Facebook Twitter Appstore
Page d'accueil > Résultats de la recherche

§ X. et Y. c. IRLANDE

Imprimer

Type d'affaire : Decision
Type de recours : Partiellement irrecevable ; partiellement recevable

Numérotation :

Numéro d'arrêt : 8299/78
Identifiant URN:LEX : urn:lex;coe;cour.europeenne.droits.homme;arret;1980-10-10;8299.78 ?

Analyses :

(Art. 35-1) EPUISEMENT DES VOIES DE RECOURS INTERNES, (Art. 35-3) RATIONE TEMPORIS, (Art. 6-1) PROCES EQUITABLE


Parties :

Demandeurs : X. et Y.
Défendeurs : IRLANDE

Texte :

APPLICATION/ REQUETE N° 8299/7 8 X . and Y . v/IRELAN D X . et Y . c/IRLAND E DECISION of 10 October 1980 on the admissibility of the applicatio n DÉCISION du 10 octobre 1980 sur la recevabilité de la requêt e
Article 6, paragraph I, of the Conventlon : Without prejudice to respect for the various saf'eguards it cotuairts. this provisiorr does not forbid the bringing o(arr accused before a special court . It does not guarantee the accused a right tn he tried by a jury. In the case of a trial which follows extradition . the Commission is not cornpetem to define the political character of an offence, which has not been recognised as such bv either the State which requested the extradition, or the State which granted it .
Article 26 of the Convention : (a) Are domestic remedies exhausted . if the competent jurisdiction has reiected an appeal without a hearing although the person concerned has asked for arr adjourtunent in order to prepare himself ( Question not pursued) . (b) The prisoner who alleges rtot havirtg received the court's decision in due titne for lodging art appeal is not exempted frorn exhausting this rernedy if the law provides for the possibility of appealing out of time .
(c) It is the introduction of arr application, and not its registration bv the Secretaq- of the Commission which has to take place within a period of six rnonths frorn the final dontestic decision . Article 6, paragraphe 1, de la Conventlon : Sous réserve du respect des diverses garauties qu'elle contient, cette disposition n'interdit pas de traduire un accusé .lle detnnt un triburral spécial. F ne garantit pas â l'accusé le droit d ëtre jugé avec le concours d'un jury . S'agissant d'un procès après extradition . la Commissiou n'est pas qualillée ponr déftnir le caractère politique d'une infractiopt, qui n'a été recomtue .tat qui l'a conune (elle ni par ('F(at qui a requis l'extradition ni par lF accordée .
-si-
Artlcle 26 de la Convention : (a) Les voies de recours internes sont-elles épuisées lorsque la juridiction contpétente a rejeté un recours sans débats. bien que l'intéressé ait demandé un ajournentent pour se préparer? (Question non résolue) (b) Le détenu qui allègue n'avoir pas reçu la décision d'un tribunal en temps utile pour former recours n'est pas dispensé d'exercer ce recours lorsque la loi prévoit la possibilité d'obtenir une prorogation du délai pour recourir . (c) C«est l'introduction de la requéte et non son enregistrement comme telle par le Secrétaire de la Contmission qui doit avoir lieu dans les six mois à compter de la décision interne définitive .
THE FACTS
(français : voir p . 75)
The facts of the case as submitted by the applicants may be summarised as follows : The applicants are brothers, and both British citizens . X . was born in 1941 in Scotland and Y . in 1947 in Birmingham, England . They are both serving prison sentences in Mountjoy Prison . Dublin, Ireland for armed bank robbery in Dublin on . . . October 1972 together with some members of the IRA . On . . . October 1972 the applicants were arrested in England for this bank robbery and held in solitary confinement until an I rish warrant was obtained . On . . . October 1972 they were brought before a magistrate at B . Cou rt where they were remanded pending extradition proceedings . On . . . Janua ry 1973 the Attorney General of Ireland swore an affidavit to be used before British cou rts in proceedings against the applicants for the purpose of having them extradited to Ireland, pursuant to the provisions of the Backing of Warrants ( Republic of Ireland) Act 1965 . C . 45 . In the affidavit the following, inter alia, is said and sworn : J . I am the Attomey General of Ireland under Article 30 .3 of the Constitution of Ireland . All crimes and offences prosecuted in any court constituted under Article 34 of that Constitution other than a court of summary jurisdiction, shall be prosecuted in the name of the people and the suit of the Attorney General or some other person authorised in accordance with law to act for that purpose . "
-52-
Subsequently it is specifically stated in the affidavit on what charges the applicants will be tried and the affidavit concludes by saying, iater alia : "The above offences are not under I ri sh law ones of a political character . . . " On . . . January 1973 the extradition hearing started before the B . Magistrate Court . The Attorney General on behalf of the British Government asked that the hearing be conducted in camera for reasons of national security . This request was granted . The applicants maintain that the reason for this request was that from a period dating from 1971 until October 1972 they had been working in cooperation with the British Secret Intelligence Service to subvert the IRA in Ireland and Northern Ireland . They maintain that this can be substantiated from official statements issued by various ex-British Government Ministers such as Lord Carrington (former Minister for Defence), Geoffrey JohnsonSmith M .P . (former Under-Secretary of State for War) and Robert Carr M .P . (former Home Secretary) . The applicants state that the purpose of the bank robbery of . . . October 1972 was : 1 . To create trouble south of the border to force Irish authorities to take action against IRA extremists sheltering on their territory from Northern Ireland forces .
2 . To strengthen their (the applicants) position within the IRA as successful operators . To finance a self-sufficient Splinter group that X commanded whic h .3 could be manipulated by British Intelligence . It is stated by the applicants that they worked with British Intelligence on the understanding that if ever they were arrested in Ireland they would be disowned absolutely, but if they were able to return to England, in the event of things going wrong, then they would be free from prosecution . However the applicants were arrested in England on . . . October 1972, as I mentioned above . The applicants submit that because of va rious prosecution pressures, such as the fact that X .'s wife would be prosecuted ( she had been arrested with hint but later released), they gave up their intention to summon Lord Carrington, Geoffrey Johnson-Smith M .P . and two SIS officers to give testimony at the extradition hearings rt hermore, the applicants maintain that although the hea ri ngs were .Fu held in camera, counsel for the English Attorney General declared that the Official Secrets Act barred them from stating names or giving any descriptions of any SIS personnel whom they might have come into contact with . Therefore
-53-
they were forced to give incomplete testimony and the defence was confined to the following points : a) The charge, as stated, was one of a political characte r b) They would be detained for an offence of a political character . This defence met with the Irish Attorney General's affidavit of . . . Janua ry 1973 . stating that under I ri sh law the offences were not of a political character.
The applicants, however, emphasise that in August 1973, after they had been sentenced to long-term imprisonment, the Irish Attorney General made several public statentents, some conflicting, which they maintain made it clear that if he had been aware of the true facts, he would not have sworn the affidavit . or. in his own words . "1 have sworn an affidavit which was false for the use in the English cou rt s . " On . . . January 1973 the B . Magistrates Court endorsed the extradition warrant . The applicants appealed to the Queens Bench Division of the High Court by way of habeas corpus . This appeal was heard before the cou rt in March 1973 in camera after the judge has ordered that the applicants should also be removed from the cou rt . The Oueens Bench Division of the High Cou rt also endorsed the extradition warrant and ruled that this was an IRA offence but not an offence of a political character . (The date is not mentioned and the cou rt order has not been submitted) . The House of Lords refused to grant leave to appeal . The applicants were then extradited to Ireland and on . . . April 1973 they entered a plea of guilty before the Dublin Dist rict Court . The applicants later withdrew their plea of guil ty when they learned that the Attorney General had directed that they should be tried by a Special Criminal Court (without a ju ry) under the Offences against the State Act, 1939 . The applicants point out that the Special Criminal Cou rt is constituted under Article 38 of the Constitution, but in the affidavit sworn by the A tt orney General of . . . Janua ry 1973, reference is only made to A rt icle 34 of the Constitution, and not to A rt icle 38 or to the Offences against the State Act . 1939 or to the Special Criminal Cou rt . The applicants considered this in complete contradiction to the terms of the extradition and protested to the Special Criminal Cou rt and contended it must decline jurisdiction to the ordina ry cou rt s as this was an abuse of legal procedure . executive power and a violation of natural justice . On . . . July 1973 the trial of the applicants before the Special Criminal Cou rt sta rted with submission from their counsel for an adjournment until the question of jurisdiction could be decided by the Supreme Cou rt .
- 54 -
This application was refused . Counsel then requested the court to decline jurisdiction on the basis that the terms of the Attorney General's affidavit only allowed venue for trial in the ordinary criminal courts . i .e . a court constituted under Article 34 of the Constitution . This application was also refused . On . . . July 1973 the applicants were found guilty as charged and remanded in custody to await sentence . On . . . August 1973 the applicant X . gave evidence on oath in the Special Criminal Court about the IRA and the British Secret Intelligence Service involvement in the offence charged . Counsel for both the applicants submitted that under Irish law the offence was patently "one of a political character", and that the court was still in a position to decline jurisdiction in these circumstances . However the court proceeded to sentence X . to a term of twenty years' penal servitude and to a term of fifteen years' penal servitude . The applicants point out that after this their case was taken up by the world's news media front . . . August 1973 both the British and Irish Governments and opposition parties proceeded to publish extraordinary statentents, accusations, denials, counter-accusations and retractions .
The applicants maintain that on . . . August 1973 the British Ministry of Defence issued a statement (a copy of it has not been submitted by the applicants) in which the British Government admitted an involventent with A . and Y . but denied sanctioning any bank robbery in Ireland . Immediately after the applicants had been sentenced on . . . August 1973 an application was ntade for leave to appeal . The court refused leave to appeal against conviction on . . . August 1973 and against sentence on . . . October 1973 . An application was then prepared for leave to appeal to the Court of Criminal Appeal . The application was listed for hearing before the Court of Criminal Appeal on . . . October 1973 . but then the court directed that certain points regarding the constitutionality of the Special Criminal Court would be more properly heard on an application of habeas corpus and/or certiorari . This action was agreed upon and the appeal application was adjourned to allow time for counsel to prepare the habeas corpus/certiorari application .
-55-
On . . . January 1974 counsel appeared again before the Court of Criminal Appeal and submitted that the habeas corpus/ceniorari application was still not ready and asked for further adjournment . The court refused the application for adjournment and directed that it would properly hear the habeas corpus application there and then and in the alternative would hear the appeal . Counsel then advised the court that he was not ready to go ahead with either application and in the circumstances would have to ask that the appeal application be withdrawn . The court refused this application and summarily dismissed the appeal without hearing it . The applicants submit that thecourt misdirected itself in accepting the proposition that counsel could withdraw or abandon an appeal without a notice of abandonment (form No . 20, Rules of Superior Courts (Ireland)) . The applicants further point out that this was done without their having given any such instruction to counsel . On . . . Januray 1974 the applicants applied to the High Court for conditional orders of habeas corpus and certiorari, raising issues of the constitutionality of the Special Criminal Court and the jurisdiction of that court to deal with the allegedly political offences committed by the applicants . On . . . January 1974 the application, which had been continued only in the name of Y . . was dismissed by the High Court . An appeal was taken on behalf of Y . to the Supreme Court, raising issues of the validity of the Attorney-General's Certificate of . . . May 1973 referred to above . The Supreme Court adjourned the case to enable the counsel for the applicant to raise in the High Court some of the grounds on which the appeal relied and which had not been raised in the earlier High Court proceedings . On . . . February 1976 the High Court refused this subsequent application and by judgment of . . . March 1976 the Supreme Court dismissed the appeal . It appears that in February or March 1974 a conditional order of habeas corpus was granted to the applicants by the Irish High Court, but the absolute order was refused on . . . March 1974 . Having heard this decision, the applicants escaped from prison during the night of . . . March 1974 . Y . was recaptured shortly afterwards . He subsequently appealed the habeas corpus refusal to the Irish Supreme Court . There was again granted a conditional order, which was never made aboslute . (Refused in February 1976) X . was recaptured in England in November 1974 .
-56-
New extradition proceedings took place . X . complains that the same judge (Lord Chief Justice W .) sat in judgment as in the previous extradition proceedings in 1973 . In this extradition judgment of . . . July 1975 . he inrer nlia, ruled : "although the robbery committed by X . and Y . was not for personal financial gain, and although the Irish authorities had invoked the Offences against the State Act, 1939, and although X . and Y . had been tried in the Special Criminal Court . and although there was an affidavit from an Irish Barrister and Senator, Mrs Mary Robinson, that the Special Criminal Court was a court for the trial of political offences, and although there were so many statements from involved politicians, . . . he could see no reason to alter the decision that he made two years earlier . " X . was returned to Dublin on . . . August 1975 where he was charged with "escape from lawful custody" . He pleaded "not guilty" to this offence before a jury in the Dublin Circuit Criminal Court . He had witness summons se rved on MM . Jack Lynch, Colm Condon and Desmond O'Malley in order that they would give evidence on oath as to their part in this affair . These men refused to give evidence on oath and the cou rt refused to compel them to appear . X . was convicted as charged but he maintains it was a nominal sentence that did not affect his situation with regard to the first sentence of twenty years . The conviction was appealed to the Cou rt of Criminal Appeal which refused the appeal . The applicants maintain that meanwhile they wrote countless letters to the Court of Criminal Appeal, the Supreme Cou rt and the Chief of Justice himself on the matter of being refused the right to appeal their o riginal conviction and sentence of . . . August 1973 . They state that a major problem that they were faced with in obtaining the transcript of the trial, exhibits and documents lay in the fact that these had been in the possession of their solicitor who, as well as having been struck off the legal roll, was also being examined by the bankruptcy cou rts . The applicants maintain that the delays in legal actions were forced upon them by the difficulty in obtaining the necessa ry legal documents . In this context they quote a le tt er from the Supreme Cou rt Office dated . . . November 1975, which reads as follows : "Your letter of . . . October 1975 having been placed before the Chief fustice as requested, I have to inform yoû that the problem of locating and producing the documents and exhibits you refer to, is likely to be resolved by reason of the steps taken by the assigned solicitor and counsel in the mattér of the appeal by your brother Y .
- 57 -
Because of this circumstance, which is common to your appeal and that of your brother, and also because the hearing of your brother's appeal has been arranged for an early date next month, it has been considered necessary to defer for the present further consideration of your letter . " The applicants draw attention to the fact that the appeal referred to in the letter is that of (he habeas corpus application first mentioned on . . . October 1973 . Another two years passed during which the applicants maintain they wrote to every superior court in Ireland on a regular basis still seeking to appeal conviction and sentence . A typical reply, the applicants state, is that from the Court of Criminal Appeal dated . . . October 1977 . which reads as follows : "Your letter concerning your appeâthas been received at this office . I am directed to inform you that the matter was finally dealt with by the Court of Criminal Appeal on the . . . January 1974 when application for leave to appeal was disntissed . " The applicants reiterate that this dismissal occurred when their counsel attentpted to withdraw the application for leave to appeal because he was not ready to go ahead with it because he had not been instructed by their solicitor, a circumstance which the applicants maintain they had no control over, never agreed to and had not been consulted about until after the event . On . . . November 1977 X . wrote again to the Supreme Court and then received the following letter dated . . . November 1977 : "This is to acknowledge receipt of your letter dated the . . . instant and to inform you that the decision of the Court of Criminal Appeal is final and no appeal lies to the Supreme Court unless you obtain a certificate under section 29 of the Courts of Justice Act 1924 . Section 29 reads as follows :'29 . - The determination by the Court of Criminal Appeal if any appeal or other matter which it has power to determine shall be final and no appeal shall lie from that court to the Supreme Court, unless that court* or the Attorney General shall certify that the decision involves a point of law of exceptional public importance and that it is desirable in the public interest that an appeal should be taken to the Suprente Court, in which case an appeal may be brought to the Supreme Court, the decision of which shall be final and conclusive . "
• This means the Cou rt of Criminal Appeal .
- 58 -
Another exchange of letters between X . and the Cou rt of Criminal Appeal resulted in the following letter from the cou rt dated . . . December 1977 : "Your letter stating the points of law of exceptional public import ance which you contend arise in your case has been received at this office . The Chief of Justice has directed that your application be listed before the Court of Criminal Appeal . You will be notified of the date of the hearing as soon as the date is fixed . " The application for a ce rt ificate under Section 29 of the Cou rt s of Justice Act 1924 was heard on . . . July 1978 in the I rish Cou rt of Criminal Appeal before three Judges . X . was unrepresented and with the cou rt 's permission made the application personally . The basis of his appeal . relevant to the present application before the Commission, would be as follows : X . and Y . should not have been arraigned before the Special Criminal Court, and the Irish Attorney General misdirected himself in preferring the indictntent to that court, when in order to comply with the undertakings given in Ihe English Extradition Courts, the court of trial should have been one constituted under Article 34 of the Irish Constitutionm but not the Special Crimianl Court which is constituted under Article 38 of the Constitution .
Fu rt her it was argued by the applicant X . that the Extradition Act 1965, Section 39 ( 3) would have prevented a t ri al in the Special Criminal Cou rt , even without relying on the affidavit of the Irish A tt orney General . F_xtradition Act 1965 : "39 . (3) . Where the desc ri ption of the offence charged is altered in the course of the proceedings,-he shall only be proceeded against or sentenced insofar as the offence under its new description is shown by its constituent elentents to be an offence for which he would be liable to be surrendered to the State . ' Hence the applicantssubntit that before a trial can be transferred to a non-ju ry Special Cou rt the Attorney General of Ireland had to invoke his powers under the Offences Against the State Act 1939 ce rtifying that for that pa rt icular offence the ordina ry cou rt s are inadequate for the effective administration of justice . The offence in question then adopts an additional description ; it becontes either a schedule or a non-schedule offence against the State, pursuant to the relevant section of the Offences Against the State Act 1939 . As soon as an accused person raises this issue the I rish cou rt s then have the duty pursuant to the Extradition Act of 1965 to decide whether under its new or additional description the offence is an extraditable offence .
- 59 -
The applicants maintain that in the United Kingdom extradition court s the standard precedent used for reference in Anglo-I ri sh extradition case is that of R . v . Keene (not specified clearer) . From the basis of this precedent, in British law, IRA offences are not offences of a political character . Irish cou rt s, however, have in recent years consistently ruled that all IRA offences are offences of a political character for the purpose of extradition law, and since the Eztradition Trea ty Agreement between the United Kingdom and the Republic of I reland ( 1965), no IRA offender has been extradited by an Irish cou rt . Hence the interpretation of what constitutes " an offence of political character" is completely at odds in the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland . In the applicants opinion this diffe re nce in interpretation between the two countries goes beyond reasonable va ri ance in interpretation . The applicants therefore submit that the Extradition Act 1965 ( Republic of Ireland) and the Backing of Warrants Act 1965 ( United Kingdom) a re unconstitutional and contra ry to the concept of reciprocal protection of human rights and freedoms as accepted in international law regarding extradtion between two treaty countries . By a judgment on . . . July 1978 the Court of Criminal Appeal refused the application for a certificate under Section 29, Courts of Justice Act 1924, for a further appeal to the Supreme Court inter alia with the reasoning that it would not be sufficient for Mr X to show that this is a point of law . "He would have to go further and show that it is a point of law of exceptional public importance . so exceptional that it would be desirable in the public interest that a further appeal should be desirable to the Supreme Court . " The applicants submit that the Court of Criminal Appeal misdirected itself in this adjudication of the matter, because it was a party to the cause at issue, having already, on . . . January 1974, incorrectly dismissed their previous appeal . The applicants maintain that the Court of Criminal Appeal had no alternative but to properly refer the matter to the Supreme Court . Since the court did not do so, the applicants submit that this was a denial of the fundamental human legal right of a convicted person to appeal his conviction and sentence to a higher court .
-60-
Conditlone In MounUoy Prison The applicants also complain of the conditions under which they have had to serve their sentences in Mountjoy Prison, Dublin . They maintain that these conditions have been inhuman and degrading . Since March and April 1973 they have respectively been detained in B-Basement (a punishment/ psychiatric area) of Mountjoy Prison . They describe B-Basement as a tunnel, approximately 150 feet long, 20 feet wide and 9 feet high, with a barred window at one end of the tunnel . It is lit day and night with fluorescent light . The B-Basement has 24 single cells including a padded cell used for unruly, uncontrollable or mentally disturbed prisoners who often caused X . and Y . suffering and frustration by their demented outbursts . When Y . was recaptured in March 1974 and brought back to B-Basement, a sheet of perspex was put up to cover the window in his cell . This caused so much humidity in the cell that it was eventually removed on repeated protests of the prison doctor . The applicants state that they asked for a psychiatric examination in the prison . Instead they say that they were referred to a welfare officer whom they were first to inform about their family, friends and background . They refused to disclose such information lest it might fall in the wrong hands and became harmful for friends and relatives . They maintain that this procedure was used by the administration to refuse them the psychiatric examination . X . applied to the Governor of the Prison in October 1975 (he thinks) for workshop facilities where X . and Y . would have room to move and breathe and where they would have access to tools and materials . Another room was prepared for them the following year . They then refused to use it . Consequently they were officially charged with refusing to work, deprived of 14 days privileges and confined to their cells . After the sentence elapsed they claim they were confined to their celles unofficially and remained so for a further two and a half years, or until July 1978 . From the day they were confined to their cells they were deprived of the weekly gratuity payments that they maintain were stopped without an official hearing as required by Article 57 of the Statutory Rules and Orders 1947 . No . 320, for the Government of Prisons . which reads as follows : "67 . Before a report of misconduct against a prisoner is dealt with, he shall be informed of the precise nature of the offence for which he has been reported and shall not be punished until he has had an opportunity of hearing the evidence against him and of being heard in his defence . "
-61-
The applicants further maintain that by law (not cited) a departmental order is required for any prisoner to be deprived of any privilege for a period exceeding six months and this order should be renewed every six months . As mentioned previously X . and Y . refused to work (for example, scrubbing the floors or making cardboard churches) . Instead they chose to study imer alia languages, for which they were given facilities . This they niaintain should be considered as work on their part with regard to the right to get gratuity payments . The applicants state that over the years they repeatedly asked to be taken out of B-Basement to the main prison . In this regard they were asked to sign an undertaking that they would be responsible for their own safety if taken into the main prison . This they refused because they maintain that no other prisoners are required to sign such a document . The applicants further complain about the lack of area for movement in B-Basement and state that the distance from their cells to the toilets is approximately 50 feet and from their cells to the exercise yard approximately 12 feet . On . . . October 1977 the applicants swore an affidavit under Article 40 of the Irish Constitution for an application of Habeas Corpus to the High Court . The Governor of the prison gave written replies to the affidavit in whic h he maintained that the applicants' conditions in prison were self-imposed by their conduct and their refusal to do normal work . On . . . December 1977 the High Court refused X . and Y .'s application for an Order of Habeas Corpu s The applicants maintain that they first read of this decision in an Irish newspaper . They expected that they would receive a copy of the decision within a short time . This, however, did not happen, according to the applicants . in spite of their requests . The time-limit for an appeal to the Supreme Court is 21 davs . but the cnurt has nower to extend that time-limit . The applicants did not appeal the High Court's decision of . . . December 1977 because thev state that thev did not receive documents relevant for the appeal (the High Court decision plus accompanying document, i .a ., copies of the Governor's replies) until . . . June 1978 . Thev point out that these documents were sent from the High Court on . . . March 1978 and have submitted a letter froni that court dated . . . June 1978 to substantiate this . The applicants allege that the Governor of the prison withheld these documents until . . . June 1978 which, they maintain, was two days after the time-limit for appeal had expired .
- 62 -
Complaints The applicants complain that they did not get a fair trial, that thei r extradition proceedings were held in cantera and that thev were extradited on the basis of a false affidavit, sworn by the Irish Attorney General, stating that their offences were not of a political character . Nevertheless they were tried by a Special Criminal Court under Ihe Offences Against the State Act 1939 . They maintain that their sentences were excessive and that they were refused the basic human right to appeal their convictions and sentences . In this context the applicants invoke Article 5 (4) of the Convention . The applicants further coniplain about the conditions under which they have had to serve their sentence in the B-Basement of Mountjoy Prison, Dublin . They point out that they were kept in virtual solitary confinement from March and April 1976 (respectively) until July 1978 . that they have been deprived of their weekly gratuity payments since the beginning of their solitary confinentent without a hearing in contravention of Article 67 of the Statutory Rules and Orders 1947 . No . 320, for the Government of Prisons . The applicants ntaintain that by this they have been subjected to an inhuman and degrading treatment and invoke Article 3 of the Convention . PROCEEDINGS BEFORE THE COMMISSIO N The application was introduced on 16 June 1974 and was registered on 13 July 1978 . On 13 March 1980 the Commission decided to eive notice of the application to the Irish Governntent and to invite that Government to submit its observations in writing on the admissibility of the application . Such observations were submitted by the Government on 10 June 1980 and the applicants subntitted observations in reply on 18 July 1980 . SUBMISSIONS OF THE PARTIES The Govemment : As repuested bv the Commission the Government have limited their observations to the particular complaints relating to Article 6(1) of the Convention . As to the Special Criinina! Court In 1972, due to the situation arising from the troubles in Northern Ireland . the Governntent found it necessary to invoke Article 38 .3 of the Constitution of Ireland which provides as follows : "3 .1 ° Special courts mav be established bv law for the trial of offences in cases where it mav be determined in accordance with such la w
- 63 -
that the ordinary courts are inadequate to secure the effective administration of Justice and the preservation of public peace and order . 2° The Constitution, powers, jurisdiction and procedure of such special courts shall be prescribed by law . " On 26 May 1972 the Government made â Proclamation declaring that they were satisfied that the ordinary courts were inadequate to secure the effective administration of justice and the preservation of public peace and brought into force Part V of the Offences against the State Act 1939 which relates to Special Criminal courts . On 30 May 1972, the Govemment made an order establishing a Special Criminal Court and a number of statutory orders were niade by the Government scheduling the following offences for the purpose of Part V of the Offences against the State Act, 193 9 (1) Offences under the Malicious Damage Act, 1961 (2) Offences under the Explosive Substances Act, 1883 (3) Offences under the Firearms acts, 1925 to 197 1 (4) Offences under the Offences against the State Act, 193 9 (5) Offences under Section 7 of the Conspiracy and Protection of Property Act, 1875 . Dail Eireann (Parliantent) may by resolution annul the Government Proclamation by virtue of which Part V of the Act was brought into force . Part V also provides that the Special Criminal Court is to consist of an uneven number (not less than three) members . The majority decision is to be the decision of the Special Criminal Court and the existence or content of individual opinions . whether assenting or dissenting is not to be disclosed . Convictions or sentences of a Special Criminal Court are subject to appeal to the Court of Criminal Appeal in the same way as convictions or sentences of the Central Criminal Court . Section 45 provides for the sending forward from the District Court to the Special Criminal Court for trial of persons charged with scheduled offences . Section 46 empowers the Attorney General to request that a District Justice send forward to the Special Criminal Court for trial a person charged with a non-scheduled offence if he certifles °that the ordinary courts are, in his opinion, inadequate to secure the effective administration of justice and the preservation of public peace and order in relation to the trial of such person on such charge" . Provision is made for allowing such persons to be at liberty on bail . No provision is made for trial by jury . The Government point out that since Part V of the Offences against the State Act, 1939 was brought into operation in 1972, there has been only one Special Criminal Court (in Dublin) each of whose members, with one exception, was a judge of the ordinary courts at the time of his appointment, and one o f
-64-
whom (the exception) was a former judge of the ordinary courts at the time of his appointment . Their impartiality and independence in the exercise of their judicial function has, to the respondent Government's knowledge, been unchallenged . Trials in the Special Criminal Court have been public, in accordance with the rules of procedure adopted by the court (No . 147 of 1972, being the rules in force at the date of the applicants' trial in the Special Criminal Court) . Appeals have been taken to the ordinary courts of appeal against conviction and sentence in the same way as appeals from ordinary courts . The Governntent further maintain that there are no rules of evidence which apply to the Special Criminal Court which do not also apply to the ordinary courts . As to the questiort of fair trial" under Article 6(1) of the Conventio n The Government points out that the applicants seek to establish a contradiction between the averment of the then Attorney General in his affidavit of . . . January 1973 and the subsequent certificates of the subsequent Attorney General dated . . . april and . . . May 1973 that "the ordinary courts are inadequate to secure the effective administration of justice and the preservation of public peace and order in relation to the trial" which directed that the applicants be tried before the Special Criminal Court . No such contradiction exists . The allegation that such a contradiction exists seems to be based on an assumption that a certificate directing the trial of an offence before the Special Criminal Court means that the offence was political, or, at least, that the authority that issued the certificate believed the offence to have been political . Such an assuntption is false . The basis on which a certificate is issued is that the issuing authority (i .e . the Attorney General or the Director of Public Prosecution) is satisfied that the ordinary courts are inadequate to secure the effective adniinistration of justice and the preservation of public peace and order in relation to the trial . The Government furher submit that it is clear from the relevant provisions of the Constitution, the text of Part V of the Offences against the State Act 1939 and a Suprente Court judgment "In the matter of the Criminal Law (Jurisdiction) Bill 1975" . 110 The Irish Law Times Reports 69, that in 1973 the Attorney General was the appropriate authority nominated by Irish law to deterntine whether unscheduled offences should be referred to the Special Court and whether scheduled offences, which would otherwise be referred to that court . should in fact be dealt with by the ordinary courts . He could only exercise this first-mentioned authority in relation to unscheduled offences on certifying that "the ordinary courts are, in his opinion, inadequate to secure the effective administration of justice and the preservation of public peace and order in relation to the trial of the person charged with such offencé" . Neither the Constitution nor the Act mentions anywhere the concept of "political" ot'fence . The "apparent motive" of the crime is one of the factors instanced b y
-65-
the Supreme Court in its judgment which might be borne in mind for the purpose of determining whether a certificate should issue under Part V of the Offences against the State Act, but the judgment also indicate other factors which may be predominant for that purpose . Accordingly, the fact that an accused person has been tried in the Special Criminal Court does not mean that the offence in question is one of a political nature . Insofar as the basis of the claim may be that the trial before special Criminal Court was unfair, the respondent Government submit firstly that the applicants have failed to exhaust their domestic remedies in relation to the trial in that on . . . January 1974 they withdrew their appeal before the Court of Criminal Appeal and thereby abandoned the normal process whereby a superior court can review ihe trials as a whole . Secondly, the respondent Government submit that if the application is based on an assumption that the Convention provides a right to trial by jury, such an assumption is incorrect . Article 6 of the Convention does not specify trial by jury as one of the elements of a fair hearing in the determination of criminal charges . Neither does the Convention guarantee an individual the right to trial in any specific domestic court ; the important thing is that the court in which his is tried does, in fact, comply with the requirements of Article 6 . In this connection, the respondent Governrnent refers to its description of the Special Criminal Court above and submits that that court does comply with the requirements of Article 6 . Accordingly, for these aforementioned reasons, the respondent Government submit that this application is manifestly ill-founded and is incompatible ratione materiae. The respondent Government also submit that the requirements of Article 26 of the Convention relating to the "six months' rule" have not been satisfied . On . . . lanuary 1974 the Court of Criminal Appeal dismissed the application for leave to appeal against the decision of the Special Criminal Court of . . . July 1973 . The application was dismissed on that date following a statement by counsel for the defence that he was instructed by both applicants to withdraw the appeal application . One applicant, Y ., pursued in the High Court and Supreme Court, with particular regard to the Constitution . The final decision on these applications of Y . is that of the Supreme Court date . . . March 1976 . The other applicant, X . applied to the Court of Criminal Appeal for a certificate that a point of law of exceptional public importance had arisen in his appeal and that it was desirable in the public interest that an appeal be taken to the Supreme Court . The final decision on this application of X . is that of the Court of Criminal Appeal dated . . . July 1978 . Both applications to the Commission were registered on 13 July 1978 . and the respondent Government submit that this is the appropriate date for the purpose of applying the six months' rule . -66-
The Government ntoreover submit that the flnal relevant decision in this case could be regarded as either the decision of the Court of Criminal Appeal of . . . January 1974 dismissing the applications for leave to appeal of (taking into account that these applications were dismissed because the applicants, through their counsel, did not pursue them) that of the Special Criminal Court on . . . October 1973 disntissing the applications for leave to appeal . In either event neither Y .'s subsequent applications to the High Court and Supreme Court nor X .'s subsequent application to the Court of Criminal Appeal formed part of the ordinary hierarchy of judicial decisions in criminal cases . It is further sumitted that it would be inappropriate for the Commission to take a date other than the date of registration of the application for the purpose of applying the six months' rule, as the real significance of that rule cannot be weakened by circumstances such as the escape of the applicants from lawful custody . The respondent Government conclude by requesting the Commission t . odeclarthisp ndmible The appllcante : The applicants repudiate the Government's contentions that they have lodged their application with the Commission out of time regarding the "six months' rule" of Article 26 of the Convention . They point out that they have submitted two applications, the former dated 2 June 1978 and the latter dated 24 October 1978, which were joined to the application of 2 June 1978 . The applicants maintain that the proceedings in the Court of Criminal Appeal, on . . . July 1978, were on behalf of both X . and Y . X . pleaded the case without counsel and the applicants maintain that it was made clear by the court that what applied to one applicant automatically applied to the other because of the common grounds of appeal . The applicants further submit that the Government's claim that this hearing was not a part of the ordinary hierarchy of judicial decisions, is an incorrect statement of law . The Courts of Justice Act 1924 lays down the procedure for appellants in the Court of Criminal Appeal : "S .31 A person convicted on indictment before the Central Criminal Court or before any Court of the High Court Circuit may appeal under this Act to the Court of Criminal Appeal", an d "S .29 The determination by the Court of Criminal Appeal of any appeal or other matter which it has the power to determine shall be final, and no appeal shall lie from that court to the Supreme Court . unless that court or the Attorney General shall certify that th e
- 67 -
decision involves a point of law of exceptional public importance and that it is desirable in the public interest that an appeal should be taken to the Supreme Court, in which case an appeal may be brought to the Supreme Court, the decision of which shall be final and conclusive . " Hence the applicants submit that applications under Section 29 of the Courts of Justice Act 1924 are normal procedure as laid down by Statute, and there is nothing unusual or unique about such an application . Furthermore the applicants emphasise that they did not instruct counsel to withdraw their appeal in the Court of Criminal Appeal on . . . January 1974 . In this context they have produced an affidavit from their solicitor at the relevant time, Mr B ., sworn on . . . July 1980 . The applicants refer to paragraphs (7) and (8) of this affidavit which reads as follows :"(7) 1 say that I did not receive instructions from either of the accuse d to withdraw the appeal on their behalf, or on behalf of either of them . (8) At no time did I instruct either one of the counsel referred to in paragraph 2 above to apply to the court to have the appeal withdrawn . Any suggestion to the contrary is untrue to the best of my knowledge, information and belief . " Moreover the applicants maintain that at every stage in their proceedings, the State or persons acting on behalf of the State have withheld vital judgments or documents, and then at a later stage penalised them for being out of time . The applicants' observations on the question of ' fair trial" under Article 6( 1 ) of the Converrtio n The applicants maintain that the fornier Irish Attorney General's affidavit . sworn on . . . January 1973, and particularly paragraphs (1) and (4), gives the implicit guarantee of prosecution and trial in the ordinary courts constituted under Article 34 (I) of the Constitution, and trial subject to the general criminal law Article 34 (4) of the Constitution . The fact that the said affidavit was not reasonably and honestly made notwithstanding, Ireland was in breach of the said undertaking sworn on its behalf, when the extradited applicants were prosecuted pursuant to the Offences Against the State Act 1939 in a court constituted under Article 38 of the Constitution, i .e . the Special Criminal Court . The applicants further submit that it is impossible to reconcile paragraph (I) of the affidavit of the Irish Attorney General (for extradition purposes) with the terms of the certificates, on foot of which the applicants were sent for trial in the Special Criminal Court, signed by the Attorney General on . . . April and . . . May 1973-after extradition had been secured .
- 68 -
The applicants hence maintain that such a clear cut breach of accepted judicial standards is not compatible with Article 6(1) of the Convention, which relates to "fair triaf" . The applicants moreover maintain that the Special Criminal Court is a political court . In this context they refer to the respondent Government's admission that the Special Criminal Court was established "due to the situation arising from the troubles in Northern Ireland" . The applicants also refer to the verbatim reports of the debates in the Irish Parliament about the Offences Against the State Act 1939 that took place on 8 February 1939 - 27 April 1939 as follows : Page 90 :"It will deal with certain sections which were in the Treasonable Offences Act 1925 . " Page 1283 :"1 will refer to the principal of the Bill . I should say at the outset, that the sole object of this Bill is the prevention of the display, the use, or the advocacy of force as a method to achieve political or social aims . . . Page 1290 : "Now the first four parts of this Bill are intended to do no more than to replace the Treasonable Offences Act 1925 . " and
"Part V of the Bill . . . is an emergency provision . " Page 1291 : "Part VI of the Bill provides for internment . It is intended to deal with offences against the State in connection with cases in which there is moral certainty, although legal proof is lacking . " Page 1307 : "This is not a Bill to deal with ordinary disorder, such as rows in the street about trivial matters . It is a Bill which, it is clear from its context, is designed to deal with what I may describe as dangerous POLITICAL disorder . " The applicants, in particular, repudiate the Government's contentions that "there are no rules of evidence which apply to the Special Criminal Court which do not also apply to the ordinary courts" . In reply the applicants refer to the "Offences Against The State (Amendment) Act 1972, Section 3 (2) : "When an officer of the Garda Siochana not below the rank of Chief Superintendent, in giving evidence in proceedings relating to an offence under the said Section 21, states that he believes that the accused was at a material time a member of an unlawful organisation, the statement shall be evidence that he was then such a mentber . "
-69-
The applicants state that it has happened during many trials since the amendment came into force that an accused person has been convicted purely on the stated belief of a police officer . No supporting evidence or proof of any kind is required . This is a special rule of evidence that applies in the Special Criminal Court . but which does not apply in any other court . The applicants' conclusions are that the Irish Government are in breach of Article 6 (1) of the Convention and request the Commission to declare that application admissible under that Article .
THE LAW 1 . As to the applicants' exlradillon 1 . The applicants complain that their extradition proceedings in the United Kingdom were held in camera and that they were extradited by the United Kingdom authorities on the basis of a false affidavit by the Irish Attorney General . 2 . The Commission observes that it cannot in the present application against Ireland consider complaints relating to proceedings before courts, or acts of administrative or governmental authorities, of another High Contracting Party, namely, the United Kingdom . 3 . It follows that the applicants' complaints conce rning their extradition proceedings in the United Kingdom and their extradition to Ireland by the United Kingdom authorities are as such incompatible ratione personae with the provisions of the Convention . 4 . The Commission has nevertheless considered the applicants' submission that their extradition by the United Kingdom was based on the Irish Attorney General's statement that, under Irish law, their offences were not of a political character . The Commission does not, however, find this submission conclusive, for two reasons . 5 . Firstly, insofar as the applicants claim that, because of their involvement in IRA activities, their offences were ones of a political character, the Commission notes from the applicants' own submissions that, in British law . IRA offences are not treated as political offences . The Commission further observes that, in the extradition proceedings against the applicants, it was for the British courts to decide whether the offences concerned were political or not . It follows that the applicants' claim that their offences were political ones under Irish law, was irrelevant for their extradition by the United Kingdom . 6 . Secondly, it also appears from the applicants' own submissions that, following their conviction and sentence and their escape from prison in Ireland, the second applicant was recaptured in England, and that his extradition was again granted, the judge seeing "noreason to alter the decision that he made two years earlier" .
-70-
7 . This, in the Commission's view, confirms that the United Kingdom's decision, taken before the applicants' trial and repeated in the second applicant's case after their trial, that the applicants should be extradited to Ireland, was not based on any statement by Irish authorities as to whether or not the applicants' offences were political ones under Irish law, but on an independent examination by the competent British courts of the character of those offences under British law . 8 . The Commission notes that the applicants' complaint that the Irish interpretation of what constituted a political offence differs from that in the United Kingdom . However, it does not consider that this difference raises an issue under the Convention in the present case . 9. The Commission will examine the relevance of the Irish Attorney Geneneral's affidavit, as regards the applicants' right to a fair trial in Ireland . in connection with their complaints concerning their conviction and sentence . As to the appllcante' convlctlon and sentence 10 . With respect to the applicants' complaints concerning their conviction and sentence the Commission has first considered the respondent Government's objections, under Article 26 of the Convention, that the applicants failed to exhaust a domestic remedy and that, moreover, they did not observe the six months' rule . The Commission does not feel called upon to determine these issues because it finds that the present complaints are in any case inadmissible under Article 27 (2) of the Convention as being manifestly illfounded . It therefore limits its statements concerning the respondent Government's objections under Article 26 to the following observations .
11 . In the Government's view the applicants failed to exhaust a domestic remedy in that they withdrew their appeal before the Court of Criminal Appeal . The Commission notes that the relevant facts were as follows : at the hearing on . . . January 1974 the court refused counsel's application for an adjournment and directed that it would hear the habeas corpus application and in the alternative the appeal : counsel advised the court that he was not ready to go ahead with either application and in the circumstances would have to ask that the appeal be withdrawn ; the court refused this and summarily dismissed the appeal without hearing it . These facts raise the question, not to be determined in the present case, whether an applicant, whose appeal was dismissed by a domestic court of appeal because he failed to present his case, may be said to have complied with the condition as to the exhaustion of domestic remedies . 12 . With regard to the Government's second objection under Article 26 that the applicants failed to observe the six months rule, the Commission notes the following facts : the applicants' appeal was dismissed by the Criminal Court of Appeal on . . . January 1974 ; the first communication to the Commissio n
- 71 -
indicating the object of the present application was made by the first applicant's letter of 16 June 1974, that is less than six months later . The Commission observes that-as stated in Rule 38, paragraph_ (3) of its Rules of Procedure-the date of introduction of an application is in general considered to be the date of the applicant's first communication setting out, even summarily, the object of the application ; that the date of the subsequent registration of the application is not relevant in this respect (cf . Application No . 1468/62 , Iversen v . Norway, Yearbook 6, pp . 278 . 322) ; and that in the present case registration was substantially delayed by further correspondence between the applicants and the Commission's Secretariat relating to the development of the domestic proceedings between 1974 and 1978 . 13 . The Commission's linding that the present complaints are in any case manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 27 (2) of the Convention is based on the following considerations . 14 . The applicants complain that, in spite of the Attorney General's statement in the extradition proceedings that their offences were not of a political character, they were after their extradition tried in Ireland by a Special Criminal Court under the Offences Against the State Act 1939 ; that their sentences were excessive ; and that they were refused the right to appeal . 15 . The Commission first recalls, with regard to the Irish court decisions complained of- that, in accordance with Article 19 of the Convention, its only task is to ensure the observance of the obligations undertaken by the Parties in the Convention, and that it is not competent to deal with an application alleging that errors of law or fact have been committed by domestic courts, except where it considers that such errors might have involved a possible violation of any of the rights and freedoms set out in the Convention and, in particular, in Article 6 . The Commission here refers to its constant jurisprudence (see e .g . decisions on the admissibility of Applications Nos . 458/59, Yearbook 3, pp . 222, 236 and 1140/61, Coll . of Decisions 8, pp . 62) . 16 . The applicants' submission that they were extradited on the basis of the Attorney General's statement that their offences were not of a political character under Irish law has already been considered above in connection with their contplaints concerning their extradition by the United Kingdom . Having found no reason for the assumption that their extradition was in fact based on that statement, the Commission has now to consider whether, in view of that statement, the applicants' conviction by the Special C riminal Cou rt under the Offences against the State Act 1939, may be said to have infringed their ri ght, under A rt icle 6(1) of the Convention, to a fair hea ri ng by an independent and impa rt ial tribunal established by law . 17 . The Commission, having noted the Government's submissions under A rt icle 6 and the applicants' reply, is satisfied that the Special C ri minal Cou rt sitting in the applicants' case was a tribunal established by law .
- 72 -
18 . In this respect the Commission has also noted that the Attorney General's aflidavit referred to (ordinary) courts constituted under article 34 of the Constitution of Ireland and that the applicants' case was subsequently brought bcfore the Special Criminal Court, a tribunal established under Article 38 of that Constitution . However, the Commission does not consider that the applicants can rely on the above passage in the affidavit as constituting a guarantee that they would only be tried before ordinary courts, in the sense that their trial before a special court necessarily raises an issue under Article 6 of the Convention . The reference to Article 34 of the Constitution appears to be part of the introductory phrase of the afïidavit, descriptive of the Attorney General's ordinary functions and powers, which does not prevent the applicants subsequently being arraigned before the Special Criminal Court, established under Article 38 of the Constitution, if the conditions for seising that court are fulfdled . In any case, as pointed out by the Government . the Convention does not guarantee an individual the right to trial in any specific domestic court . 19 . The Contmission is satisfied that the Special Criminal Court sitting in the applicant's case was independent and impartial . It also agrees with the Government's view that Article 6 does not specify trial by jury as one of the elements of a fair hearing in the determination of a criminal charge . 20 . The Commission does not feel called upon to deterntine the question, disputed between the parties, whether the bank robbery of which the applicants were convicted constituted a political offence .lt notes that the Special Criminal Court is competent not only for the trial of persons chârged with offences scheduled in the Offences Against the State Act but, under the conditions set out in Section 46 of the Act, also for the trial of persons charged with non-scheduled offences, as in the applicants' case . The Commission has already noted that the Irish interpretation of the ternt "political offence" differs, as regards IRA activities, front that in the United Kingdom, and it finds no basis in the Convention for an authoritative interpretation of this widely disputed notion in the present case . 21 . The Commission's examination of the applicants' complaint under Article 6 of the Convention must irrespective of the meaning of the term "political offence" be limited to the question whether their trial was fair . In this respect the Commission notes that the applicants were extradited in order to be tried on a charge of aggravated robbery under Section 23, paragraph (1) of the Larcency Act 1916, and that they were convicted of that offence . The question whether a violation of the principle of speciality in extradition cases may raise an issue under Article 6 of the Convention does not therefore arise in the present case . 22 . The Commission finally observes, with regard to the applicants' complaint that they were refused the right to appeal . that no right to appeal to a higher court is as such included among the rights and freedoms guaranteed b y
- 73 -
the Convention (cf . Applications Nos . 4133/69, X . v . the United Kingdom, Coll . of Decision 36, pp . 61, 63, with further references, and 4607/74, X . v . the United Kingdom Coll . of Decisions 37, pp . 146, 155) . 23 . The Commission has nevertheless, with regard to the same complaint, considered the concrete circumstances in which the applicants' appeal was dismissed by the Court of Criminal Appeal and, in this respect, noted the following : following their conviction and sentence on . . . August 1973 the applicants sought leave to appeal ; the Special Criminal Court refused leave to appeal against conviction on . . . August and against sentence on . . . October 1973 : an application was then prepared for leave to appeal to the Court of Criminal Appeal, was listed for hearing before that court on . . . October 1973 and adjourned to allow time for counsel to prepare the habeas corpus/ceniorari application ; at the hearing before the Court of Criminal Appeal on . . . January 1974 counsel advised the court that he was not ready to go ahead with their application and the court summarily dismissed the appeal without hearing it . 24 . The Commission concludes that an examination of the applicants' trial as a whole does not disclose any appearance of a violation of their right under Article 6(I) of the Convention to a fair trial in the determination of the criminal charge against them . It follows that this part of the application is manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 27 (2) of the Convention . Ill . As to the conditlone of the applicants' detention 25 . The applicants finally complain that, from March and April 1976, respectively, until July 1978, they were kept in virtual solitary confinement in the B-Basement of Mountjoy Prison, Dublin, and that, since the beginning of that confinement, they were without a hearing deprived of their weekly gratuity payments, in contravention of Article 67 of the Statutory Rules and Orders 1947 . No . 320 . They submit that this constituted inhuman treatment contrary to Article 3 of the Convention, which states that no one shall be subjected to "inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment" . 26 . The Commission first observes, with regard to the applicants' claim to gratuity payments that, during the period concerned, they refused to work and instead chose to study languages, and that no right to be paid for studying languages while serving a prison sentence is as such guaranteed by the Con . vention . • 27 . In any case, the Commission isnot required to decide whether the detention conditions complained of by the applicants disclose any appearance of a violation of Article 3 as, under Article 26 of the Convention, it may only deal with a matter after all domestic remedies have been exhausted according to the generally recognised rules of international law .
- 74 -
28 . The applicants had a domestic remedy as under Article 40 .4 .2 of the Irish Constitution they could apply for an Order of Habeas Corpus to the High Court with a right to appeal to the Supreme Court . 29 . They availed themselves of their right to apply for an Order of Habeas Corpus, but this was refused by the High Court on . . . December 1977 . 30 . The applicants then failed to appeal to the Supreme Court . They state that they were prevented from appealing within the prescribed time-limit of 21 days because they did not receive the High Court decision and other relevant documents until . . . June 1978, allegedly because the decision and documents were withheld by the Prison Governor until that date . They consider that, by these special circumstances, they were absolved from exhausting the remedy concerned . The Comniission observes, however, that, under Order 86, Rules 8, 33 31 . and 40 of the Rules of the Superior Courts, it was open to the applicants to seek an extension of the time-limit for appeal . It finds that their failure to seek such an extension prevents them from now invoking special circumstances absolving them from exhausting the remedies at their disposal under Irish law with the consequence that the remainder of the application must be rejected under Article 27 (3) of the Convention . For these reasons, the Commissio n DECLARES THIS APPLICATION INADMISSIBL E
(TRADUCTION ) EN FAIT 1. Les faits de la cause, tels que les requérants les ont présentés, peuvent se résumer comme suit : Les requérants sont frères et tous deux ressortissants britanniques . X . est né en 1941 et Y . en 1947 à Birmingham, Angleterre . Tous deux purgent actueBement des peines à la prison de Mountjoy à Dublin, Irlande, pour vol à main armée commis contre une banque de Dublin le . . octobre 1972, en compagnie de certains membres de l'IRA . Le . . octobre 1972, les requérants furent arrêtés en Angleterre en raison de ce vol et maintenus en régime cellulaire jusqu'à l'obtention d'un mandat irlandais . Le . . octobre 1972, ils furent traduits devant un magistrat du tribunal de B . qui ordonna leur détention provisoire en vue d'extradition .
-75-
Le . . janvier 1973, l'Attorney General d'Irlande fit, conformément à l'article 45 de la loi de 1965 sur la procédure d'exequatur en Irlande (Backing of Warrants Act) un certificat (affidavit) à l'intention des tribunaux britanniques saisis de la procédure concernant les requérants et destiné à obtenir leur extradition à l'Irlande . Dans ce document figure notamment la déclaration suivante : . 1 . Je soussigné, Attomey General d'Irlande, atteste que, conformément à l'article 30, paragraphe 3 de la Constitution d'Irlande, les auteurs de cri mes et délits poursuivis devant un t ri bunal constitué selon l'a rt icle 34 de ladite Constitution, autre qu'un t ribunal de simple police, seront poursuivis au nom du peuple et à la diligence de l'Attorney General ou de toute autre personne autorisée par la loi à agir à cet e ffet . .
Le certificat précise ensuite expressément sous quels chefs d'accusation les requérants seront jugés et conclut notamment que : . Aux yeux de la loi irlandaise, les infractions susdites n'ont pas un caractère politique . . . e Le . . janvier 1973, l'audience s'ouvrit devant le tribunal d'instance de B . L'Attorney General demanda, au nom du Gouvernement b ri tannique . que l'audience ait lieu à huis clos pour raisons de sécu ri té nationale . Le juge fit droit à cette requête . Selon les requérants. cette demande s'explique par le fait qu'ils avaient, de 1971 à octobre 1972, travaillé en collaboration avec les Se rvices secrets britanniques à détruire l'IRA en Irlande et en Irlande du Nord . Cette thèse serait étayée par les déclarations officielles d'anciens ministres b ri tanniques comme Lord Carrington ( ancien ministre de la Défense), le député GeoHrey Johnson-Smith ( ancien Sous-secrétaire d'Etat à la guerre) et le député Robe rt Carr ( ancien ministre de l'Inté ri eur) . Selon les requérants . le hold-up de la banque le . . octobre 1972 avait pour but : 1 . de créer des troubles au sud de la frontière pour obliger le Gouvernement irlandais à agir contre les extrémistes de l'IRA qui trouvaient sur son territoire un refuge contre les forces d'Irlande du Nord . 2 . de renforcer, par une copération réussie, la situation des requérants au sein de l'IRA . 3 . d'alimenter les caisses du groupe que dirigeait X ., groupe - dissident e autonome qui pourrait être manipulé par les Se rv ices secrets b ri tanniques . Les requérants affirment que leur travail pour les Serv ices secrets britanniques impliqùait qu'en cas d'arrestation en Irlande, leurs supé rieurs les désavoueraient totalement mais qu'un retour en Angleterre, au cas où les choses tourneraient mal, les mettrait à l'ab ri des poursuites .
- 76 -
Or, on l'a vu plus haut, l'arrestation a bien eu lieu en Angleterre le . . octobre 1972 . Les requérants soutiennent qu'en raison de diverses pressions - notamment le fait que l'épouse de X . serait poursuivie (elle avait été arrêtée avec lui mais relâchée par la suite) - ils ont renoncé à citer Lord Carrington, le député Geoffrey Johnson-Smith et deux agents des Services secrets comme témoins lors du procès en extradition . Les requérants affirment en outre que, malgré le huis clos, l'avocat représentant l'Attorney General d'Angleterre déclara que la loi sur les secrets d'Etat leur interdisait de citer le nom ou de décrire d'une manière quelconque tout agent des Services secrets avec lequel ils auraient pu entrer en contact . Ils ont donc été obligés de fournir des témoignages incomplets et de borner leurs moyens de défense aux points suivants : a . l'accusation, telle qu'énoncée, avait un caractère politiqu e b . les accusés seraient détenus pour une infraction de caractère politique . Or, ce moyen de défense était contraire au certificat délivré le . . janvier 1973 par l'Attorney General d'Irlande, selon lequel l'infraction litigieuse n'avait pas, aux yeux de la loi irlandaise, un caractère politique . Les requérants soulignent toutefois qu'en août 1973, aprds qu'ils eurent été condamnés à une longue peine de prison, l'Attorney General d'Irlande a fait plusieurs déctarations publiques, dont certaines contradictoires qui, selon eux, indiquent clairement que s'il avait eu connaissance de la réalité des faits, il n'aurait pas délivré ce certificat puisque, pour reprendre ses propres termes, . J'ai fait, à l'usage des tribunaux anglais, une attestation sous serment qui était fausse • .
Le . . janvier 1973, le tribunal d'instance de B . valida la demande d'extradition . Les requérants recoururent à la • Queens Bench Division • de la . High Court • par la voie de I'habeas corpus . La cour examina le recours à huis clos en mars 1973, après que le juge eut ordonné de faire sortir de la salle les requérants . La . Queens Bench Division • valida, elle aussi, la demande d'extradition et déclara qu'il s'agissait d'une infraction liée à l'IRA mais non d'une infraction à caractère politique . (La date de cette décision n'est pas mentionnée et le texte n'en a pas été produit devant la Commission .) La Chambre des Lords refusa aux requérants l'autorisation de recourir .
Les intéressés furent alors extradés à l'Irlande et, le . . avril 1973, firen . taveudclpbiéanteruldiscDbn 11s revinrent ensuite sur leurs aveux en apprenant que l'Attorney General avait ordonné leur comparution devant un tribunal pénal spécial (sans jury), en vertu de la loi de 1939 sur les atteintes à la sûreté de l'Etat (Offences against the State Act) .
- 77 -
Les requérants soulignent que le tribunal pénal spécial est créé en vertu de l'article 38 de la Constitution mais que le certificat de l'Attorney General du . . janvier 1973 ne fait référence qu'à l'article 34 de la Constitution et non à l'article 38 ni à la loi de 1939 sur les atteintes à la sûreté de l'Etat, non plus qu'au tribunal pénal spécial . Selon les requérants, cette procédure était en opposition totale avec les conditions de l'extradition . Ils protestèrent devant le tribunal pénal spécial, soutenant que celui-ci devait se dessaisir au profit des tribunaux de droit commun, puisqu'il s'agissait là d'un détournement de la procédure légale, d'un abus du pouvoir exécutif et d'une transgression des principes de droit fondamentaux . Le . . juillet 1973, le procès des requérants devant le tribunal spécial s'ouvrit par une demande d'ajournement, présentée par leur avocat, pour attendre que la Cour suprême ait tranché la question de compétence . Le tribunal rejeta cette demande . L'avocat pria alors le tribunal de se déclarer incompétent en invoquant les termes du certificat de l'Attorney General, selon lesquels le procès ne pouvait avoir lieu que devant les tribunaux de droit commun, ou plus exactement devant une juridiction constituée conformément à l'article 34 de la Convention . Cette requête fut également rejetée . Le . . juillet 1973, les requérants furent reconnus coupables des accusations po rt ées contre eux et maintenus en détention provisoi re en attendant le prononcé de la peine. Le . . ao(1t 1973, le requérant X . fit devant le tribunal pénal spécial une déposition sous serment conceroant la part icipation de l'IRA et des Se rvices secrets b ri tanniques à l'infraction en questi on . L'avocat des deux re quérants fit valoir qu'en droit irlandais cette infrac tion avait manifestement . un caractère politique . et que, dans ces conditions, le tribunal pouvait enco re se déclarer incompétent . Toutefois, le tri bunal n'en prononç a pas moins contre X . une peine de vingt ans de travaux forcés et contre Y . une peine de quinze ans de travaux forcés . Les requérants indiquent que les organes d'information du monde entier s'emparèrent ensuite de l'affaire et qu'à partir du . . août 1973, les Gouvernements britannique et irlandais, comme les partis de l'opposition, se mirent à publier d'extraordinaires déclarations, accusations, démentis, contre-accusations et rétractations . Les requérants soutiennent que, le . . aoGt 1973, le Ministre b ritannique de la Défense publia une déclaration (dont ils n'ont pas produit copie) dans
-78-
laquelle le Gouvernement britannique admettait être impliqué dans cette affaire mais niait avoir approuvé un quelconque hold-up de banque en Irlande. Aussitôt après le prononcé de la peine, le . . août 1973, les requérants demandèrent l'autorisation d'interjeter appel . Le tribunal refusa l'autorisation de faire appel de la condamnation du . . août 1973 et de la peine prononcée le . . octobre 1973 . Les intéressés se préparèrent alors à demander l'autorisation d'interjeter appel devant la cour d'appel en matière pénale . La requête fut inscrite au rôle de cette juridiction pour les . . et . . octobre 1973 mais la cour décida qu'il était préférable de traiter les questions relatives à la constitutionnalité du tribunal pénal spécial par la voie d'une demande d'habeas corpus et/ou de certiorari. Cette ligne de conduite fut approuvée et la demande d'appel ajournée pour permettre à l'avocat de préparer la requête d'habeas corpus/ceniorari . Le . . janvier 1974, l'avocat comparut à nouveau devant la cour d'appe l en matière pénale où il déclara que la demande d'habeas corpus/certiorari n'étant pas encore prête, il sollicitait un nouveau délai . La cour refusa l'ajournement et décida qu'elle examinerait séance tenante la demande d'habeas corpus et qu'à défaut, elle examinerait l'appel . L'avocat informa alors la cour qu'il n'était prêt ni pour l'un ni pour l'autre et qu'il demandait dans ces conditions à retirer la demande d'appel . La cour rejeta cette demande et débouta les requérants de leur appel sans débat . Selon les requérants, il y aurait eu vice de fortne puisque la cour a accepté que l'avocat puisse se désister d'un appel sans qu'ait été fourni un avis de désistement (formule N° 20, Règlement des juridictions supérieures d'Irlande) . Ils soulignent au surplus que l'opération s'est faite sans qu'ils aient donné aucune instruction en ce sens à leur avocat . Le . . janvier 1974, les requérants s'adressaient à la High Court pour obtenir la délivrance, sous conditions, des ordonnances d'habeas corpus et de certiorari . lls soulevaient le problème de la constitutionnalité du tribunal pénal spécial et de la compétence de cette juridiction pour connaitre des infractions qualifiées de politiques commises par eux . Le . . janvier 1974, la High Court rejeta la requête qui n'avait d'ailleurs été maintenue qu'au nom de Y . Un recours fut formé au nom de Y . devant la Cour suprême qui posait le problème de la validité de l'instruction donnée par l'Attorney General quant à la saisine d'un tribunal pénal spécial . La Cour suprême ajourna l'affaire pour permettre à l'avocat du requérant de faire valoir devant la High Court certains des moyens sur lesquels se fondaient l e
-79-
recours et qui n'avaient pas été soulevés antérieurement devant cette juridiction . Le . . février 1976, la High Court rejeta cette requête subséquente et, par un arrêt du . . mars 1976, la Cour suprême débouta l'appelant . Il appert qu'en février ou mars 1974, la High Court d'Irlande délivra au requérant, sous conditions . une ordonnance d'habeas corpus mais refusa le . . mars 1974 de la rendre immédiatement exécutoire . A l'annonce de cette décision, les requérants s'évadèrent de la prison pendant la nuit du . . mars 1974 . Y . fut repris peu de temps après . II recourut par la suite contre le refus d'habeas corpus devant la Cour suprême d'Irlande, qui accorda à nouveau, sous conditions, une ordonnance qui ne lut jamais rendue immédiatement exécutoire . (Refus datant de février 1976 . )
Quant à X ., il fut repris en Angleterre en novembre 1974 . Une nouvelle procédure d'extradition intervint, dont X . se plaint qu'elle ait été décidée par le même magistrat (le juge W . .) que lors de la précédente demande d'extradition en 1973 . Dans sa décision du . . juillet 1975, le juge déclara notamment : . Bien que le hold-up commis par les frères X . et Y . n'ait pas eu un but d'enrichissement personnel, bien que le Gouvernement irlandais ait invoqué la loi de 1939 sur les atteintes à la sGreté de l'Etat, que les frères X . et Y . aient été traduits devant le tribunal pénal spécial, qu'un sénateur et avocat irlandais, Mme Mary Robinson, ait attesté sous serment que le tribunal pénal spécial connait des infractions de caractère politique et nonobstant les multiples déclarations d'hommes politiques mis en cause . . . . il ne voyait, quant à lui, aucune raison de modifier la décision qu'il avait prise deux ans plus tôt . » X . fut renvoyé à Dublin le . . août 1975 où il fut accusé d'évasion pendant une garde à vue légale . 11 plaida . non coupable » du chef de ce délit devant le jury où il comparut lors d'une tournée du tribunal pénal itinérant de Dublin . 11 cita à comparaitre MM . Jack Lynch, Colm Condon et Desmond O'Malley pour qu'ils témoignent sous serment de leur rôle dans cette affaire . Les intéressés déclinèrent le témoignage sous la foi du serment et le tribunal se refusa à les obliger à comparaitre . X . fut condamné à la peine requise mais il s'agissait, selon lui, d'une peine nominale qui ne modifia en rien sa situation quant à la peine initiale de vingt ans . Appel fut intedeté de la condamnation devant la cour d'appel en matière pénale, qui débouta l'appelant . Les requérants prétendent que, dans l'intervalle, ils écrivirent d'innombrables lettres à la cour d'appel en matière pénale, à la Cour suprême et au Président de la Haute Cour lui-même à propos de ce déni du droit d'interjeter appel de leur première condamnation le . . août 1973 .
-80-
Ils affirment avoir eu de grandes difficultés à se procurer le compte rendu sténographique du procès, les pièces à conviction et les documents car tout ce dossier se trouvait chez leur . solicitor . qui, déjà radié du barreau, comparaissait de surcroit devant le tribunal des faillites . Ils soutiennent en conséquence que les retards de procédure leur ont été imposés par les diHicultés à se procurer les pièces juridiques nécessaires . fls cient à cet égard une lettre du greffe de la Cour suprême en date du . . novembre 1975, ainsi libellée : . Votre lettre du . . octobre 1975 a été, comme vous le demandiez, soumise au Président de la Cour . Je dois vous informer que le problème de retrouver et de produire les documents et pièces que vous évoquez va sans doute trouver sa solution après les mesures prises par l'avocat désigné d'office dans l'affaire du recours présenté par votre frère Y . Compte tenu de ce fait, commun à votre recours et à celui de votre frère, et compte tenu aussi de la fixation de l'audience dans l'affaire de votre frère au début du mois prochain, nous avons estimé nécessaire pour le moment de renvoyer à plus tard l'examen de votre lettre . • Les requérants signalent que le recours dont cette lettre fait état est celui de la demande d'habeas corpus évoquée pour la première fois le . . octobre 197 3 . Deux autres années s'écoulèrent durant lesquelles les requérants affirrnent avoir périodiquement éc rit à toutes les juri dictions supérieures d'Irlande pour revendiquer encore le droit de se pou rvoir contre la condamnation et la peine . Une réponse caracté ristique, aux dires des requérants, est celle que leur a faite le . . octobre 1977 la cour d'appel en matière pénale . En voici le texte : . Votre lettre conce rn ant vot re recours nous est bien parvenue . Je suis chargé de vous informer que l'affaire a été finalement traitée par la cour d'appel en matiè re pénale le . . janvier 1974, lors qu'elle a rejeté la demande d'autorisation de former appel . . Les requérants répètent que ce rejet est inte rvenu lorsque leur avocat a essayé de reti rer sa demande d'autorisation de former appel au motif qu'il n'était pas prêt à poursuivre, n'ayant pas re ç u d'instruction du . solicitor . . Les requérants maintiennent qu'ils n'y étaient pour rien, qu'ils n'ont jamais donné leur accord à ce re trait et n'ont été consultés qu'une fois les choses terminées . En . . novembre 1977, X . écrivit derechef à la Cour suprême, dont il re ç ut la lettre suivante, datée du . . novemb re 1977 : . J'accuse réception de votre lettre du . . courant et vous informe que l'arrét rendu par la cour d'appel en matière pénale est définitif et non susceptible de recours devant la Cour suprême, sauf à produire par vous une attestation conforme à l'a rt icle 29 de la loi de 1924 sur les Cours de justice . L'a rticle 29 est ainsi libellé : '29 . - La décision rendue par l a
- g1 -
cour d'appel en matière pénale sur tout appel ou toute question qu'elle a le pouvoir de trancher est définitive et non susceptible de recours devant la Cour suprême, à moins que la cour' ou l'Attorney General n'atteste que la décision met en jeu un point de droit d'un intérêt général exceptionnel et qu'un pourvoi devant la Cour suprême est souhaitable dans l'intérêt général, auquel cas le pourvoi peut être formé devant la Cour suprême qui rendra une décision définitive et sans appel . . Un nouvel échange de correspondance entre X . et la cour d'appel en matière pénale aboutit, le . . décembre 1977, à la lettre suivante de la Cour : . Nous avons bien reçu votre lettre indiquant les points de droit d'un intérêt général exceptionnel que, d'après vous, poserait l'affaire . Le Président de la Cour a ordonné l'inscription de votre requête au rôle de la cour d'appel en matière pénale . Vous serez avisé de la date de l'audience dès que celle-ci sera fixée .' • La demande d'attestation au titre de l'article 29 de la loi de 1924 sur les cours de Justice fut entendue le . . . juillet 1978 par la cour d'appel irlandaise en matière pénale, en présence de trois magistrats . X . n'y était pas représenté par un avocat et, avec l'autorisation de la Cour, présenta personnellement la demande . Ce pourvoi, qui intéresse la présente requête devant la Commission, se fondait sur le raisonnement suivant : X . et Y . n'auraient pas dû être traduits devant le tribunal pénal spécial et l'Attorney General d'Irlande a commis une erreur en déposant l'acte d'accusation devant cette juridiction alors que, conformément aux engagements donnés aux tribunaux anglais d'extradition, la juridiction compétente aurait dû être l'une de celles constituées en vertu de l'article 34 de la Constitution irlandaise et non pas le tribunal pénal spécial créé en vertu de l'article 38 de la Constitution . Le requérant X . faisait valoir en outre que, même sans invoquer le certificat de l'Attorney General d'Irlande, l'article 39, paragraphe 3 de la loi de 1965 sur l'extradition aurait dû suffire à empêcher la saisine du tribunal pénal spécial . La loi de 1965 sur l'extradition stipule en effet : . Article 39, paragraphe 3 . - Lorsque la qualification de l'infraction reprochée est modifiée en cours d'instance, le prévenu ne sera poursuivi ou condamné que dans la mesure où les éléments constitutifs de l'infraction dans sa nouvelle qualification montrent qu'il s'agit d'une infraction susceptible d'entrainer la remise de l'intéressé aux autorités de l'Etat . . Les requérants soutiennent en conséquence qu'avant de déférer un procès à un tribunal spécial dépourvu de jury, l'Attorney General d'Irlande aurait d û • Autrement dit la cour d'appel en matière pénale .
- 82 -
invoquer les pouvoirs que lui confère la loi de 1939 sur les atteintes à la sûreté de l'Etat en certifiant qu'eu égard à l'infraction en question, les tribunaux de droit commun ne pouvaient assurer efficacement l'administration de la justice . L'infraction revêt alors une qualification complémentaire en devenant une atteinte à la sûreté de l'Etat, nommée ou innommée selon l'article y afférent de la loi de 1939 sur les atteintes à la sûreté de l'Etat . Dès qu'un accusé soulève ce problème, les juridictions irlandaises sont, conformément à la loi de 1965 sur l'extradition, tenues de déterminer si l'infraction dans sa qualification nouvelle ou complémentaire, donne lieu à extradition . Selon les requérants, dans les affaires anglo-irlandaises d'extradition, le précédent type auquel se réfèrent les tribunaux britanniques compétents en matière d'extradition est l'affaire R . c/Keene (sans autre précision) . Sur la foi de ce précédent . les crimes et délits liés à l'IRA ne sont pas, selon le droit du Royaume-Uni, des infractions à caractère politique . Ces dernières années, cependant, la jurisprudence constante des tribunaux irlandais veut qu'aux fins de la législation sur l'extradition, toutes les infractions liées à l'IRA revêtent un caractère politique . Du reste, depuis le traité d'extradition signé en 1965 entre le Royaume-Uni et la République d'Irlande, les tribunaux irlandais n'ont extradé aucun délinquant relevant de cette catégc .^.c .
Aussi bien l'interprétation de ce qui constitue . une infraction de caractère politique . est-elle totalement différente au Royaume-Uni et en R6publique d'Irlande . Selon les requérants, cette différence d'interprétation entre les deux pays va bien au-delà des divergences raisonnables . Les requérants soutiennent en conséquence que la loi de 1965 sur l'extradition (République d'Irlande) et la loi de 1965 sur la procédure d'exequatur au Royaume-Uni sont contraires à la Constitution et à la notion de protection mutuelle des droits de l'homme et des libertés tels que les reconnaissent les orincipes de droit international en matière d'extradition entre deux pays liés par un accord . Par un arrêt du . . juillet 1978, la cour d'appel en matière pénale rejeta la demande d'attestation formulée au titre de l'article 29 de la loi de 1924 sur les cours de Justice pour présenter un pourvoi devant la Cour suprême . Elle motiva sa décision en indiquant notamment qu'il ne suffirait pas à M . X . de prouver qu'il s'agit là d'un point de droit . . Il lui faudrait aller plus loin et prouver qu'il s'agit d'un point de droit d'un intérêt général exceptionnel . Il lui faudrait en outre établir que la question est non seulement importante pour lui mais qu'elle est d'un intérét général tellement exceptionnel qu'il serait souhaitable, dans l'intérêt général, de former un pourvoi devant la Cour suprême . .
-83-
Selon les requérants, la cour d'appel en matière pénale aurait commis une erreur en statuant sur cette affaire : elle était en effet intéressée au litige puisqu'elle avait déjà, le . . janvier 1974, débouté à tort les requérants de leur précédent appel . Ceux-ci maintiennent que la cour d'appel en matière pénale n'avait pas d'autre solution que de déférer régulièrement l'affaire à la Cour suprême . Comme elle ne l'a pas fait, ils prétendent que cette situation équivalait au déni du droit fondamental de toute personne condamnée de faire appel de la condamnation et de la peine devant une juridiction supérieure .
Il . Conditions de détention à la prison de Mountjoy Les requérants se plaignent également des conditions dans lesquelles ils ont dû purger leur peine à la prison de Mountjoy, à Dublin . Selon eux, ces conditions étaient inhumaines et dégradantes . Depuis mars et avril 1973 respectivement, ils sont détenus au sous-sol B (zone disciplinaire/psychiatrique) de la prison de Mountjoy . Ils décrivent le sous-sol B comme un tunnel d'environ 45 m de long, 6 m de large et 2 .70 m de haut, avec une fenêtre munie de barreaux à une extrémité . Il est éclairé jour et nuit au néon . I.e sous-sol B comprend 24 cellules individuelles dont une capitonnée pour les détenus indisciplinés, violents ou dérangés mentaux qui ont souvent provoqué chez les requérants souffrances et frustrations par leurs crises de démence . Lorsque Y . fut repris en mars 1974 et ramené au sous-sol B, on tendit sur la fenêtre de la cellule une feuille de plastique qui provoqua dans la pièce une telle humidité qu'elle fut finalement enlevée sur les protestations réitérées du médecin de la prison . Les requérants affirment avoir demandé en prison un examen psychiatrique mais qu'au lieu d'un psychiatre on les adressa à un assistant social qu'ils devaient d'abord renseigner sur leur famille, leurs amis et leurs antécédents . Ils refusèrent de fournir ce genre d'informations de peur qu'elles ne tombent en de mauvaises mains et ne nuisent à leurs amis ou parents . Selon les requérants, l'administration eut recours à ce stratagème pour leur refuser l'examen psychiatrique . X . demanda en octobre 1975 ( croit-il) au directeur de la p ri son d'avoir accès aux installations de l'atelier pour que son frère et lui aient assez d'espace pour se mouvoir et respire r et où ils puissent disposer d'outils et de matériaux . Une autre pièce fut préparée à leur intention l'année suivante mais ils refusèrent de l'utiliser, ce qui leur valut d'être officiellement accusés de refu s
-84-
de travailler, d'être privés d'avantages pendant 14 jours et d'être placés en régime cellulaire . A l'expiration de la punition, c'est contrairement au règlement qu'ils auraient été maintenus en régime cellulaire et ceci pendant deux ans et demi encore, soit jusqu'à juillet 1978 . Du jour où ils ont été placés en régime cellulaire, ils ont été privés du pécule hebdomadaire, dont le versement aurait, d'après eux, été suspendu sans que l'administration les ait entendus, comme l'exige pourtant l'article 67 du Règlement pénitentiaire de 1947, N° 320, ainsi libellé : • 67 . Avant d'examiner un rapport de mauvaise conduite établi contre un détenu, celui-ci sera informé de la nature précise de l'infraction qui lui est reprochée et n'en sera pas puni avant d'avoir pu entendre les témoignages portés contre lui et fournir lui-même des explications . . Les requérants soutiennent en outre que selon une loi (qu'ils ne citen t pas), il faut une décision du Ministère pour priver un détenu d'un avantage quelconque pendant plus de six mois et cette décision doit être renouvelée tous les six mois . Comme indiqué précédemment, les requérants refusèrent de travailler (de frotter les parquets par exemple ou de fabriquer des églises en carton) . Ils choisirent plutôt l'étude, celle des langues étrangères notamment, et se virent accorder des facilités à cet effet . Ils soutiennent que cela doit être considéré comme un travail de leur part, leur ouvrant droit à percevoir le pécule . Les requérants affirment avoir, au fil des ans, demandé à plusieurs reprises leur transfèrement du sous-sol B au bâtiment principal de la prison . On leur demanda à ce sujet de signer un engagement aux termes duquel ils seraient responsables de leur sécurité s'ils étaient transférés dans le bâtiment principal . Ils s'y refusèrent, arguant de ce qu'aucun autre détenu n'était obligé de signer pareil document . Les requérants se plaignent en outre de manquer d'espace au sous-sol B et précisent que la distance de leur cellule aux toilettes est de 15 m environ et de la cellule au préau d'environ 3,5 m . Le . . octobre 1977, les requérants firent, conformément à l'article 40 de la Constitution irlandaise, une déclaration sous serment (affidavit) pour solliciter de la Haute Cour une ordonnance d'habeas corpus . Le directeur de la prison donna une réponse écrite à l'affidavit, soutenant que les requérants s'étaient infligés à eux-mêmes leurs conditions de détention du fait de leur conduite et de leur refus d'effectuer un travail normal . Le . . décembre 1977, la Haute Cour débouta X . et Y . de leur requête d'ordonnance d'habeas corpus . Les requérants soutiennent avoir eu connaissance de cette décision en lisant un journal irlandais . lls s'attendaient à recevoir à bref délai copie de l a
-85-
décision, ce qui ne fut pas le cas malgré les demandes qu'ils disent avoir faites . Le délai de recours à la Cour suprême est de 21 jours mais le tribunal peut étendre ce délai . Les requérants ne se sont pas pourvus devant la Haute Cour contre la décision du . . décembre 1977 car ils n'auraient reçu que le . . juin 1978 les documents utiles au pourvoi (décision de la Haute Cour et pièces d'accompagnement, notamment copies des réponses du directeur de la prison) . Ils soulignent que ces pièces ont été envoyées par la Haute Cour le . . man 1978 et ont d'ailleurs produit une lettre de cette juridiction en date du . . juin 1978 pour étayer ce qu'ils avancent. A les entendre, le directeur de la prison aurait retenu ces documents jusqu'au . . juin 1978, c'est-à-dire, selon eux, deux jours après l'expiration du délai de recours .
Griefs Les requérants se plaignent de n'avoir pas bénéficié d'un procès équitable ; ils se plaignent également du huis clos de la procédure d'extradition et de leur extradition sur la foi d'un certificat erroné fait par l'Attorney Général d'Irlande et indiquant que les infractions qui leur étaient reprochées n'avaient pas un caractère politique . Ils ont néanmoins été traduits devant un tribunal pénal spécial, en vertu de la loi de 1939 sur les atteintes à la sûreté de l'Etat . Ils soutiennent que les peines qui leur ont été infligées étaient excessives et qu'ils se sont vu dénier le droit fondamental de l'homme à faire appel de leur condamnation et des peines qui leur ont été infligées . Les requérants invoquent à cet égard l'article 5, paragraphe 4 de la Convention . Ils se plaignent en outre des conditions dans lesquelles ils ont dû purger leur peine au sous-sol B de la prison de Mountjoy à Dublin . lls soulignent qu'ils ont été pratiquement placés en régime cellulaire dé mars et avril 1976 (respectivement) jusqu'à juillet 1978, qu'ils ont été privés de leur pécule hebdomadaire depuis le début de leur isolement cellulaire sans que les services de l'administration pénitentiaire les aient entendus . ce qui est contraire à l'article 67 du Règlement pénitentiaire de 1947, N° 320 . Les requérants en tirent argument poûr affirmer qu'ils ont été soumis à un traitement inhumain et dégradant, contraire à l'article 3 de la Convention .
PROCÉDURE DEVANT LA COMMISSIO N La requête a été introduite le 16juin 1974 et enregistrée le 13 juillet 1978 . Le 13 mars 1980, la Commission a décidé de porter la requête à l a connaissance du Gouvemement irlandais et d'inviter celui-ci à présenter pa r
-86-
écrit ses observations sur la recevabilité . Le Gouvernement a présenté ses observations le 10 juin 1980 et les requérants y ont répondu le 18 juillet 1980 .
ARGUMENTATION DES PARTIE S Le Gouvernement Comme la Comniission le demandait, le Gouvernement a limité ses observations aux griefs fondés sur l'article 6, paragraphe 1 de la Convention . Sur le tribunal pénal spécial En 1972, le Gouvemement estima nécessaire, en raison de la situation née des troubles en Irlande du Nord, de se prévaloir de l'article 38 .3 de la Constitution d'Irlande ainsi libellé : • 3 .1 0 La loi peut établir des tribunaux spéciaux pour connaitre des cas où les tribunaux de droit commun lui semblent incapables d'assurer effectivement l'administration de la justice et le maintien de la paix et de l'ordre publics . 2° La constitution, les pouvoirs, la compétence et la procédure de ces tribunaux spéciaux seront déterminés par la loi . • Le 26 mai 1972, le Gouvernement fit une Proclamation affirmant sa conviction que les tribunaux de droit commun n'étaient pas en mesure d'assurer effectivement l'administration de la justice et de sauvegarder la paix publique et qu'en conséquence il mettait en oÿuvre le titre V de la loi de 1939 sur les atteintes à la sûreté de l'Etat (concernant les tribunaux pénaux spéciaux et prévoyant que les auteurs de certaines infractions seront poursuivis devant ces juridictions) . Le 30 mai 1972, le Gouvernement prit un décret portant création d'un tribunal pénal spécial et un certain nombre d'arrêtés énumérant les infractions suivantes comme relevant du titre V de la loi de 1939 sur les atteintes à la sûreté de l'Etat : 1 . Crimes et délits prévus par la loi de 1961 sur les actes de sabotage 2 . Crimes et délits prévus par la loi de 1883 sur les explosif s 3 . Crimes et délits prévus par les lois de 1925 à 1971 sur les armes à feu 4 . Crimes et délits prévus par la loi de 1939 sur les atteintes à la sûreté de l'Eta t 5 . Crimes et délits prévus par l'article 7 de la loi de 1975 sur les associations de malfaiteurs et la protection des biens . Le Parlement (Dail Eireann) peut, en votant une résolution, annuler la Proclamation du Gouvernement qui a mis en oeuvre le titre V de la loi . Le titre V stipule également que le tribunal pénal spécial se compose d'un nombre impair de membres (3 au minimum) . Il prend ses décisions à la majorité sans révéler ni l'existence ni la teneur des opinions individuelles ,
- 87 -
concordantes ou dissidentes . Les condamnations ou peines prononcées par un tribunal pénal spécial sont susceptibles du recours devant la cours d'appel en matière pénale, de la même façon que celles prononcées par le tribunal pénal central . L'article 45 fait obligation au tribunal de district de renvoyer au tribunal pénal spécial le procès des personnes accusées d'infractions énumérées dans ladite loi . L'article 46 habilite par ailleurs l'Attorney Général à demander à un juge de district de déférer au tribunal pénal spécial toute personne inculpée d'une infraction non visée par cette loi s'il certifie . qu'à son avis les tribunaux de droit commun ne sauraient assurer effectivement l'administration de la justice ni sauvegarder la paix et l'ordre publics quant au procès de la personne accusée de ce genre d'infractions • . Il est prévu d'autoriser la mise en liberté sous condition des intéressés . Aucune disposition ne prévoit le jugement par un jury . Le Gouvernement souligne que le titre V de la loi de 1939 sur les atteintes à la sûreté de l'Etat ayant été mis en ceuvre en 1972, il n'a existé qu'un seul tribunal pénal spécial (siégeant à Dublin) dont chaque membre, à une exception près, était au moment de sa nomination juge dans un tribunal de droit commun, le demier (l'exception) étant, à l'époque où il fut nommé, ancien magistrat des tribunaux de droit commun . Pour autant que le sache le Gouvernement défendeur, l'impartialité et l'indépendance de ces juges dans l'exercice de leurs fonctions judiciaires n'ont jamais été contestées . Les procès qui ont eu lieu devant le tribunal pénal spécial ont été publics, conformément au règlement adopté par cette juridiction (N° 147 de 1972, règlement en vigueur à la date du procès des requérants devant le tribunal pénal spécial) . Les recours contre la condamnation et la peine ont été formés devant les cours d'appel ordinaires, de la même manière que les appels interjetés contre les décisions des tribunaux de droit commun . Le Gouvernement soutient au surplus que le tribunal pénal spécial n'applique, relativement à la preuve, aucune autre norme que celles qu'appliquent les tribunaux de droit commun . Sur la question du • procès équitable . selon l'urticle 6, paragraphe 1 de la Convention Le Gouvernement souligne que les requérants cherchent à établir qu'il existe une contradiction entre l'affirmation contenue dans le certificat délivré à l'époque (le . . janvier 1973) par l'Attomey Général et les certificats fournis ultérieurement par son successeur en date du . . avril et . . mai 1973 selon lesquels • les tribunaux de droit commun ne sauraient assurer effectivement l'administration de la justice ni préserver la paix et l'ordre publics en liaison avec le procès •, ce qui amena les requérants à être traduits devant le tribunal pénal spécial . Or, il n'existe aucune contradiction de ce genre . Pour affirmer
-gg-
son existence, les requérants s'appuient, semble-t-il, sur l'hypothése qu'un certificat obligeant à traduire l'auteur d'une infraction devant le tribunal pénal spécial signifie que l'infraction a un caractère politique ou, du moins, que l'autorité qui a émis le certificat estimait que l'infraction était politique . Pareille hypothèse est erronée . Pour délivrer un certificat de ce genre, il faut et il suffit que l'autorité émettrice (c'est-à-dire l'Attorney Général) ait la conviction que les tribunaux de droit commun ne sauraient en l'espèce assurer effectivement l'administration de la justice ni préserver la paix et l'ordre public quant au procès en question . Le Gouvernement soutient par ailleurs que les dispositions pertinentes de la Constitution, du titre V de la loi de 1939 sur les atteintes à la sûreté de l'Etat et le texte d'un arrêt de la Cour suprême . sur la question du projet de loi de 1975 sur la compétence en matière pénale .(In the matter of the Criminal Law) (Jurisdiction) Bill) - 110 The Irish Law times Reports N° 69 -) montrent clairement qu'en 1973, l'Attomey General était l'autorité compétente désignée par la loi irlandaise pour déterminer si des infractions non visées par la loi devaient être déférées au tribunal pénal spécial et si des infractions dûment visées, dont cette juridiction aurait dû connaitre, devaient en réalité être portées devant les tribunaux de droit commun . Pour les infractions non visées par la loi, l'Attorney General ne pouvait exercer ce pouvoir qu'en certifiant qu' . à son avis, les tribunaux de droit commun ne sauraient en l'espèce assurer effectivement l'administration de la justice ni sauvegarder la paix et l'ordre publics quant au procès de l'intéressé » . Ni la Constitution ni la loi ne connaissent la notion d'infractions - politiques . . Le - motif apparent . du crime ou du délit est l'un des facteurs cités par la Cour suprême dans son arrêt comme devant aider à déterminer si un certificat doit être délivré en vertu du titre V de la loi sur les atteintes à la sûreté de l'Etat mais l'arr@t indique aussi d'autres facteurs pouvant primer la conviction . En conséquence, le fait qu'un prévenu ait été traduit devant le tribunal pénal spécial ne signifie pas que l'infraction en question fût politique . Quant à fonder le grief sur le caractère inéquitable du procès devant le tribunal pénal spécial, le Gouvernement défendeur soutient, premièrement, que les requérants n'ont pas épuisé en l'espèce les voies de recours internes puisqu'ils ont retiré le 22 janvier 1974 l'appel qu'ils avaient formé devant la cour d'appel en matière pénale, renonçant par là-même à suivre la voie normale permettant à une juridiction supérieure de revoir l'ensemble du procès . Deuxièrement, le Gouvernement défendeur soutient que si la requête se fonde sur l'hypothèse que la Convention garantit le droit d'être jugé par un jury, cette hypothèse est inexacte . L'article 6 de la Convention ne précise pas que le jugement par un jury soit l'une des composantes d'un procès équitable conduisant à décider du bien-fondé d'une accusation en matière pénale . La Convention ne garantit pas non plus à un particulier le droit d'être jugé pzr tel ou tel tribunal national dûment précisé ; l'important est que le tribunal devant lequel l'intéressé est traduit réponde en fait aux conditions de l'article 6 .
-89-
Le Gouvernement défendeur se réfère à cet égard à la description qu'il a donnée plus haut du tribunal pénal spécial et soutient que cette juridiction répond bien aux exigences de l'article 6 . En conséquence, et pour les raisons susmentionnées, le Gouvernemen t défendeur soutient que la requête est manifestement mal fondée et incompatible ratione materiae avec les disposition avec les dispositions de la Convention . Le Gouvernement soutient également que les exigences de l'article 26 de la Convention concemant le délai de six mois n'ont pas été satisfaites . En effet, le . . janvier 1974, la cour d'appel en matière pénale a rejeté la demande d'autorisation d'interjeter appel contre la décision rendue le . . juillet 1973 par le tribunal pénal spécial . Cette demande a été rejetée à cette date après que l'avocat de la défense eut déclaré avoir été chargé par ses clients de retirer la demande d'appel . Le requérant Y . a soulevé devant la Haute Cour et la Cour suprême des problèmes de compétence du tribunal pénal spécial, au regard notamment de la Constitution . La décision finale concernant les demandes de Y . est l'arrêt de la Cour suprême en date du . . mars 1976 . Le deuxième requérant, X . a demandé à la cour d'appel en matière pénale d'attester que le recours qu'il avait formé soulevait un point de droit d'un intérêt général exceptionnel et qu'il était souhaitable dans l'intérêt public qu'il puisse se pourvoir devant la Cour suprême . La décision finale sur cette demande de X . est l'arrêt rendu par la cour d'appel en matière pénale le . . juillet 1978 . Les deux requêtes à la Commission ont été enregistrées le 13 juillet 1978 et le Gouvernement défendeur soutient que c'est la date dont il faut tenir compte pour appliquer la règle des six mois .
Le Gouvemement soutient en outre que la décision finale pertinente en l'espèce peut être considérée comme étant soit l'arrêt rendu par la cour d'appel en matière pénale le . . janvier 1974 et déboutant les requérants de leur demande d'interjeter appel ou, (ces demandes ayant été rejetées parce que les requérants, par leur avocat, ne les avaient pas maintenues), la décision prise par le tribunal pénal spécial le . . octobre 1973 rejetant les demandes d'autorisation d'interjeter appel . Dans un cas comme dans l'autre, ni les demandes subséquentes de Y . à la Haute Cour et à la Cour suprême ni la requête présentée ultérieurement par X . à la cour d'appel en matière pénale ne relèvent de la hiérarchie ordinaire des décisions judiciaires en matière pénale . D'autre part . il ne conviendrait pas que la Commission, pour appliquer la règle des six mois, retienne une date autre que celle de l'enregistrement de la requête car la véritable importance de cette règle ne saurait être affaiblie par des circonstances telle que l'évasion des requérants pendant la garde à vue . Le Gouvernement défendeur conclut en demandant à la Commission de déclarer la requête irrecevable .
-90-
Les requérant s Les requérants contestent la thèse soutenue par le Gouvernement selon laquelle ils auraient introduit leur requête à la Commission tardivement, eu égard au délai de six mois prévu à l'article 26 de la Convention . lls soulignent qu'ils ont soumis des requêtes, la première le 2 juin 1978 et la deuxième le 24 octobre 1978, laquelle a été jointe à celle du 2 juin 1978 . La procédure qui s'est achevée le . . juillet 1978 devant la cour d'appel en ntatière pénale concernait les deux requérants, X . et Y . . X . a plaidé sa cause sans le ministère d'un avocat et, selon les deux frères, la cour avait clairement indiqué que ce qui s'appliquait à l'un des requérants était automatiquement valable pour l'autre, les motifs de l'appel étant communs aux deux . Les requérants soutiennent en outre que l'allégation du Gouvernement selon laquelle cet arrêt de la cour d'appel ne fait pas partie de la hiérarchie ordinaire des décisions judiciaires est juridiquement incorrecte . En effet, la loi de 1924 sur les cours de justice fixe la procédure d'appel devant la cour d'appel en matière pénale : . Article 31 . Quiconque est condamné sur acte d'accusation déposé devant le tribunal pénal central ou devant toute juridiction de la circonscription de la Haute Cour peut, aux termes de la présente loi, former appel devant la cour d'appel en matière pénale . e t . Article 29 . L'arrêt rendu par la cour d'appel en matière pénale sur tout appel ou question qu'elle a le pouvoir de trancher est définitif et non susceptible de recours devant la Cour suprême, sauf à cette juridiction ou à l'Attorney General à certifier que l'arrêt comporte un point de droit d'un intérêt général exceptionnel et qu'il est souhaitable dans l'intérêt public qu'un pourvoi soit formé devant la Cour suprême, auquel cas le recours est possible devant la Cour suprême, dont la décision est définitive et sans appel . . Les requérants en déduisent que les demandes présentées en vertu de l'article 29 de la loi de 1924 sur les cours de justice relèvent bien d'une procédure normale fixée par la loi et qu'elles n'ont rien d'inhabituel . Au surplus, les requérants insistent sur le fait qu'ils n'avaient pas chargé leur avocat de retirer leur appel devant la cour d'appel en matière pénale le . . janvier 1974 . Ils ont à cet égard produit une déclaration sous serment faite le . . juillet 1980 par leur solicitor à l'époque . M . B ., et dont les paragraphes 7 et 8 sont ainsi libellés : .(7) Je déclare n'avoir pas reçu instruction d'aucun des accusés de retirer l'appel formé collectivement ou individuellement en leur nom . (8) Je n'ai à aucun moment non plus donné instruction à l'un de s avocats cité au paragraphe 2 ci-dessus de demander à la cour la radia-
-91-
tion de l'appel . Tout ce qui donnerait à penser le contraire serait inexacte, à ma connaissance . • Les requérants soutiennent en outre qu'à tous les stades de leur affaire, l'Etat ou certains de ses mandataires ont refusé de communiquer des jugements . des documents d'une importance capitale, pour les pénaliser par la suite en les déclarant forclos . Obse rvations des requérants sur la question du • procès équitable . au sens de l'article 6, paragraphe 1, de la Conventio n I .es requérants soutiennent que le certificat signé le . . janvier 1973 par l'ancien Attorney General d'Irlande garantit implicitement, notamment en ses paragraphes 1 et 4, que les poursuites et les procès auront lieu devant les tribunaux de droit commun constitués en vertu de l'article 34, paragraphe 1 de la Constitution et que le procès sera soumis au droit pénal général conformément à l'article 34, paragraphe 4 de la Constitution . Nonobstant le fait que ce certificat n'ait pas été fait de manière honnête et raisonnable, l'Irlande a bel et bien contrevenu à cet engagement pris en son nom en traduisant les requérants, extradés conformément à la loi de 1939 sur les atteintes à la sûreté de l'Etat, devant un tribunal constitué en vertu de l'article 38 de la Constitution à savoir le tribunal pénal spécial . Selon les requérants, il est en outre impossible de concilier le paragraphe 1 du certificat de l'Attorney General d'Irlande (délivré aux fins d'extradition) avec les termes des certificats signés les . . avril et les . . mai 1973 par l'Attorney General et sur la foi desquels les requérants ont, après avoir été extradés, été traduits devant le tribunal pénal spécial . Les requérants soutiennent en conséquence que transgresser aussi nettement les normes judiciaires reconnues n'est pas compatible avec l'article 6, paragraphe 1 de la Convention qui vise un • procès équitable . . Les requérants soutiennent par ailleurs que le tribunal pénal spécial est un tribunal à caractère politique . Ils renvoient à cet égard aux propos du Gouvernement défendeur reconnaissant que cette juridiction avait été créée • en raison de la situation née des troubles en Irlande du Nord • . Les requérants se réfèrent également aux comptes rendus intégraux des débats qui ont eu lieu au Parlement irlandais les 8 février et 27 avril 1939 à propos de la loi de 1939 sur les atteintes à la sûreté de l'Etat, où l'on lit notamment : A la page 90 :• Le texte reprendra certains articles de la loi de 1925 sur les actes séditieux . » A la page 1283 : - J'évoquerai l'essentiel du projet de loi . Je dirai, d'entrée de jeu, que l'unique objectif de ce texte est d'empêcher d e
-92-
montrer, d'utiliser ou de préconiser la force comme un moyen d'a tteindre des objectifs POLITIQUES ou sociaux . . . . : • Les quatre premiers Titres de ce projet •Alapge1290 de loi n'on t d'autre intention que de remplacer la loi de 1925 sur les actes séditieux . . et . Le Titre V du projet de loi . . . est une disposition de circonstance . + Page 1291 : . Le titre VI du texte prévoit l'internement pour réagir aux atteintes à la sûreté de l'Etat dans les cas où il existe une certitude morale, même si les preuves ju ri diques font défaut . . A la page 1307 : . Ce texte ne vise pas les troubles ordinaires, par exemple les tapages sur la voie publique . Le projet de loi, le contexte le montre clairement, vise ce que je qualifierai de désord re POLITIQUE dangereux . . Les requérants contestent notamment la thèse du Gouvernement selon laquelle • le tri bunal pénal spécial n'applique, relativement à la preuve, aucune autre norme que celle qu'appliquent les t ribunaux de droit commun » . Les requérants y répondent en citant l'a rt icle 3, paragraphe 2 de la loi modificative de 1972 sur les atteinte à la sûreté de l'Etat, ainsi libellé : • Lorsqu'un agent de la Garda Siochana ayant au moins le grade de commissaire principal témoigne, dans une instance relative à une infraction relevant de l'article 21, qu'à son avis le prévenu appartenait, à un moment essentiel pour l'affaire, à une organisation interdite, sa déclaration vaut preuve que tel était effectivement le cas à ce moment-là . » Selon les requérants, il est ar ri vé dans maints procès depuis l'entrée e n vigueur de cet amendement qu'un prévenu a été condamné uniquement sur la conviction ainsi affirmée d'un haut fonetionnai re de police . II n'est pas nécessaire de fournir aucune pièce ou preuve à l'appui de ces dires . C'est là une règle de preuve spéciale, applicable devant le t ri bunal pénal spécial mais non pas devant toute autre ju ri diction . Les requérants en concluent que le Gouvernement irlandais a enfreint l'article 6, paragraphe 1 de la Convention et demandent en conséquence à la Commission de déclarer la requête recevable sous l'angle de cette disposition .
EN DROI T Sur l'eztradltlon des requérant s 1 . Les requérants se plaignent que la procédure de leur extradition au Royaume-Uni s'est déroulée à huis clos et qu'ils aient été extradés par le Gouvernement britannique sur la foi d'un certificat erroné délivré par l'Attomey Generaf d'Irlande .
-93-
2 . La Commission relève qu'elle ne saurait, dans le cadre de la présente requête contre l'Irlande, examiner des griefs concemant la procédure suivie devant les tribunaux ou les actes d'une administration relevant d'une autre Haute Partie Contractante, en l'espèce le Royaume-Uni . 3 . Il s'ensuit que, pris en eux-mêmes, les griefs formulés par les requérants sur la procédure suivie pour leur extradition au Royaume-Uni et leur extradition vers l'Irlande par les autorités britanniques ne peuvent être examinés ici étant donné l'Etat contre lequel la requête est dirigée . 4 . La Commission a néanmoins pris en considération la thèse des requérants selon laquelle leur extradition par le Royaume-Uni s'est faite sur la foi de l'attestation de l'Attorney General d'Irlande affirmant qu'en droit irlandais les infractions qui leur étaient reprochées n'avaient pas un caractère politique . De l'avis de la Commission, cette argumentation n'est pas déterminante et ceci pour deux raisons . Premièrement, dans la mesure où les requérants prétendent qu'en raison 5. de leur participation à des activités de l'IRA, les actes délictueux qui leur sont reprochés avaient un caractère politique, la Commission relève que, selon les dires mêmes des requérants . les actes délictueux de l'IRA ne sont pas, en droit britannique, traités comme des infractions politiques . Elle relève en outre que dans la procédure d'extradition suivie contre les requérants, c'est aux tribunaux britanniques qu'il incombait de décider si les infractions en cause avaient ou non un caractère politique . Il en découle que le fait pour les requérants de prétendre que leurs actes avaient un caractère politique en droit irlandais n'entrait pas en ligne de compte pour leur extradition par le Royaume-Uni . 6 . Deuxièmement, il ressort également de l'argumentation des requérants eux-mêmes qu'après leur condamnation et leur évasion de prison en Irlande, le deuxième requérant fut repris en Angleterre et qu'il fut à nouveau fait droit à la demande d'extradition, le juge ne voyant . aucune raison de modifier la décision qu'il avait prise deux ans plus tôt . . 7 . Ceci confirme, aux yeux de la Commission, que la décision d'extrader les requérants à l'Irlande, prise par le Royaume-Uni avant le procès des requérants et réiiérée pour le deuxième requérant après le procès, ne se fondait sur aucune déclaration des autorités irlandaises quant au caractère politique ou non des actes reprochés aux requérants en droit irlandais, mais bien sur un examen, fait de manière indépendante par les tribunaux britanniques compétents . du caractère de ces infractions au regard du droit du Royaume-Uni . 8 . La Commission note que les requérants se plaignent que l'interprétation de ce qu'est une infraction politique diffère en Irlande et au Royaume-Uni . Elle n'estime pas toutefois que cette différence pose en l'espèce un problème au regard de la Convention .
- 94 -
9 . La Commission examinera la pertinence du certificat de l'Attorney General d'Irlande en relation avec le droit des requérants à un procès équitable en Irlande, lorsqu'elle se penchera sur les griefs relatifs à la condamnation et à la peine infligées aux intéressés . Il .
Sur la condamnation des requérants et la peine qui leur a été infligée
10. En ce qui concerne les griefs formulés par les requérants à propos dé leur condamnation et de la peine qui leur a été infligée, la Commission note d'abord les moyens opposés par le Gouvernement défendeur sur le terrain de l'article 26 de la Convention . Selon lui, les requérants n'auraient pas exercé un recours interne et n'auraient, en outre, pas respecté le délai de six mois . Toutefois, la Commission ne s'estime pas appelée à se prononcer à ce sujet car elle constate que, de toute manière, ces griefs sont, en vertu de l'article 27, paragraphe 2 de la Convention, irrecevables comme manifestement mal fondés . Aussi, se limitera-t-elle aux observations suivantes quant aux ntoyens que le Gouvernement défendeur tire de l'article 26 . Selon le Gouvernement, les requérants n'ont pas exercé un recours Il . interne, puisqu'ils se sont désistés de leur appel devant la cour d'appel en matière pénale . La Comntission relève que les faits pertinents sont les suivants : A l'audience du . . . janvier 1974, la cour débouta l'avocat du requérant de sa demande d'ajournement et décida de traiter la requête d'kabeas corpus et, à titre subsidiaire, l'appel ; l'avocat informa la cour qu'il n'était pas prêt à poursuivre l'une ou l'autre requête et qu'il devrait, dans ces conditions, demander le retrait de l'appel ; la cour s'y refusa et rejeta l'appel sans en débattre . Ces faits soulèvent la question, que la Commission n'a pas à trancher en l'espèce, de savoir si un requérant qui s'est vu débouté par une cour d'appel pour n'avoir pas défendu sa cause, peut être considéré comme ayant . satisfait à la condition de l'épuisement des voies de recours internes .
12 . Quant au deuxième ntoyen tiré par le Gouvernement de l'article 26,F selon lequel les requérants n'auraient pas observé le délai de six mois, la~ Comniission note ce aui suit : l'aopel formé par les requérants a été rejeté lé. . janvier 1974 par la cour d'appel en matière pénale ; la prentière communication faite à la Commission et indiquant l'objet de la présente requéte, remonte à une lettre du premier requérant en date du 16 juin 1974, soit moins' de six ntois après . La Commission relève que, comme le précise l'article 38, , paragraphe 3 de son Règlement intérieur, en règle générale la requête est réputée introduite à la date de la première communication du requérant exposant - ntême sommairement - l'objet de la requête ; que la date de l'enregistrement ultérieur de la requête n'a donc rien à voir en l'espèce (cf . requête 1468/62 - Iversen c/Norvège - Annuaire 6 . pp . 278, 322) ; et qu'en l'occurrence l'enregistrement a été considérablement retardé par un échange complémentaire de correspondance entre les requérants et le Secrétariat de l aComisnàprduéolemntaprcdu.ient1974 8
- 95 -
13 . La conclusion de la Commission selon laquelle les présents griefs sont nianitestement mal fondés, au sens de l'article 27, paragraphe 2 de la Convention, repose sur les considérations suivantes . 14 . Les requérants se plaignent qu'en dépit du certificat établi par l'Attorney General dans la procédure d'extradition, attestant . que les actes qui leur étaient reprochés n'avaient pas un caractère politique, ils ont néanmoins, après léur extradition, été traduits en Irlande devant un tribunal pénal spécial en vertu de la loi de 1939 sur les atteintes à la sfireté de l'Etat ; que les peines qui leur ont été infligées étaient excessives et qu'ils se sont vus dénier le droit d'interjeter appel . 15 . La Commission rappelle tout d'abord en ce qui concerne les décisions judiciaires irlandaises litigieuses que, conformément à l'article 19 de la Convention elle n'a d'autre tâche que d'assurer le respect des engagements résultant pour les Parties contractantes de la Convention et qu'elle n'a pas compétence pour connaitre d'une requête alléguant que les tribunaux internes auraient commis des erreurs de fait ou de droit, sauf si elle estime que ces erreurs ont pu entraîner une violation de l'un des droits ou d'une des libertés garantis par la Convention, notamment par son article 6 . La Commission renvoie ici à sa jurisprudence constante (voir par exemple décisions sur la recevabilité des requêtes N° 458/59, Annuaire 3, pp . 222, 236 et 1140/61 . Recueil de décisions 8, pp . 57, 63) . 16 . La thèse des requérants selon laquelle ils ont été extradés sur la foi du certificat de l'Attorney General attestant que les actes qui leu étaient reprochés n'avaient pas un caractère politique en droit irlandais a déjà été examinée plus haut en liaison avec les griefs relatifs à l'extradition par le Royaume-Uni . N'ayant pas trouvé de raison de penser que l'extradition des requérants se fondait en fait sur cette attestation, la Commission doit maintenant examiner si, compte tenu de celle-ci, la condamnation des requérants par le tribunal pénal spécial, en application de la loi de 1939 sur les atteintes à la sûreté de l'Etat, peut être considérée comme une infraction au droit que leur reconnait l'article 6, paragraphe 1 de la Convention d'être jugés équitablement par un tribunal indépendant et impartial établi par la loi . 17 . Après avoir pris connaissance de l'argumentation présentée par le Gouvernement au titre de l'article 6 et de la réponse des requérants, la Commission a la conviction que le tribunal pénal spécial qui a siégé en l'espèce était bien un tribunal établi par la loi . 18 . A cet égard, la Commission a également relevé que le certificat de l'Attorney General mentionnait les tribunaux (de droit commun) constitués en vertu de l'article 34 de la Constitution d'Irlande et que les requérants ont été ultérieurement traduits devant le tribunal pénal spécial, juridiction créée en vertu de l'article 38 de cette même Constitution . Selon la Commission toutc . fois, les requérants ne sauraient invoquer le passage précité du cerrtifica t
-96-
comme garantissant qu'ils ne devaient être traduits que devant des tribunaux de droit commun, en ce sens que leur jugement par une juridiction d'exception poserait nécessairement un problème au regard de l'article 6 de la Convention . Il apparait que la référence à l'article 34 de la Constitution fait partie de la phrase introductive du certificat, décrivant les fonctions et pouvoirs habituels de l'Attorney General et qu'elle n'empêche pas les requérants de pouvoir être ultérieurement traduits devant le tribunal pénal spécial, créé en vertu de l'article 3 8 de la Constitution, si les conditions de saisine de cette juridiction se trouvent remplies . De reste, comme le souligne le Gouvernement, la Convention ne garantit pas à un particulier le droit d'être jugé par tel ou tel tribunal de l'ordre interne . 19 . La Contmission a également la conviction que le tribunal pénal spécial qui a siégé en l'espèce était indépendant et impartial . Elle souscrit, là encore, au point de vue du Gouvernement selon lequel l'article 6 ne précise pas que le jugement par jury soit l'une des composantes d'un procès équitable lorsqu'il s'agit de décider du bien-fondé d'une accusation en matière pénale . 20 . La Commission n'estime pas avoir à trancher la question, contestée entre les parties, de savoir si le hold-up de la banque dont les requérants ont été reconnus coupables constituait ou non une infraction politique . Elle relève que le tribunal pénal spécial a compétence pour juger non seulement les personnes inculpées des infractions énumérées dans la loi sur les atteintes à la sûreté de l'Etat . dans les conditions fixées à l'article 46 de cette loi, mais également les personnes inculpées d'infractions qui ne sont pas désignées dans ladite loi, comme c'est le cas en l'espèce . La Commission a également relevé que l'interprétation par l'Irlande du terme • infraction politique • diffère, quant aux activités de l'IRA, de celle qu'en donne le Royaume-Uni . Or, rien dans la Convention ne lui permet de donner de cette notion, fortement contestée en l'espèce, une interprétation qui fasse autorité . 21 . La Commission doil, sans égard à la signification à accorder au terme • infraction politique +, limiter son examen du grief que les requérants tirent de l'article 6 de la Convention au point de savoir si le procès a été équitable . Elle relève à ce sujet que les requérants ont été extradés pour être jugés du chef de vol qualifié selon l'article 23, paragraphe 1 de la loi de 1916 sur le vol, et qu'ils ont été reconnus coupables de ce chef . Il ne se pose pas, en l'espèce, la question de savoir si une violation du principe de la spécialité de l'extradition peut ou non soulever un problème au regard de l'article 6 de la Convention . 22 . La Contmission remarque enfin, sur le grief des requérants selon lequel le droit d'interjeter appel leur aurait été refusé, que la Convention ne garantit pas en tant que tel le droit d'interjeter appel devant une juridiction supérieure (cf . requête N° 4133/69, X . c/Royaume-Uni, Recueil de décisions 36, pp . 61, 63 avec références complémentaires, et 4607/74 . X . c/Royaume-Uni, Recueil de décisions 37, pp . 146, 155) .
- 97 -
23 . La Commission n'en a pas moins, en ce qui concerne ce même grief, examiné dans quelles circonstances de fait la cour d'appel en matière pénale a rejeté l'appel formé par les requérants . Elle relève à cet égard les éléments suivants : Après leur condamnation le . . août 1973, les requérants ont demandé l'autorisation d'interjeter appel ; le tribunal spécial leur a refusé, le . . août, l'autorisation d'en appeler de la condamnation et le . . octobre 1973, celle d'interjeter appel contre le prononcé de la peine ; les intéressés ont alors préparé une demande d'autorisation d'interjeter appel devant la cour d'appel en matière pénale ; l'examen en était prévu pour l'audience du . . octobre 1973, puis il fut ajourné pour permettre à l'avocat de préparer une requête d'ordonnance d'habeas corpus/cerriorari ; à l'audience de la cour d'appel en matière pénale de . . janvier 1974, l'avocat informa la cour qu'il n'était pas prêt à poursuivre l'une ou l'autre demande, sur quoi la cour rejeta l'appel sans débats . 24 . La Commission en conclut qu'un examen de l'ensemble du procès des requérants ne révèle aucune apparence de violation du droit à un procès équitable que leur reconnaît l'article 6, paragraphe 1 de la Convention, s'agissant de décider du bien-fondé de l'accusation pénale portée contre eux . Il en découle que cette partie de la requête est manifestement mal fondée au sens de l'article 27, paragraphe 2 de la Convention .
111 . Sw lea condillons de détention des requérent s 25. Les requérants se plaignent enfin que de mars et avril 1976, respectivement, jusqu'à juillet 1978, ils ont été pratiquement maintenus au régime cellulaire au sous-sol B de la prison de Mountjoy à Dublin et que, dès le début de cet isolement, ils ont été privés de leur pécule hebdomadaire sans avoir été entendus de l'administration, ce qui est contraire à l'article 67 du Règlement pénitentiaire de 1947, N° 320 . Ils allèguent que cela constituait un traitement inhumain contraire à l'article 3 de la Convention, selon lequel nul ne peut être soumis à . des peines ou traitements inhumains ou dégradants . . 26 . La Commission remarque tout d'abord, à propos du grief des requérants concernant le pécule, que pendant la période concernée, ils ont refusé de travailler, préférant choisir d'étudier les langues étrangères, et que la Convention ne garantit pas en tant que tel le droit d'être rémunéré pour l'étude des langues étrangères alors qu'on purge une peine de prison . 27 . Quoi qu'il en soit, la Commission n'est pas tenue de décider si les conditions de détention dont se plaignent les requérants révèlent ou non l'apparence d'une violation de l'article 3, puisqu'en vertu de l'article 26 de la Convention, elle ne peut être saisie qu'après l'épuisement des voies de recours intemes, tel qu'il est entendu selon les principes de droit international généralement reconnus .
-98-
28 . Or, les requérants disposaient d'une voie de recours interne, puisqu'en vertu de l'article 40 .4 .2 . de la Constitution irlandaise, ils pouvaient solliciter une ordonnance d'habeas corpus auprès de la Haute Cour, dont la décision est susceptible de pourvoi devant la Cour suprême . 29 . Ils se sont prévalu de ce droit de solliciter une ordonnance d'habeas corpus mais la haute Cour les en a déboutés le 6 décembre 1977 . 30 . Les requérants n'ont pas alors formé de pourvoi devant la Cour supréme . lls affirment qu'ils n'ont pas pu faire appel dans le délai légal de 21 jours parce qu'ils ont reçu le . . juin 1978 seulement l'arrêt de la Haute Cour et les autres pièces nécessaires, tous documents que le directeur de la prison aurait retenus jusqu'à cette date-là . Ils estiment qu'en raison de egs circonstances particulières, ils étaient dispensés d'épuiser la voie de recours en question . 31 . La Commission fait remarquer toutefois qu'aux termes de l'ordonnance N° 86, articles 8, 33 et 40, du Règlement des juridictions supérieures, les requérants avaient la faculté de demander une prorogation du délai d'appel . Elle estime que le fait qu'ils n'en aient pas usé leur interdit à présent d'invoquer des circonstances particulières les dispensant d'épuiser les voies de recours qui étaient à leur disposition en droit irlandais . Il en résulte que la requête doit, pour le surplus, être rejetée conformément à l'article 27, paragraphe 3 de la Convention . Par ces motifs, la Commission
DECLARE LA REQUETEfRRECEVABLE .
-99-

Origine de la décision

Formation : Commission (plénière)
Date de la décision : 10/10/1980

Fonds documentaire ?: HUDOC

HUDOC
Association des cours judiciaires suprêmes francophones Organisation internationale de la francophonie

Juricaf est un projet de l'AHJUCAF, l'association des cours judiciaires suprêmes francophones,
réalisé en partenariat avec le Laboratoire Normologie Linguistique et Informatique du droit (Université Paris I).
Il est soutenu par l'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie et le Fonds francophone des inforoutes.