Facebook Twitter Appstore
Page d'accueil > Résultats de la recherche

§ FELL c. ROYAUME-UNI

Imprimer

Type d'affaire : Decision
Type de recours : Partiellement recevable ; Partiellement irrecevable

Numérotation :

Numéro d'arrêt : 7819/77;7878/77
Identifiant URN:LEX : urn:lex;coe;cour.europeenne.droits.homme;arret;1981-03-19;7819.77 ?

Analyses :

(Art. 41) PREJUDICE MORAL


Parties :

Demandeurs : FELL
Défendeurs : ROYAUME-UNI

Texte :

APPLICATION/REQUETE N° 7878/7 7 Patrick FELL v/the UNITED KINGDO M Patrick FELL c/ROYAUME-UN I DECISION of 19 March 1981 on the admissibility of the application DÉCISION du 19 mars 1981 sur la recevabilité de la requête
Articles 6 and 8 of the Convention : Prison rule according to which a prisoner is not allowed to have confidential consultations with a solicitor. with a view to bring proceedings before an internal administration enquiry has taken place as regard the object of the complaint (internal ventilation rule) . (Complaint declared adrnissible).
Article 8 of the Convention : Restriction on prisoner's correspondence to close relatives (Complaint declared admissible) . Article 8, paeagraph 2 of the Convendon a) A restriction imposed on the [number of] "visits" to a prisoner must be considered as being in accordance with the law. when the rules relied on authorise restrictions on "communicattons".
b) Restriction on the nurnber of persons who may visit a high security prisoner : interference considered necessary in the present case for the prevention of disorder and crime. Article 13 of the Conventlon, In cotç)unction with Attlclea 6 and 8 of the Convention : Alleged absence of effective renredy against restrictions on a prisoner's correspondence and his access to court (Complaint declared adniissible) . Article 26 of the Convention : Non exhaustion of domestic remedies as the applicant failed to avail himself of a remedy the existence of which was brought to light between the introduction of the application and the Commission's decision on adnrissibility, but which could have been exhausted in the course of that lapse of tirne .
- 102 -
Articles 6 et 8 de la Convention : Règle pénitentiaire selon laque!le un détenu ne peut prendre contact sans témoin avec un honurre de toi aux fins d'intenter ture action en justice avant qu'ait eu lieu. quant à l'objet de sa plainte, urte emquéte adrninistrative interne (Grief déclaré recevable) .
Article 8 de la Conventlon : Limitation de la correspondance d'un déterru à celle qu'il entretient avec des proches (Grief déclaré recevable) . Article 8, paragraphe 2, de la Convention : a) Doit être considérée comme prévue par (a loi une linritation apportée aux , visites . faites à un détenu, lorsque le règlement invoqué muorise uue litnitation des • contrrtunications . . b) Limitation des visites à un détenu en régime de haute sécurité : ingérence jugée nécessaire, en l'espèce, â/a défense de l'ordre et à(a préverttiorr des infractions pénales. A rt icle 13 de la Convention, combiné avec les articles 6 et 8 de la Convention : A bsence alléguée de recours effectif contre les resnictions à la correspondance d'un détenu et à son accès à un tribunal (Grief déclaré recevable) . Arricle 26 de la Convention : Non-épuisement des voies de recours irrternes du fait que le requérant a omis d'exercer un recours dont l'existence est apparue emre l'introduction de la requéte et la décision de la Cornrnissiorr sur la recevabilité de celle-ci, mais qui aurait pu être exercé au cours de ce laps de ternps .
((rarcais : voirp . 115)
THE FACTS
The applicant is a Roman Catholic priest, born in England in 1940 . He is represented by Mr Cedric Thornberry, barrister-at-law, and Ms Karin Landgren acting on the instructions of Mr A .D .W . Logan, solicitor, Guildford (Surrey) . The applicant was amested in about April 1973 and on 1 November 1973 was convicted at Birmingham Crown Court of conspiracy to commit arson, conspiracy to commit malicious damage and taking part in the control and management of an organisation using violent means to obtain a political end (the IRA) . He was sentenced to twelve years' imprisonment . He was in Albany Prison front July 1976 onwards, prior to which he was detained at different times in four prisons in England . He is now in Parkhurst Prison . In his application, the applicant made a variety of complaints concerning matters arising during his detention . They concerned, in particular, an incident which occurred in Albany Prison on 16 September 1976 and event s
- 103 -
thereafter . On 9 October 1980 the Commission declaréd the application partly inadmissible . The remaining complaints with which the present claim is concerned, relate to the following matters : - rertain continuing restrictions on the applicant's correspondence and visits - Articles 8 and 13 ; - disciplinary proceedings against the applicant before the Board of Visitors following the incident - Articles 6 and 13 ; - the applicant's access to legal advice and court following the abovementioned incident - Articles 6, 8 and 13 of the Convention ; The facts relevant to these complaints, presented by the pa rt ies, are summa ri sed below . In some respects they are in'dispute . Vlslts end correspondence In his application the eppllcant made various allegations concerning the question of his visits and correspondence in prison . He alleged that at the time of his mother's death, in June 1976, he applied for extra letters and was granted a single letter over the normal issue of one . per week . An application for compassionate visits was allegedly refused and . in June 1976 he received only two thirty-minute visits . The applicant further stated that he had often been refused visits and letters from nuns and priests of his acquaintance . In particular he alleged that he had been refused visits from Father F ., a priest from D . who he had known since 1968-69, and from a sister P . of L . The applicant also stated that two parishioners, a Mr & Mrs O ., known to him for 4-5 years visited him almost daily during his nine-month detention on remand but were refused permission to visit him from the date of his conviction . As to correspondence, the applicantstated that he was not allowed to correspond with Sister P . or with another . nun, from Liverpool . The applicant also referred to alleged "interference" with mail dealing with current legal proceedings (his appeal) whilst at Wakefield Prison (January to July 1974) . He referred in this contect to a letter of 27 October 1974 from the Home Secretary stating inter alia : "The Governor felt obliged, for security reasons, to exercise his discretion to censor all Father Fell's mail, including letters concerning his appeal ." The applicant also asserted that at Hull Prison (July 1974 to May 1976) instructions were entered on his record that all letters to and from Father F . were to be photocopied to the Home Office . Further allegations concerning correspondence with the applicant's solicitors since September 1976 are set out below . The respondent Government state that, as a priest, the applicant is known to a large number of people . Whilst on remand he received correspondence from more than 200 people . After being convicted he was permitted - 104 -
to correspond with 40 of them . In June 1976, when his mother died, many letters and cards of condolence were sent to him . He was allowed to receive all the cards but letters from persons not on the list of 40 approved correspondents were returned . The applicant applied for permission to write two letters in addition to his allowance under the Prison Rules . Both application were granted . All his correspondence at Hull Prison was photocopied and submitted to the Honie Office for security reasons according to the Government . The applicant was transferred from Hull to Bristol because he was suspected of involvment in an escape plot . The practise of photocopying his correspondence was terntinated after his transfer . As to visits, the Government state that no application for a compassionate visit was made by the applicant in June 1976 when he was at Bristol . He received two visits during the month . As to Father F ., the applicant applied in early 1974 to have him approved as a visitor . Enquiries indicated that he was not an existing friend of the applicant's and the request was therefore refused . After reconsideration of the decision it was subsequently accepted that Father F . was known to the applicant prior to his being taken into custody but it was considered that he was only an acquaintance and not a friend and that no special circumstances justitied an exceptional decision in this case . No application was made for Sister P . to be approved as a visitor . As to Mr & Mrs O . the Government state that the applicant applied in early 1975 for them to be placed on his list of approved visitors . Enquiries confirmed that they had known the applicant for about three years prior to his trial . On the basis of the information then available the application was refused because of the security risk which seemed to be involved . The Government deny that there was any policy of refusing to allow the applicant to be visited by . or to correspond with, priests or religious associates . In their written observations they point out that 20 persons are at present authorised to visit the applicant, including two priests and that in addition he receives pastoral visits from the Chaplain to the Archbishop of Birmingham and also receives the ministrations of the Roman Catholic chaplain to the prison . 2 . Pro ceedings beforo the Board of Vislton erlsing out of the Incldent of 16 September 197 6 On 16 September 1976 an incident took place in the Albany Prison involving a struggle between the applicant and five other prisoners on the one side and a number of prison officers on the other . There is dispute as to what occurred . Broadly speaking the applicant's version of the incident is that the prisoners were unarmed and engaged in a peaceful protest by sitting down in a "spur" or corridor, that they were attacked by a considerable number of prison officers in riot gear and that he and other prisoners received inju ri es . The applicant maintains that he was assaulted by officers not only on the spu r
- 10S -
itself but after he had been removed from it, in pa rt icular in a cell . The offlcial version of the incident is, broadly, that the prisoners refused to leave the spur peacefully and had to be removed forcibly by warders wearing protective helmets and carrying batons, that they resisted with weapons, including chair legs and other items, and that both prisoners and warders sustained injuries in the struggle . On 1 8 September 1976 the applicant was charged in connection with the incident with four offences under the Prison Rules 1964 namely : a . absenting himself from a place where he was required to be - Rule 47 (6) b . disobeying a lawful order - Rule 47 (18 ) c . mutiny - Rule 47 (1) ; d. gross personal violence to an officer - Rule 47 (2) . At a preliminary hearing before the Governor on 21 September 1976, the applicant pleaded guilty to the charge (a) above, under Rule 47 (6), and not guilty to the remaining charges . The Governor referred all the charges to the Board of Visitors . Pending the hearing the applicant was segregated from other prisoners under Prison Rule 48 (2) which provides that a prisoner who is to be charged with an offence against discipline may be kept apart from other prisoners pending adjudication . The hearing before the Board of Visitors took place on 24 September 1976 . The applicant was certified fit by the prison medical officer beforehand . He was found not guilty of the charge of disobeying an order and guilty of the charges of ntutiny and assault . The Board awarded him a total of 570 days' loss of remission and 112 days' cellular confinement and loss of earnings and various privileges on these charges . The applicant was also awarded seven days' cellular confinement and loss of earnings and privileges on the charge of absenting himself from the place where he was required to be, to which he had pleaded guilty . The applicant states that he was refused any opportunity to communicate with anyone else before the hearing . He states that the hearing lasted about 8 or 15 minutes and alleges that he was refused a request to call as a witness the Deputy Governor who had been involved in the incident . It is also alleged on behalf of the applicant that, although physically fit enough to attend the hearing . he was not mentally or emotionally competent at the time . In this respect reference is made to a letter written by a Dr S . who visited the applicant on 25 September . He described various injuries and also stated thât the applicant was in a"confused state akin to concussion" . The Government maintain that the applicant was given adequate opportunity to present his case and state that there is no record that he asked to call a witness .
- 106 -
3 . Contact between the applicent and his sollcltor after 16 September 197 6 On and after 21 September 1976 the applicant petitioned the Home Secretary for permission to seek legal advice in connection with the incident and also for permissi .n to seek an independent medical examination . On I October 1976 the Home Office replied to the request concerning legal advice by stating that the applicant should first complain in sufficient detail to enable his complaints to be investigated, through internal channel . On 5 October 1976 the request for independent medical examination was refused . On 4 October 1976 the applicant re-petitioned giving details of his allegations . In a reply of 9 February 1977 he was informed that the Home Secretary was satisfied there was no substance in his allegations of assault and inadequate or delayed medical treatment and told that he would be granted facilities lo seek legal advice if he wished . On 10 February 1977 the applicant's solicitors wrote to the Governor of Albany Prison requesting permission to interview the applicant . On 14 February 1977 the Governor replied stating that this would be in order . Thereafter the solicitors asked for confirmation of the conditions under which they might visit the applicant . In a letter of 23 March 1977 the Governor informed them that under Rule 27 (2) of the Prison Rules the visit must take place within sight and hearing of a prison otl'tcer . On 30 March 1977 the solicitors replied that they were unable to accept these conditions . After introduction of the present application, the prison Governor informed the solicitors, by letter of 12 May 1977, that they might visit the applicant subject to the provisions of Rule 37 (1) of the Prison Rules, in sight but out of hearing of an officer . This provision provides for such facilities to be afforded to a prisoner who is a party to "legal proceedings" . According to the Government the reference to Rule 37 (1) was made in error and the facilities were in fact granted under Rule 33 (5) which enables the Secretary of State to direct that a visit take place out of the hearing of a prison officer in cases other than those expressly provided for in the Rules . The applicant has apparently since received various legal advice concerning his allegations of assault during the incident of 16 September 1976 and concerning the hearing before the Board of Visitors, and has taken certain steps with a view to instituting proceedings in the United Kingdom Courts in connection with these matters . It appears that writs were issued in September 1979 on his behalf and o n behalf of five other prisoners involved in the incident, instituting proceedings against the Home Office, a prison Deputy Governor and individual prison officers on grounds of assault and that statements of claim were served some 15 months after issue of the writs . - 107 -
As to the Board of Visitors' proceedings, the applicant received preliminary advice . in November 1979 to the effect that an application to the High Court for an order of certiorari to quash the Board of Visitors' decision might be feasible . He was granted legal aid for the purpose of obtaining counsel's opinion on the matter . On 16 June 1980, counsel advised that certiorari would not lie, there having been no breach of the rules of natural justice . However further consideration was given to the matter and on 3 February 1981 senior counsel advised on the advisability of an immediate application for certiorari on the ground that there had been "substantial unfairness" in the Board of Visitor's hearing .
THE APPLICANT'S COMPLAINTS UNDER THE CONVENTIO N In his application the applicant made the following complaints under the Convention . Article 6 ( Accese to Court ) - that he was refused access to his solicitor for almost five months after being assaulted in the incident of 16 September 1976, contrary to Article 6 . paragraph 1 . - that he was refused access to his solicitor in conditions which would respect the contidentiality of such consultation for approximately two further months, contrary to Article 6, paragraph 1 . - that he was refused access to independent medical examination after such assaults . contrary to Article 6, paragraph 1 . In support of these complaints the applicant submitted that the application of the requirement of "internal ventilation" of complaints before access lo legal advice was allowed was in breach of the right of access to court under Article 6 . paragraph 1 . of the Convention, as interpreted by the Court in the Golder Case (Judgment of 21 February 1975) . He submitted that the refusal of confidential consultation placed him in a situation where he would either be impelled not to take legal advice, or to lake it in a manner which jeopardised his rights and that there was consequently a breach of Article 6 in this connection also . He also submitted that in light of the inevitably ambivalent position of prison doctors in litigation against their employers, the refusal to allow independent medical examination also breached Article 6, paragraph 1 . Article 6 (Dlsclplinary proceedinga ) - that the Board of Visitors' hea ri ng on 24 September 1976 occurred in circumstances that were in breach of Article 6, paragraphs 1 and 3 .
- 108 -
In this connection the applicant observed that, from sentences passed against the other f ­ ve prisoners involved in the incident (who did not attend the hearing), it seemed that the presence or absence of the accused, which might be considered an integral factor under Article 6, made no apparent difference to the punishments imposed . He submitted that each guarantee of Article 6 . paragraph 3, save that of Article 6, paragraph 3 (e), was breached . The issue whether he was granted "adequate time" was, he suggested, superfluous since no facilities for preparation of a defence were given . He was never permitted to obtain the attendance and examination of witnesses on his behalf. Although informed that he might call witnesses, such right was retracted on his attempting to call the Deputy Governor involved in the incident . The applicant also submitted that Article 6 was applicable to the proceedings in question, since they fell within the "criminal" sphere under the criteria laid down by the Court in the Fngel case for distinguishing the "criminal" from the "disciplinary" .
Article 8 - that the refusal, for a period of approximately two months to permit the applicant to consult his solicitor, save in the hearing of a prison officer, was in breach of his right to private life . - that the refusal to perniit him to write to a solicitor for a period of approximately five months commencing in September 1976 constituted a breach of his right to correspondence .
- that the continuing refusal to permit him to correspond with friends, including two nuns, constituted an unjustifiable breach of his right to correspondence . - that the refusal to permit him visits from friends, including religious colleagues, a priest and nuns, without sufficient reason, constituted a breach of his right to private life . In connection with this complaint the applicant referred to the Commission's previous jurisprudence to the effect that "the right to respect for private life . . . comprises . . . to a certain degree, the right to establish and to develop relationships with other human beings . . ." (Application No . 6825/74 X v . Iceland, Decisions and Reports 5, p . 86) . He also referred to Rules 37 and 58 of the Council of Europe Standard Minimum Rules for the Treatment of Prisoners and to Rule 62 which states that :"The treatment of prisoners should emphasise not their exclusion from the community but their continuing part in it" . He conceded that restrictions on private and family life might to some extent be implicit in the conditions of imprisonment but submitted that only restrictions falling within Article 8, paragraph 2, were justifiable and that no provisions of Article B . paragraph 2, justified the restriction in his case .
- lp9 -
Article 8 required that a reasonable balance be struck between security and family and private life, but no such balance was attempted in his respect . Artlcle 1 3 - the applicant had no effective remedies before a national authority in respect of these alleged violations of his rights and freedoms . The applicant submitted that Article 13 required an "effective or suMcienP" remedy "according to the generally recognised rule of international law" as set out by the Commission in its constant jurisprudence . He recalled the submissions made in the case of Campbell (No . 7819/77) * . The Prison Rules did not provide any legal basis for an action by a prisoner but "in many instances purport to protect and regulate rights in domestic law which are set forth in the Convention" . He submitted that this was clearly the case in respect of :(a) punishments imposed by a Board of Visitors ;(b) interferences with his civil rights and failure to afford him a fair trial in a penal matter, forming the basis of his complaints under Article 6 ; (r) interferences with his correspondence and private and family life forming the basis of his complaints under Article 8 .
THE LA W The Commission has first considered the applicant's complaints con1. cerning the authorities' refusal to allow him to receive visits from certain persons . It first observes that in his application the applicant has made reference to various alleged interferences with his correspondence and visits from about 1974 onwards . However his complaints under the Convention are directed solely to the continuing effects of the authorities' decisions refusing him permission to correspond with, or receive visits from, certain individuals . It is not in dispute that the applicant has been refused, in the past, permission to receive visits from Father F . and a Mr & Mrs O . In his application he alleged that he had also been refused visits from a nun . Sister P . The documents he submitted, including a relevant petition reply, indicated only that he had been refused permission to correspond with her and the Government state that no application was made on her behalf to become an approved visitor . The applicant has not disputed this statement and the Conimission finds that his original allegation concerning a refusal of visiting permission is not substantiated .
• See D .R . 14, p . 186 .
- 110 -
The Commission notes that the refusal to approve Father F . as a visitor was based on the authorities' view that he was not a"friend" of the applicant . The decision relative to Mr and Mrs O . was motivated, according to the Governntent . by the fact that on the basis of information available at the time, a security risk seemed to be involved . The Government argue that insofar as the restriction on the persons who may visit the applicant may interfere with his right to respect for private life under Article 8, paragraph 1, it is justifiable under Article 8, paragraph 2, as being in accordance with the law and necessary for inter alia "the prevention of disorder or crime" . They argue that the rule or practice of restricting visitors to close relatives or personal friends is in principle justifiable on this ground . The applicant maintains that the restrictions in question were not "in accordance with the law" and denies that they were necessary for any of the purposes mentioned in Article 8, paragraph 2 . The Commission finds that the restrictions complained of in this case were "in accordance with the law" for the purposes of Article 8, paragraph 2 . It notes in this respect that Rule 34 (8) of the Prison Rules specifically provides that, except with the leave of the Secretary of State, a prisoner may not communicate with any person other than a relative or friend and Rule 33 (1) of the Prison Rules also authorises the Secreta ry of State to impose restrictions on communications between a prisoner and other persons with a view to secu ri ng inter alia "discipline and good order or the prevention of crinie" . It is true, as the applicant has pointed out, that these provisions do not expressly mention "visits" . However the Commission considers that the word "communications" is apt to cover personal visits in addition to postal or other communications and it is clear from the context that it is intended to do so in the Prison Rules . The restrictions at issue in the present case were, in the Commission's view, adequately foreseeable from the above-mentioned provisions (see Silver and others v, the United Kingdom . Repo rt of the Commission , paras . 277-285 and 329) . The Contmission does not find it necessa ry in the present case to decide as a matter of general principle whether the relevant rules, in pa rt icular the limitation of visits to those by close relatives or friends, are justifiable under Article 8 (2) . It is not its task to examine the relevant legislation in abstracto and it must, so far as possible, confine its examination of a case to the manner in which legislation has actually been applied to the individual applicant ( see e .g . Marckx Case . Series A, Vol . 31, p . 13, para . 27 ; Guzzardi Case, Series A . Vol . 39, pp . 31-32, para . 88) . The Commission accepts that some restriction on the number of persons who may visit a high security prisoner such as the present applicant may legitimately be considered necessary under Article 8 (2) "for the prevention of disorder or crime" . It accepts furthermore that this is the aim of the restrictions
at issue in the present case . Taking into account the general manner in which the relevant provisions have been applied to the applicant, who has a substaotial number of approved visitors, the Commission does not find that the continuing restrictions on the persons who may visit the applicant go beyond what could be considered "necessary" for that purpose . It considers that, contrary to the applicant's submission, a reasonable balance does appear to have been drawn between the requirements of security and the applicant's private and family life . Accordingly even assuming that the restrictions in question could be seen as an interference with the applicant's right to respect for his private life, they were justified under Article 8 (2) . This part of the application is therefore ntanifestly ill-founded and inadmissible under Article 27, paragraph 2, of the Convention . 2 . The applicant also complains of a continuing restriction on his correspondence arising from the application of the rule prohibiting correspondence with persons other than relatives or friends . In particular he complains that he is not allowed to correspond with two nuns, Sister P . and Sister B . He invokes Article 8 of the Convention . The Commission notes that this part of the application raises issues under Article 8 of the Convention similar to those which it considered in the case of Silver and others v . the United Kingdom (Report adopted on 11 October 1980, paras . 327-335), which is now pending before the Court . This part of the application therefore raises issues which require examination on the merits and falls to be declared admissible . 3 . The Commission has next considered the applicant's complaints concerning the proceedings before the Board of Visitors . The applicant complains primarily of unfairness by the Board of Visitors in their handling of his case . He alleges in particular that they dealt with his case when he was not in a fit mental or emotional condition, that he did not have adequate time and facilities to prepare his defence and that he was not able to call witnesses, in particular a Deputy Governor . He invokes Article 6 of the Convention . It is in dispute that the judgment of the Court of appeal in the St . Germain case, which was delivered on 3 October 1978, established as a rule of English law that the disciplinary awards of Boards of Visitors are subject to judicial review and may be quashed by order of certiorari. The Government maintain that since the applicant has not sought such review, this part of the application is inadmissible for non-exhaustion of domestic remedies . The applicant, whilst not now disputing that he may be able to obtain ccrtiorari on grounds of substantial unfairness and thus have the decision quashed . maintains that the present existence of this remedy is irrelevant since it was not available at the date of introduction of his application . -112-
The Commission considers that it must normally decide the question whether domestic remedies have been exhausted by reference to the situation presented to it at the date of its decision on admissibility . If at that date it is clear that a dontestic remedy is, or has been, available to the applicant, then the existence of that remedy must be taken into account . The remedy of certiorari has been available to the applicant since at least 3 October 1978 . Even though its availability was uncertain before the St Grnunirt litigation settled the matter, it has clearly been open to the applicant to apply for it at any time since then, but he has not done so . Insofar as it would if successful lead to the quashing of the findings of guilt and disciplinary awards against the applicant, the Commission considers it an efl'ective and adequate remedy similar in result to an appeal against conviction in a crintinal case . In these circumstances the Commission finds that the applicant has failed to comply with the requirement of exhaustion of domestic remedies laid down in Article 26 of the Convention and this part of the application is accordingly inadmissible under Article 27, paragraph 3 . 4 . The Commission has next considered the applicant's complaints under Articles 6 and 8 of the Convention relating to his access to legal advice and court . The applicant complains in particular of : - delay in affording him access to legal advice through the operation of the "internal ventilation" rule ; - refusal to allow independent medical examinatio n - refusal, for a certain time, to allow him confldential consultations with his lawyer. The Commission finds that this part of the application raises issues under Article 6 and 8 of the Convention which are to some extent similar to those which arise in the connected case of Campbell (Application No . 7819/77) which it has already declared admissible, and, so far as concems correspondence the case of Silver and others v . the United Kingdom, which is now pending before the Court . The present case raises the additional question relating to the conlidentiality of legal consultation, but this is very closely connected to the other issues . In the circumstances the Commission finds that this part of the application is not manifestly ill-founded and that there is no other obstacle to its admissibility . It must therefore be declared admissible . S . The Commission has finally considered the applicant's complaint under Article 13 of the Convention to the effect that he has no effective remedy in respect of the above-mentioned complaints . - 113 -
Insofar as this complaint is related to the applicant's complaints concerning visits, the Commission finds that it has not been shown that the prison administrative remedies, including in particular a petition to the Honte Secretary, would be insufficient for the purposes of Article 13, having regard in particular to the number of visitors in respect of whom the applicant has been able to obtain approval . Insofar as the complaint relates to a remedy in respect of the proceedings before the Board of Visitors, the Commission notes that, as it has found above, it is open to the applicant to apply to the High Court for judicial review of the relevant decision . To this extent therefore the applicant's complaint under Article 13 is manifestly ill-founded and inadmissible under Article 27, paragraph 2, of the Convention . On the other hand, insofar as the applicant complains that he has no effective remedy in respect of his complaints under Articles 6 and 8 of the Convention in relation to his correspondence and his access to court and legal and medical advice, the Commission finds that issues arise under Article 13 of the Convention which require examination on the merits and that this part of the applicant's complaint cannot be described as manifestly ill-founded . In the absence of any other ground of inadmissibility, it must therefore be declared admissible . For these reasons, the Commission 1 . DECLARES ADMISSIBIL E - the applicant's complaints under A rt icle 8 of the Convention concerning a continuing restri ction on his correspondence with ce rt ain persons ( para . 2 above) and under Article 13 concerning the alleged lack of a remedy in respect thereof ( para . 5 above) ; - his complaints under A rticles 6 and 8 of the Convention concerning his access to legal advice and cou rt (para . 4 above) and under Article 13 concerning the alleged lack of a remedy in respect thereof ( para . 5 above) . 11 . DECLARES THE REMAINDER OF THE APPLICATION INADMISSIBLE .
- 114-
(TRADUCTION)
EN FAI T Le requérant est un prétre catholique né en Angleterre en 1940 . II est représenté par Me Cedric Thornberry, avocat, et par Mme Karin Landgren, agissant sur les instructions de M . A .D .W . I.ogan, solicitor à Guildford (Surrey) . Il a été arr@té en avril 1973 et le 1« novembre 1973 a été reconnu coupable par la Crown Court de Birmingham d'entente en vue de provoquer un incendie, d'entente en vue de commettre un sabotage et de participation à la direction et au commandement d'une organisation recourant à la violence à des fins politiques (l'IRA) . Il a été condamné à douze ans de prison . Il a été détenu à la prison d'Albany à contpter de juillet 1976 après avoir été détenu dans quatre prisons d'Angleterre . Il se trouve actuellement à la prison de Parkhurst . Dans sa requête le requérant a formulé divers griefs relatifs à des questions qui ont surgi au cours de sa détention . Elles ont trait en particulier à un incident survenu à la prison d'Albany le 16 septembre 1976 et à des événements ultérieurs . Le 9 octobre 1980 . la Commission a déclaré la requête en partie irrecevable . Les autres griefs, qui seront examinés ici, portent sur les questions suivantes : - certaines restrictions continues à la correspondance et aux visites du requérant - articles 8 et 13 ; - procédure disciplinaire contre le requérant devant la commission des visiteurs des prisons après l'incident - articles 6 et 13 ; - accès du requérant à des conseils juridiques et à un tribunal à la suite de l'incident susmentionné - articles 6, 8 et 13 de la Convention . Les faits qui sont à la base de ces griefs, tels qu'ils sont exposés par les parties, sont résumés ci-après . Ils sont contestés sur certains points . Visites et correspondance Dans sa requête, le requérrnt a forniulé diverses allégations relatives à la question de ses visites et de sa correspondance en prison . Il a allégué qu'au moment du décès de sa mère, en juin 1976, il avait demandé à recevoir des lettres supplémentaires et ne s'est vu accorder qu'une seule lettre en plus du contingent normal d'une par semaine . Une demande de visites exceptionnelles pour raisons humanitaires a été prétendument rejetée et en juin 1976 il n'aurait reçu que deux visites de trente minutes . Il a déclaré en outre qu'on lui a souvent refusé des visites et des lettres de religieuses et de prêtres de sa connaissance . Il a prétendu en particulier qu'on lui a refusé des visites du Père F ., un prêtre de D . qu'il connaissait - 115 -
depuis 1968-1969 et d'une Sreur P ., de Leeds . II a aussi déclaré que deux paroissiens, M . et Mme O ., qu'il connaissait depuis quatre ou cinq ans, lui avaient rendu visite presque quotidiennement au cours de sa détention provisoire de neuf mois, mais n'avaient plus été autorisés à lui rendre visite à partir de sa condamnation . Quant à la correspondance, le requérant a déclaré ne pas avoir été autorisé à correspondre avec la So :ur P . ou une autre, de Liverpool . Il a aussi mentionné une « ingérence . prétendue dans son courrier portant sur une procédure judiciaire en cours (son appel) alors qu'il se trouvait à la prison de Wakefield (de janvier à juillet 1974) . 11 s'est référé à cet égard à une lettre du 27 octobre 1974 du Ministère de l'intérieur disant notamment : . Le directeur (de la prison) a cru devoir, pour des raisons de sécurité, exercer son pouvoir discrétionnaire de censurer tout le courrier du Père Fell, y compris les lettres relatives à son appel . - Le requérant a aussi affirmé qu'à la prison de Hull (de juillet 1974 à mai 1976) a été consignée dans son dossier l'instruction de faire photocopier à l'intention du Ministère de l'intérieur toutes les lettres adressées au Père F . ou envoyées par lui . D'autres allégations relatives à la correspondance avec les solicitors du requérant depuis septembre 1976 sont rapportées plus loin .
Le Gouvernement défendeur déclare qu'en tant que prêtre le requérant est connu d'un grand nombre de personnes . Alors qu'il se trouvait en détention provisoire il a reçu de la correspondance de plus de deux cents personnes. Après sa condamnation . il a été autorisé à correspondre avec quarante d'entre elles . En juin 1976, lorsque sa mère est décédée, de nombreuses lettres et cartes de condoléances lui ont été adressées . On l'a autorisé à recevoir toutes les cartes, mais les lettres des personnes ne figurant pas sur la liste des quarante correspondants agréés ont été retournées . Le requérant a demandé l'autorisation d'écrire deux lettres en plus de celles auxquelles le règlement pénitentiaire lui donnait droit . Il a été accédé à ces deux demandes . Toute sa correspondance à la prison de Hull a été photocopiée et adressée au Ministère de l'intérieur, selon le Gouvemement pour des raisons de sécurité . Ix requérant a été transféré de Hull à Bristol parce qu'il était soupçonné de tremper dans un complot d'évasion . Après ce transfert on a cessé de photocopier sa correspondance . Pour ce qui est des visites, le Gouvernement déclare que le requérant n'a demandé aucune visite exceptionnelle pour raisons humanitaires en juin 1976, alors qu'il était à Bristol . Il a reçu deux visites au cours du mois . Quant au Père F ., le requérant a demandé au début de 1974 qu'il soit agréé comme visiteur . Les enquêtes ont montré que ce n'était pas un ami attitré du requérant et la requête a donc été rejetée . Après un nouvel examen de la décision, il a été admis que le Père F . était connu du requérant avant que celui-ci ne fût emprisonné, mais on a estimé qu'il s'agissait d'une simple connaissance et non d'un ami et qu'aucune circonstance particulière ne justifiait une décisio n -116-
exceptionnelle dans ce cas . Aucune demande n'a été faite de reconnaître la qualité de visiteur à la So:ur P . . Pour ce qui est de M . et Mme O ., le Gouvernement déclare que le requérant a demandé au début de 1975 à les faire figurer sur la liste de ses visiteurs agréés . Des enquêtes ont confirmé qu'ils connaissaient le requérant depuis trois ans environ avant son procès . Vu les renseignements disponibles, la demande a été rejetée en raison du danger qu'il semblait y avoir pour la sécurité . Le Gouvernement nie qu'il y ait eu quelque politique concertée de refuser d'autoriser le requérant à recevoir des visites de pr@tres ou d'autres ecclésiastiques ou de correspondre avec eux . Dans ses observations écrites, il relève que vingt personnes, dont deux prétres, sont actuellement autorisées à rendre visite au requérant et qu'en outre celui-ci reçoit des visites pastorales de l'aumônier attaché à l'archevêché de Birmingham et bénéficie aussi du ntinistère de l'aumônier catholique attaché à la prison . 2 . Procédure devant la commission des visiteurs des prisons à la sulte de l'incident du 16 septembre 197 6 Le 16 septentbre 1976 un incident est survenu à la prison d'Albany : une rixe s'est engagée entre le requérant et cinq autres détenus, d'une part . et plusieurs gardiens de prison, de l'autre . Il y a contestation sur les faits précis . La version que le requérant donne de l'incident est en gros que les détenus n'étaient pas armés et ont entrepris une protestation pacifique en s'asseyant dans un détour du couloir, qu'ils ont été assaillis par un grand nombre de gardiens en tenue de combat et que lui-même et d'autres détenus ont été blessés . Il soutient qu'il a été assailli par des gardiens non seulement dans le corridor mais après en avoir été emmené, notamment dans une cellule . Selon la version officielle de l'incident, en gros, les détenus ont refusé de quitter le corridor tranquillement et ont dû en être délogés de force par des gardiens qui portaient des casques de protection et des matraques, qu'ils ont résisté avec des armes, y compris des pieds de chaises et autres objets, et que des détenus comme des gardiens ont été blessés dans la bataille . Le 18 septembre 1976 le requérant a été accusé à propos de l'incident de quatre infractions au règlement pénitentiaire de 1964, à savoir : a . d'abandon d'un endroit où il était tenu de se trouver - article 47, paragraphe 6 ; b . de désobéissance à un ordre régulier - article 47, paragraphe 18 c . de mutinerie - article 47, paragraphe 1 d . de graves voies de fait sur la personne d'un gardien - article 47, paragraphe 2 . Au cours d'une audience préliminaire devant le directeur de ta prison le 21 septembre 1976, le requérant a plaidé coupable du chef d'accusation a . - 117 -
ci-dessus, visé à l'article 47, paragraphe 6, et non coupable des autres chefs d'accusation . Le directeur a transmis toutes les accusations à la commission des visiteurs des prisons . Au cours de l'audience, le requérant a été séparé des autres détenus en application de l'article 48, paragraphe 2 du règlement pénitentiaire, qui prévoit qu'un détenu sur le point d'être inculpé pour une infraction à la discipline peut être tenu à l'écart des autres détenus en attendant la décision . L'audience devant la commission des visiteurs des prisons a eu lieu le 24 septembre 1976 . Au préalable, le requérant avait été déclaré apte par le médecin de la prison . La commission l'a déclaré non coupable de l'accusation de désobéissance à un ordre et coupable des chefs de mutinerie et de voies de fait . Elle a prononcé pour ce motif au total 570 jours de perte de remise de peine et 112 jours de réclusion cellulaire, de perte de salaire et de divers privilèges . Le requérant s'est aussi vu infliger sept jours de réclusion cellulaire et de perte de gains et de privilèges pour s'être absenté de l'endroit où il était tenu de se trouver . chef d'accusation pour lequel il avait plaidé coupable . Le requérant déclare s'être vu refuser toute possibilité de communiquer avec qui que ce soit avant l'audience . Selon lui, celle-ci a duré de 8 à 15 minutes et il prétend qu'on a rejeté sa demande de citer comme témoin le directeur adjoint de la prison, qui avait été mêlé à l'incident . Il prétend aussi que, bien qu'assez apte physiquement à assister à l'audience, il n'était pas à l'époque en bonne condition d'un point de vue mental ou émotif . A cet égard, il se réfère à la lettre d'un certain docteur S ., qui lui a rendu visite le 25 septembre . Celui-ci a décrit les diverses blessures et a aussi déclaré que le requérant se trouvait - dans un état de confusion voisin de l'état de choc . . Le Gouvernement soutient que le requérant a eu une possibilité suffisante de présenter sa défense et déclare qu'il n'est mentionné nulle part que le requérant ait demandé à citer un témoin . 3 . Contacts entre le requérant et son solicitor après le 16 septembre 197 6 Le 21 septembre 1976 et ultérieurement, le requérant a demandé au Ministre de l'intérieur l'autorisation de prendre des conseils juridiques à propos de l'incident ainsi que celle de se soumettre à un examen médical indépendant . Le 1 - octobre 1976, le ministère de l'intérieur a répondu à la demande relative à une consultation juridique en déclarant que le requérant devait d'abord formuler ses plaintes de façon suffisamment détaillée pour qu'elles puissent être instruites par la voie interne . Le 5 octobre 1976 la demande d'un examen médical indépendant a été rejetée . Le 4 octobre 1976 . le requérant a présenté une nouvelle demande détaillant ses allégations . Dans une réponse du 9 février 1977, il a été informé que le Ministre de l'intérieur était convaincu que ses allégations de voies de fait et de traitement médical insuffisant ou tardif étaient sans fondement et qu'il se verrait accorder la possibilité de consulter un homme de loi s'il le souhaitait . - 118-
Le 10 fév rier 1977, les solicitors du requérant ont éc ri t au directeur de la p ri son d'Albany en vue d'obtenir l'auto risation de s'entretenir avec le requérant . Le 14 février 1977, le directeur a répondu favorablement ; après quoi les solicitors ont demandé confirmation des conditions dans lesquelles ils pourraient rendre visite au requérant . Dans une lettre du 23 mars 1977, le directeur les a informés qu'en application de l'article 27, paragraphe 2 du règlement pénitentiaire, la visite devait avoir lieu à la vue et à po rt ée de voix d'un gardien . Le 30 mars 1977, les solicitors ont répondu qu'ils n'étaient pas en mesure d'accepter ces conditions . Après l'introduction de la présente requête, le directeur de la p ri son a informé les solicitors, par une lett re du 12 mai 1977, qu'ils pouvaient rendre visite au requérant sous rése rve des dispositions de l'article 37, paragraphe 1 du règlement pénitentiai re , à la vue mais hors de portée de voix d'un gardien . Cette disposition prévoit que ces possibilités seront accordées à un détenu qui est pa rtie à une . procédure judiciaire . . Selon le Gouvernement, c'est par erreur qu'il a été fait référence à l'article 37, paragraphe 1 ; ces possibilités ont en fait été accordées en application de l'a rt icle 33, paragraphe 5, qui habilite le Ministre à ordonner qu'une visite ait lieu hors de po rtée de voix d'un gardien de prison dans des cas autres que ceux expressément prévus par le règlement . I .e requérant a apparemment re ç u depuis divers conseils ju ri diques quant à ses allégations de voies de fait au cours de l'incident du 16 septembre 1976 et quant à l'audience devant la commission des visiteurs des p ri sons, et il a pris ce rt aines mesures en vue d'engager une procédure devant les t ri bunaux britanniques à propos de ces faits .
Il appe rt que des actes introductifs d'instance pour voies de fait ont été déposés en septembre 1979 au nom du re quérant et de cinq autres détenus mêlés à l'incident, contre le Ministère de l'inlérieur, un directeur-adjoint de prison et différe nts gardiens et que des déclarations de plainte ont été déposées quelque quinze mois après le dépôt des actes introductifs d'instance . Pour ce qui est de la procédure devant la commission des visiteurs des prisons, le requérant a bénéficié en novembre 1979 de conseils préliminaires d'après lesquels une demande de ce rtiorari adressée à la High Court et visant à faire annuler la décision de la commission des visiteurs des p ri sons était possible . Il a bénéficié de l'assistance judiciaire en vue d'obtenir l'avis d'un avocat sur la question . Le 16 juin 1980 . l'avocat l'a informé qu'une demande de certiorari serait irrecevable puisqu'il n'y avait eu aucun manquement aux règles de la justice naturelle . Toutefois, l'affai re fut à nouveau examinée et le 3 février 1981 un avocat de grande expérience ( senior counsel) lui conseilla d'introduire immédiatement une demande de ce rt iorari au motif qu'il y avait eu une . importante iniquité • au cours de l'audience devant la commission des visiteurs des prisons . - 119 -
GRIEFS DU REQUÉRANT TIRÉS DE LA CONVENTIO N Dans sa requête, le requérant a formulé les griefs suivants tirés de la Convention .
Article 6 (accès à un tribunal ) - Refus d'accès à son solicitor pendant presque cinq mois après qu'il eut subi des voies de fait au cours de l'incident du 16 septembre 1976 violation de l'article 6, paragraphe 1 ;
- Refus d'accès à son solicitor dans des conditions qui respectent le caractère confidentiel d'une telle consultation pendant deux autres mois environ ; violation de l'article 6, paragraphe 1 ; - Refus d'accès à un examen médical indépendant après ces voies de fait ; violation de l'article 6, paragraphe 1 . A l'appui de ces griefs le requérant a soutenu que l'application de la condition d'une . enquête interne - sur ses plaintes avant de pouvoir accéder à des conseils juridiques a porté atteinte au droit d'accès à un tribunal garanti par l'article 6 . paragraphe 1 de la Convention, tel que la Cour l'a interprété dans l'affaire Golder (arrêt du 21 février 1975) . Il a soutenu que le refus de le laisser s'entretenir sans témoin avec un avocat l'a mis dans une situation qui le poussait soit à ne pas prendre de conseils, soit à les prendre d'une manière qui compromettait ses droits, et qu'il y a donc eu violation de l'article 6 à cet égard également . Il a soutenu aussi que vu la position inévitablement ambivalente des médecins de la prison dans un procès contre leurs employeurs, le refus d'un contrôle médical indépendant a porté lui aussi atteinte à l'article 6 . paragraphe 1 . Article 6 (procédure disciplinaire ) - l'audience du 24 septembre 1976 devant la commission des visiteurs des prisons a eu lieu dans des circonstances qui ont violé l'article 6, paragraphes 1 et 3 . A cet égard, le requérant a remarqué qu'il semble ressortir des peines prononcées contre les cinq autres détenus impliqués dans l'incident (mais qui n'ont pas assisté à l'audience) que la présence ou l'absence de l'accusé, qui peut être considérée comme un élément visé par l'article 6, n'a entraîné aucune différence quant aux peines prononcées . Il a soutenu que toutes les garanties de l'article 6, paragraphe 3, à l'exception de celle de l'alinéa e), ont fait défaut . La question de savoir s'il a disposé du . temps nécessaire . était d'après lui superflue puisqu'aucune possibilité de préparer sa défense ne lui fut donnée . Il n'a jantais pu obtenir la convocation et l'interrogatoire de téntoins à décharge . Bien qu'il ait été informé qu'il pouvait citer des témoins, ce droit lui fut dénié lorsqu'il a tenté de citer le directeur-adjoint de la prison mêlé à l'incident .
- 120 -
Le requérant a aussi soutenu que l'article 6 était applicable à la procédure en question, puisqu'elle tombe dans le domaine . pénal . d'après les critères énoncés par la Cour dans l'affaire Engel pour distinguer entre le . pénal . et le . disciplinaire • .
Article 8 - Le refus pendant une période de deux mois environ d'autoriser le requérant à consulter son solicitor, sauf à portée de voix d'un gardien de prison, a contrevenu à son droit au respect de la vie privée ; - le refus de l'autoriser à écrire à un solicitor pendant cinq mois environ à compter de septembre 1976 a emporté violation de son droit à la correspondance ; - le refus persistant de l'autoriser à correspondre avec des amis, y compris deux religieuses, a constitué une violation injustifiable de son droit à la correspondance ; - le refus de l'autoriser à recevoir des visites d'antis, y compris d'autres ecclésiastiques, un prêtre et des religieuses, sans raison suffisante, a constitué une violation de son droit à la vie privée . A propos de ce grief, le requérant s'est référé à la jurisprudence antérieure de la Commission selon laquelle le droit au respect de la vie privée • comprend . . . dans une certaine mesure le droit d'établir et d'entretenir des relations avec d'autres êtres humains . . . _(Requéte N° 6825/74, X . contre Islande, Décisions et Rapports 5 p . 86) . fl a aussi invoqué les articles 37 et 58 de l'Ensemble de règles minima du Conseil de l'Europe pour le traitement des détenus et l'article 61, aux termes duquel : . le traitement ne doit pas mettre l'accent sur l'exclusion des détenus de la société, mais au contraire sur le fait qu'ils continuent à en faire partie . . Il a admis que des restrictions à la vie privée et familiale peuvent dans une certaine ntesure être inséparables des conditions de détention mais a soutenu que seules des restrictions relevant de l'article 8, paragraphe 2 se justifiaient et qu'aucune disposition de cet article ne justifiait les restrictions dans son cas . L'article 8 exige que l'on établisse un équilibre raisonnable entre la sécurité et la vie privée et familiale mais on ne l'a pas recherché en ce qui le concerne .
Article 1 3 - Le requérant ne disposait pas d'un recours effectif devant une instance nationale quant aux violations alléguées de ses droits et libertés . Le requérant a soutenu que l'article 13 exige un recours . effectif ou suffisant • . selon les principes généralement reconnu de droit international ., tel que l'énonce la Commission dans sa jurisprudence constante . Il a rappel é - 121 -
les arguments avancés dans l'affaire Campbell (N° 7819/77) * . Le règlement pénitentiaire ne fournirait aucune base légale à une action qu'intenterait un détenu mais . à de nombreux égards . entend protéger et réglementer sur le plan interne les droits que la Convention garantit . . (l a soutenu que c'était manifestement le cas a) des sanctions prononcées par la commission des visiteurs des prisons, b) des atteintes à ses droits de caractère civil et de l'omission de lui assurer un procès équitable en matière pénale, ce qui constitue la base de ses griefs sur le terrain de l'article 6, et c) des ingérences dans sa correspondance et dans sa vie privée et familiale . ce qui constitue la base de ses griefs tirés de l'article 8 .
EN DROIT 1 . La Commission a d'abord examiné les griefs du requérant relatifs au refus des autorités de l'autoriser à recevoir la visite de certaines personnes . Elle remarque d'abord que dans sa requête le requérant a allégu é diverses ingérences dans sa correspondance et ses visites à compter de 1974 . Toutefois, ses griefs sur le terrain de la Convention portent seulement sur les effets permanents des décisions des autorités pénitentiaires lui refusant l'autorisation de correspondre avec certaines personnes ou d'en recevoir la visite . Il n'est pas contesté que . par le passé, le requérant s'est vu refuser la permission de recevoir des visites du Père F . et de certains M . et Mme O . . Dans sa requSte, il a allégué s'être vu également refuser la visite d'une religieuse, Sœur P . . Les documents qu'il a produits, y compris la réponse qui fut faite à une demande, indiquent seulement qu'il lui a été refusé de correspondre avec cette religieuse et le Gouvernement déclare qu'il n'a jamais été demandé en son nom qu'elle devienne un visiteur agréé . (x requérant n'a pas contesté cette déclaration et la Commission constate que son allégation initiale quant à un refus d'autoriser ces visites n'est pas étayée par des faits . La Commission note que le refus d'agréer le Père F . en qualité de visiteur était dû au fait que les autorités pensaient qu'il ne s'agissait pas d'un . ami e du requérant . La décision relative à M . et Mme O . était motivée, d'après le Gouvernement, par le fait que, sur la foi des renseignements disponibles à l'époque, il semblait y avoir un risque pour la sécurité . Lx Gouvernement soutient que, pour autant que la restriction touchant les personnes autorisées à rendre visite au requérant peut entraver son droit au respect de sa vie privée garanti par l'article S . paragraphe 1, elle se justifie e n
• Voir D .R . 14 p . 1 86 .
- 122 -
vertu de l'article 8, paragraphe 2, comme étant prévue par la loi et nécessaire notamment • à la défense de l'ordre et à la prévention des infractions pénales • . Il avance que la règle ou la pratique de limiter les visites à celles des proches parents ou amis personnels se justifie en principe pour ce motif . Le requérant soutient que pareilles restrictions n'étaient pas • prévues par la loi • et nie qu'elles fussent nécessaires à l'une des fins mentionnées à l'article 8, paragraphe 2 . La Commission estime que les restrictions incriminées en l'espèce étaient . prévues par la loi . . au sens de l'article 8 . paragraphe 2 . Elle note à cet égard que l'article 34, paragraphe 8 du règlement pénitentiaire prévoit spécifiquement que, sauf si le Ministre de l'intérieur donne son autorisation, un détenu ne peut communiquer avec une personne autre qu'un parent ou ami et que l'article 33, paragraphe 1 du règlement pénitentiaire autorise aussi le Ministre de l'intérieur à imposer des restrictions aux communications entre un détenu et d'autres personnes en vue d'assurer notamment • la discipline et le bon ordre » ou de « prévenir les infractions pénales . . Certes, comme le requérant l'a relevé, ces dispositions ne mentionnent pas expressément les • visites . . Cependant, la Commission estime que le mot • communications • peut viser les visites personnelles, en plus des communications postales ou autres, et il ressort clairement du contexte qu'il est censé les recouvrir dans le règlement pénitentiaire . Les restrictions en cause en l'espèce étaient, de l'avis de la Commission . suffisamment prévisibles à partir des dispositions susmentionnées (voir Silver et autres contre Royaume-Uni, rapport de la Commission, paragraphes 277-285 et 329) . La Commission ne juge pas nécessaire en l'occurrence de décider d'une manière générale si les règles pertinentes, en particulier la limitation des visites à celles des proches parents ou amis, se justifient en vertu de l'article 8 . paragraphe 2 . Elle n'a pas pour tâche d'examiner la législation en cause in abstracto et elle doit, autant que possible, borner son examen d'une affaire à la manière dont la législation a été effectivement appliquée au requérant (voir, par exemple, Cour eur . DH . Affaire Marckx, Série A . volume 31, page 13, paragraphe 27 ; Affaire Guzzardi . Série A . volume 39, pp . 31-32, paragraphe 88) . La Commission admet que certaines limites au nombre des personnes qui peuvent rendre visite à un détenu sous haute surveillance, tel le présent requérant, peuvent à juste titre être considérées comme nécessaires, en vertu de l'article 8, paragraphe 2, • à la défense de l'ordre et à la prévention des infractions pénales « . Elle admet en outre que tel était bien le but des restrictions en cause en l'espèce . Tenant compte de la manière dont les dispositions pertinentes ont, dans l'ensemble, été appliquées au requérant, qui a un nombre important de visiteurs agréés, la Commission ne juge pas que les restrictions permanentes quant aux personnes qui peuvent rendre visite au requérant dépassent ce que l'on pourrait considérer comme « nécessaire . à
- 123 -
cette fin . Elle estime que, contrairement à ce que prétend le requérant . un équilibre raisonnable semble être établi entre les exigences de la sécurité et la vie privée et familiale du requérant . En conséquence, même à supposer que les limitations incriminées puissent être vues comme une atteinte au droit du requérant au respect de sa vie privée, elles se justifiaient en vertu de l'article 8, paragraphe 2 . Cette partie de la requête est donc manifestement mal fondée et irrecevable en application de l'article 27, paragraphe 2 de la Convention . 2 . Le requérant se plaint aussi d'une restriction continue à sa correspondance, découlant de l'application de la règle interdisant la correspondance avec des personnes autres que des parents ou amis . En particulier, il se plaint de ne pas être autorisé à correspondre avec deux religieuses, So :ur P . et So_ur B ., et invoque l'article 8 de la Convention . La Commission note que cette partie de la requête soulève sous l'angle de l'article 8 de la Convention des questions semblables à celles qu'elle a examinées dans l'Affaire Silver et autres contre Royaume-Uni (Rapport du 11 octobre 1980, paragraphes 327-335) . actuellement pendante devant la Cour . Cette partie de la requête pose donc des problèmes qui appellent un examen au fond et doit être déclarée recevable . 3 . La Commission a examiné ensuite les griefs du requérant relatifs à la procédure devant la commission des visiteurs des prisons . Le requérant se plaint essentiellement que la commission des visiteurs aurait traité son cas de manière inéquitable . Il allègue en particulier qu'elle l'a traité alors qu'il ne se trouvait pas dans un état mental ou émolif convenable, qu'il n'a pas disposé du temps et des facilités nécessaires à la préparation de sa défense et qu'il n'a pu citer des témoins, en particulier un directeur adjoint . Il invoque l'article 6 de la Convention . Il n'est pas contesté que l'arrêt de la Court of Appeal dans l'Affaire St-Germain, prononcé le 3 octobre 1978, a érigé en règle du droit anglais que les sanctions disciplinaires de la commission des visiteurs des prisons sont susceptibles d'un recours judiciaire et peuvent être annulées par une ordonnance de certiorari . Le Gouvernement soutient que puisque le requérant ne s'est pas prévalu de ce recours, cette partie de la requête est irrecevable pour non-épuisement des voies de recours internes . Le requérant . tout en ne contestant pas maintenant qu'il pourrait obtenir une ordonnance de certiorari pour iniquité sérieuse et donc faire annuler la décision, maintient que le fait que ce recours existe aujourd'hui est sans pertinence, puisqu'il n'existait pas à la date de l'introduction de sa requête . La Commission estime qu'elle doit normalement trancher la question de savoir si les voies de recours internes ont été épuisées en se fondant sur la situation qui lui est présentée à la date de sa décision sur la recevabilité . Si à
- 124 -
cette date il est clair que le requérant dispose ou disposait d'un recours interne, il faut tenir compte de l'existence de ce recours . Le recours du certiorari est ouvert au requérant depuis le 3 octobre 1978 au moins . Même s'il était incertain qu'il en disposàt avant que le procès St-Germain eût réglé la question, le requérant a manifestement eu la faculté de s'en prévaloir à tout moment depuis lors mais ne l'a pas fait . Dans la mesure où ce recours, s'il avait été couronné de succès, aurait entraîné l'annulation des constatations de culpabilité et des sanctions disciplinaires contre le requérant, la Commission estime qu'il s'agit d'un recours effectif et suffisant comparable par ses résultats à l'appel d'une condamnation en matière pénale . Dans ces circonstances la Conimission estime que le requérant n'a pas satisfait à la condition de l'épuisement des voies de recours internes posée par l'article 26 de la Convention et que cette partie de la requête est donc irrecevable en application de l'article 27, paragraphe 3 . 4 . La Commission a examiné ensuite les g riefs du requérant tirés des articles 6 et 8 de la Convention et relatifs à son accès à des conseils juridiques et à un tribunal . Le requérant se plaint en pa rt iculie r - du retard apporté à lui donner accès à des conseils juridiques à cause de l'application de la règle de . l'enquête interne préalable - ; - du refus à l'autoriser à se soumettre à un examen médical indépendant : - du refus, pendant un certain temps, de l'autoriser à s'entretenir sans témoin avec son avocat . La Commission estime que cette pa rt ie de la requête soulève sous l'angle des articles 6 et 8 de la Convention des questions qui, dans une ce rt aine mesure, sont comparables à celles qui se posent dans l'Affaire Campbell qui lui est connexe ( Requête N° 7819/77) et qu'elle a déjà déclarée recevable et, pour ce qui est de la correspondance, à celles de l'Affaire Silver et autres contre Royaume-Uni, pendante devant la Cour . La présente affaire pose une question supplémentaire relative au caractère confidentiel de la consultation juridique, mais cette question est étroitement liée aux autres . Dans ces circonstances, la Commission estime que cette pa rt ie de la requête n'est pas manifestement mal fondée et . en l'absence d'autre motif d'irrecevabilité, elle doit donc ê tre déclarée recevable . 5 . La Commission a enfin examiné le g ri ef du requérant tiré de l'article 13 de la Convention et selon lequel il ne dispose d'aucun recours effectif quant aux griefs susmentionnés . Pour autant que ce grief vise celui qui a trait aux visites, la Commission estime qu'il n'a pas été démontré que les recours administratifs pénitentiaires ,
- 125 -
y compris en particulier une requête adressée au Ministre de l'intérieur, seraient insuffisants aux fins de l'article 13, eu égard notamment au nombre de visiteurs que le requérant a pu faire agréer . Pour autant que ce grief vise l'absence de recours à propos de la procédure devant la commission des visiteurs des prisons, la Commission note que, comme elle l'a constaté ci-dessus, le requérant a la faculté de demander à la High Court un contrôle judiciaire de la décision dont il s'agit . Dans cette mesure . le grief du requérant tiré de l'article 13 est donc ntanifestement mal fondé et irrecevable en application de l'article 27 . paragraphe 2 de la Convention . En revanche, pour autant que le requérant se plaint de ne pas disposer d'un recours effectif quant à ses griefs tirés des articles 6 et 8 de la Convention, à propos de sa correspondance ainsi que de son accès à un tribunal et à des conseils juridiques et médicaux, la Commission estime que se posent sur le terrain de l'article 13 de la Convention des questions qui appellent un examen au fond . Cette partie du grief du requérant ne peut donc être qualifiée de manifestement mal fondée . En l'absence de tout autre motif d'irrecevabilité, elle doit donc être déclarée recevable . Par ces motifs, la Commissio n
DÉCLARE RECEVABL E - les griefs du requérant tirés de l'article 8 de la Convention, relatifs à une restriction permanente de sa correspondance avec certaines personnes (par . 2 ci-dessus), et de l'article 13, relatifs à l'absence alléguée d'un recours sur ce point (par . 5 ci-dessus) ; - les griefs du requérant tirés des articles 6 et 8 de la Convention, relatifs à son accès à des conseils juridiques et à un tribunal (par . 4 ci-dessus), et de l'article 13, relatifs à l'absence alléguée d'un recours sur ce point (par . S ci-dessus) .
Il . DÉCLARE LA REQUÉTE IRRECEVABLE POUR LE SURPLUS .
- 126 -

Origine de la décision

Formation : Commission (plénière)
Date de la décision : 19/03/1981

Fonds documentaire ?: HUDOC

HUDOC
Association des cours judiciaires suprêmes francophones Organisation internationale de la francophonie

Juricaf est un projet de l'AHJUCAF, l'association des cours judiciaires suprêmes francophones,
réalisé en partenariat avec le Laboratoire Normologie Linguistique et Informatique du droit (Université Paris I).
Il est soutenu par l'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie et le Fonds francophone des inforoutes.