicant made the following statement as to the "relief (he) sought " "The applicant seeks an examination by the Commission of his complaint that his rights have been violated and continue to be violated, to require the respondent Government to end such violations and compensation for pain and suffering" . The respondent Government have requested the Commission, on the ground that there is no power for it to grant such relief, to dismiss the application in that respect as incompatible with the Convention . The Commission finds it sufficient to observe that it has no power under the Convention to order a respondent Government to end a violation alleged by an applicant and no power to award compensation . Nevertheless it is open to an applicant to specify in his application to the Commission the nature of any redress which he seeks to obtain through the Convention proceedings . In this respect the Commission recalls that Rule 38, paragraph 1 Idl of its Rules of Procedure provides that an application under Article 25 of the Convention shall set out "a . . ." . sfarpoible,thjcfapliton
- 131 -
For these reasons, the Commissio n DECLARES ADMISSIBLE . without prejudging the merits . the applicants complaints concerning the laws in force in Northern Ireland prohibiting homosexual activities between males (or attempts at such activities) : DECLARES INADMISSIBLE the applicants complaints concerning the offences ot conspiracy to corrupt public morals and conspiracy to outrage public decenc y
( 7RADUCiION )
EN FAI T Les faits de la cause, tels qu'ils ont été présentés par le requérant dans sa requète introductive, peuvent se résumer comme sui t Le requérant, âgé de 30 ans au moment où il a introduit sa requëte, exerce la profession d'expéditionnaire et réside à Belfast, en Irlande du Nord . II est représenté par M . Francis Keenan, solicitor et M . Kevin Boyle, barrister à Belfast . Le requérant déclare qu'il est consciemment homosexuel depuis d'âge de 14 ans et qu'il a, dés cette époque de sa vie, fait l'expérience d'attitudes sociales très réprobatrices à l'égard des comportements homosexuels . II a également appris que de tels comportements sont, en Irlande du Nord, une infraction pénale, à partir de l'âge du consentement légal à des relations hétérosexuelles . Depuis la prise de conscience de son homosexualité, le requérant a connu la crainte, renforcée par l'impossibilité d'obtenir des conseils, et s'est trouvé dans un état de souffrance et de détresse . Cette crainte, qui a augmenté à l'âge adulte, est directement provoquée par la détinition des comportements homosexuels comme étant des délits en droit pénal De ce fait, le requérant a subi un préjudice permanent dû notamment à l'angoisse, à la peur de tracasseries, de chantages, de poursuites et du scandale qui en serait résulté . Les rapports de l'intéressé avec sa famille ont été affectés par la crainte de ses parents que ses tendances homosexuelles soient connues et les déshonorent, la destruction des relations familiales normales a entrainé pour le requérant des troubles psychologiques constants et lui a enlevA les motivations nécessaires pour progresser dans la vie . Il allégue qu'il a donc subi un préjudice économique direct du fait de la criminalisation de son état d'homosexuel . Le requérant indique qu'il a également participé à des tentatives pour réformer cette partie du droit pénal en Irlande du Nord Il présente des copies des lettres, brochures et autres documents montrant les mesures prises par différente s
- 132 -
organisations auxquelles il a appartenu, pour obtenir une réforme du droit . Il ajoute que ces efforts sont demeurés vains et que l'adhésion aux groupes en question s'est accompagnée pour lui d'une grande anxiété, puisqu'il risquait des poursuites en vertu de la loi sur les associations é but délictueux . Le requéram allégue en outre qu'il a été interrogé par la police en janvier 1976 au sujet de relations homosexuelles et intormé que la loi pénale serait appliquée ; il en a déduit qu'il allait peut-être être poursuivi . Des journaux intimes et documents ont été saisis à son domicile et retenus par la police . Le requérant se plaint, en particulier, de l'existence des infractions suivantes, prévues par le droit pénal d'Irlande du Nord : 1 . en vertu des articles 61 et 62 de la loi de 1861 relative aux délits contre la personne (Offences against the Person Act) - les délits de sodomie (passible au maximum de l'emprisonnement à vie) et de tentative de sodomie ; 2 . en vertu de l'article 11 de la loi de 1885 portant amendement au Code pénal (Criminal Law Amendment Act) - le délit d'attentat aux mo,urs entre hommes (peine maximum de deux ans de prison) ; 3 . en droit coutumier - les tentatives de commettre les délits ci-dessus (passibles des mèmes peines maxima) et le fait de s'entendre à plusieurs pour corrompre la morale publique et commettre un outrage à la pudeur (peine laissée à la discrétion du tribunal) . Le requérant se référe également aux dispositions de la loi de 1967 sur les délits sexuels (Sexual Offences Act), selon laquelle, en Angleterre et au Pays de Galles seulement, un acte homosexuel commis en privé entre parties consentantes de plus de vingt-et-un ans ne constitue pas une infraction .
GRIEF S Le requérant se plaint d'être passible de poursuites pénales, en droit d'Irlande du Nord, parce qu'il est homosexuel . Il se plaint également des craintes et des angoisses que lui fait éprouver la possibilité de poursuites . Il allégue la violation de l'article 8 de la Convention à cet égard . Le requérant se plaint en outre d'avoir été interrogé par la police sur son état, ses attitudes et son comportement d'homosexuel en janvier 1976 et fait valoir que l'organisation homosexuelle de réforme à laquelle il appartenait a fait l'objet depuis lors de tracasseries de la part de la police et que ces tracasseries ont été pour lui une source de peur et d'angoisse . Par ailleurs, le requérant se plaint d'avoir subi, en tant d'homosexuel, une discrimination injustifiable pour des motifs de sexe et de résidence, en violation de l'article 14 de la Convention, puisque les délits qui sont prévus en droit pénal d'Irlande du Nord ne se retrouvent pas dans le droit d'autres parties du Royaume-Uni et que le requérant n'aurait pas connu la crainte de poursuites s'il avait résidé dans ces autres régions tout en étant homosexuel .
- 133 -
Le requérant demande à titre de réparation : L'examen de sa plainte par la Commission et des démarches afin d'obtenir du Gouvernement défendeur qu'il cesse de violer la Convention ; enfin, une indemnisation du préjudice souffert .
ARGUMENTATION DU REQUÉRAN T Le requérant fait valoir qu'il est une « victime » au sens de l'article 25 de la Convention, compte tenu du préjudice que lui a causé la crainte de poursuites : le droit pénal a eu pour effet d'entraver ou d'inhiber la libre expression de sa sexualité ; il a subi des dommages et souffrances psychologiques ; l'interdiction d'ètre homosexuel et les contraintes légales correspondantes l'ont deshonoré socialement et lui ont fait perdre eslime et respect pour lui-méme ; l'exislence de délits graves l'expose au chantage, à l'intimidation et aux tracasseries ; enfin, il souffre d'un état de discrimination, en tant que citoyen du Royaume-Uni, pour des motifs de résidence et de sexe . Le requérant allégue que l'article 8 de la Convention a été violé puisqu'il a subi, en tant qu'homosexuel, des atteintes sérieuses à sa vie privée . Il ressort de la jurisprudence de la Commission que le droit au respecl de la vie privée concerne également les homosexuels . Le requérant appuie cet argument sur un certain nombre de décisions amérieures de la Commission' . Il appartiendrait au Gouvernement défendeur de montrer que les restrictions imposées par le droit pénal d'Irlande du Nord aux droits garantis par l'article 8, paragraphe 1 sont nécessaires, dans une société démocralique, à la protection de la morale ou à d'autres fins indiquées dans l'article 8, paragraphe 2 Mais le Gouvernement ne peut se fonder sur l'articie 8, paragraphe 2 pour justifier l'atteinte aux droits garantis au requérant par l'article 8, paragraphe 1, puisque les restrictions en questions n'existent pas dans le droit pénal d'autres parties du Royaume-Uni et que, dans ces autres régions, elles ne sont considérées comme nécessaires à la sauvegarde d'une société démocratique pour aucune des raisons spécifiées à l'article 8, paragraphe 2 . L'article 14 de la Convention est violé en ce que des restrictions sont imposées par le droit pénal d'Irlande du Nord à des actes homosexuels commis par des hommes dans des circonstances où ils ne constitueraient pas des délits selon les lois d'autres parties du Royaume-Uni . Le requérant a donc été victime d'une discriminalion fondée sur sa résidence . Il fait valoir également que « l'existence desdites infractions concernant les comportements homosexuels établit une discrimination à son égard pour des motifs sexuels n . Il n'existe pas d'autorité nationale devant laquelle le requéranl aurait pu porter plainte pour violation des droits que lui garantissent les articles 8 et 14 de la Convention . Par ailleurs, il a entrepris des démarches, avec d'autres, pour faire respecter ses droits en utilisant la pétition et d'autres moyens constitutionnels . Le requérant se réfère à cet égard à des copies de sa correspondance avec des parlementaires et à d'autres documents sur cette action en vue d'obtenir une ' cf . par exemple Requête N° 1e0/55 . Annua i re 1, p . 17B .
- 134 -
réforme des lois . II allégue que la Convention ne peut étre invoquée dans l'ordre juridique interne d'Irlande du Nord et que tous les recours internes ont été épuisés, si bien que l'article 26 de la Convention n'est pas un obstacle à la recevabilité de la requête .
PROCEDURE DEVANT LA COMMISSIO N La Commission a examiné la question de la recevabilité de la requête le 10 décembre 1976 et a décidé, conformément à l'article 42, paragraphe 2 b) de son Réglement intérieur, d'en donner connaissance au Gouvernement défendeur et de l'inviter à présenter des observations par écrit . Celles-ci sont parvenues à la Commission le 22 février 1977 et la réponse du requérant le 7 avril 1977 . La Commission a examiné à nouveau la requête le 18 mai 1977 et décidé d'inviter le Gouvernement à présenter des observations é crites complémentaires sur la recevabilité . Celles-ci ont été présentées le 23 août 1977 . Le Gouvernement y fait valoir qu'il est inutile de continuer à s'occuper de l'affaire avant que les propositions relatives à la nouvelle législation de l'Irlande du Nord concernant l'homosexualité soient publiées . Cette législation semble répondre aux objectifs de la plainte et il serait utile que le requérant, aprés avoir eu la possibilité de commenter ces textes, indique à la Commission si leur mise en ce uvre lui permettrait de retirer sa requête . Les observations complémentaires du requérant ont été présentées le 22 septembre 1977 . II y commente é galement la question de la procédure future, en indiquant qu'il n'est pas disposé à retirer sa requéte et souhaite au contraire l'activer . Le 28 novembre 1977, le requérant a précisé qu'aucune date n'a é té indiquée en ce qui concerne la publication des propositions de réforme ou leur adoption éventuelle . De récentes déclarations officielles donnent à penser que ce projet pourrait être abandonné ou indûment retardé . Le requérant demande, en conséquence, que sa requéte soit examinée sans désemparer .
ARGUMENTATION DES PARTIE S Premières observations du Gouvernement défendeu r Le Gouvernement défendeur donne des précisions sur les faits et les textes pertinents . Il reproduit les articles 61 et 62 de la loi de 1861 relative aux infractions contre la personne et l'article 11 de la loi de 1885 portant amendement au droit pénal, et explique les infractions qui y sont prévues . L'application des peines maxima indiquées est peu probable . En fait, la peine dépend des circonstances . La loi de 1967 relative aux délits sexuels, qui s'applique seulement à l'Angleterre et au Pays de Galles, stipule que la sodomie ou les actes d'outrage à la pudeur commis en privé entre deux hommes consentants 8gés de 21 ans ou davantage ne sont pas des infractions . En Ecosse, on ne poursuit pas, en pratique, les actes homosexuels commis en privé entre hommes consentants de plus de 21 ans, bien que de tels actes soient interdits par la loi .
- 135 -
Le Gouvernement réserve sa position quant à l'interprétation sur la base de la jurisprudence des infractions de droit coutumier mentionnées dans la requéte . Ces délits de conspiration ne constituent apparemment pas un point capital des griefs invoqués . Le requérant ne pourrait sans doute pas affirmer que les dispositions de droit coutumier violent la Convention si les textes législatifs en question étaient considérés comme compatibles avec elle . On ne voit pas clairement à quels points de vues le requérant juge contraires à la Conventlon les dispositions du droit d'Irlande du Nord dont il se plaint Toutefois, il a indiqué dans sa demande que ces lois le poussaient à « émigrer vers d'autres parties du Royaume-Uni dans lesquelles le droit a été réformé » . Il parait donc raisonnable de supposer que les griefs du requérant ont trait aux dispositions en question seulement dans la mesure où elles s'appliquent à des actes homosexuels commis en privé entre hommes consentants âgés de 21 ans ou plus . La législation sur l'homosexualité en Irlande du Nord est en cours d'examen et des mesures sont prises pour connaitre l'avis de la population, y compris la Commission consultative permanente pour les Droits de l'Homme Icette Commission a recommandé, dans son rapport publié le 19 juillet 1977, que le droit d'Irlande du Nord soit harmonisé avec celui de l'Angleterre et du Pays de Galles ; le Gouvernement produit une copie de ce rapport et indique que le Secrétaire d'Etat espére, au cours de l'année 1977, donner suite à ces recommandations en publiant des propositions sous la forme d'un projet de loi' I En ce qui concerne la recevabTté, le Gouvernement résenie tout d'abord sa position quant au point de savoir si le requérant doit, étant donné les faits qu'il allégue, être considéré comme une victime, au sens de l'anicle 25 . Le Gouvernement reconnait que les dispositions visées, dans la mesure où elles risquent d'affecter le requérant, peuvent constituer en principe une ingérence dans sa vie privée, au sens de l'article 8, paragraphe 1 Toutefois, dans chacune des affaires mentionnées par le requérant IN° 104/55, etc . . .l, la Commission a déclaré irrecevables des plaintes du même ordre parce que l'institution d'un délit d'homosexualité se justifiait en vertu de l'article 8 , paragraphe 2 . De même, la présente requête est irrecevable en vertu de l'article 8 . Le requérant a souligné la condition figurant à l'article 8, paragraphe 2, selon laquelle les restrictions doivent ètre nécessaires . A cet égard, le Gouvernement se référe aux passages de l'Arrêt Handyside dans lesquels la Cour européenne des Droits de l'Homme déclare que l'article 10, paragraphe 2 laisse une marge d'appréciation aux Etats" . Le terme « nécessaire » a le méme poids dans le conlexte de l'article 8, paragraphe 2 que dans celui de l'article 10, paragraphe 2 . Les dispositions juridiques dont se plaint le requérant relévent de la marge d'appréciation contenue dans l'article 8, paragraphe 2 .
' Les arguments entre parenthéses ont été présenlés dans les observations Gouvernement et sont résumPs ici par commodité .
" Arrèt du 7 décembre 1976, Série A . N° 24, para . 48 .
- 136 -
comp/Amentaires du
Le requérant a souligné également l'absence d'infractions analogues dans d'autres parties du Royaume-Uni . Des arguments similaires avaient été présentés lors de l'affaire Handyside et la Cour avait estimé Ipara . 48) que les lois sur les nécessités morales variaient selon le lieu . Ces arguments sont traités dans le paragraphe 54 de l'Arrét, auquel le Gouvernement se rétére . La Cour y déclare notamment que l'article 10, paragraphe 2 n'astreint en aucun cas les autorités à imposer des « restrictions » ou « sanctions » dans le domaine de la liberté d'expression . Il est évident, estime le Gouvernement, que la Cour n'a pas attaché d'importance particuliére aux différentes pratiques adoptées (selon les régionsl dans les domaines en question, et les mêmes considérations s'appliquent à la présente affaire . Le requérant a souligné par ailleurs, eu égard à l'article 14, que les dispositions visées équivalaient à une discrimination fondée sur le sexe . On peut supposer que ce grief a été avancé parce que certaines des dispositions s'appliquent seulement à des actes homosexuels entre hommes . Cependant, dans les affaires mentionnées par le requérant, la Commission a rejeté des griefs analogues . Le Gouvernement se référe à un passage de la décision sur la requéte N° 104/55 selon lequel l'article 14 n'exclut pas la possibilité de faire une différence entre les sexes dans les mesures prises en matiére d'homosexualité pour la protection de la santé ou de la morale en vertu de l'article 8, paragraphe 2 . Le présent grief tiré de l'article 14 doit ètre déclaré irrecevable pour des raisons analogues . Le requérant a allégué en outre que les disposilions en question constituaient à son égard une discrimination fondée sur la résidence . Or, l'appiication de ces dispositions ne dépend pas de la résidence en Irlande du Nord ; celles-ci s'appliquent à toute personne qui y commettrait un acte considéré comme une infraction . II esi exact que le droit pénal en vigueur dans un territoire quelconque affecte d'abord, par la force des choses, les personnes qui résident sur ce territoire . On ne peut en conclure qu'il établit une discrimination à l'égard de ces habitants . Un tel argument aurait des incidences sérieuses sur l'exercice de la juridiction pénale, traditionnellement fondée principalement sur le caractére territorial du droit . En outre, l'article 14 ne dit pas que les lois iouchant les droits et libertés énoncés dans la Convention doivent être appliquées uniformément dans l'ensemble d'un Etat qui comprend plus d'un systéme juridique . Chaque systéme de droit doit être examiné séparément et l'article 14 ne pourrait être mis en cause que si les lois en vigueur dans un système juridique créaient des différences de traitement . Dans l'affaire Handyside, il est significatif que la Cour, en examinant ex officio les points relevant de l'a«icle 14 n'ait pas jugé nécessaire d'examiner les arguments du requérant fondés sur des pratiques différentes selon les régions du Royaume-Uni . Le Gouvernement demande en conséquence que la requête soit déclarée irrecevable en vertu de l'article 27, paragraphe 2 de la Convention et, quoi qu'il en soit, dans la mesure où la Commission n'est pas habilitée à accorder la réparation demandée, que la requète soit rejetée comme étant, de ce fait, incompatible avec la Convention .
- 137 -
2 . Premières observations du requéran t Le requérant se référe à deux décisions de la Chambre des Lords' qui confirment, selon lui, l'existence d'un délit de conspiration en vue de corrompre la morale publique et d'un délit de conspiration en vue d'outrage à la pudeur . Ces délits ont une portée potentiellement plus large en Irlande du Nord, où ils englobent les comportements homosexuels, qu'en Angleterre et au Pays de Galles . Îls rendent potentiellement illégale toute action pour réformer les lois relatives à l'homosexualité L'association explicite d'homosexuels en groupes, clubs ou sociétés peut donner lieu à des poursuites . Les organisations de conseils, rencontres et autres ont une situation juridique peu sûre lorsqu'elles s'adressent aux homosexuels . Les griefs du requérant concernent principalement les infractions prévues par une loi . Toutefois, ces infractions et les délits de droit coutumier s'associent pour aboulir à une incompatibilité avec la Convention dans la mesure où ils ont les effets néfastes indiqués par le requérant dans sa requête introductive et dans une déclaration sous serment où il donne des précisions concernant son interrogatoire de janvier 1976 par la police et les événements ultérieurs . Dans cette déclaration, le requérant allégue qu'il a été interrogé le 21 janvier 1976 dans un commissariat au sujet de délits homosexuels aprés avoir étA averti que ses réponses pourraient ètre retenues contre lui . Des remarques humiliantes sur certains éléments de sa correspondance lui ont Até faites par les policiers . Entre janvier et juin 1976, vingt membres de la « Gay Liberation Society x ont été interrogés pour infractions homosexuelles . Une personne a été arrétée en vertu de l'article 61 de la loi de 1861 . Depuis janvier 1976, le requérant craint des poursuites En février 1977, aprés avoir appris que le Parquet avail recommandé de telles mesures, il a été informé qu'une décision contraire avait été prise . Des effets qui lui avaient été enlevés par la police lui ont alors été rendus . En ce qui concerne l'article 8, le requérant tait valoir que toutes restrictions imposées par les autorités publiques à la vie sexuelle privée d'homosexuels doit se justifier aux termes de l'article 8, paragraphe 2 . La charge de prouver que des restrictions sont nécessaires dans une société démocratique incombe au Gouvernement . En se référant à la requète N° 104/55, le Gouvernement semble justifier les lois d'Irlande du Nord sur l'homosexualité en les déclarant nécessaires à « la protection de la santé et de la morale » . Cette décision date de vingt-deux ans . L'évaluation des restrictions nécessaires ne saurait être absolue et définitive . La Commission peut tenir compte des progrés dans les connaissances sur les comportements homosexuels et du changement des opinions sur la morale . Le requérant produit et cite une Etude générale du droit relatif à l'homosexualité en Europe, pour montrer les changements d'opinion qui y sont intervenus . S'il s'agit de protéger la santé, les médecins sont virtuellement unanimes à considérer que l'homosexualité ne peut être classée parmi les maladies . A cet ' ( Shew v . Direclor of Public Prosecutions) 11%1) 2 AII . E .R . 446 ;(Knuller SARL v . Director of Public Prosecutions ) 119721 2 AII . E .R . e 48 .
- 138 -
égard, le requérant mentionne le rapport du Comité sur les délits homosexuels et la prostitution' et une décision récente de l'« American Psychiatric Association » tendant à ne plus inclure l'homosexualité parmi les troubles mentaux . Le requérant affirme que les restrictions légales, loin de protéger la santé des homosexuels, sont nuisibles par elles-mêmes à leur état mental puisqu'elles tendent à supprimer l'élément sexuel de leur personnalité et les expose au chantage et à la crainte d'être découverts . Rien ne donne à penser que la levée des restrictions en question représenterait un danger pour la santé de personnes autres que les homosexuels . Sur ce point, le requérant se référe au chapitre V du rapport Wolfenden (sup . cit .l . L'expression « protection de la santé » semble viser la santé publique . Aucune détérioration de la santé publique ne semble avoir été constatée en Angleterre et au Pays de Galles depuis l'adoption de la loi de 1967 relative aux délits sexuels . Si on envisage une justification fondée sur la protection de la morale, il y a lieu de rappeler que cet argument n'a pas empéché l'adoption de la loi de 1967 ni la décision que des poursuites ne seraient plus exercées en Ecosse . En Irlande du Nord, une subvention gouvernementale de 750 livres a été accordée à l'organisme « Cara-Friend », agence de conseils et de rencontres pour homosexuels, gérée par des homosexuels . II est incohérent de prétendre que des restrictions s'imposent pour des raisons de morale publique tout en attribuant une subvention à des services qui permettent à des homosexuels d'en connaitre d'autres. La Commission devrait prendre acte des changements du climat moral à l'égard des comportements homosexuels dans toute d'Europe . Elle pourrait aussi considérer que l'Irlande du Nord est une région où les valeurs conse rv ent des fondements religieux solides et que des res«ictions légales aux comportements homosexuels y sont moins nécessaires qu'ailleurs pour protéger la morale . Le requérant admet que la notion de « marge d'appréciation » peut s'appliquer à l'article 8 comme à l'article 10 . Toutefois, chaque article de la Convention doit en premier lieu ètre considéré selon le sens de ses termes et toute situation de fait pour elle-même . La marge d'appréciation est sujette au contrôle de la Commission et de la Cour larr@t Handyside, sup . cit ., para . 49) . Les principes établis par la Cour à cet égard dans le cadre de l'article 10, paragraphe 2 s'appliquent, mutatis mutandis, à l'article 8, paragraphe 2 . L'affaire Handyside portait sur des actes de répression (saisie de livres et poursuites pénales) alors qu'il s'agit dans la présente action d'une législation . Le requérant reconnaît que la Convention n'impose aucune obligation de restreindre ou limiter les droits et libertés qu'elle énonce, mais l'existence d'une législation demande un examen plus attentif du point de vue de sa nécessité dans une société démocratique que l'absence d'uniformité dans les poursuites contre un livre comme celui de l'affaire Handyside .
• Rappurt Wolfenoen a . 1957, Cmnd . 247, pera . 26.
- 139 -
Au sujet de l'anicle 14, le requérant se référe aux principes généraux établis dans l'affaire Grandrarh' et dans l'affaire linguistique belge" . Concernant la discrimination fondée sur le sexe, le requérant avance l'argument suivant : si des restrictions au comportement homosexuel sont justifiées, il est absurde, aux termes de l'article 8, paragraphe 2, d'établir une distinction entre homosexuels hommes et femmes . L'illogisme de cette différenciation est rendu plus flagrant encore par d'adoption de disposition sans cesse plus nombreuses qui interdisent la discrimination fondée sur le sexe . Dans l'ensemble du Royaume-Uni, ces lois s'appliquent également aux hommes et aux femmes . Les restrictions du droit pénal d'Irlande du Nord, relatives seulement aux comportements homosexuels des hommes, n'ont pas de justification objective ou raisonnable en vertu de l'artiGe 8, paragraphe 2 . Le requérant est donc victime d'une violation de l'article 8 combiné avec l'article 1 4 Le requérant fait allusion aux peines existant en droit coutumier pour les délits de conspiration ainsi qu'aux dispositions législatives pertinentes, notamment la peine maximum de prison à vie stipulée à l'article 61 de la loi de 1861 relative aux délits contre la personne . Si l'on considère l'objectif de protection de la santé et de la morale, et les sanctions employées pour atteindre cet objectif, il n'y a aucun rapport raisonnable de proportionalité, et donc violation de l'article 8 combiné avec l'article 14 . Si pour l'une ou l'autre des deux raisons invoquées, les restrictions imposées au requérant violent l'article 8 combiné avec l'article 14, Pintéressé doit aux termes de l'article 8, paragraphe 1 bénéficier du mème respect de la vie sexuelle privée que les hétérosexuels et les homosexuelles Le droit d'Irlande du Nord maintient 8 luste titre les comportements hétérosexuels dans certaines limites (quant à l'âge du consentement, par exemple) mais seules ces limites doivent s'appliquer au requérant en tant qu'homosexuel . L'argumentation du Gouvernement sur le grief du requérant quant à la discrimination fondée sur le sexe n'est d'aucun poids Le fait que les visiteurs comme les résidents soient soumis, en Irlande du Nord, aux restrictions en question aggrave la situation et ne fait que souligner la dualité des normes appliquées au Royaume-Uni Qu'un Etat ait un ou plusieurs systèmes juridiques, il est tenu par l'article 1 d'assurer des normes minima, y compris dans les domaines visés par les articles 8 et 14, à tous les citoyens sans considération de leur lieu de résidence . La question de normes minima uniformes dans les différentes parties de l'Etat n'a pas été traitée lors de l'affaire Handyside Le requérant étaie cet argument sur l'opinion séparée du Juge Mosler dans l'affaire Handyside ISérie A, Vol . 24, pp . 32 à 341 . Le requérant est donc victime d'une violation de l'article 8 combiné avec l'article 14, puisqu'il n'existe pas de justification objective et raisonnable de l a • Reouéte N° 2299/64, Annuaire X, p . 626 . Cour eur . D .H ., Arrêt du 23 iuillet 1988 ISArie A, Vol . 81 . pp . 33 d 35 .
- 140 -
notamment les paragraphes 8 à 10 ,
différence de traitement entre les homosexuels d'Irlande du nord et ceux d'autres parties du Royaume-Uni, ou encore parce que les moyens législatifs utilisés sont disproportionnés . Enfin, le requérant fait valoir qu'il a droit à la réparation sollicitée et que sa demande de réparation, compte tenu de l'article 13 et des pouvoirs de la Commission en vertu de l'article 28, ne rend pas la requête incompatible avec la Convention . 3 . Observations complémentaires du Gouvernement défendeu r Le Gouvernement se référe aux arguments du requérant sur le droit relatif à la conspiration pour corrompre la morale publique et commettre un outrage à la pudeur . Il n'est pas évident que les affaires citées puissent être invoquées en l'occurrence . Même si les arguments quant à la portée des délits étaient fondés (et, en tout cas, l'affirmation selon laquelle une action pour la réforme des lois relatives à l'homosexuaiité peut ëtre jugée délictueuse parait sans fondement), on voit mal de quelle maniére les activités mentionnées par le requérant ont, de son point de vue, affecté sa vie privée . La décision prise dans l'affaire Knuller (sup . cit .) était due au fait que la publicité visée avait pour but d'aider ou d'encourager d'autres personnes à participer à des activités homosexuelles . De telles activités ne relévent pas de l'article 8, paragraphe 1 et, en tout état de cause, les raisons d'interdire des comportements homosexuels en tant que tels s'appliquent à fortiori aux tentatives pour favoriser de tels comportements et sont fondées aux termes de l'article 8, paragraphe 2 . Quant à l'argument selon lequel ces délits auraient une portée plus grande en Irlande du Nord qu'en Angleterre et au Pays de Galles, il faut noter que lors de l'affaire Knuller le droit avait déjà été amendé par la loi de 1977 et que la décision relative à l'accusation de conspiration pour corrompre la morale publique avait été prise parce que les pratiques visées n'étaient plus considérées en elles-mémes comme des infractions . Il y a lieu de remarquer également que, dans ce cas, la condamnation pour conspiration en vue d'un outrage à la pudeur a été annulée . En ce qui concerne les allégations du requérant relatives à l'attitude de la police, le Gouvernement indique que des agents se sont rendus au domicile de l'intéressé le 21 janvier 1976 pour exécuter un mandat d'arrèt en application de la loi de 1971 relative à l'abus des drogues IMisuse of Drugs Act) . Un autre habitant de l'immeuble a été ultérieurement condamné pour infraction à cette loi . A la suite de la découverte de certains documents, le requérant a été invité à se rendre au Commissariat . Il a été interrogé et ramené chez lui . Les documents ont été conservés par la police . Une plainte au sujet du comportement de cette derniére a donné lieu à une enquête qui n'a rien révélé d'irrégulier . La question de savoir si le requérant devait étre poursuivi a été soumise au Ministére Public d'Irlande du Nord, qui a pris une décision négative le 25 janvier 1977 . Cette décision a été notifiée au requérant le 23 février et ses documents lui ont été rendus .
Deux subventions ont été accordées à l'organisation « Cara-Friend n . Elles ne tendent pas à encourager des infractions mais à soutenir une organisation qu i
- 141 -
semble agir raisonnablement en conseillant et en aidant les personnes qui éprouvent des difficultés dues à leur homosexualité . Le Gouvernement a pris de telles mesures parce qu'il estime que la législation ne suffit pas à résoudre les problémes posés par l'homosexualité . Le Gouvernement n'a pas cherché à prendre position sur le point labordé par le requérantl de déterminer si l'homosexualité est une maladie . S'il y a eu des progrés dans les connaissances et des changements de l'opinion morale sur l'homosexualité depuis la décision concernant la requéte N° 104/55 Isup. cir.l, ces progrés dans les connaissances n'ont évidemment pas encore atteint le point où l'on aurait appris comment tel ou tel individu pourrait réagir à un comportement homosexuel : les attitudes homosexuelles touchent, en outre, à des domaines moraux dans lesquels de nombreux groupes sociaux ont des vues bien arrétées, pour des raisons religieuses et autres . Les considérations qui ont amené la Cour à estimer, dans l'affaire Handyside, qu'une marge d'appréciation doit être laissée aux Etats pour déterminer les mesures nécessaires à la protection de la morale s'appliquent 8 (onrbri aux questions abordées dans la présente requéte, car ces question relévent en grande partie d'un jugement éthique Le fait (mentionné par le requérant) que l'Irlande du Nord soit une région où les valeurs ont des fondements religieux solides est un argument important en faveur du maintien de dispositions législatives conçues pour renforcer et sauvegarder ces valeurs . Le Gouvernement souhaite particuliérement s'assurer l'appui général de la population d'Irlande du Nord avant de légiférer dans un domaine aussi délicat et personnel . D'éventuelles réformes juridiques doivent être abordées avec prudence pour plusieurs raisons . L'opinion publique en la matiére est, dans l'ensemble, plus conservatrice en Irlande du Nord qu'en Angleterre Les homosexuels ne gagneraient rien au cllmat hostile que créerait une rapidité excessive dans l'évolution du droit . Jusqu'en 1972, la responsabilité de ces problémes incombait au Gouvernement délégué et au Parlement d'Irlande du Nord Depuis le rattachement direct, le Gouvernement a fait de gros efforts pour établir des dispositions constitutionnelles permanentes dans cette région et a naturellement hésité à introduire des mesures que beaucoup auraient désapprouvées . Les articles 13 et 28 de la Convention ne concernent pas la question de savoir si la Commission peut allouer une réparation . Le Gouvernement persiste à conclure que la requète doit être déclarée irrecevabl e Observations complémentaires du reqùéran t Le requérant observe que le Comité consultatif permanent pour les Droits de l'Homme a recommandé l'harmonisation du droit d'Irlande du Nord avec la loi de 1967 relative aux délits sexuels Toutefois, ce Comité n'a pas préconisé l'application automatique des futurs amendements à la loi en Irlande du Nord, mais jugé souhaitable de chercher à connaître l'opinion publique dans cette région pour que les amendements y soient adoptés s'il n'y a pas de « contre-indication » . La discrimination selon les régions pou«ait donc être maintenue . En outre, l'exten-
- 142 -
sion de la loi de 1967 à l'Irlande du Nord ne répondrait pas à l'argument du requérant selon lequel il a subi une discrimination fondée sur le sexe, contrairement à l'article 14 combiné avec l'article 8 . Par ailleurs, le requérant s'en tient à ses observations initiales .
EN DROIT 1 . Le requérant, qui déclare être homosexuel, se plaint que les lois en vigueur en Irlande du Nord qui interdisent les pratiques homosexuelles entre hommes ont porté atteinte et continuent à porter atteinte à son droit au respect de la vie privée, en violation de l'article 8 de la Convention . Le requérant se plaint à cet égard des effets des articles 61 et 62 de la loi de 1861 relative aux délits contre la personne de l'article 11 de la loi de 1885 portant amendement au droit pénal et des délits de droit coutumier de tentative de commettre les actes interdits par ces dispositions statutaires . Le requérant allègue en outre que ces lois établissent à son égard, une discrimination en premier lieu fondée sur le sexe, en ce sens qu'il subit, en tant qu'homosexuel, des restrictions à sa vie sexuelle privée plus grande que (a) les homosexuelles et Ibl les hétérosexuels, et en second lieu, fondée sur la résidence (ou présence) en Irlande du Nord, en ce sens que les homosexuels ne font pas l'objet des mémes restrictions dans d'autres parties du Royaume-Uni . Le requérant affirme que ces différences de traitement démontrent que les restrictions imposées à sa conduite par les lois précitées ne sont pas a nécessaires » et ne se justifient donc pas en vertu de l'article 8, paragraphe 2, et qu'elles impliquent par ailleurs une violation de ses droits aux termes de l'article 14 combiné avec l'article 8 . Si le requérant n'a été condamné ou poursuivi pour aucun des délits précédemment mentionnés, il déclare que le fait que ces délits soient prévus, de même que les diverses mesures de police prises de ce fait l'ont exposé à la crainte de poursuites et à une angoisse psychique . Il allégue notamment qu'il a été lui-même interrogé par la police au sujet de délits homosexuels . Le Gouvernement défendeur réserve sa position quant au point de savoir si le requérant doit, sur la base des éléments de preuve qu'il a fournis, étre considéré comme une « victime », au sens de l'article 25 de la Convention . Le Gouvernement affirme, en invoquant la jurisprudence de la Commission et de la Cour, que toute ingérence dans la vie privée du requérant se justifie en vertu de l'article 8, paragraphe 2 et que les dispositions en question relévent de la marge d'appréciation laissée aux Etats par ledit article . Il soutient que l'article 14 n'exclut pas la possibilité de faire une différence entre les sexes dans les mesures relatives à l'homosexualité prises conformément à l'article 8, paragraphe 2 . II soutient en outre que, dans un Etat comportant différents systémes juridiques, un probléme ne peut se poser sur le terrain de l'article 14 que si les lois établies dans le cadre d'un systéme juridique déterminé créent des différences de traitement . Le Gouvernement conclut que la requète soit déclarée irrecevable en vertu de l'article 27, paragraphe 2 de la Convention . Les articles 8 et 14 de la Convention sont libellés comme suit :
- 143 -
Article 8 « 1 . Toute personne a droit au respect de sa vie privée et familiale, de son domicile et de sa correspondanc e 2 II ne peut y avoir ingérence d'une autorité publique dans l'exercice de ce droit que pour autant que cette ingérence est prévue par la loi et qu'elle constitue une mesure qui, dans une société démocratique, est nécessaire à la sécurité nationale, à la sùreté publique, au bien-être économique du pays, à la défense de l'ordre et à la prévention des intractions pénales, à la protection de la santé ou de la moraie, ou à la protection des droits et libertés d'autrui »
Article 1 4 « La jouissance des droits et libertés reconnus dans la présente Convention doit étre assurée sans distinction aucune, fondée notamment sur le sexe, la race, la couleur, la langue, la religion, les opinions politiques ou toutes autres oplnions, l'origine nationale ou sociale, l'appartenance à une minorité nationale, la fortune, la naissance ou toute autre situation . n La Commission, ayant procédé à un examen préliminaire de l'argumentation des parties concernant cette partie de la requête, estime qu'elle soulève d'importantes questions relatives à l'interprétation et à l'application de la Convention, notamment des articles cités ci-dessus Les problémes qui se posent sur le terrain de l'article 8, en particulier de son paragraphe 2, et ceux qui relévent de l'article 14 combiné avec l'article 8 sont étroitement liés et demandent à ètre examinés ensemble Icf Requéte N° 7215/75 c/Royaume-Uni, Décision du 5 octobre 1977' . Cette partie de la requète ne peut donc ètre considérée comme nlanifestement nlal fondée . Aucun autre motif d'irrecevabilité ne pouvant étre retenu, cette partie de la requète doit donc étre déclarée recevable et faire l'objet d'un examen au fon d 2 . Le requérant se plaint égalemeni de l'existence, dans le droit coutumier d'Irlande du Nord, des délits de conspiration en vue de corrompre la morale publique et de commettre un outrage à la pudeur . Le requérant allègue que ces iniractions ont, en Irlande du Nord, une portée potentiellement plus large qu'en Angleterre et au Pays de Galles en ce qui concerne les attitudes homosexuelles . Il soutient que toute démarche en vue d'obtenir une réforme du droit relatif à l'homosexualité devient ainsi potentiellement illégale, que l'association explicite d'homosexuels en groupes, clubs ou sociétés peut étre poursuivie et que les organismes de conseils, de rencontres et autres, qui s'adressent aux homosexuels ont une situation juridique peu sùre . Selon le Gouvernement défendeur, le rapport entre ces délits et la présente requéte n'est pas clair et les activités mentionnées dans les textes de référence nationaux que cite le requérant"ne concernent pas l'article 8, paragraphe 1 . ' Voir p . 36 . " Shaw v . Director ol Public Prosecutions 119611 2 AII . E .R . 446 : Knuller Sari v . Director of Public Prosecutions 119721 2 All E .R . M .
- 144 -
La Commission note que les seuls articles de la Convention invoqués par le requérant en l'occurrence sont l'article 8, paragraphe 1, dans la mesure où il garantit le droit au respect de la vie privée, et l'article 14, combiné avec le précédent . Toutefois, le requérant n'a pas montré comment l'existence de ces délits, qui semblent par nature viser les actes commis en public, peut avoir affecté sa vie privée . La Commission ne discerne donc, à cet égard, aucune apparence de violation des dispositions précitées . Cependant, compte tenu des arguments du requérant sur la portée des infractions, telles qu'elles sont définies, la Commission a examiné ex officio si cette partie de la requête pouvait impliquer une violation du droit à la liberté d'expression, garanti par l'article 10, ou du droit à la liberté d'association, garanti par l'article 11 . La Commission remarque tout d'abord, sur un plan général, que le requérant ne s'appuie sur aucun texte faisant autorité lorsqu'il prétend que la portée de ces infractions est plus large en Irlande du Nord, du fail du droit relatif à l'homosexualité qui y est en vigueur, qu'en Angleterre et au Pays de Galles . L'affaire Knuller, à laquelle se référe le requérant, semble contredire cette allégation : il s'agissait en effet dans .cette affaire d'accusations de conspiration en vue de corrompre la moralité publique et de commettre un outrage à la pudeur en raison d'annonces parues en Angleterre pour inviter des hommes à des activités homosexuelles . La Chambre des Lords a estimé à la majorité que, bien que les actes homosexuels en privé entre hommes adultes ne soient plus des infractions pénales en vertu de la loi de 1967 relative aux délits sexuels, un jury pouvait considérer comme une tentative de corruption le fait d'aider ou d'encourager des personnes à participer à de tels actes . De même, personne ne semble avoir prétendu que la légalité des actes mentionnés dans les annonces enlevait à ces derniéres le caractére d'un outrage à la pudeur . La Commission ne trouve donc aucune raison de penser, d'aprés les données qui lui ont été fournies, que l'argument du requérant soit fondé . LaCommission ne trouve, non plus, aucune raison de penser que la portée donnée aux infractions susvisées aurait pour effet de rendre illégale une action tendant à faire réformer les lois relatives à l'homosexualité, et restreindre ainsi la liberté d'expression du requérant . En outre, alors que, selon les argumenis du requérant, « l'association explicite » d'homosexuels en groupes, clubs ou sociétés pourrait être illégale et que les organismes de conseils, de rencontres et autres ont une situation juridique peu sûre, la Commission estime que les éléments fournis ne montrent pas que les infractions susvisées auraient une portée telle que le seul fait qu'elles soient prévues en droit pourrait restreindre l'exercice de la liberté d'association du requérant d'une maniére contraire à l'article 11 . Il en résulte, de l'avis de la Commission, que cette partie de la requête est manifestement mal fondée et doit Ptre considérée comme irrecevable en vertu de l'article 27, paragraphe 2 de la Conventio n
- 145 -
Dans sa requéte, le requérant fait la déclaration suivante quant 3 réparation qu'il sollicite :
à
la
« Le requérant demande l'examen par la Commtssion de la plainte relatlve é la violation passée et présente de ses droits, les démarches nécessaires pour obtenir du Gouvernement défendeur qu'iI mette fin 2 ces violations ; enfin, une indemnisation du préjudice souffert » Le Gouvernement défendeur demande à la Commission de déclarer, sur ce point, la requéte irrecevable comme incompatible avec la Convention, au motif que la Commission n'est pas habilitée à accorder une telle réparatlo n
La Commission se bornera à observer que la Convention ne lui confére pas le pouvoir d'ordonner à un gouvernement de mettre fin à une violation alléguée par un requérant, pas plus que le pouvoir d'accorder une réparation . Néanmoins, tout requérant peut spécifier dans sa requête à la Commission la nature de la réparation qu'il cherche à obtenir en intentant une procédure en vertu de la Convention . A cet égard, la Commission rappelle l'article 38, paragraphe 1 dl de son Règlement intérieur aux termes duquel toute requête formulée en vertu de l'article 25 de la Convention doit indiquer « autant que possible, l'objet de la demande . . » Par ces niotifs, la Commissio n DÉCLARE RECEVABLE, tout moyen de fond étant réservé, les griefs du requéram concernant les lois en vigueur en Irlande du Nord, aux termes desquelles sont interdites les activités homosexuelles entre hommes (y compris la tentaGve) ; DÉCLARE IRRECEVABLES les griefs du requérant concernant les infractions de conspiration en vue de corrompre la morale publique et de conspiration en vue de commettre un outrage à la pudeur .
- 146 -

Origine de la décision

Formation : Commission (plénière)
Date de la décision : 03/03/1978

Fonds documentaire ?: HUDOC

HUDOC
Association des cours judiciaires suprêmes francophones Organisation internationale de la francophonie

Juricaf est un projet de l'AHJUCAF, l'association des cours judiciaires suprêmes francophones,
réalisé en partenariat avec le Laboratoire Normologie Linguistique et Informatique du droit (Université Paris I).
Il est soutenu par l'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie et le Fonds francophone des inforoutes.