Facebook Twitter Appstore
Page d'accueil > Résultats de la recherche

§ E.M. KIRKWOOD c. ROYAUME-UNI

Imprimer

Type d'affaire : Decision
Type de recours : Violation de l'Art. 5-4 ; Non-violation de l'art. 5-1 ; Préjudice moral - constat de violation suffisant ; Remboursement frais et dépens - procédure nationale

Numérotation :

Numéro d'arrêt : 10479/83
Identifiant URN:LEX : urn:lex;coe;cour.europeenne.droits.homme;arret;1984-03-12;10479.83 ?

Analyses :

(Art. 5-1) LIBERTE PHYSIQUE, (Art. 5-1-e) ALIENE, (Art. 5-4) INTRODUIRE UN RECOURS


Parties :

Demandeurs : E.M. KIRKWOOD
Défendeurs : ROYAUME-UNI

Texte :

APPLICATION/REQUÉTE N° 10479/83 E .M . KIRKWOOD v/the UNITED KINGDOM E .M . KIRKWOOD c/ROYAUME-UNI DECISION of 12 March 1984 on the admissibility of the application DÉCISION du 12 mars 1984 sur la recevabilité de la requét e
Article I of the Convention : I1+e undertaking given by High Contracting Parties in respect of everyone within their jurisdic7ion extends, in the Article 3 sphere, to a duty not to expose anyone to an irremediable siruation of objective danger, even outside their jurisdiction . Articles 2 and 3 of the Convention :- Because A rticle 2 authorises capital punishment, pursuant to the law and a coun sentence, this may create a long period of incertitude for the convicted person during the appeal proceedings in an elaborate judicial system . However, it cannotbe held that this long period of uncertainty (the"dearh row phenomenon") falls outside the notion of inhuman treatment (Article 3) . 7he terms of Article 2 do not suppori the contention that if a State were to fail to require binding assurances from the State requesting estradition that the death penalty would not be infficted, this would constitute treatmentcontrary to Article 3 . Article 3 of the Convention : Factors to be considered in assessing whether the long period of uncertainty experienced bv the person condemned to death, during the appeal procedures (the "death row phenomenon ") amounts to inhuman treatment : the importance of the appeal system designed to protect the right to life, delays caused bv the backlog of cases before the appeal courts, the possibility of a conanutation of sentence by very reason of the duration of detention on "death row " . Ar ticle 6 of the Convention : 7his provision does not applv to a court 's examination of an extradition request from a foreign State, even if the Court carries out an assessment of whether there is an outline ofa criminal case to answeragainst the applicant .
- 158 -
Artlde 25 of fhe Convent(on : A person who is about to be subjected to a violation of the Convention may c/aim to be a victim . Such is the case of a person who finds hirnvelf in the hands of a High Contracting Party which has decided to extradite him to a foreign State when extradition is imminent and could expose him, he claims, to treatment contrary to Article 3 .
Article 1 de la Convention : L'engagement pris par les Hautes Parties Contractantes à l'égard de toute personne relevant de leur juridiction s'étend, dans le domaine de l'article 3, à l'obligation de ne pas exposer cette personne à une situation irrémédiable de danger objectif m@me en dehors de leur juridication . Articles 2 et 3 de la Convention : Du fait que l'article 2 autorise la peine capitale si elle est prévue par la loi et infligée par un tribunal, ce qui, dans un système judiciaire élaboré, peut placer le condamné dans une longue incertitude durant les procédures de recours, on ne peut pas déduire que cette longue incertitude (« couloir de la mort .) échappe à la notion de traitement inhumain (anicle 3) . Le libellé de l'article 2 ne permet pas de soutenir que l'omission par un Etat d'eziger des assurances formelles que la peine de mort ne sera pas exécutée dans l'Erat requérant l'extradition, constitue un traitement conrraire à l'article 3 . Article 3 de la Canvention : Eléments pris en considération pour déierminer si la longue incenitude d'un condamné à mort pendant les procédures de recours (-couloir de la mort .) constitue un traitement inhumain : Importance des recours pour la protection du droit à la vie, retards dus à l'engorgement des instances de recours, perspective d'une commutation de peine en raison méme de la durée du « couloir de la mort . . Arücle 6 de la Conventlon : Cette disposition ne s'applique pas à 1'examen par un tribunal d'une demande d'extradition à un Etat éiranger, même si ce tribunal procéde à un examen sommaire des accusations dont l'intéressé devra répondre . Article 25 de la Convention : Peut se prétendre victime d'une violation celui qui est sur le point de subir une violation du fait d'une Haute Partie Contractante . Tel est le cas de celui qui se trouve aux mains des autorltés d'une Haute Panie Contractante, que celle-ci a décidé d'estrader à un Etat étranger, dont l'extradition est imminente et pourrait l'e-cposer, ajfinne-t-il, à un traitement contraire à l'article 3.
-159-
(français : vairp . 1 92 )
THE FACTS -
The facts as they have been submitted on behalf of the applicant, an American national, presently de tained in B ri xton p rison, by his representative, Mr Colin Nicholls, Q .C ., and Ms Clare Montgomery of Counsel, and MM . Maxwell and Gouldman, solicitors, of London, may be summ arised as follows : On 14 July 1982 three men were shot in San Francisco, two of whom died immediately, and one of whom su rv ived and identified the applicant from a photograph as the man responsible for the shooting, an identification con fi rmed by an affidavit dated 3 December 1982 . On 28 July 1982 the police officer responsible for enquiring into the murder s made a complaint at the Municipal Court in Sans Francisco ; alleging that the applicant had committed two counts of murder, contrary to Section 187 of the California Penal Code, and one count of attempted murder, contrary to Section 664 and 187 of the Califomia Penal Code, end a warrant was issued for the applicant's arrest the following day . ". . On 20 November 1982 the ap licant was ar ested on ar ival at Heathrow airport, London, and was charged the following day on a warrant issued by a magistrate at Bow Street Magistrate's Court for his extradition to the United States of America . On 30 December 1982 the Government of the United States made a formal request for the applicant's return to Lhe United States in accordance with procedure set out in the Treaty between the two States of8 June 1972 . On 10 January 1983 the Secretary of State for Home Affairs ordered a magistrate to proceed to hear the evidence in accordance with théprovisions of the Extradition Acts 1870-_1935 and the Treaty as contained in Order in Council N°~2144 of 1976, the United Stetesof America (Extradition) Order 1976 . On 11 May 1983 the Bow Street Magistrates' Court ordered the applicant to be committed to prison to await the order of Lhe Secretary of State for his surrender to the United States in accordance with the provisions of Section 10 of the Extradition Act . In making this order of committal, the Magistrate overruled the applicant's submission that the affidavit of the sole witness to the shootings should not be received in evidence and that if it were so received, it was insufficientto justify committal . On 16 May 1983 counsel advised the applicant that there were no arguable grounds on which he might apply to Lhe High Court for a writ of habeas corpus and, subject to the Secretaryof State exercising his discretion not to order thé applicant's surrender, Lhe applicant had exhausted his judicial and administrative remedies . On 18 and 19 May 1983, the Secretary of State informed the applicant's solicitors that the Government of the United States were unwilling to give any assurances before committal that the death penalty would not be carried out on the applicant if tried and convicted, but that the papers would not be placed before th e
- 160 -
Secretary of State for his decision under Section 2 of the Extradition Act 1870 until assurances had been received from the United States Government and any representations had been made by the applicant . On I July 1983, the Secretary of State informed the applicant's representatives that he had received from the Govemment of the United States of America : "The assurance of the Deputy Attorney General of the State of Califomia (the competent authority) that should the applicant be convicted of either or both counts of murder with which he is charged, and if the death penalty is imposed for either or both these offences, a representation will be made in the name of the United Kingdom that it is the wish of the United Kingdom that the death penalty will not be carried out . " On 12 July 1983 the applicant submitted a petition to the Secrctary of State that he should not be ordered to be surrendered to the United States . It is the applicant's submission that, bearing in mind the probability of the imposition of the death penalty in the event of his return to the United States and trial and conviction, and taking account of the automatic appeal procedure operated in Califomia and the consequent delay in the implementation of any such death penal ty , his extradition to the United States would constitu[e inhuman and degrading treatment contrary to An . 3 of the Convention . He also invokes Art . 6 in relation to the fairness of the committal proceedings and in particular the opportunity to crossexamine witnesses against him . On 6 February 1984 the Secretary of State signed the warrant in accordance with Section 11 Extradition Act 1870 for the applicant's surrender to the United States' authorities and removal from the United Kingdom . On 7 February 1984 the applicant applied ex part e in the High Court for a stay on his surrender and for Ieave to challenge the Secretary of State's decision by way of judicial review as one which no reasonable authority would reasonably make . The application was granted the same day . On 10 Febmary 1984 the Secretary of State applied to discharge the order, staying the applicant's removal, on the grounds that there was no power for the High Court to issue a stay with the effect of an injuction against the Crown by virtue of Section 21 (2) Crown Proceedings Act 1947 .1 It was contended for the Secretary of State that the High Court had no power to control his decision to surrender the applicant and no power to order a stay . (1) S 21 (2) provides : "The Caun stWl nul in eny civil prooeedings grant any injunetion or make any order egainst n olficer of the Crown if the effea of gnnting the injunction or making the order would be lu give any relief against the Crown which chauld noa have teen obuined in procadings against the Ctown . "
- 161 -
On the same day the High Court lifted the stay on the applicant's surrender, granting the Secretary of State's application . On 13 February 1984 the applicant issued proceedings in the Divisional Court for habeas corpus and an order that it was unreasonable of [he Secretary of State to order the applicant's surrender before the Commission had further examined the application or alternative at all, in the light of the severity of the death row phenomenon . , The applicant's petition for habeas corpus was rejected after pleadings before the Divisional Court on 13 and 14 February 1984 . The applicant sought a stay in his surrender pending the lodging of an appeal to the House of Lords . Although no stay was possible, the Court indicated that it would not be unreasonable for the Secretary of State to defer surrender by 24 hours if the leave petition was lodged within that period . The petition for leave to appeal was lodged with the House of Lords the following day and the applicânt's surrender was not implemented pending the hearing of the application for leave to appeal . The application's petition for leave to appeal was refused by the House of Lord s on 1 March 1984 .
Domestic Law and Practice : United Kingdo m The penalty for murder .in the United Kingdom is life imprisonment, and the death penalty cannot-be imposed . The law relating to extradition between the United Kingdom and the United States is governed by the Extradition Acts 1970-1935 and the Treaty signed between the two States on 8 June 1972 . For a request to be successful, the ôffence charged in the United States warrânt must be referred to in the Extradition Acts or another mate ri al English statute as an extradition crime . The relèvant lists include murder and attempted murder . Anicle HI of the Treaty provides : "1 . That extradition shall be granted for any act or omission the facts of which disclose an offence within any of the descriptions of the Treaty . . . or any other offence if ;• ' • a) the offence is punishable under t te laws of both panies by imprisonment o r
other form of detention for more than one year or the death penalty . b) the offence is extraditable under the relevant law, being the law of the United Kingdom . c) the offence constitutes a felony under the laws of the United States o f America . 2 . Extradition shall also be granted for any attempt . . . within paragraph (1) of this Article . . ." . - 162 -
However, Article 1V of the Treaty provides : "If the offence for which extradition is requested is punishable by death under the relevant law of the requesting party, but the relevant law of the requesting party, but the relevant law of the requested party does not provide for the death penalty in a similar case, extradition may be refused unless the requesting party gives assurances satisfactory to the requested party that the death penalty will not be carried out . " This discretion is vested in the Secretary of State by Section 1 I of the Extradition Act 1870, and comes into play after the fugitive has exhausted his legal remedies at committal or by way of habeas corpus . It is the English practice before surrendering a fugitive who is liable to the death penalty to seek the best assurances from the requesting State that the death penalty will not be carried out, although it is generally impossible for the requesting State to give a binding guarantee as to this . It would appear that the United Kingdom Government may never have refused to surrender a fugitive on these grounds . "Assurances" of requesting States have been considered by the House of Lords in a different context (Section 10 Fugitive Offenders Act 1881), which provided that the High Court could discharge a fugitive on an application for habeas corpus where it would be unjust or oppressive to retum him (e .g . in R . v . Governor of Brixton Prison ex parte Armah, (1968) AC 192), where the desirability of undertakings which obtain special treatment for fugitives in the norrnal application of criminal administration was questioned . The applicant contrasts this attitude and reluctance with regard to the obtaining of assurances with that of the Govemment of the Federal Republic of Germany in relation to extradition in cases where the fugitive faces the death penalty . illustrated by the Commission's case-law in Application N° 9539/81 .
Domestic Law and Practice : United States of Americ a For the purposes of extradition, the law of the United States includes the law of any of its States . Section 187 of the Califomia Penal Code defines "murder" as "the unlawful killing of a human being . . . with malice aforethought" . Section 189 provides that "all murder which is perpetrated by a destructive device or explosive . . . or by any other kind of wilful, deliberate and pre-meditated killing . . . is murder in the first degree . . ." Section 190 provides that every person guilty of murder in the first degree shall suffer death, confinement in a State p ri son for life without possibility of parole or confinement in a State prison for a term of 25 years to life . The penalty to be applied shall be determined as provided in Sections 190 .1-5 . Sections 190 .1-5 provide that the penalty shall be death or confinement in a State prison for a terrn of life without parole in any case in which one or more of
- 163 -
the following special circumstances has been charged and specifically found under Section 190.2 to be true : . . , . . . Where (3) the defendent has in the same proceedings been convicted of more than one offence of murder in the first or second degree . " The existence of absence of these "special circumstances", and the choice between the death penalty or life imprisonment is deterroined by a jury in separate penalty proceedings after guilt has been established . In those proceedings, evidence may be presented by both the prosecution and the defendant as to any matter relevant to .aggravation, mitigation and sentence . This includes any prior conviction, the existence of any other criminal activity by the defendant which involved the use or attempted use of force, or violence, and the defendant's background, history, and mental and physical condition . The words "criminal activity" as used in Section 190 .3 do not require a conviction
factors if relevant :
,
. In determining the penalty, the jury shall take into account any of the followin g . _
a . The circumstances of the crime and any special circumstances ; b . The presence or absence of criminal activity by the defendant which involved the use or attempted use of force or violence . . . c . The presence or absence of any prior felony or conviction . . . Any other circumstance which extenuates the gravity of the.d crime eve n thoughit is not a legal excuse for the crime . " The jury shall impose sentence of death if they conclude that the aggravating circumstances outweigh the mitigating circumstances . Otherwise the penalty is life imprisonment . Where the death penalty is imposed, under Sub-Division 7 of Section 1181 o f the California Penal Code, the defendant shall be deemed to have made an application for the modification of such verdict . In ruling on the application, a judge shall review the evidence, consider, take into account and be guided by the aggravating and mitigating circumstances referred to in Section 190 .3, and shall make a determination as to whether the jury's findings and verdict are contrary to law or to the evidencé presented . A denial of the modification of the death penalty verdict pursuant to Sub-Division 7 of Section 1181 of the Code shall be reviewed on the defendant's atitomatic appeal pursuant to Sub-Division (b) of Section 1 239 of thi Code . The granting of the application shall be reviewed in the event of the prosecution making an appeal pursuant to paragraph (6) of that Section . Section 190 .6 requires the decisions of appeal to the State Supreme Court shall be made within 150 days of the completion of the entire record by the sentencing court . Under Section 1217-9 a statement of conviction and judgment and the complete transcript of atl the testimony given at the trial, including any argumenas made bÿ
-16y-
respective counsel, must be sent to the State Governor, who may require the opinion of the justices of the Supreme Court and the Anomey General or any of them upon the statement so fumished . Implementation of the Death Penalty and the "Death Row" Phenonreno n Up until 1963 the death penalty was regularly carried out in California for murder, but since then it has been carried out only once in 1967 for the murder of a police officer . In February 1972 the Califomia Supreme Court reversed a death sentence on the ground that it was unconstitutional as a"cruel and unusual punishment", but it was re-introduced in late 1972 by an amendment to the State Constitution, and when that amendment was mled unconstitutional by the Supreme Court, a funher amendment to the Constitution was made in 1978 . Both amendments reinstating the death penalty resulted from bills introduced by the present Govemor in California in his then capacity as Senator . Following the Supreme Court mlings, a totalof 179 persons awaiting execution on "death row" were paroled . The most recent figures relating to the imposition of the death penalty at present (up to March 1983) disclose that 115 people are awaiting execution in California and 1,147 in the United States as a whole . As of the date of the Attomey General's report on murder and the death penalty, published by the Califomia Department of Justice in July 1981, 53 persons have been sentenced to death since the re-introduction of the death penalty in 1978 . Of these, 2 had had their sentences affirroed, 2 had had their convictions reversed, 5 had had their sentences reversed, I for a technical reason, and 44 were awaiting the result of their appeal . Of those whose sentences werc affirmed, I waited 9 months, and the other 23 months for the result . Four and a half years later, neither has been executed, although they are both liable for execution . Of those awaiting the result of their appeals, 1 had been waiting 5 years . Since the publication of the repon, according to the information received by the applicant's representatives, 3 of the 44 persons awaiting the result of their appeals have had their sentences reversed .
COMPLAINTS The Death Penalty and Death Row in the Applicant's Cas e The applicant contends that there are a number of facts which are rclevant to the likely imposition of the death penalty in the event of his conviction . In particular, he is charged with double murder by shooting and a further attempt to kill, and it is alleged that the shooting arose prior to peddling dangerous dmgs . The applicant has previous convictions, including one for armed robery, and a history of violence during his prison sentences, and is suspected of violent political and racial activity in California as a leader of an ex-convict group called "Tribal Thumb" .
- 165 -
The likelihood of a death sentence being imposed on the applicant in view of the above facts is in no way diminished'by the nature of the "assurance" received by the Secretary of State, which is, that if the death penalty is imposed upon the applicant, "a representation will be made in the name of Lhe United Kingdom that it is the wish of the United Kingdom that the death penalty will not be carried out" . The applicant contends that this is not an "assurance" within the terms of the Article IV of the Treaty, and furthertnore, Section 1219 of the California Penal Code makes it clear that Lhe Attomey General may only express an opinion if called for by the Govemor, which opinion is, by implication, not binding on him . Nor is the "assurancé" that of the requesting party, since it is the Federal Government of the United States which has made Lhe request for extradition . Furthermore, the Deputy Attomey General has not indicated what, if any, par t he proposes to take in Lhe penalty stage of Lhe trial proceedings and what, if any, effect his failure to call for the death penalty or call evidence in support of it would have on the court . However, if the applicant is executed, neither he nor the United Kingdom will have any effective redress on a matter of utmost finality . In the light of the personal identity of the Governor, there is a serious risk that the United Kingdom's wishes will not prevail in the applicant's case . In particular, the applicant refers to the Governor's frequently expressed view that Lhe will of the people should not be thwarted and cannot be overestimated, a view forcefully expressed in his report published by the Attomey General's office . In addition, a failure to carry out an execution in the applicant's case might give rise to legal argument in other cases owing to unequal application of the law, invalidating Lhe death penalty in those cases and thereby influence the Govemor not to exercise clemency in the present case . The applicant submits that the facts referred to above indicate that if he is surrendered to the United States there is serious reason to believe that he will be subjected to inhuman and degrading treatment and punishment in contravention of Art . 3 of the Convention . Such treatment and punishment arises from Lhe unexceptional and inordinate delay in carrying out the death penalty in California . It is further submitted that the fact that there have been no executions in Califomia since 1967 cannot detract from the very real .fear in those .condemned that they will be executed in the light of a resurgence of executions in the United States generally and recent enthusiasm and legislation in favour of the death penalty in Califomia specifically . ' .' The applicant complains in this respect that the 'assurance' ;that the United Kingdom's wish that he should not be executed will be brotight to the Govemor's attention, will only operate after he has completed all possible appeals and that in the intervil he will be exposed to thè rigours of the death row phenomenon . -
- 166 -
In addition, the applicant complains that he has been denied the opportunity to cross-examine the sole witness against him . On the basis of this testimony his extradition is sought . Under Section 10 of the 1970 Extradition Act, under English law, the magistrate is not required to decide upon the merits of the criminal charges against a fugitive as such, but he is required to decide whether the evidence adduced amounts to prima facie evidence of the commission of the offences charged . In these circumstances, it is argued that the right provided under Art . 6 (3)(d) applies to extradition proceedings and the failure of the magistrate to make the witness against the applicant available for cross-examination was in violation of that right . According to the Commission's case-law, and most recently its decision in X . v . Ireland (Application N° 9742/82) it has afftrmed that the applicability of Art . 6 to extradition proceedings remains an open question .
PROCEEDINGS BEFORE THE COIviNi1SSIO N The application was introduced on 13 July 1983 and registered on the same day . It was examined by the Contmission on 14 July 1983, when notice of it was given to the respondent Govemment pursuant to Rule 42 (2)(b) of the Rules of Procedure, and the respondent Government was invited to submit observations on its admissibility and merits before 2 September 1983 . On 10 August 1983 the respondent Govemment requested an extension for the submission of the observations, which was granted by the President of the Commission until 15 September 1983 . The observations were submitted on 21 September 1983 . The applicant was invited to submit observations in reply before 5 November 1983 . On 2 November 1983 the applicant's representative requested an extension until 14 November 1983 in the time limit for the submission of these observations to enable legal opinions to be sought in the United States . This extension was granted on the same day and the observations were received on 14 November 1 983 . On 14 July 1983 the Commission also indicated to the respondent Govemment, pursuant to Rule 36 of the Rules of Procedure, that it would be desirable in the interests of the parties and the proper conduct of the proceedings before the Commission that the applicant should not be extradited to the United States of America before 14 October 1983 . This indication was renewed on 14 October 1983 until 15 November 1983, pending receipt of the applicant's observations in reply to those of the respondent Govemment . On 14 November 1983 the Commission decided to extend the indication under Rule 36 of the Rules of Procedure until 19 November 1983 to enable the applicant's observations to be considered .
On 12 November 1983 the Commission resumed its examination of the application and decided in accordance with Rule 42 (2)(a) of its Rules of Procedure to request the respondent Government to inform the Commission before 12 December 1983 whether they would be prepared to seek a better assurance from the United -•167 -
States authorities of the type referred to in the applicant's submissions and extended the indication under Rule 36 of the Rules of Procedure until 1 7 December 1983 . On 13 December 1983 the respondent Govemment informed the Commission by telephone that they were informing the United States' authoritiei of the further points made on the applicant's behalf, but that they did not consider the question of assurances as relevant under the Convention . They indicated that they wished to maintain the momentum of the application and agreed to defer removal of the applicant until 17_Decembçr 1983 as requested . On 15 December 1983 the Commission decided not to renw its indication under Rule 36 and to resume its examination of the admissibility and merits of the application on 5 March 1984 . On 6 February 1984 the applicant's representative informed the Secretary tha t the Secretary of State had signed the relevant warrant for the applicant's surrender to the United States' authorities .In view of the proximity of the Contmission's resumption of its examination of the admissibility of the matter, the applicant's representative requested that the President give an indication under Rule 36of the Rules .of Procedure : On 7 February 1984 the President declined to give an indication under Rule 3 6 and the parties were informed accordingly . On 5 March 1984 the applicant again requested an indication under Rule 36 of the Rules of Procedure invoking inter alia, Article 13 of the Convention and in the light of the unsuccessful outcome of the proceedings for habeas corpus . The Commission decided not tomake an indication under Rule 36 on the samé day . SUBIVDSSIONS OF THE PARTIE S
Submissionc of the Respondent'Governmen t l . 7he Facts The respondent Government does not dispute the facts as submitted by th e applicant . Domestic Law and Practice : The United Kingdo .2 m The Government first reject the allusion to a "practice" by the Féderal
Republic of Germany in relation to the extradition of persons facing thé death penalty, by reference to merely one case, especially where insufficient is known of the circumstances relevant to that case to assesswhether the alleged contrast is'wellfounded in fact . In addition, the English courts have nojurisdiction to try the offences in respec t of which the applicant's extradition has been sought . Although murder and manslaughter zre one of the exceptional cases where the English courts have jurisdiction over offences committed abroad, thisjurisdiction is generally limited to case s
- 168 -
where the offender holds a specified citizenship conferred by the United Kingdom . Hence aliens such as the applicant would be inunune from prosecution in the United Kingdom and if fugitive offenders discovered in the United Kingdom could not be extradited they would generally have to be set at libeny . Although immigration laws might provide some powers of removal which might be exercisable in respect of such people, where, as in the present case, the fugitive is a national of the requesting State, it is probable that the requesting State is the only place to which removal could be effected, since it is highly unlikely that any other country would be prepared to receive a fugitive . Hence substantially the same issue as in the present extradition context could be raised in the context of expulsion . The practical effect is therefore that if the applicant cannot be sent to the United States of America he would be effectively irremovable and would have to be released from custody and permitted to remain in the United Kingdom . Extradition is universally premissed on the basic proposition that it is in the interests of all nations that a criminal should be brought to justice and conversely not in the interests of any nation to become a haven for fugitive offenders . The possibility of irremovable fugitives in the United Kingdom would undermine the very foundations of extradition . Funhennore, the objective of bringing criminals to justice implies that extradition arrangements between States should only be entered into where the standards of justice and penal administration obtaining in those States are acceptable one to the other and such as to secure justice for the fugitive offender . This policy is reflected in the Extmdition Treaties entered into the United Kingdom, which must first be ratified, by being laid before Parliament . A further significant feature of United Kingdom extradition law is the requirement that no extradition may take place unless evidence is furnished by the requesting State in due fonn which establishes a prima facie case against the fugitive . This provision of Section 10 of the Extradition Act 1970 seeks to ensure basic equality of treatment for all persons who come before the courts accused of an offence, wherever the offence in question may have been committed . 3.
Relevant Law and Practice : United States of America
The respondent Govemment accept that the description of this law and practice as set out by the applicant, subject to pointing out the reversal of one of the decisions referred to, following the State of California's appeal to the Supreme Court of the United States, which, on 6 July 19 8 3 reinstated a death penalty, which had previously been reversed by the Supreme Court of California . The respondent Government refer to the prohibition in the Eighth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States of "cruel and unusual punishments", a n
-169-
almost identical prohibition being con tained in the Constitution of the State of California, Artic)e 1, Section 17, which provides that : "Cmel or unusual punishments may not be inflicted or excessive fine s imposed" . The parallel to Art . 3 of the Convention itself is evident, but equally significant is the interpretation given to this provision by the S tate cou rts and the United States' Supreme Cou rt . The latter has held in particular that any penalty must accord with "the dignity of man" (Propp v . Dulles 356 U .S . 86, 100 (1958)) and the Cou rt has shown itself willing to examine whether the punishment is disp roport ionate to the crime in respect of which it is imposed . The Califomia Supreme Court has shown a similarly dynamic approach in examining proportionality and has indicated a preparedness to consider an argument for re lief based on the p roposition that lengh ty incarceration p rior to proposed execution might itself constitute "cruel or unusual punishment" ( People v . Anderson (1972) 6 COL .3d 628, 649-650) . With reg ard to Lhe time spent pending appeal, the law and practice of Califomia appear to be designed to minimise any period which might cont ribute todelay, so far as the courts and the prosecuting authorities are concerned . The law of Califomia provides that all death penalty cases on appeal must go direct to the Supreme Cou rt of the State, bypassingthe oppo rtunities which would otherwise exist for intermediate appellate cou rt reviews . in .addition, as a matter of policy, Lhe Attorney General of Califomia assigns high p ri ority to death penal ty cases and whenever possible fi les the State's bri ef within 30 days of the fding of the defendant's brief on appeal . To facilitate this, the Attorney handling the case is relieved of all other assignments in order to devote full time to Lhe preparation of the State's b ri ef. In addition, Section 190 .6 of the California Penal Code requires that decisions of appeal to the Califo rn ia Supreme Cou rt shall be made within 150 days of the completion of Lhe entire record by the sentencing court . With regard to the question of the assurances, and the commutation of the death penalty, if imposed on the applicant, Lhe respondent Government point out that it would be improper for the prosecuting authoritiés to give an assurance prior to extradition, that they would not seek to obtain the death penalty for the offences in question, if the applicant were convicted . This impropri e ty would be two-fold : first such an assurance would infringe the discretion properly vested in the prosecutor as reg ards submissions as to sentencing ( and would incidentally reward Lhe applicant for his flight to the United Kingdom) ând second, such an assurance would be contra ry to statute and probably unconstitutional . The relevant California statutes define specific types of cases to which the death penal ty applies, multiple murders being one such case . These specific definitions were prompted by the decisions of the United States' Supreme Court (Furman v . -170-
Georgia 1972 408 U .S . 238) . An assurance from the prosecuting authorities not to seek the death penalty, which would have the effect of singling out the applicant quite arbitrarily from the ambit of the death penalty provisions, would probably undermine therefore the existing compatibility of the specific statutory provisions with the Constitution . Equally, for constitutional reasons, it is considered that the Govemor could not, with propriety, give an assurance prior to extradition to commute any death sentence which might be imposed in respect of the applicant, since under Art. 5, Section 8 of the Constitution of Califomia the Governor is empowered to grant clemency only "after sentence" and not prior to trial . Such a provision is grounded in common sense : the Governor ought not to be called upon to consider clemency until after all relevant facts have been fully developed during the trial process, sentence imposed and all avenues of judicial relief pursued . In these circumstances, any assurance given by the Govemor in the terms referred to by the Commission might well be held to violate the Constitution of the State of Califomia .
4 . Alleged violation of Article 3 The applicant contends in essence that if extradited, convicted and sentenced to death, there is likely to be an inordinate delay between the time of sentencing, and the final determination of whether or not that sentence is to be implemented . Such a delay, coupled with the uncertainty of the outcome, would act on the applicant's mind in such a way as to subject him to inhuman and degrading treatment or punishment . With regard to the form of assurance obtained by the United Kingdom Government, this has been issued under cover of a diplomatic note from the Ambassador of the United States of America in London, in the form of an affidavit sworn by the Deputy Attorney General for the State of California, which affidavit was forwarded under the certificate of the Governor of California . The Deputy Attomey General swore that he had discussed the matter of the assurance with the authorised representative of the District Anorney of the County of San Francisco and that the latter had concurred in offering the assurance given . Having regard to the constitutional and practical complexities affecting the nature and extent of any assurance that could properly be given, the Govemment are satisfied that they have in relation to the commutation of any death sentence in the circumstances obtained the best possible assurances . Furthermore, they are in no doubt that the assurance would be fulfilled . The affidavit was forwarded under the certificate of the Governor and is already part of the latter's file in the applicant's case . The affidavit refers to the prosecutor's concurrence in the assurance and it is understood that prior to joining in that assurance, the prosecutor agreed that in the event that the death penalty would be imposed on the applicant he would write to the Govemor reminding him of the assurance and expressing the wishes of the United Kingdom . Finally, as a maner of statutory procedure and practice, whenever the Governor is seised of an application for clemency, the application is referred t o - 171 -
the . investigatory branch of the Parole Board, which then reviews the case file in detail and solicits views from, among others, the prosecuting attomey . These views are then included in the report submitted to the Govemor . The respondent Government pointout that the terms of Art . IV of the Treaty relied on by the applicant's representative are not mandatory on the United Kingdom, but merely pemtit the requested State to refuse extradition, whereas this would otherwise be impossible, if they are not satisfied with the assurances provided in the event of a possible imposition of the death penalty . Furthermore, Art . 2 of the Convention expressly allows the judicial imposition of the death penalty and hence, failing to obtain an assurance that the penalty will not be carried out in any particular case can never of itself constitute a violation of the Convention . By analogy, the respondent Govemment refer to the Commission's decision on the admissibility of Application N° 7994/77, Kot81Ia v . the Netherlands (D .R . 14, p 238) . The Government also refer to the practice of the Commission concerning acts of grace (e .g . pardons, parole, etc .) which have been consistently regarded as outside the scope of the Convention ( e .g . X . v . United Kingdom, Application N° 4103/69, Coll . 36 p 61), and submit that since the question of conunutation of sentence is outside the scope of the Convention, failure to obtain a .part icular assurance in that respect must also fall outside its scope . 7he applicant is not a victim
.5
. With regard to the question whether the applicant's extradition in the face o f the possibili ty of a prolonged peri od on "death ro w" in the event of his conviction and sentence to death, raises an issue under A rt . 3 of the Convention, the Govemment refer to the Commission's p re vious case-law which has established that a pe rson's extradition may exceptionally give ri se to such an issue where extradition is contemplated to a particular count ry in which "due to the ve ry nature of the regime of that count ry or to a particular situation in that country , basic human righLt such as are guaranteed by the Convention tnight be eithergrossly violated or entirely suppressed . (X . v . the Federal Republic of Germany, Application N° 1802/62, Yearbook VI, p . 462 at 480), a view recently a ffi rmed in X . v . Switzerland ( D .R . 24 . p .205) . These decisions appe ar to be founded upon the principle that : . "Although extradition and the right of asylum are not as such among the ma tt ers governed by the Convention . . . the contracting States have nèvenheless accepted to rest rict the free exercise of their powers under general international law, including the power to control the entry and exit of aliens, to the extent and within the limits of the obligations which they have assumed under the Convention" . ( Application N° 2143/64, Yearbook VII, 314 at 328) . The respondent Govemment submit for the reasons set out below that the Convention does not impose any such obligation and invites the Commission to depart from its previous case-law to this extent . - 172-
In order to introduce an application there must be a victim within the meaning of Art . 25 of the Convention . This concept implies the existence of facts which, at the time the application was made, disclose that a violation of the Convention has been or is being perpetrated . Where a breach of Art . 3 is alleged to flow from an expulsion, the facts upon which the alleged violation is ultimately premissed have yet to occur : the allegation is based on the expectation that certain events will occur . The respondent Government submit that because such allegation is derived from assumptions rather than fact, and because those assumptions inevitably involve substantial uncertainty, it represents a distortion of the text of the Convention to regard applicants in such cases "as victims" . In this respect the respondent Government point out that only once has the Court held the view that a person could be a "victim" without demonstrating that concrete measures affecting him personally violate the provisions of the Convention, namely in the Klass case, where the measures involve secret surveillance which the applicant was therefore unable to demonstrate affected him, although there was no doubt of their existence at the time the application was made . The circumstances of the present case are not analogous . Further, in the case of Ireland v . the United Kingdom (para 161 of the Judgment) the Court specifically considered the standard of proof to be adopted when evaluating material which forms the basis of an allegation under An . 3 and concluded that the correct standard was whether the material evidenced "beyond a reasonable doubt" the violation alleged . That standard cannot be met when the material in question consists of assumptions about future events . In the present case the Government point out the various assumptions which must be made to lead to circumstances which might give rise to a breach of Art . 3, and submit that these assumptions about the course of future events arre so substantial and involve such uncertainties that the applicant cannot be regarded as a victim for the purposes of Art . 25 of the Convention . Nor can the material relied upon to substantiate the allegation of a breach of Art . 3 be regarded as proven "beyond a reasonable doubt" based as it is upon assumption and hypothesis . In addition, the respondent Government contend that where the alleged violation is ultimately based upon anticipated events taking place in a non-contracting State, the Commission lacks competence ratione loci to determine the application . Whereas the Commission has previously justified its assumption of competence on the basis that the contracting State contributes to a breach of Art . 3 of the Convention, the Government invite the Cotruoission to re-examine this position . In reality the "contributory act" in returning an offender is of no significance in Convention terms, unless it is related to the conditions which obtain in the receiving noncontracting State . It is the circumstances or anticipated circumstances which prevail in the latter State which colour and lend significance to the contributory act . It is therefore essentially the behaviour of the non-contracting State which falls to be measured against the guarantees of protection afforded by the Convention . Yet, that State will have no forrnal standing before the Commission or the Court and will thu s
- 173 -
have no opportunity to represent its views fully . Nor can it be expected that either the applicant, the contracting State involved or the Commission or Court will independently have comprehensive access to all relevant information such as wi6 enable a reliable and objective measure to be information such as will enable a reliable and objective measure to be made . Such a measure is even more approximate where the application is based on allegations and expectation that certain events will occur where their occurrence is far from inevitable . Thus the reality behind the "contributory act" theory is to base the culpability of a contracting State on events outside its jurisdiction over which it has no control and of which it has no first-hand knowledge or experience and which events may never even take place . In the Govemment's view this situation is fundamentally at odds with that envisaged in Art . I of the Convention . By this provision those who framed the Convention clearly contemplated that possibilities would only be engaged by matters over which the State had actual or ostensible control and first-hand knowledge . Such is not the case in allegations of breach of Art . 3 founded upon expulsions and extraditions . The present case particularly clearly illustrates the unsatisfactory consequences of an assumption of competence, since the acts said to constitute a violation of Art . 3 would all take place outside thejurisdiction of the United Kingdom, if they take place at all . The United Kingdom has no first-hand knowledge of the issues of the United States law and practice alleged and the United States is not a party to the Convention or able to present its views to the Commission . Moreover, the essence of the Art . 3 allegation is mis-conceived since the substance of the allegation is both anticipated and justifiable in terms of-Art . 2 of the Convention . Although the applicant complains of the interval and uncertainty occasioned by the imposition of the death( sentence, some such interval and uncertainty is necessarily to be tolerated, having regard to the terms of Art . 2, which implicitly sanctions the existence of an interval between the imposition and final determination of such a sentence, which is inevitable . Where such an interval is increased by virtue of the existence and pursuit of a right of appeal, it is also sanctioned, since the opening words of Art . 2 are "Everyone's right to life shall be protected by law", and a right of appeal or petition for clemency will clearly fall within the scope of this provision . Hence mental anguish brought about by the lapse of time during such appeal or clemency plea cannot constitute inhuman and degrading treatment or punishment . In any event it is difficult to see how a period of detention during which an applicant pursues all avenues to chaltenge a lawful sentence can be held merely for the reason of the uncertainty of the outcome, to constitute inhumân and degrading treatment in the sense in which those terms have been interpreted by the Commission and thè Court . Neverthetess, if the Commission adhe:es to its previous analysis of the relevance of Art . 3 in such cases, the present application is still manifestly illfounded . The applicant cannot show that "due to the very nature of the regime" in the United States of America in general or the State of California in particular or
- 174 -
"to a particular situation" in that country or State, the rights guaranteed by Art . 3 of the Convention "might be either grossly violated or entirely suppressed" . The evidence so far adduced has not disclosed a possibility, let alone a probability, of a gross violation or entire suppression of the standards implicit in Art . 3 of the Convention . The matters complained of derive from a complex of procedures designed to protect human life, such protection being the cornerstone of the protection of all other rights . The applicant's allegation would presumably be unsustainable if it were mandatory to carry out the death sentence within 7 days of its imposition . Such wooden inflexibility is in marked contrast to the fundamental emphasis given to the life and dignity of man under American law, where the courts are constantly vigilant to reinforce that emphasis . Having regard to the dynamic approach taken by the courts in the United States and to the network of constitutional provisions which exist to safeguard the individual to which the courts may refer, it is submitted that the allegation made by the applicant fails to disclose any appearance of a violation of the Convention . That the system may be capable of refinement is a matter for consideration by the national authorities, not the Commission or the Court . 6 . Under Art . 6 of the Convention With regard to the applicant's complaint that he was unable to cross-examine the witness against him at his committal, the Government contend that the complaint is manifestly ill-founded . The specific guarantees of Art . 6(3) of the Convention must be examined in the context of the general entitlement to a fair and public hearing which is protected by Art . 6(1), and must usually be considered by reference to the criminal proceedings as a whole (Application N° 8303/79, D .R . 22, p147) . Due to this perspective the committal proceedings for extradition can be seen as a preliminary step in the criminal process and it would be wholly inappropriate to accord the full panoply of rights contemplated in An . 6 to an accused at committal proceedings . This view is supported by the underlying principles and object of extradition, to deny fugitive offenders a safe haven and to facilitate their return to a jurisdiction where they may be tried for the offence which prompted their flight . The role of the requested State, without jurisdiction to try the offence, is necessarily limited and the preliminary nature of the committal proceedings is self-evident . Whereas the United Kingdom may be the only member State of the Council of Europe which insists that a prima facie case be made against the alleged offender, it is a common limitation on requested States that they are unable to compel the attendance of witnesses who are probably aliens resident abroad . Article 12 of the European Convention on Extradition makes provision for extradition requests to be supported by documentary evidence only, no mention bein g - 175 -
made of the a ttendance of witnesses, and it must be assumed that that Convention and the Convention on Human Rights must be construed comparatively . 5(4) of the .Funheor,tfgivndesprotcbyhnfArt Convention and is thereby able to challenge the validity of his detention pending extradition . Such proceedings are not intended to e subject to the stricter requirements of Art . 6 . . It follows that this a.spect of the application is inadmissible .
The applicant's submissions in repl y
Introduction The applicant's observations are very substantial and voluminous and include an opinion on the California constitutional position submitted on behalf of the Califomia Attomies for Criminal Justice and the National Association of Criminai Defence Counsel, together with detailed submissions by Colin Nicholls Q .C . in rcply to the Govemment's observations . They may be summarised as follows :
Domestic law and practiee : the United Kingdo m The applicant does not dispute that the English courts have no jurisdiction to try him in respect of the offences for which his extradition has been requested and that it is not in the interests of any nation to become a haven for criminals . He points out however that the United Kingdom does not enter into extradition arrangements with states whose standards of justice and penal administration are not acceptable to it, and that in the case of those states with whom it does nutke arrangements, it reserves a discretion not to extradite . The applicant contends that the United Kingdom Govetnment should provide the Commission with full details of cases where the Secretary of State has refused to surrender fugitives in the exercise of this discretion, and the principles on which such refusalshave been based . The applicant contends that the test applied should be whether, having regard to all the circumstances, it would be unjust or oppressive to return him .
3 . Domestic law and practice : the United States of Americ :
aTheplicntods
A . . that the prohibition against "cruel and unusual punishment" (under the United States and California constitutions) would not operate to protect him from the treatment of which he complains ;
and B . that no remedy is available in fact in the United States against the inordinate slowness of the automatic appeal proceedings which cause the death row phenomenon ; -176-
and C . that a binding assurance could be given by the Attorney General of Califomi a not to seek the death sentence against the applicant without infringing Californian or United States constitutional principles ; and D . that the assurance offered to the United Kingdom Government would in any event not operate to prevent the applicant from being exposed to the death row phenomenon and hence the subject matter of his complaint .
A . The available remedies in the United State s The respondent Govemment have alleged that constitutional remedies available in the United States would enable the applicant to challenge his detention on "death row" . The applicant suggests that it is inconceivable that in the last ten yars, when more than a thousand prisoners in the United States have been subject to such treatment, the legal ingenuity of all those prisoners' legal advisers has wholly failed to secure to those prisoners the protection which the respondent Government consider that the applicant could obtain under American law . No "death row" prisoner has successfully challenged the "death row" phenomenon before the American courts on the basis alleged by the respondent Government . B . The length of time spent avaiting appea l The respondent Government contend that the law of Califomia provides procedural guarantees to ensure the speedy consideration of appeals in capital cases . Nevertheless the applicant submits that the Commission need only consider the actual delays which have consistently occurred in Califomia to appreciate that the law and practice alleged does not prevent the existence of substantial delays in the judicial process . The appeal procedure in such cases to the Califomia Supreme Coun is automatic . Applications by prisoners on death row to waive this right have been expressly refused (Massie v . Summer . 10lS .Ct . 899) . Further opportunities for petition to the United State Supreme Court and for petitions of habeas corpus through the Federal District Courts are subsequently available to applicants if they so wish . The appellant closest to exhaustion of these remedies, one Harris, has been on death row since May 1979 and his appeal, pending before the US Supreme Court, is expected to be decided in mid to late 1984 . It was in fact detetntined in February 1984 . A backlog of cases is arising before the Califomia Supreme Court, notwithstanding the success of a number of these appeals . Eight death sentences entered in 1979 have not yet been reviewed, nor have 21 entered in 1980 and any entered in subsequent years have been reviewed, totalling a further 116 . A contributory factor to this delay is the extreme difficulty of finding competent defence counsel prepared to accept briefs of the magnitude involved in capital cases in the light of the comparatively low remuneration of this work . Thus as of 21 October 1983 at leas t
- 177 -
23 inmates on California death row had not received appointed counsel, although at least five of these had been on death row for more than seven months .
C . The constitutionality of an assurance by the Attorney General not to seek the death penalt y The respondent Governinent have contended that it might be unconstitutional for an assurance to be given that the death penalty would not be imposed on the applicant prior to his trial and conviction . The applicant submits that the California Attomey General has the authority to make a binding pledge that the death penalty will not be sought by the local District Attorney, thereby assuring that it will not be imposed . In panicular this could be achieved by way of analogy to the practice of "plea bargaining", on which no restraints-have been imposed either by California or Federal Constitutional decisions . The US Supreme Court has repeatedly upheld the authority of a prosecutor to reduce the charges against an accused in exchange for the accused's agreement to plead guilty (Corbitt v . New Jersey, 439 US 212 ; Bordenkircher v . Hages, 434 US 357) . The California Penal Code expressly provides for plea bargaining and a plea bargain once accepted by the accused binds the prosecutor (eg . Geisser v . the United States, 513 s .2d 862, and Santobello v . New York, 404 US 257) . The Santobello case related to a bargain where the prosecutor agreed to make no recommendation on sentence, but at the trial a different prosecutor appeared and recommended the maximum sentence . The US Supreme Court held Ihat the plea bargaining required the judgment to be quashed and the case remitted to the trial court to decide whether the agreement should be specifically enforced, or rescinded in which case the appellant's guilty plea should be vacated . In the present case the Califomia Government through its prosecuting agents could promise not to seek the death penalty in the separate proceedings on sentencing which would follow a finding of guilt against the applicant . At the least the prosecutors could pledge to exert their "best efforts" to see that the death penalty was not imposed against the applicant ; such a representation would leave the interpretation of the "plea bargain" to the California Courts, where the issues are best determined . Under California law, if the prosecutor does not seek the death penalty in the sentencing proceedings, such penalty, may not be imposed . In such a case, if the jury finds the accused guilty of charges sufficient to warrant the death penalty, a sentence of life imprisonment without possibility of parole would be entered . No automatic appeal to the California Supreme Court would then lie andlhen the death row phenomenon would not arise . The inadequacy of the assurances obtained by the United Kingdom .D Governmen t The applicant contends that the present recommendation of the Attomey General to the Govemor of California regarding the exercise of his authority to commute sentences is advisory and does not bind the Govemor . The Govemor' s
- 178 -
energetic and frequent advocacy of the death penal ty suggests that the "representation" as to the United Kingdom's wish would not be decisive in the applicant's case ; the chances of the applicant being sentenced to death are therefore estimated at 99% . It would be open to the Governor to conunute or modify the death sentence subject to Article 5 Section 8 of the Califomia Constitution : "the Governor may not grant a pardon or commutation to a person twice convicted of a felony except on a recommendation of a Supreme Court, four judges concurring" . It is likely that the Califomia Supreme Court as presently constituted would so concur . An indication of a willingness to contmute or modify death sentence would not introduce an element of arbitra ri ness into the death penalty process, which might be unconstitutional . The clemency power is not intended to rectify legal errors or disproportionality among sentences which would be the basis of such a constitutional challenge . The clemency authority was granted to the executive precisely to permit the introduction of values not considered in the judicial process and this extend necessarily injects a degree of arbitrari ness under the guise of mercy . The present assurance is furthermore inadequate since, as envisaged, it would operate after exhaustion of the automatic appeal procedure before the California Supreme Court, and therefore after the applicant had spent a minimum of several years on the Califomia death row . It would therefore not be effective to prevent the treatment about which the applicant complains .
4 . The applicant as a victi m The applicant refers to the Klass judgment and recalls that the procedural provisions of the Convention must be applied in a manner which serves to make the system of individual applications efficacious . He invites the Commission to draw the consequences of the respondent Government's submissions if they were applied to the facts of the Amekrane case (Application No . 5961/72) had that application been made before extradition . The applicants contends that he runs a risk of being directly affected by a particular matter, the relevant elements in assessing the severity of this risk must be weighed by the Commission in the light of the submissions made by the applicant and the respondent Government . Specifically the Commission must consider the risk of the applicant being convicted, and sentenced to death, if extradited to California, and the likely duration of the automatic appeal which he would be deemed to have made during which he will be subjected to the psychological strain of death row . The applicant contends that his submissions establish prima facie proof of the likelihood of the imposition of the death sentence, and of the duration of any such appeal . - 179 -
In order to establishthe presence of such a risk, the applicant contends that he must shows . that lhere is a serious risk that the alleged treatment will occur and :a b . should it occurthat it will amount to prohibited treatment .
. .
. .
The applicant refers to the test prbposed by the Court in Ireland v . the United Kingdom : "Such proof may follow from the co-existence of sufficiently strong, clear an d concordant inferences or similar unrebutted presumptions of fact . In this context the conduct of the panies when evidence is being obtained has to bé taken into account" . Th e Commission must therefore consider whether there is prima facie evidence of treatment of such seve ri ty as to raise an issue under Article 3 . There may be difficulties in practice in such an assessment where it involves the likely course of future events, however certain treatment is so severe that it must fall per se within A rticle 3 . It issubrnitted that a delay of five years or mo re between the imposition of carrying out of a death sentence is per se inhuman and degrading treatment and punishment within the meaning of Article 3 . Alleged violation of Article 6 The applicant refers to the Commission's decision of admissibility of Application No . 7945/77 (X . v . Norway ; D .R . 14 p . 228) which recognised that, although examination of proceedings under Article 6 can only be decided by reference to the proceedings as a whole, a particular aspect of this proceeding may be so decisive as to allow the fairness of the procedure to be challenged at an early stage ~ The applicant contends that extradition proceedings under English law are c riminal proceedings in their own right and have consequences which are decisive for the applicant, the decision of the magistrate determining issues of law and fact which are within the meaning of the term "bien fondé" which is recognised in the French text of Article 6 . The Coun has held in the Delcoun case that proceedings in cassation : "may prove decisive for the accused . . . it would therefore be hard to imagine that . . . (they) fall outside the scope of Article 6(1)" . 8269/78 (X v . Austria) the.SimlarynApctoN Commission held that , although the decision of an Austrian court in question did not constitute a conviction in a formal sense, it nevertheless : "could have certain adverse legal effects for the applicant . . . in the circumstances the Commission considers that the case raises problems as to the application of Article 6 of the Convention . " - 180-
Furthermore, in normal criminal proceedings prior to a normal trial, defects in the committal proceedings may be corrected at the trial . In extradition proceedings this oppo rt unity is not provided within the control exercised by the Convention, where the country of destination is not a pa rt y to the Convention . Finally, although Article 12 of the European Convention on extradition does not require states to set up cou rt s to determine whether or not there was a prima facie case against an individual before extradition, it is submitted that where such court s are established the provisions of Art icle 6 should apply ( Delcou rt case, mu ta tis mutandis) . In addition the fact that the guarantees of Anicle 5 apply to the applicant's detention pending deportation does not of itself exclude the operation of Article 6 in addition .
6 . Motio n The applicant contends that he has thereby established a pri ma facie case warranting funher examination by the Commission under Rules 28 and 42 of its Rules of Procedure and/or that the case be declared admissible .
THE LA W I . The applicant complains that his extradition to California would amount to inhuman and degrading treatment contrary to Article 3 of the Convention since, if extradited, he would be tried for two counts of murder and one of attempt . and would very probably be convicted and sentenced to death . The applicant does not contend that the death penalty as such would constitute inhuman and degrading treatment contrary to Article 3 ; he argues however that the circumstances surrounding the implementation of such a death penalty, and in particular the "death row" phenomenon, of excessive delay during a prolonged appeal procedure lasting several years, during which he would be gripped with uncertainty as to the outcome of his appeal and therefore his fate, would constitute inhuman and degrading treatment . The respondent Government contend that the applicant cannot claim to be a victim of a violation of the Convention, first because the matters which might form the basis of an alleged breach of the Convention are too remote and uncertain, and secondly because the Commission lacks competence ratione loci to determine the application, since any acts of the respondent Government are insufficiently directly contributory to the circumstances which it is alleged might give rise to a violation of Article 3 .
The applicant as a victi m The Commission recalls first its case law in relation to the interpretation of the concept of a"victim" under Article 25 (I) of the Convention . In accordance with this case law, an applicant satisfies the requirements of Anicle 25 (I) of the Convention if he can claim that he will suffer or has suffered a violation "by one of the High Contracting Parties" of the rights set out in the Convention . It is thereforenecessary for the applicant to show State responsibility for the matters about whic h
- 181 -
he complains and that thoie ma tters relate to the alleged violation of one of the rights contained in the Convention . In the present case the applicant contends that his extradition from the United Kingdom to the United States of American would, in the special circumstances of his case, give rise to circumstances which would be contrary to Article 3 . The applicant is presently detained under the Extradition Acts 1870-1935, by the respondent Government, and is subject to their authority . His extradition to California has been formally requested by the Government of the United States and his surrender to the authorities of the United States, if it occurs, will be an act of the respondent Government . Funhermore, the applicant's surrender and extradition is imminent . The Secretary of State has signed the relevant documents authorising the applicant's surrender, although this has been temporarily stayed by the proceedings in the United Kingdom to challenge the exercice of discretion by the Secretary of State as unlawful . In these circumstances the applicant is immediately and directly affected by the ri sk of his extradition . He contends that the consequences of this extradition will be to result in in-
human and degrading treatment contrary to Article 3 . In these circumstances, faced with an imminent act of the executive the consequences of which for the applicant will allegedly expose him to Article 3 treatment, the Commission finds that the applicant is able to claim to be a victim of an alleged violation of Article 3 : It remains for the Commission to consider whether or not the maners alleged by the applicant to constitute treatment contrary to Article 3 are of such seriousness as to fall within the ambit of that provision . The respondent Government's responsibilit y The respondent Govemment nevertheless contend that the application is incompatible ratione (oci, since the matters complained of by the applicant which would constitute the alleged breach of Article 3 of the Convention would arise in and be the sole responsibility of a non-Contracting Party to the Convention, namely the United States of America . The respondent Government contend that, to the extent that the United Kingdom is involved at all in contributing to the circumstances which would constitute the applicant's complaint, this contribution is insufficiently proximate for it to engage State responsibility . .. The Commission has recognised in its previous case law that a person's extradition may, exceptionally,'give rise to issues under Article 3 of the Convention where extradition is contemplated to a country in which "due to the very nature of the regime of that country or to a particulxr situation in that country, basic human rights, such as are guaranteed by the Convention, might be either grossly violated or entirely suppressed" (X . against the Federal Republic of Germany, Applicatio n
- 182 -
No . 1802/62, YB 6 p 462 at 480, Altun v . Federal Republic of Germany, Application No . 10308/83, D .R . 36 p . 209) . The Contmission has further recognised that : "although extradition and the right of asylum are not, as such, among the matters govemed by the Convention . . . the Contracting States have nevertheless accepted to restrict the free exercise of their powers under general and intemational law, including the power to control the entry and exit of aliens, to the extent and within the limits of the obligations which they have assumed under the Convention" (Application No . 2143/64, YB7 p 314 at 328) . According to the Commission case-law concerning cases of extradition unde r Anicle 3 of the Convention, the only factor which is relevant is the existance of an objective danger for the person extradited . Establishing that such a danger exists does not necessarily imply State responsibility upon the requesting State ; in cenain cases the Commission has taken into account dangers which were not due to acts of Govemment authorities in the country of destination (Applications No . 7216/75, DR 5 p 137, No . 8581/79 unpublished) . If conditions in a country are such that the risk of serious treatment and the severiry of that treatment fall within the scope of Article 3 of the Convention, a decision to deport, extradite or expel an individual to face such conditions incurs the responsibility under Article I of the Convention of the contracting State which so decides (Altun v . Federal Republic of Germany, Application No . 10308/83, The Law paras 5-10, D .R . 36, p . 209 at p . 219-220) . The Commission affirms this interpretation which is based upon the unqualified terms of Article 3 of the Convention, and the requirement which this read in conjunction with Anicle 1 imposes upon the Contracting Parties to the Convention to protect "everyone within their jurisdiction" from the real risk of such treatment, in the light of its irremediable nature .
4 . Whether the death row phenomenon is precluded from constituting inhuman treatment by Article 2 (1 ) The respondent Goverrvnent have further contended that the "death row phenomenon", i .e . the delay that the applicant complains of in the event of his being convicted and sentenced to death, during the appeals proceedings which will inevitably arise from such a conviction and sentence and will inevitably delay its implementation, is not capable of constituting inhuman or degrading treatment of punishment contrary to Anicle 3 of the Convention in the light of the provisions of Article 2 . Article 2 (1) of the Convention provides : "Everyone's right to life shall be protected by law . No one shall be deprived of his life intentionally save in the execution of a sentence of a court following his conviction of a crime for which this penalty is provided by law . "
- 183 -
The respondent Government point out that the second sentence of Article 2(1) of the Convention expressly provides for the imposition of the death sentence by a court, following conviction for a crime for which that penalty is provided by law . They submit that the reference to the provisions of "law" in the context of a criminal conviction necessarily implies a judicial system for the application of the death penalty, which contains proper guarantees to ensure compliance with this provision, including in appropriate cases a system of appeals, to ensure that the imposition of the death penalty cannot arise arbitrarily . , They point out that in the United States of America, and specifically in California, such safeguards do indeed exist, and regulate the operation of the death penalty in the context of a criminal conviction with great precision . However, a system which, whilst granting such legal guarantees and appeals did not give those appeals suspensive effect, would fail to take account of the nature of the death penalty as an ultimate sanction . The respondent Govemment contend that it follows that any delay arising as a result of the opportunities for appeal and legal control of the imposition of a death penalty as a result of a conviction is implicitly foreseen by Article 2 (1) of the Convention, and thus cannot constitute inhuman and degrading treatment contrary to Article 3 . • The Commission cannot accept this contention . Whilst it acknowledges that the Convention must be read as one document, its respective provisions must be given appropriate weight where there may be implicit overlap, and the Convention organs must be reluctant to draw inferences from one text which would restrict the express terrns of another . As both the Coun and the Commission have recognised, Article 3 is not subject to any qualification . Its terms are bald and absolute . This fundamental aspect of Article 3 reflects its key position in the structure of the rights of the Convention, and is further illustrated by the terms of Article 15 (2), which permit no derogation from it even in time of war or other public emergency threatening the life of the nation . In these circumstances the Commission considers that notwithstanding the terms of Article 2(I), it cannot be excluded that the circumstances surrounding the protection of one 6f the other rights co n tained in the Convention might give rise to an issue under Anicle 3 . The nature of the treatmen t .5
(a) 7he risk of exposure The Commission must therefore consider the nature of the treatment which the applicant complains he would be subjected to in the event of his extradition, and the severity of the risk thereby arising, in ôrder to assess whether or not it attains a sufficient degree of seriousness to raise an issue under Article 3 of the Convention .
- 184-
The Commission must consider first the degree of risk which the applicant runs of being convicted of the offences with which he is charged, and of being sentenced to the death penalty . The respondent Government have contended that it would be improper to prejudge the outcome of either the proceedings to establish criminal liability, or those relating to the penalty, and that this degree of uncertainty has the result that the applicant is not exposed to a real risk of treatment contrary to Article 3 . The applicant contends that in the light of the evidence which is available to the prosecution, he is highly likely to be convicted of the offences with which he is charged . As far as the question of sentence is concemed, this is regulated by specific provisions of the Californian Penal Code . The Code specifically identifies "special circumstances" which must be taken into account by a jury in determining the penalty to be imposed, including the balancing assessment of mitigating and aggravating circumstances which the jury must undertake before deciding on sentence . He contends that in the light of the circumstances surrounding his alleged involvement with the offences in question, and his previous criminal record and suspected involvement in the organisation known as "Tribal Thumb", it is extremely likely that he will be convicted and sentenced to death . The opinion submitted by the applicant's representative and prepared by a California criminal lawyer is to the effect that it is 99 per cent certain that the applicant will convicted and sentenced to death . On the basis of the information before it, the Commission considers the probability that the applicant, if convicted, will be sentenced to death is high, although it cannot prejudge this issue which will depend upon the outcome of the proceedings . In any case, the Commission finds that the risk is sufficiently real and immediate to justify its examination of other aspects of the seriousness of the treatment to which the applicant contends that he will be subjected .
(b) the length and cause of delays The applicant's complaint centres upon the inevitable psychological tension and uncertainty which will be generated during the appeal procedure from a decision imposing the death penalty on him . He contends ihat the length of such proceedings and the vital nature of their outcome will create circumstances which amount to inhuman and degrading treatment or punishment . The Commission notes first that the appeal procedure from a sentence of death in California is automatic . This is provided by sub-division 7 of Section 1181 of the California Penal Code, by virtue of which the defendant is deemed to have made an application for the modification of the verdict where it is a verdict of death . In ruling on such an application, a judge shall review the evidence, taking into account and being guided by the aggravating and mitigating circumstances referred in Section 190 .3 Califomia Penal Code and shall decide whether the jury's findings and verdict are contrary to law or to the evidence presented . There is a further automatic appeal by virtue of sub-division (b) of Section 239 of the Code .
- 185 -
It appears from the submissions of the parties that it is not open to the applicant to challenge-the making of such an application for a modification of the verdict, which will proceed with or without his consent and it is not disputed that the number of these automatic appeals and ttieir complexity, cause delay . The applicant has further submitted that the absence of qualified counsel who are prepared to undertake the defence of capilal offenders in relation to these proceedings causes further delays over and above those which are inherent in the automatic appeal system . The overall delays are severe . From figures submitted by the applicant, as of March 1983, 115 persons are awaiting execution in California, and 1147 in the United States as a whole . A significant number of offenders have been sentenced to death since the re-introduction of the death penalty in California in 1977 . Two of those who had their sentences affirrned by the Supreme Court, had waited respectively nine and 23 months . Four and a half years later neither of them had been executed apparently as a result of Federal appeals, although both were still liable for execution . Of the remaining appellants on "death row", one has been waiting five years for the result of his appeal in Califomia, which has not yet been decided . Since 1981, when 44 people were waiting on death row for the outcome of their appeals in Califomia, which had not yet been determined, decisions have been reached in very few cases, and in one, Ramos, whose sentence was reversed by the California Supreme Court, the death penalty was reimposed on appeal by the State of Californi . The offences in respect1ratoheSupmCftUniedSas,o6July983 of which Ramos was tried arose in June 1979 . According to the applicant's submissions the average amount of time between the entry of a death judgment and its reversal, vacation or affirtnation by the Supreme Court of Califomia has up to now been two years, although several cases required four years for their resolution . However in the applicant's contention this period is lengthening, because there is a growing backlog of accummulated cases awaiting judgment from the Supreme Court of Califomia . The assurance obtaine d .6 The respondent Government contend that, notwithstanding the length of time which appeals may take to be determined at the "automatic" stage of appeals, before the Supreme Court of Califomia, in theapplicant's case he will not be exposed to the psychological anguish of the death row phenomenon, owing to the form of assurance which the United Kingdom Government has obtained from the competent authorities in the United States . The respondent Government contend that th edv,asurnc(tobve)wilha fct eaplinscotd the death sentence is imposed on him, the assurnnce would be fulfilled, and he woul . dnotbexcu
The affidavit of the Deputy Attomey General of California containing the assurance was forwarded under the certificate of the Governor of the State of California and is already part of the Govemor's file in the applicant's case . The affidavit recalls the prosecutor's concurrence in the assurance, and the assurance an d - 186 -
the associated affidavit would form part of the file which would be referred to the Govemor if an application for clemency is made . The file would be examined by a parole board which would repon to the Cmvemor, whose decision on a reprieve would be flnal . The applicant has contended that the assurance that has been obtained does not comply with the requirements of Article iV of the extradition treaty between the United Kingdom and the United States, and would furthermore operate, if at all, after the applicant's appeals had been exhausted . He submits in addition that the value of the assurance given must be interpreted in the light of the fact that it would be open to the prosecuting authorities in Califomia to undertake not to seek the death penalty in respect of the applicant and thereby to remove him from the death row phenomenon, since if the death penalty was not sought in the penalty proceedings, it could not be imposed . The Commission notes first that the Convention contains no express provisions relating to the obtaining of assurances between states in the implementation of extradition arrangements . It recalls that the Commission's task in these cases, as in all other applications, is to examine whether or not the matters complained of by the applicant constitute the violation which the particular applicant alleges . It is therefore for the individual High Contracting Parties to decide what conditions should govem their extradition arrangements with other states, and the manner in which they are to ensure that they comply with the requirements of the Conv6ntion in the exercise of State responsibility in, inter alia, extradition matters . It is clear that the undertaking which has been obtained by the United Kingdom Government will operate after the applicant has exhausted the avenues of appeal open to him at least in Califomia, and possibly in the Federal jurisdiction of the United States as well . As such, the applicant contends that it fails to prevent the treatment about which he complains, i .e . the intolerable delay linked with the mental anguish of uncertainty as to the outcome of the appeals, which is the "death row phenomenon" . At the same time, the assurance which has been obtained has apparently been given in good faith, and originates from the Deputy Attomey General of California, having been certified by the Office of the Govemor . The assurance forms part of the file relating to the applicant's case and must be considered in the event of a request for clemency by him . The Commission concludes that, although the full extent and value of the assurance must remain uncertain, part of this uncertainty derives from the fact that it is unknown at present whether or not the assurance will have to be relied upon, since the applicant has not yet been convicted or sentenced for the offences of which he is accused . The Commission must also recognise that the United Kingdom Government have sought and obtained these assurance in full consciousness of their obligations imposed under the terms of the Convention, which require the Government to seek such assurances (if any) as will ensure the avoidance of treatment contrary to Article 3 in the event of extradition .
- 187-
The Commission cannot find that the assurances obtained have removed the risk of the applicant being exposed to the death row phenomenon . The assurances do not amount to a legal guarantee that the applicant, if sentenced to death, will have the death sentenced commuted . However, in the light of the provisions of Art= icle 2(I) of the Convention, which expressly recognises the ending of life through the death penalty following appropriate criminal conviction, such an assurance cannot be expressly or implicity required by the terrns of Article 3 . Just as .the terms of Article 2(1) of the Convention do not per se exclude the possibility that the death row phenomenon may constitute inhuman and degrading treatment, they have the further effect that the failure to seek a legally binding assurance that a death sentence, if imposed, will definitely be commuted, would not itself constitute treatment contrary to Article 3 . Assessment of seriousnes s It therefore remains for the Commission to assess the effect of the anxiety to which the applicant will remain subject during his appeal proceedings, and the risk of his conviction, and thus whether the "death row phenomenon" does, on the facts of the present case, attain a degree of seriousness such as to involve treatment contrary to Article 3 of the Convention . For the following reasons the Commission considers that, grave though the risk and the treatment which the applicant is likely to endure are, they do not attain the degree of seriousness envisaged by Article 3 of the Convention . First the Commission notes the existence of complex and detailed measures to accelerate the appeal system in capital cases in Califomia . This is reflected both in the priority assigned to capital cases in the District Attorney's Office, where counsel responsible for a capital case on appeal are relieved of all other responsibilities to be able to concentrate exclusively on the preparation of that appeal, and also in the formal time limit imposed on the Supreme Coun by Section 190 .6 of the Penal Code, requiring it to decide appeals within 150 days of the complete trial record being referred to it . It is true that delays subsist in dealing with appeals under the automatic appeal procedûre in Califomia, but the Commission cannot lose sight of the momentous significance of these appeals for the particular appellant in each case, whose life depends upon the outcome . In these circumstances the tradition of the rule of law which underlies the principles of the Convention requires painstaking thoroughness in the examination of any case the effects of which will be so irremediably decisive for the appellant in question . Part of the delay about which the applicant inherently complains derives from a complex of procedures which are designed tô protect human life, such protection providing the comerstone for all other rights . The Commission must also recognise a product of this emphasis on the protection of life and the dignity of man shown by the American courts, in that although the death penalty exists as a real possibility in California, the courts are constantl y
- 188 -
vigilant to reinforce the emphasis of the protection of these basic values . The California Supreme Court indicated in the People against Anderson (493 P .2d 880) that it was willing to consider an argument to the effect that the delay in carrying out a death sentence might constitute a basis for relief from that sentence and that the death row phenomenon . if not the death penalty itself, might therefore be found to be cruel or unusual punishment contrary to the Califomian or United States Constitutions . The applicant has pointed out that such an argument has not yet been successful in putting an end to the death row phenomenon . Nevertheless the Commission is conscious of the rapid developments in case law which are possible in a common law system . It notes that it is established that the death row phenomenon is now an arguable basis for alleging cmel or unusual punishment in the United States, and it cannot ignore the similarity between this concept and that of inhuman and degrading treatment under Article 3 of the Convention . Furthermore it is significant that the applicant contends that the death row phenomenon is becoming worse, owing lo the backlog of cases currently faced by the Califomia Supreme Coun . It appears from the statistics submitted by the applicant that no cases where a death penalty was imposed at the penalty stage of proceedings in 1981 or subsequently have yet had their automatic appeals determined by the Supreme Court of California . This suggests that there is a growing backlog of cases, and that the average period of time which will be spent by death row inmates in awaiting the outcome of their automatic appeals in California is likely to be extended, unless measures are taken to accelerate these proceedings further . However this very submission suggests that, if these circumstances arise in a particular case, that appellant will have better grounds than hitherto for arguing before the Californian courts that the death row phenomenon constitutes cmel or unusual punishment . This illustrates a further element in the assessment of the seriousness of the death row phenomenon in the context of Article 3, namely the uncenainty of whether the applicant will or will not be exposed to the death row at all . The Commission finds from the evidence which has been submitted to it that it must be regarded as likely, if convicted, that the applicant will be exposed to the death row phenomenon . However this cannot be presupposed as a fact, and it is significant that the applicant will have a fair trial conforming with guarantees equivalent to those contained in the Convention before any decision is reached which would result in his being on death row . It is not the Commission's task in the present case to assess as a mathematical probability the likelihood of the applicant being exposed to the treatment about which he complains, but to examine the machinery of justice to which he will be subjected and to establish whether there are any aggravating factors which might indicate arbitrariness or unreasonableness in its operation . The Commission finds however from the material which has been submitted by the applicant, that capital cases are dealt with with particular vigilance to ensure their compliance with the standards of protection afforded by the Californian and United States Constitutions, in order to prevent arbitrariness . In these circumstances the Commission does not find that th e
- 189-
delays in the operation of the death penalty in Califomia as they may apply to the applicant constitute a "particular situation" of the kind envisagd in Application No . 1802/62 (supra) . Finally the applicant has also alléged that the actual conditions of detention i n which he will be placed, in the event of his conviction and sentence to death raise an issue under Article 3 . The applicant has submitted reports in .this connection, which reveals that the conditions of detention in death row in Califomia may be severe . It appears that death row inmates in California are detained in a separate section of the high security prison system . Nevertheless, despite the security provisions which apply, inmates appear to be allowed exercise outside their cells and the cells themselves are in certain cases better equipped and larger than those of long-term prisoners . Furthertoore inmates have various recreational facilities and are provided with medical treatment, as well as having access to publications and periodicals .It follows that there is nothing to show that the conditions of detention of death row prisoners are so severe is to constitute a gravely aggravating aspect in assessing the seriousness of the applicant's complaints . Conclusio n
.8
The Commissioh notes that one may see a certain disharmony between Articles 2 and 3 of the Convention . Whereas Article 3 prohibits all forms of inhuman and degrading treatment and punishment without qualification of any kind, the right to life is not protected in an absolute manner . Article 2(1) expressly envisages the possibility of imposing the death penalth "in the execution of a sentence of a court following his conviction of a crime for which this penalty is provided by law" . Against this background the death row phenomenon presents a dilemma . On the one hand a prolonged appeal system generates accute anxiety over long periods owing to the uncertain, but possibly favourable, outcome of each successive appéal . On the other hand an acceleration of the system would result in earlier executions in cases where appeals were unsuccessful . The essential purpose of the Califomia appeal system is to ensure protection for the right to life and to prevent arbitrariness . Although the system is subject to severe delays, these delays themselves are subject to the controlling jurisdiction of the courts . In the present case the applicant has not been tried or ctinvicted and his risk of exposure to death row is unce rtain . In the light of these reasons which have been developed above, the Commission finds that it has not been established that the treatment to which the applicant will be exposed, and the ri sk of his exposure to it, is so se ri ous as to constitute inhuman or degrading t re atment or punishment contrary to Art icle 3 of the Convention . It follows that this aspect of the application is manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 27 ( 2) of the Convention . - 1 g0 -
9 . Article 6 The applicant invokes Article 6 in relation to the proceedings conceming his extradition from the United Kingdom and contends that he has not been afforded the guarantees of Article 6 (3) (d) and specifically the opportunity to cross-examine the prosecution witness against him at the committal stage of the extradition proceedings . He points out that, whereas in norrnal trial proceedings in the United Kingdom, any mistake occurring at the committal stage could be rectified during the trial itself, in the present case the committal stage takes on an unique significance, since the applicant's trial will take place out of the jurisdiction of the United Kingdom . The Commission recalls its decision on the admissibility of application No . 10227/82, H against Spain (1), where it considered whether extradition proceedings involved the "determination" of a criminal charge . It recognised that the word "determination" involve the full process of the examination of an individual's guild or innocence of an offence . Since the proceedings in Spain did not involve an examination of the question of the applicant's guilt, but merely whether formal extradition requirements had been fulfilled, that application was declared inadmissible . The present case also concems extradition, but the Commission notes that the tasks of the Magistrates' Court included the assessment of whether or not there was, on the basis of the evidence, the outline of a case to answer against the applicant . This necessarily involved a certain, limited, examination of the issues which would be decisive in the applicant's ultime trial . Nevertheless, the Commission concludes that these proceedings did not in themselves form part of the detetmination of the applicant's guilt or innocence, which will be the subject of separate proceedings in the United States which may be expected to conform to standards of faimess equivalent to the requirements of Article 6, including the presumption of innocence, notwithstanding the committal proceedings . In these circumstances the Commission concludes that the committal proceedings did not form part of or constitute the determination of a criminal charge within the meaning of Article 6 of the Convention . This aspect of the applicant's complaint is accordingly incompatible ratione materiae with the provisions of the Convention, within the meaning of Anicle 27 (2) of the Convention . For these reasons, the Commissio n
DECLARES THE APPLICATION INADMISSIBLE .
(I) See p. 93 .
- 191 -
(lRADULT/ON) EN FAI T Les faits de la cause tels qu'ils ont été exposés au nom du requérant, un ressortissant américain actuellement détenu à la prison de Brixton, par ses représentants, M . Colin Nicholl, Q .C ., et Mme Clare Montgomery . conseil, ainsi que par MM . Maxwell et Gouldman, solicitors à Londres, peuvent se résumer comme suit : Le 14 juillet 1982 à San Francisco, trois hommes ont été victimes d'une fusillade ; deux d'entre eux sont morts sur le coup ; le troisième a survécu et, sur une photographie, il a identifié le requérant comme étant l'auteur de la fusillade ; cette identification fut confirmée par une attestation écrite sous serment datée du 3 décembre 1982 . Le 28 juillet 1982, l'officier dé police chargé de l'enquête a saisi le tribunal de la ville de San Francisco, alléguant que le requérant avait commis deux homicides . en violation de l'article 187 du code pénal de Californie, et une tentative d'homicide, en violation des articles 664 et 187 du ntéme code ; un mandat d'arrét fut décerné le lendemain à l'encontre du requérant . Le 20 novembre 1982 le requérant a été arrété à son arrivée à l'aéroport d'Heathrow à Londres et remis à la justice le lendemain en vertu d'un mandat délivré par un magistrat de la Magistrate'sCourt de Bow Street en vue de son extradition aux Etats-Unis d'Amérique . Le 30 décentbre 1982, le Gouverneméht des Etats-Unis a formulé une requête officielle de remise du requérant aux Etats-Unis conformément à la procédure prévue par le traité du 8 juin 1972 entre les deux Etats . Le 10 janvier 1983, le ministre de l'intérieur a ordonné qu'un magistrat recueille les éléments conformément aux dispositions des lois de 1870 et 1935 sur l'extradition et du traité tel qu'il figure dans l'ordonnance royale N° 2144 de 1976, ainsi que dans le décret américain de 1976 (sur l'extradition) . Le_11 mai 1983, la Magistrate's Court de Bow Street ordonna la détemion du requérant dans l'attente du décret du ministre de l'intérieur ordonnant sa remise aux Etats-Unis conformément aux dispositions de l'article 10 de la loi sur l'extradition . En ordonnant cette décision, le magistrat passa outre l'argument du requérant selon lequel l'attestation écrite sous serment du seul témoin de la fusillade ne pouvait ètre retenue comme preuve et que si elle l'était, elle ne suffisait pas à justifier la déteniion . Le 16 mai 1983, le requérant fut informé par son avocat qu'il n'y avait pas d e niotif défendable qui lui permit de demander à la High Court une ordonnance d'habeas corpus et . mise à part la possibilité que le ministre de l'intérieur, usant de son pouvoir discrétionnaire, n'ordonnât pas la remise du requérant aux Etats-Unis, celui-ci avait épuisé les voies de recours judiciaires et administratives . Les 18 et 19 mai 198 1 le ministre informa les solicitors du requérant que le Gouvernement des Etats-Unis n'était pas disposé à donner des assurances, avant l a
-192-
détention, que la peine de mon ne serait pas exécutée sur la personne du requérant s'il était jugé et reconnu coupable, mais que le dossier ne serait pas soumis au ministre pour décision par application de l'article 2 de la loi de 1870 sur l'extradition tant que le Gouvemement américain n'aurait pas donné des assurances et que le requérant n'aurait pas présenté d'arguments . Le 1 - juillet 1983, le ministre informa les représentants du requérant qu'il avait reçu du Gouvemement des Etats-Unis d'Amérique : .1'assurance du ministre adjoint de la justice de l'Etat de Californie (l'autorité compétente) que si le requérant était reconnu coupable de l'un ou des deux chefs d'accusation d'homicide dont il faisait l'objet, et si la peine de mort était prononcée pour ces deux infractions ou l'une d'entre elles, une intervention serait faite au nom du Royaume-Uni pour exprimer son v®u que la peine capitale ne soit pas exécutée . • Le 12 juillet 1983, le requérant adressa au ministre de l'intérieur une requête pour que sa remise aux Etats-Unis ne fùt pas ordonnée . Selon le requérant, comme il était probable que la peine de mort serait prononcée dans le cas où il retournerait aux Etats-Unis . y serait jugé et reconnu coupable, et vu la procédure d'appel automatique en Californie et le retard qui en résulterait dans l'exécution de la peine de mort, son extradition aux Etats-Unis constituerait un traitement inhumain et dégradant contraire à l'article 3 de la Convention . Il invoque aussi l'article 6 à propos de l'équité de la procédure de détention et en particulier de la possibilité de procéder à interrogatoire croisé (to cross-examine) des témoins à charge .
Le 6 février 1984, le ministre de l'intérieur signa le décret conformément à l'article 11 de la loi de 1870 sur l'extradition en vue de la remise du requérant aux autorités américaines et de sa sortie du Royaume-Uni . Le 7 février 1984, le requérant demanda dans le cadre d'une procédure non contradictoire (ex parte) devant la High Coun un sursis à sa remise aux Etats-Unis et l'autorisation de contester la décision du ministre au moyen d'un recours judiciaire parce qu'il s'agissait, selon lui, d'une décision qu'aucune autorité raisonnable n'eût pu raisonnablement prendre . La requête fut accueillie le méme jour . Le 10 février 1984, le ministre demanda que l'ordonnance qui suspendait la remise du requérant fût annulée, au motif que la High Coun n'avait nullement le pouvoir de prononcer un sursis qui avait l'effet d'une décision contre la Couronne en venu de l'article 21 par . 2 de la loi de 1947 sur les procédures contre la Couronne (1) . Au nom du ministre de l'intérieur fut avancé l'argument que la High Court n'avait pas le pouvoir de contrôler la décision du ministre de livrer le requérant et aucun pouvoir d'ordonner un sursis à exécution . (1) L'anicle 21 par . 2 esl ainsi libellé . Le tribunal ne doit prendre dans aucune procédure civile une ordonrunce ou décision contre un agent de la Couronne dans le cas où cene ordonnance ou décision aunit pour effet d'accorder à l'encontm de la Courunne un redressement qui n'aurait pu 21re obtenu dans le cadre d'une procédure contre la Couronne . .
- 193 -
Le méme jour, la HighCoun leva le sursis à la remise du requérant, faisant droit à la requête du ministre . Le 13 février 1984, le requérant engagea devant la Divisional Çoun une procédure en habeas corpus et demandé qu'il fittjugé déraisonnable que le ministre ordonnàt sa remise avant que la Commission n'e0t examiné plus avant la requéte ou toute aut re solution, compte tenu de la gravité du syndrome dit du « couloir de la mon- . La demande en habeas corpus du requérant fut rejetée après plaidoirie devant la Divisional Court les 13 et 14 février 1984 . Le requérant demanda qu'il fût sursis à sa remise aux Etats-Unis en attendant qu'il interjetât appel devant la Chambre des Lords . Bien qu'aucun sursis ne fût possible, la cour indiqua qu'il ne serait pas déraisonnable que le ministre ajoumàt de 24 heures la remise du requérant si une demande en autorisation d'appel était introduite dans l'intervalle . Cette demande fut déposée devant la Chambre des Lords Îe lendemain et la remise du requérant ne fut pas exécutée tant que la demande en autorisation d'appel ne fut pas examinée . La Chambre des Lords rejeta cette demande le I°' mars 1984 .
Législation et pratique internes : Royaume-Un i Au Royaume-Uni, la peine prévue pour homicide est la prison à vie ; la peine capitale ne peut être prononcée . Le droit relatif à l'extradition entre le Royaume-Uni et les Etats-Unis est rég i par les lois de 1870 et 1935 sur l'extradition et le traité signé entre les deux Etats le 8 juin 1972 . Pour qu'une requète soit accueillie, l'infraction dont il est question dans le mandat d'arrêt américain doit être qualifiée dans les lois sur l'extradition ou toute autre loi anglaise d'infractionjusticiable de l'extradition . Sur les listes pertinentes figurent l'homicide et la tentative d'homicide . L'article 111 du Traité stipule : « I . Que l'extradition sera accordée pour tout acte ou omission dont les éléments permettent de conclure à une infraction entrant dans l'une quelconque des définitions du Traité . . . ou à toute autre infraction s i a . l'infraction est, en vertu des lois des deux parties, punissable d'une peine de prison ou de toute au tre forme de détention de plus d'un an ou de la peine capitale , b . l'infraction est passible d'extradition au regard de la loi pertinente, à savoir la loi du Royaume-Uni . l'infraction est un délit grave au regard des lois des Etats-Unis d'Amérique . ,c
2 . L'extradition doit aussi ètre accordée pour toute tentative . . . au sens du paragraphe I du présent article . . . • -194-
L'article IV du Traité stipule par contre : « Dans le cas où l'infraction pour laquelle l'exuadition est demandée est punissable de la peine capitale en venu de la loi pertinente de la panie requérante, mais où la loi de la partie requise ne prévoit pas cette peine dans les mêmes circonstances, l'extradition peut étre refusée sauf si la partie requérante donne à la partie requise des assurances suffisantes que la peine capitale ne sera pas exécutée .Ce pouvoir discrétionnaire est attribué au ministre de l'Intérieur par l'article 11 de la loi de 1870 sur l'extradition, et entre en jeu une fois que le fugitif a épuisé les voies de recours judiciaires contre son incarcération ou sous la forme d'une demande en habeas corpus . La pratique anglaise veut qu'avant de remettre un fugitif risquant la peine capitale, les autorités cherchent à obtenir de l'Etat requérant les meilleures assurances que la peine capitale ne sera pas exécutée, encore que l'Etat requérant ne puisse en général pas fournir de garantie contraignante sur ce point . Il semblerait que le Gouvernement britannique n'ait jamais refusé de remettre un fugitif pour ce motif . La Chambre des Lords a examiné les "assurances" des Etats requérants dans un contexte différent (celui de l'article 10 de la loi de 1881 sur les délinquants en fuite, qui dispose que la High Court pew élargir un fugiiif sur demande en habeas corpus quand il y aurait injustice ou oppression à le rendre par exemple dans R .c . Governor of Brixton Prison ex parte Armah, (1968) AC 192, affaire dans laquelle était mise en doute l'opportunité de prendre l'engagement de réserver un traitement spécial aux fugitifs dans le cadre de l'administration normale . Le requérant oppose cette attitude réticente quant à l'obtention d'assurances à celle du Gouvernement de la République Fédérale d'Allemagne en matière d'extradition dans les cas où le fugitif risque la peine capitale, attitude dont témoigne la décision de la Commission sur la requête No 9539/81 . Législation el pratique internes : Etats-Unis d'Amériqu e Aux fins de l'extradition, la législation des Etats-Unis inclut celle de chacun des Etats . L'article 187 du Code pénal de Californie définit • l'homicide - comme • le fait de tuer de manière illicite un étre humain . . . avec intention malveillante . . L'article 189 dispose que •tout homicide perpétré par un dispositif destructeur ou un explosif . . . ou par tout autre mode volontaire de donner la mort, délibéré et prémédité . . . constitue un homicide au premier degré . . . • . L'article 190 stipule que toute personne coupable d'un homicide du premier degré est passible de la peine capitale, de la réclusion à vie dans une prison d'Etat sans possibilité de libération conditionnelle ou de 25 ans de réclusion dans une prison d'Etat . La peine sera fixée selon les modalités prévues aux articles 190 .1-5 .
- 195 -
Les articles 190 .1-5 disposent que la peine sera la peine capitale ou la réclusion à vie dans une prison d'Etat sans possibilité de libération conditionnelle dans tous les cas où l'une ou plusieurs des circonstances spéciales suivantes ont été alléguées et vérifiées conformément à l'article 190 .2 : . . . lorsque (3) au cours de la méme procédure, le défendeur est convaincu de plus d'une infraction d'homicide au premier ou second degré . « circonstances spéciales- et le•L'existncoulabdes choix entre la peine capitale et la réclusion à vie sont déterminés par un jury dans le cadre d'une procédure séparée sur la fixation de la peine une fois que la culpabilité est établie . Au cours de cette procédure, des éléments de preuve peuvent être produits tant par l'accusation que par la défense sur toute question se rapponant aux circonstances aggravantes ou atténuantes et à la peine . Parmi elles figurent toute condamnation antérieure, l'existence dans le chef du défendeur de toute autre activité qui comportait le recours ou la tentative de recours à la force ou à la violence, ainsi que les antécédents du défendeur, son histoire, son état physique et mental . Les termes d'•activité criminelle- tels qu'ils sont employés à l'article 190 .3 n'exigent pas une reconnaissance de culpabilité . Pour déterminer la peine, le jury tient compte les cas échéant des éléments suivants . les circonstances de l'infraction et tout facteur particulier ; :a b . l'existence ou l'absence dans le chef du défendeur d'une activité criminelle qui comportait le recours ou latentative de recours à la force ou à la violence . . . c . l'existence ou l'absence de toute . infraction grave ou condamnation antérieure . . . d . Toute autre circonstance qui atténue la gravité de l'infraction méme si elle ne constitue pas une cause légale d'exculpation . Le jury prononcera la peine capitale s'il conclut que les circonstances aggravantes l'emportent sur les circonstances atténuantes . Dans le cas contraire, la peine est celle de l'emprisonnement à vie . Dans le cas où la peine capitale est prononcée, conformément à la section 7 d u chapitre Il du Code pénal de Californie, le défendeur est réputé avoir demandé une modification du verdict . Lorsqu'il se prononce sur la demande, un juge doircontrB1er les éléments de preuve, examiner et tenir compte des circonstances aggravantes et atténuantes visées à l'article 190 .3 et se prononcer sur le point de savoir si les conclusions du jury et son verdict vont à l'encontre de la loi ou des éléments de preuves présentés . Un refus de modification du verdict de peine capitale conformément à la section 7 de de l'article 1181 du Code est révisé sur appel automatique du défendeur en vertu de l'alinéa(b) de l'article 1239 du Code . La décision accueillant la demande est revue dans le cas où l'accusation forme un recours par application d u
- 196 -
paragraphe 6 de cet article . L'article 190 .6 exige que les décisions de faire appel à la cour suprème de l'Etat soient prises dans un délai de 150 jours à compter de la date à laquelle la juridiction qui a prononcé la condamnation a terminé la transc ri ption intégrale du procès . Selon les articles 1217-1219, un exposé de la condamnation et du jugement ainsi que la transcription intégrale de tous les témoignages produits au procès, y compris les arguments avancés par les avocats de l'une et l'autre parties, doivent être adressés au Gouverneur de l'Etat, qui peut demander l'avis des juges de la Cour supréme et du ministre de la Justice (Attorney General) ou de l'un quelconque d'entre eux sur l'exposé ainsi produit .
Exécution de la peine capitale et syndrome du -coutoir de la mort • Jusqu'en 1963, la peine capitale était régulièrement exécutée en Californie pour homicide, mais depuis lors elle n'a été appliquée qu'une fois en 1967 pour l'homicide d'un officier de police . En février 1972, la Cour supréme de Californie a cassé une peine capitale au motif qu'il s'agissait d'une «peine cruelle et inhabituelle» inconstitutionnelle, mais cette peine fut réintroduite à la fin de 1972 par un amendement à la Constitution de l'Etat, et lorsque la Cour suprême a jugé cet amendement inconstitutionnel, un nouvel amendement fut apporté à la Constitution en 1978 . L'un et l'autre amendements rétablissant la peine capita)e étaient issus de propositions de lois présentées par le Gouvemeur actuel de la Califomie, sénateur à l'époque .
A la suite des arrèts de la Cour suprême, 179 personnes au toaal attendant leur exécution dans -le couloir de la mon• furent libérées sous condition . Les chiffres les plus récents relatifs au prononcé de la peine capitale (jusqu'en mars 1983) révèlent que 115 personnes en Californie et 1147 dans l'ensemble des Etats-Unis attendent d'être exécutées . Depuis le rapport du ministre de la justice sur l'homicide et la peine capitale, publié par le ministére de la justice ce Ca)ifomie en juillet 1981, 53 personnes ont été condamnées à mort depuis la réintroduction de cette peine en 1978 . Parmi elles, 2 ont vu leur condamnation confirmée, 2 leur reconnaissance de culpabilité cassée, 5 leur condamnation cassée dont une pour des raisons de procédure, et 44 attendaient le résultat de leur recours . Parmi celles dont la condamnation a été confirmée, l'une a attendu le résultat 9 mois, l'autre 23 mois . Quatre ans et demi plus tard, aucune n'a été exécutée alors qu'elles sont toutes les deux passibles de l'exécution . Parmi celles attendant le résultat de leur recours, une a attendu cinq ans . Depuis la publication du rapport, selon les informations reçues par les représentants du requérant, 3 des 44 personnes attendant l'issue de leur recours ont vu leur condamnation cassée .
- 197 -
GRIEFS La peine capitale et le syndrome du couloir de la mort dans le cas du requéran t Selon le requérant, plusieurs faits sont à prendre en considération pour le prononcé probable de la peine capitale au cas où il serait reconnu coupable . En particulier, il est accusé d'un double homicide par balle et d'une autre tentative d'homicide, et il est allégué que la fusillade a eu lieu avanf un trafic de stupéfiants . Le requérant a fait l'objet de condamnations antérieures, notamment une pour vol à main armée, et s'est rendu coupable d'actes de violence au cours de ses périodes d'emprisonnement ; il est aussi soupçonné d'activités politiques et raciales violentes en Californie en sa qualité de dirigeant d'un groupe d'anciens détenus du nom de • Tribal Thumb• . La probabilité qu'une peine capitale soit prononcée à l'encontre du requérant en raison des faits susmentionnés n'est en rien atténuée par la nature des «assurances • reçues par le ministre, assurances aux termes desquelles, au cas où la peine de mort serait prononcée, •une intervention sera faite au nom du Royaume-Uni pour exprimer le v¢u que la peine capitale ne soit pas appliquée• . Selon le requérant, il ne s'agit pas d'une « assurance • selon les termes de l'article IV du Traité ; qiti plus est, l'article 1219 du Code pénal de Ca)ifomie précise que le ministre de la justice ne peut exprimer un avis que si le Gouverneur le lui demande, avisqui, par voie de conséquence, ne s'impose pas à celui-ci . L'•assurance• nécessaire n'est pas non plus celle de la partie requérante, puisque c'est le Gouvernement fédéral des Etats-Unis qui a formulé la demande d'extradition . De surcroit, le ministre adjoint de la justice (Deputy Attorney General) n'indique pas quel rôle il se propose éventuellement de jouer au stade de la fixation de la peine, dans le'cadre de la procédure de jugement, et quel effet le fait qu'il ne requière pas la peine capitale ou s'abstienne de produire des éléments de preuve à l'appui de celle-ci pouvait avoir sur la Cour . D'un autre côté, si le requérant est exécuté, ni lui ni le Royaume-Uni ne jouiront d'aucun recours effectif pour une question ainsi radicalement réglée . Vu la personnalité du Gouvemeur, il existe un risque sérieux que les v¢ux d u Royaume-Uni ne l'emportent pas dans le cas du requérant . Ce dernier en veut pour preuve en particulier l'opinion, souvent exprimée par le Gouverneur, que la volonté du peuple ne doit pas être contrecarrée et ne saurait étre surestimée . Il exprime cette idée avec force dans son rapport publié par les services du ministre de la justice . Au surplus, la non-exécution de la peine capita)e dans le cas du requérant pourrait donner lieu à une argumentation juridique dans d'autres affaires pour inéga)ité dans l'application de la loi, ce qui invaliderait la peine capitale dans ces affaires-là et inciterait le Gouvemeur à ne pas faire preuve de clémence dans la présente .
D'après le requérant, les faits susmentionnés indiquent que s'il est remis aux Etats-Unis, il y a de bonnes raisons de croire qu'il sera soumis à un traitement et une peine inhumains et dégradants contraires à l'article 3 de la Conventiôn . Pareil s - 198 -
traitement et peine sont dus au retard déraisonnable et non exceptionnel apporté à l'exécution de la peine capitale en Califomie . De plus, le fait qu'il n'y ait pas eu d'exécution en Californie depuis 1967 ne diminue en rien la crainte très réelle des condamnés d'être exécutés, en raison du regain des exécutions aux Etats-Unis en général et de la faveur et de la législation récente concernant la peine capitale en Californie en particulier . Le requérant se plaint à cet égard de ce que l'« assurance » selon laquelle le souhait du Royaume-Uni qu'il ne soit pas exécuté sera porté à l'attention du Gouverneur, ne prendra effet qu'une fois qu'il aura épuisé tous les recours possibles et que dans l'intervalle, il sera exposé aux rigueurs du syndrome du couloir de la mort . De surcroît, le requérant se plaint de s'être vu dénier la possibilité de soumettre le seul témoin à charge à un interrogatoire croisé . C'est sur la foi du témoignage de celui-ci que l'extradition est demandée . Selon l'article 10 de la Loi de 1970 sur l'extradition, en droit anglais, le magistrat n'est pas tenu de se prononcer sur le bienfondé des accusations en matière pénale portée contre un fugitif en elles-mèmes, mais de se prononcer sur le point de savoir si les éléments de preuve produits constituent un commencement de preuve que les infractions visées ont été commises . Dans ces conditions, le requérant prétend que le droit prévu à l'article 6 par . 3 d), s'applique à la procédure d'extradition et le fait que le magistrat n'ait pas cité le témoin à charge en vue d'un interrogatoire croisé constitue une atteinte à ce droit . Dans sa jurisprudence, et plus récemment dans sa décision dans l'affaire X . c/Irlande (requéte No 9742/82), la Commission affirme que la question de l'applicabilité de l'article 6 à une procédure d'extradition n'est pas tranchée . PROCEDURE DEVANT LA COMMISSIO N La requête a été introduite le 13 juillet 1983 et enregistrée le même jour . La Commission l'a examinée le 14juillet 1983, date à laquelle elle en a donné communication au Gouvemement défendeur conformément à l'article 42 par . 2 b) du réglement intérieur, et a invité ledit Gouvernement à présenter ses observations sur la recevabilité et le bien-fondé avant le 2 septembre 1983 . Le 10 août 1983, le Gouvernement défendeur a sollicité pour la présentation des observations une prorogation, que le Président de la Commission lui a accordée jusqu'au 15 septembre 1983 . Le requérant a été invité à en présenter en réponse avant le 5 novembre 1983 . Le 2 novembre 1983, le représentant du requérant a demandé que le délai f8t prorogé jusqu'au 14 novembre 1983, afin que des avis de droit pussent être recueillis aux Etats-Unis . Cette prorogation a été accordée le méme jour et les observations sont parvenues le 14 novembre 1983 . Le 14juillet 1983, Ia Commission a aussi indiqué au Gouvernement défendeur, conformément à l'article 36 du règlement intérieur, qu'il serait souhaitable dans l'intérét des parties et du déroulement normal de la procédure devant la Commission ,
-199-
que le requérant ne fût pas extradé vers les Etats-Unis d'Amérique avant le 14 octobre 1983 . Cette indication fut renouvelée le 14 octobre 1983 jusqu'au 15 novembre 1983, dans l'attente des observations du requérant en réponse à celles du Gouvemement défendeur . Le .14 novembre 1983, la Commission a décidé de proroger l'indication visée à l'article 36 du règlement intérieurjusqu'au 19 novembre 1983 afin de pouvoir examiner les observations du requérant . Le 12 novembre 1983, la Commission a repris son examen de la requête et décidé, par application de l'article 42 par . 2 a) de son règlement intérieur, d'inviter le Gouvernement défendeur à lui faire savoir avant le 12 décembre 1982 s'il était disposé à obtenir des autorités américaines de meilleures assurances, du genre de celles mentionnées dans l'argumentation du requérant, et a prorogé son indication visée à l'article 36 du ràglemenf intériéur jusqu'au 17 décembre 1983 . Le 13 décembre 1983, le Gouvernement défendeur a informé la Commission par téléphone qu'il informait les autorités américaines des nouveaux arguments présentés au nom du requérant, mais qu'il n'estimait pas que la question des assurances fût pertinente au regard de la Convention . Il indiquait souhaiter respecter la procédure fixée pour la requête et acceptait de différer la remise du requérant jusqu'au 17 décembre 1983 comme il y était invité . Le 15 décembre 1983, la Commission a décidé de ne pas renouveler son indication visée à l'article 36 et de reprendre son examen de la recevabilité et du bien-fondé de la requête le 5 mars 1984 . Le 6 février 1984, le représentant du requérant a informé le secrétaire .de la Commission que le ministre avait signé l'arrèté en vue de la remise du réquérant aux autorités américaines . Vu que l'examen de la recevabilité de l'affaire par la Commission était proche, le représentant du requérant demandait au Président de donner une indication en vertu de l'article 36 du règlement intérieur . Le 7 février 1984, le Président a refusé de donner une indication en vertu de l'article 36 et les parties en furent informées . Le 5 mars 1984, le requérant sollicita à nouveau une indication en venu de l'article 36 du réglement intérieur en invoquant notamment l'anicle 13 de la Convention et l'échec de la procédure d'habeas corpus . La Commission a décidé le même jour de ne pas donner d'indication S
.ARGUMENTIODSPARE
Argumentation du Gouvernément défendeu r 1 . En fait -
.
,
Le Gouvernement défendeur ne conteste pas les faits tels qu'ils ont été présentés par le requérant . - 2pp -
2 . Législation et prarique internes : Royaume-Un i Le Gouvemement rejette d'abord l'allusion à une •pratique• de la République Fédérale d'Allemagne concernant l'extradition de personnes risquant la peine capitale, alors que le requérant ne se réfère qu'à une seule affaire, en particulier parce que les circonstances de cette affaire sont trop peu connues pour permettre d'apprécier si le contraste prétendu est une réalité . D'ailleurs, les tribunaux anglais n'ont pas compétence pour juger les infractions pour lesquelles l'extradition du requérant est demandée . Bien que l'homicide et l'assassinat soient deux des cas exceptionnels dans lesquels les tribunaux anglais ont compétence pour connaître d'infractions commises à l'étranger, cette compétence se limite généralement aux affaires dans lesquelles l'auteur de l'infraction a une citoyenneté conférée par le Royaume-Uni . Partant, des étrangers comme le requérant seraient exempts de poursuites au Royaume-Uni et si des délinquants fugitifs découvens au Royaume-Uni ne pouvaient être extradés, ils devraient en général être remis en liberté . Mème si les lois sur l'immigration prévoient certains pouvoirs de refoulement qui peuvent s'exercer à l'encontre de délinquants lorsque, comme dans la présente affaire, le fugitif est ressortissant de l'Etat requérant, il est probable que l'Etat requérant est le seul à qui la remise puisse s'effectuer car il est tout à fait improbable qu'un autre pays soit disposé à accueillir un fugitif . Donc, la même question pourrait se poser en substance dans le contexte de l'expulsion que dans le présent contexte de l'extradition . L'effet pratique est que, si le requérant ne peut étre envoyé aux EtatsUnis d'Amérique, il serait effectivement impossible à remettre à qui que ce soit et devrait ètre élargi et autorisé à demeurer au Royaume-Uni . L'extradition repose dans le monde entier sur l'hypothèse fondamentale que l'intérêt de toutes les nations veut qu'un criminel soit traduit en justice et, inversement, l'intérêt de toute nation veut qu'elle-même ne devienne pas un refuge pour les délinquants en fuite . La possibilité qu'il y ait au Royaume-Uni des fugitifs impossibles à livrer saperait les fondements mèmes de l'extradition . En outre, l'objectif de la traduction des criminels en justice suppose que des dispositions entre Etats en matière d'extradition ne doivent 2tre prises que si les normes de la justice et de l'administration pénale prévalant dans ces Etats sont acceptables pour les uns et les autres et de nature à garantir la justice au délinquant en fuite . Cette politique se traduit dans les traités d'extradition conclus par le Royaume-Uni, lesquels doivent d'abord ètre ratifiés par la voie parlementaire . Un autre trait imponant de la loi britannique sur l'extradition est la condition qu'aucune extradition n'ait lieu sans que l'Etat requérant foumisse des éléments en due forme qui établissent un commencement de preuve contre le fugitif . Cette disposition de l'article 10 de la Loi de 1970 sur l'extradition tend à assurer une égalité fondamentale de traitement pour toutes les personnes traduites devant les tribunaux pour une infraction, où que l'infraction ait pu être commise .
- 201 -
3 . Législation et pratique pertinentes : Etats-Unis d'Amérique Le Gouvernement défendeur admet l'exposé de la loi et de la pratique fait par le requérant, en relevant cependant que l'une des décisions mentionnées a été cassée à la suite du recours de l'Etat de Californie devant la Cour suprême des Etats-Unis . Le 6 juillet 1983, cet Etat a rétabli la peine capitale, précédemment exclue par la Cour supréme de Califomie . Le Gouvernement défendeur renvoie à l'interdiction faite au 8^ amendement à la Constitution des Etats-Unis des . peines cruelles et inhumaines ., une interdiction presque identique figurant dans la Constitution de l'Etat de Californie, Titre premier, article 17 . Aux termes de cet article : • -Interdiction est faite d'infliger des peines cruelles ou inhabituelles ou d'imposer des amendes excessives . . Le parallèle avec l'article 3 de la Convention elle-méme est évident, mais l'interprétation donnée de cette disposition par les juridictions étatiques et la Cour supréme des Etats-Unis revêt elle aussi de l'importance . Cette demière a estimé en particulier que toute peine doit respecter -la dignité de l'homme- (Propp v . Duller 356 U .S . 86, 100 (1958)) et la cour est disposée à examiner si la peine est disproportionnée à l'infraction pour laquelle elle est prononcée . La Cour supréme de Califomie témoigne elle aussi d'une optique dynamiqu e dans l'examen de la proportionnalité et se montre prête à examiner un argument en faveur d'une atténuation reposant sur l'hypothèse qu'une longue incarcération avant l'exécution envisagée peut en soi constimer • une peine cruelle ou inhabimelle . (People v . Anderson (1972) 6 Col . 3d 628 . 649-650) . ' Quant à la durée d'attente pendant la procédure de recours, la loi et la pratique de la Californie semblent tendre à réduire au minimum toute durée qui pourrait contribuer à un retard, pour ce qui conceme les tribunaux et les organes de poursuites . La législation de la Californie prévoit qu'en appel, toutes les affaires de peine capitale doivent aller directement devant la cour suprême de l'Etat, sans passer par les possibilités de réexamen par les juridictionsintermédiaires qui existeraient dans les autres cas . En outre, le ministre de la Justice de la Califomie a pour principe d'accorder la première priorité aux affaires de peine capitale et lorsque c'est possible, dépose l'argumentation de l'Etat dans un délai de 30 jours à compter du dépôt de l'acte de recours du condamné . A cette .fin, le procureur s'occupant de l'affaire est déchargé de toutes "ses autres tàches de manière à pouvoir consacrer-tout son temps à la préparation de l'argumentation de l'Etat . Qui plus est, l'article 190(6) du Code pénal de Californie exige que les décisions de recourir à la Cour suprème de Californie soient prisés dans un délai de 150jours à compter de la date où la juridiction qui a condamné a terminé le compte rendu intégral . Quant à la question des assurances et de la commutation de la peine capitale, au cas où elle serait prononcée à l'encontre du requérant, le Gouvernement défendeu r
- 202 -
fait remarquer qu'il serait incorrect que les autorités de poursuites donnent avant l'extradition l'assurance qu'elles ne chercheront pas à obtenir la peine capitale pour les infractions incriminées, au cas où le requérant serait reconnu coupable . Cela tient à deux raisons : la premiére, c'est qu'une telle assurance contreviendrait au pouvoir discrétionnaire dont le procureur est investi à bon droit pour ce qui est de ses réquisitions (et, accessoirement, récompenserait le requérant pour avoir fui au RoyaumeUni) et la seconde, c'est que pareille assurance serait contraire à la loi et sans doute i nconst itut io n nel le . Les lois pertinentes de la Californie définissent des types spécifiques d'infraction auxquels la peine capitale s'applique, les homicides multiples en étant un . Ces définitions spécifiques tirent leur origine des décisions de la Cour supréme des EtatsUnis (Furman v . Georgia 1972 408 U .S . 238) . L'assurance que les autorités de poursuites donneraient de ne pas demander la peine capitale, qui aurait pour effet de faire sortir tout à fait arbitrairement le requérant de l'empire des dispositions sur la peine capitale, porterait sans doute atteinte à la compatibilité actuelle des dispositions légales spécifiques avec la Constitution . De méme, pour des raisons constitutionnelles, le Gouverneur ne pourrait pas, à bon droit, donner avant l'extradition l'assurance de commuer la peine capitale qui pourrait étre prononcée à l'encontre du requérant, puisque le Titre 5, article 8, de la Constitution de la Californie, habilite le Gouverneur à accorder sa gràce seulement . aprés le prononcé de la peine- et non avant le procés . Cette disposition est frappée au coin du bon sens : Le Gouverneur ne doit pouvoir être appelé à envisager la grâce qu'une fois que tous les faits pertinents ont été pleinement exposés au cours du procés, la peine prononcée et tous les recours judiciaires exercés . Dans ces conditions, toute assurance que donnerait le Gouvemeur selon les termes mentionnés par la Commission pourrait passer pour violer la Constitution de l'Etat de Californie . 4 . Vio(arion al(éguée de l'article 3 Le requérant soutient en substance que s'il est extradé, reconnu coupable et condamné à mort, il risque de s'écouler un délai inacceptable entre le moment de la condamnation et la décision définitive sur le point de savoir si cette peine doit ou non ètre exécutée . Un tel retard, doublé de l'incenitude du résultat, aurait un tel effet sur l'esprit du requérant qu'il reviendrait à un traitement ou une peine inhumains ou dégradants . Quant à la forme de l'assurance obtenue par le Gouvernement britannique, elle a été fournie sous couvert d'une note diplomatique de l'ambassadeur des Etats-Unis d'Amérique à Londres, sous la forme d'une attestation écrite sous serment du ministre adjoint de la Justice de l'Etat de Californie, laquelle a été transmise sous la responsabilité du Gouverneur de Californie . Le ministre adjoint de la Justice a attesté avoir discuté la question de l'assurance avec le représentant agréé du procureur du district du comté de San Francisco et que ce dernier avait accepté que l'assurance fùt donnée .
-
203
-
Eu égard aux difficultés constitutionnelles et pratiques que reflètent la nature et l'étendue de toute assurance pouvant être donnée, le Gouvernement est convaincu que,quant à la commutation d'une peine capitale éventuelte dans les circonstances de l'espèce, il a obtenu les meilleures assurances possibles . Qui plus est, il ne doute nullement que l'assurance serait respectée . L'attestation écrite sous serment a été adressée sous couvert du Gouverneur et figure déjà dans le dossier de ce dernier sur l'affaire du requérant . L'attestâtion indique que le procureur a donné son accord à l'assurance et il va de soi qu'avant d'y souscrire, le procureur est convenu que dans le cas où la peine capitale serait prononcée à l'encontre du requérant, il écrirait au Gouverneur pour lui rappeler l'assurance et lui communiquer le vau du RoyaumeUni . Enfin, du point de vue de la procédure et de la pratique légales, toutes les fois que le Gouverneur est saisi d'une demande en grâce, la demande est déférée aux services d'enquéte de la commission de libération conditionnelle (Parole Board), qui revoit alors le dossier dans le détail et recueille les vues, entre autres, du procureur . Ces vues sont alors versées au rappon soumis au Gouverneur . Le Gouvemement défendeur relève que les termes de l'a rt icle IV du Traité invoqués par le représentant du requérant ne créent pas une obtigation pour le Royaume-Uni, mais permettent simplement à l'Etat requis de refuser l'extradition, alors que sinon ce serait impossible, s'il n'est pas satisfait desassurances foumies pour le cas où la péine capitale serait prononcée . Qui plus est, l'anicle2 de la Convention autorise expressément le pro`noncéjudiciaire de la peine capitale et, partant, la non-obtention d'une assurance que la peine ne sera pas exécutée dans un cas particulier, ne peut jamais en soi empo rter violation de la Convention . Par analogie, le Gouvemement défendeur se réfè re à la décision de la Commission sur la recevabilité de la requéte No 7994/77, Kotàlla c/Pays-Bas (D .R . 14 p . 238) . Le Gouvernement se réfere aussi à la pratique de IaCommission concernan t les actes discrétionnaires ( par exemple gràce . libération conditionnelle, etc .) qui sont constamment considérés comme échappant au domaine de la Convention (par exemple X . c/Royaume-Uni, requête No 4103/69, Recueil 36 p . 61), et soutient qde la question de la commutation de la peine échappant à l'empire de la Convention, la non-obtention d'une assurance pa rt iculière à cet égard ne peut elle non plus manquer d'y échapper . 5 . Le requérant n'est pas victim e Quant à la question de savoir si .l'extradition du requérant, compte tenu de la possibilité d'un séjour prolongé dans le couloir de la mort au cas où il serait reconnu coupable et condamné à mort, soulève un point litigieux sur le terrain de l'article 3 de la Convention, le Gouvemement se réfere à la jurisprudence amérieurede la Commission selon laquelle l'extradition d'une personne peut exceptionnellement poser un tel problème lorsqu'on envisage d'extrader l'intéressé dans un pays déterminé où • en raison de la nature même du régime de ce pays ou de la situation particulière qui y règne, des droits humains fondamentaux, tels que ceux qui sont garantis par la Convention, pourraient ètre soit grossièrement violés- soit entièremen t
- 20q -
supprimés• . (X . c/République Fédérale d'Allemagne, . requ@te No 1 8 02/62, Annuaire Vi, p . 463 p . 481) . Vue récemment confirmée dans l'affaire X . c/Suisse (D .R . 24 p . 205) . Ces décisions semblent reposer sur le principe que : - . . . si, en effet, la mati8re de l'extradition et du droit d'asile ne compte point, par elle-m@me, au nombre de celles que régit la Convention . . . les Etats Contractants n'en ont pas moins accepté de restreindre le libre exercice des pouvoirs que leur confère le droit intemational général, y compris celui de contrôler l'entrée et la sortie des étrangers, dans la mesure et la limite des obligations qu'ils ont assumées en vertu de la Convention » . (requête No 2143/64, Annuaire VII, 315, p . 329) . Le Gouvernement soutient pour les raisons ci-après que la Convention n'impose pas une telle obligation et il invite la Commission à s'écarter de sa jurisprudence antérieure sur ce point . Pour qu'une requéte puisse être introduite, il faut qu'il y ait une victime au sens de l'article 25 de la Convention . Cette notion suppose l'existence de faits qui, au moment de l'introduction de la requête, laissent apparaître qu'une violation de la Convention a été ou est en train d'étre perpétrée . Dans le cas où il est allégué qu'une violation de l'article 3 découle d'une expulsion, les faits sur lesquels la violation alléguée repose finalement doivent encore se produire : l'allégation est fondée sur des événements escomptés . Le Gouvernement défendeur soutient que cette allégation découlant d'hypothèses et non de faits, et ces hypothèses componant inévitablement une incertitude non négligeable, il y aurait distorsion du texte de la Convention à consid6rer comme •victimes•, les requérants dans de pareilles affaires . A cet égard, le Gouvernement relève que la Cour a admis une seule fois l'idée qu'une personne pouvait être « victime • sans démontrer que des mesures concrètes la touchant personnellement contreviennent aux dispositions de la Convention ; il s'agissait de l'affaire Klass, qui portait sur des mesures de surveillane secrète dont le requérant ne pouvait démontrer qu'elles s'appliquaient à lui, encore que leur existence ne fit aucun doute au moment de l'introduction de la requête . Les circonstances de la présente affaire ne sont pas analogues . D'ailleurs, dans l'affaire lslande c/Royaume-Uni (par . 161 de l'arrret) la Cour a précisément envisagé le critère de la preuve à adopter pour évaluer les éléments constituant la base d'une allégation sur le terrain de l'article 3 et a conclu que le bon critère consistait à se demander si les éléments produits démontraient •au-delà de tout doute raisonnable• la violation alléguée . Cette limite ne peut être atteinte lorsque les él6ments en cause sont consitués d'hypothèses sur des événements à venir .
Dans la présente affaire, le Gouvernement relève les diverses hypothèses à faire pour aboutir à des circonstances qui peuvent donner lieu à une violation de l'article 3, et soutient que ces hypothèses sur le cours d'événements à venir sont si importantes et comportent de telles incertitudes que le requérant ne saurait être considéré comme victime aux fins de l'article 25 de la Convention . Les éléments invoqué s - 205 -
pour étayer l'allégation d'une violation de l'article 3 ne peuvent pas eux non plus être considérés comme avérés -au-delà de tout doute raisonnable . puisqu'ils partent d'hypothèses et de suppositions . Le Gouvemement fait valoir de surcroît que lorsque la violation alléguée repose finalement sur des événements escomptés devant se produire dans un Etat non contractant, la Commission n'a pas compétence ratione loci pour se prononcer sur la requête . La Commission ayant entièrement justifté l'hypothése de sa compétence à partir de l'idée que l'Etat contractant contribue à une violation de l'article 3 de la Convention, le Gouvernement l'invite à revoir sa position . En réalité, • l'acte contributif . consistant à remettre un délinquant n'a aucuné importance sous l'angle de la Convention, sauf s'il se rapporte aux conditions qui prévalent dans l'Etat, non contractant, de la remise . Ce sont les circonstances ou les circonstances escomptées prévalant dans ce dernier Etat qui donnent à l'acte contributif sa coloration et sa signfication . C'est donc essentiellement le comportement de l'Etat non contractant qu'il convient d'apprécier par rapport aux garanties de protection accordées par la Convention . Cependant, cet Etat n'aura aucun statut officiel devant la Commission ou la Cour et n'aura donc aucune possibilité de faire valoir pleinement ses vues . On ne peut pas non plus s'attendre que le requérant, l'Etat contractant concemé, la Commission ou la Cour aient un accès total et indépendant à toutes les informations pertinentbs qui permettraient une appréciition fiable et objective . Une telle appréciation est encore plus approximative lorsque la requéte'repose sur des allégations et l'anticipation que cenains événements se produirontalors qu'ils sont loin d'être inévitables . La théorie de •l'acte contrib'utif- tend donc à faire reposer la culpabilité d'un Etat contractant sur des événements qui échappent à sa juridiction et à son contrôle, dont il n'a aucune connaissance ou expérience directes et qui peuvent même n'avoir jamais lieu . Selon le Gouvernement, cetté situation n'a absolument aucun rapport avec celle visée à l'article 1 de la Convention . Par cette disposition, les auteurs de la Convention entendaient manifestement qu'une responsabilité ne ftit engagée que pour des questions dont l'Etat aurait réellement ou aisément le contrôle, et une connaissance directe . Tel n'est pas le cas des allégations de violation de l'arùcle 3 tirées d'expulsions et d'extraditions . , La présente affaire illustre paticulièrement bien les conséquences fâcheuses d'une supposition de compétence puisque les actes constituant prétendument une violation de l'article 3 auraient tous lieu hors de la juridiction du Royaume-Uni, si tint est qu'ils aient lieu . Le Royaume-Uni n'a aucune connaissance directe des questions de droit et de pratique américains alléguées et les Etats-Unis ne sont ni partie à la Convention ni en mesure de présenter leurs vues à la Commission . En outre, le grief tiré de l'article 3 est en substance erroné puisque de ce grief est, au fond, à la fois supputé et justiftable sur le terrain de l'article 2 de la Convention . Bien que le requérant se plaigne de l'attente et de l'incertitude provoquée par le prononcé de la peine capitale, il faut nécessairement tolérer une attente et une incertitude, eu égard aux termes de l'article 2, lequel cautionne implicitement l'existence d'une telle attente
- 206 -
entre le prononcé et la fixation définitive d'une telle peine, cette attente étant inévitable . Lorsque cette attente est aggravée du fait de l'existence et de l'exercice d'un droit de recours, elle est aussi autorisée puisque l'article 2 commence par les termes « Le droit de toute personne à la vie est protégé p ar la loi . et qu'un droit de recours ou de demande en grace relève manifestement de cette disposition . Partant, l'angoisse provoquée par l'attente de l'examen de ce recours ou de cette demande en grâce ne peut constituer un traitement ou une peine inhumains ou dégradants . Quoi qu'il en soit, on voit mal comment une période de détention au cours de laquelle un requérant fait usage de toutes les voies de recours pour contester une condamnation légale peut, simplement en raison de l'incertitude de l'issue, @tre tenue pour un traitement inhumain et dégradant au sens où la Commission et la Cour ont interprété ces termes . Néanmoins, si la Commission s'en tient à son analyse précédente quant à la pertinence de l'article 3 dans de pareilles affaires, la présente requête reste manifestement mal fondée . Le requérant ne peut montrer que, « en raison de la nature même du régime » des Etats-Unis d'Amérique en général ou de l'Etat de Califomie en particulier, ou de la •situation particulière• dans ce pays ou Etat, les droits garantis par l'article 3 de la Convention -poutrait être soit grossièrement violés, soit entièrement supprimés • . Les éléments de preuve produits jusqu'ici ne laissent pas apparaitre de possibilité, encore moins une probabilité de violation grossiére ou de suppression totale des nortnes visées implicitement à l'anicle 3 de la Convention . Les situations incriminées découlent d'un ensemble de procédures destinées à protéger la vie humaine, cette protection étant la pierre angulaire de la protection de tous les autres droits . L'allégation du requérant serait indéfenda6le s'il était obligatoire d'exécuter la peine capitale dans un délai de sept jours à compter de son prononcé . Une telle rigidité s'oppose de maniére frappante à l'importance fondamentale que le droit américain reconnait à la vie et à la dignité de l'homme ; les tribunaux veillent d'ailleurs constamment à réaffirtner cette importance . Vu l'attitude dynamique adoptée par les tribunaux des Etats-Unis et l'ensemble de dispositons constitutionnelles qui existent pour protéger l'individu qui peut avoir affaire aux tribunaux, le Gouvernement soutient que l'allégation formulée par le requérant ne laisse pas apparaître de violation de la Convention . La question de savoir si le système doit être amendé rel8ve des autorités nationales, non de la Commission ou de la Cour .
6 . Quanr à l'article 6 de la Convention Quant au grief du requérant selon lequel il n'a pu soumettre le témoin à charge à un interrogatoire croisé, le Gouvemement soutient qu'il est parfaitement mal fondé .
- 207 -
Les garanties spécifiques de l'article 6 par . 3 de la Convention doivent habituellement s'envisager par rapport à l'ensemble de la procédure pénale (requête No 8303/79, D .R . 22 p . 149) . Replacée dans cette perspective, la procédure de mise en prévention en vue de l'extradition peut@tre considérée conune une phase préliminaire de la procédure pénale et il serait totalement impropre de reconnaPtre à un accusé, au moment de l'incarcération, toute la gammedes droits envisagés à l'article 6 : Cette manière de voir est étayée par les principes directeurs et l'objet de l'extradition, qui sont de refuser aux délinquants en fuite un havre sûr et de faciliter leur retour dans une juridiction où ils peuvent être jugés pour l'infraction qui les a incités à fuir . L'Etat requi, incompétent pour juger l'infraction, a un rôle nécessairément limité et le caractére préliminaire de la procédure d'incarcération va de soi . Si le Royaume-Uni est peut-être ie seul Etat membre du Conseil de l'Europe qui insiste pour qu'un commencement de preuve existe contre le délinquant prétendu, les Etats requis sont tous soumis à une limitation, à savoir qu'ils ne peuvent exiger la comparution de témoins, qui sont probablement des étrangers résident à l'étranger . L'article 12 de la Convention européenne d'extradition exige seulement que les demandes d'extradition soient étayées par des pièces à l'appui, il ne demande nullement la comparution de témoins ; force est de supposer que cette Convention et la Convention des Droits de l'Homme doivent étre interprétés de manière comparative . De plus, le délinquant en fuite est protégé par les termes de l'article 5 par . 4 de la Convention et peut donc contester la validité de sa détention en attendant l'extradition . Cette procédure n'a pas à répondre aux exigences plus strictes de l'article 6 . I1 s'ensuit que cet aspect de la requète est irrecevable .
Argumentation du requérant en répons e Introduction Les observations du requérant sont très étoffées et volumineuses ; elles comprennent un avis sur la situation constitutionnelle de la Californie présenté au nom des procureurs de Californie en matiére pénale et de l'Association nationale des avocats de la défense en matière pénale, ainsi qu'une argumentation détaillée de Çolin Nicholls Q .C . en réponse aux observations du Gouvemement . Elles peuvent se résumer ainsi :
2 . Législation et pra tique internes : Royaume-Un i Le requérant ne conteste pas que les tribunaux anglais n'aient pas compétence pour le juger des infractions pour lesquelles l'extradition est demandée et qu'il n'est de l'intérêt d'aucune nation de devenir un refuge pour délinquants . II relève pourtant que le Royaume-Uni ne souscrit pas des accords d'extradition avec les Etats dont les normes de justice et d'administration pénale ne lui sont pas acceptables, et qu'il se réserve la faculté de ne pasextrader dans le cas des Etats avec lesquels il passe effectivement des accords . Le requérant soutient que le Gouvemement britannique devrai t
- 208 -
indiquer dans le détail à la Commission les affaires dans lesquelles le ministre, en usant de ce pouvoir, a refusé de remettre des délinquants en fuite, et les principes sur lesquels il a fondé ces refus . Il prétend que le critère appliqué doit considérer à se demander si, vu toutes les circonstances de l'espèce, il serait injuste ou abusif de le rendre .
3 . Législation et pratique Internes - Etats-Unis d'Amérique Le requérant prétend : A . que l'interdiction des •peines cruelles et inhabituelles• (interdiction figurant dans les constitutions des Etats-Unis et de la Californie) n'aurait pa .s pour effet de le protéger contre le traitement dont il se plaint ; et B . qu'aucune voie de recours n'existe en fait aux Etats-Unis contre la lenteur exagérée de la procédure de recours automatique qui provoque le syndrome du couloir de la mort ; et C . que le ministre de la Justice de Californie pourrait, sans violer les principes constitutionnels de la Californie ou des Etats-Unis, donner l'assurance contraignante de ne pas requérir la peine capitale à l'encontre du requérant ; et D . que l'assurance offerte au Gouvernement britannique n'aurait de toute façon pas pour effet d'empécher le requémnt d'être exposé au syndrome du couloir de la mort qui fait donc l'objet de son grief.
A . Les recours ouverts aux Etats-Uni s Le Gouvemement défendeur prétend que les recours constitutionnels ouverts aux Etats-Unis permettraient au requérant de contester sa détention dans le • couloir de la mort- . Selon lui, il est inconcevable qu'au cours des dix dernières années, alors que plus de 1 000 détenus aux Etats-Unis ont fait l'objet d'un tel traitement, l'habilité juridique de tous les conseillers de ces détenus n'ait pu garantir à ces derniers la protection que, selon le Gouvemement défendeur, le requérant dans • le couloir de la mort • n'a contesté avec succès le syndrome dudit couloir devant les tribunaux américains sur la base des arguments avancés par le Gouvemement défendeur .
B . La durée d'attente de l'appe l Le Gouvernement défendeur prétend que la législation de Califomie foumit des garanties procédurales permettant l'examen rapide des recours en cas de condamnation à mort . Le requérant soutient néanmoins qu'il suffit à la Commission d'examiner les retards effectifs qui se produisent constamment en Californie pour constater que la loi et la pratique incriminées n'empêchent pas des délais importants au cours de la procédure judiciaire . La procédure de recours en pareil cas auprès de la Cour supr@me de Califomie est automatique . Les demandes des détenus dans le couloi r
- 2pq -
de la mort désireux de renoncer à ce droit ont été expressément rejetées (Massie contre Summer, 101 S .Ct .899) . D'autres possibilités de recours devant la Cour suprême des Etats-Unis et de demandes d'habeas corpus par l'intermédiaire des tribunaux fédéraux de district sont ouvertes par la suite aux requérants s'ils le désirent . L'appelant qui est le plusprés d'avoir épuisé ces recours, un certain Harris, se trouve dans le couloir de la mort depuis mai 1979 et son recours, pendant devant la Cour suprème des Etats-Unis, devait étre tranché au cours du deuxi8me semestre de 1984 . 11 l'a de fait été en février 1984 . La Cour supréme de Californie est confrontée à un arriéré d'affaires, nonobstant le succés de plusieurs de ces recours . Huit condamnations à la peine capitale dont elle a été saisie en 1979n'ont pas encore été examinées, pas plus que 21 dont elle a été saisie en 1980 ni que celles dont elle a été saisie ultérieurement, 116 au total . Un élément qui contribue à ce retard tient à ce qu'il est extrémement difficile de trouver un défenseur compétent disposé à accepter des mandatsde l'importance que supposent les affaires de peine capitale étant donnée la rémunération relativement faible de ce travail . Ainsi, au 21 octobre 1983, au moins 23 détenus dans le couloir de la mort en Califomie ne s'étaient pas encore vu désigné un conseil, alors qu'au moins cinq d'entre eux se trouvaient dans-ledit couloir depuis plus de sept mois .C . Constitutionnalité d'une assurance que donnerait le ministre de la justic e
de ne pas requérir la peine capitale Le Gouvernement défendeur prétend qu'il serait inconstitutionnel de donner une assurance que la peine capitale ne sera pas imposée au requérant, ce avant qu'il ne soit jugé et reconnu coupable . Le requérant soutient que le ministre de la Justice de Californie a le pouvoir de demander, sans que l'on puissé le contrecarrer, que la peine capitale ne soit pas requise par le procureur du district, de sorte que cette peine capitale ne sera pas prononcée . En particulier, il pourrait y parvenir par analogie avec la pratique du • plea bargaining » (marchandage sur. la peine) à laquelle ni la Cour constitutionnelle californienne ni la Cour constitutionnelle fédérale n'imposent de limites . ta Cour supr@me des Etats-Unis ne cesse de confirmer le pouvoir d'un procureur de diminuer les chefs d'accusation contreun accusé en échange de l'acceptation de celui-ci de plaider coupable (Corbitt c . New Jersey, 439 US 212 ; Bordenkircher c . Hages, 434 US 357) . Le code pénal californien prévoit expressément le marchandage des chefs d'accusation et celui-ci, une fois qu'il est accepté par l'accusé, s'impose au procureur (par .exemple Geisser c . United States, 513 s .2d 862, et Santobello c . New York ; 404 US 257) . L'affaire Santobello portait sur un marchandage pour lequel le procureur était convenu de ne recommander aucune peine, mais un autre procureur s'était présenté au procès etil_avait recommandé la peine maxinude . La Cour suprème des Etats-Unis a estimé que le marchandage exigeait que le jugement fût cassé et l'affaire renvoyée à la première instance pour que celle-ci décidât si l'accor d
- 210 -
devait étre spécifiquement exécuté ou au contraire révoqué, auquel cas la plaidoirie de culpabilité de l'appelant devait être réputée caduque . Dans la présente affaire, le Gouvernement de Californie, par l'interrnédiaire de ses services de poursuites, pouvait promettre de ne pas demander la peine capitale au cours de la procédure portant spécifiquement sur la fixation de la peine qui suivrait une déclaration de culpabilité à l'encontre du requérant . Du moins les procureurs pourraient-ils s'engager à déployer .tous leurs effons• pour que la peine capitale ne soit pas prononcée contre le requérant ; une telle démarche laisserait aux juridictions californiennes le soin d'interpréter le .marchandage• ; or ce sont elles qui sont le mieux à même de trancher ces questions . En droit californien, si le procureur ne demande pas la peine capitale au cours de la procédure ponant sur la peine, cette peine ne peut pas étre prononcée . En pareil cas, si le jury estime l'accusé coupable d'infractions assez graves pour justifier la peine capitale, il prononcerait une peine d'emprisonnement à vie sans possibilité de libération conditionnelle . II n'y aurait alors pas place pour un recours automatique devant la Cour suprême de Californie ; partant, il n'y aurait pas de syndrome du couloir de la mort .
D . Insuffisance des assurances obtenues par le Gouvernement britanniqu e Selon le requérant, la présente recommandation du ministre de la Justice au Gouverneur de Califomie concernant l'exercice de son pouvoir de commuer les peines, est consultative et ne lie pas le Gouvemeur . Le fait que le Gouverneur défende énergiquement et fréquemment la peine capitale donne à penser que • la démarche • faisant état du vo_u du Royaume-Uni ne serait pas décisive dans le cas du requérant ; les risques que le requérant soit condamné à la peine capitale sont donc estimés à 99 % . Il serait loisible au Gouverneur de commuer ou de modifier la peine capitale sous réserve du titre 5, article 8, de la Constitution de la Califomie : .le Gouvemeur ne peut accorder la grâce ou une commutation de peine à une personne reconnue coupable par deux fois d'un crime que sur la recommandation d'une Cour supréme, l'avis de quatre juges concordant . .
II est probable que la Cour suprême de Californie telle qu'elle est composée actuellement concluerait en ce sens . Une indication de la volonté de commuer ou de modifier la peine capitale n'introduirait pas un élément d'arbitraire dans le processus de fixation de la peine capitale, ce qui pourrait étre inconstitutionnel . Le pouvoir de grâce n'est pas censé redresser des erreurs judiciaires ou une disproportion entre les peines qui pourrait fonder un recours constitutionnel . Le pouvoir de grâce a été reconnu à l'exécutif précisément pour permettre l'introduction de valeurs dont le processus judiciaire ne tient pas compte et, dans cette mesure, il introduit nécessairement une part d'arbitraire sous couvert d'une mesure de grâce .
L'assurance actuelle est de plus insuffisante puisque, comme c'est envisagé, elle prendrait effet après l'épuisement de la procédure de recours automatique devan t - 211 -
la Cour supréme de Californie, et donc apr2s que le requérant aurait passé plusieurs années au minimumdans le couloir de la mort en Californie .'Elle n'empécherait donc pas efficacement le traitement dont le requérant tire grief .
4 . Le requérant en tant que victim e Le requérant se réf8re à l'affaire Klass et rappelle que les dispositions procédurales de la Convention doivent s'appliquer d'une'maniérequi rende efficace le système des requêtes individuelles . R invite la Commission à tirer les conséquences de l'argumentation du Gouvernement défendeur au cas o ù elle auraitété appliquée aux faits de l'affaire Amekrane (Requête No 5961/72), si cette requête avait été introduite avant l'extradition . Selon le requérant, il ri sque d'être directement affecté par une situation particulière ; la Commission doit apprécier les éléinents pert inents pour évaluer la gravité de ce risque à la lumière de l' argumentation présentée p ar le requérant et le Gouve rnement défendeur . Précisément, la Conunission doit envisager le ri sque que le requérant soit reconnu coupable, et condamné à mo rt , s'il est extradé en Californie, ainsi que la durée probable de l'appel automatique qu'il serait réputé avoir interjeté, durée pendant laquelle il serait soumis à la tension psychologique provoquée par le couloir de la mo rt . Selon lui, son argumentation établit un commencement de preuve de la p robabilité du prononcé de la peine capitale, et de la durée d'un pare il appel . Pour établir l'existence d'un tel risque, le requérant prétend devoir montrer : a . qu'il y a un risque grave que le traitement allégué se produise ' et b . au cas où il se produirait, qu'il constituerait un traitement prohibé . Le requérant renvoie au critère proposé par la Cour dans l'affaire Irlande c/Royaume-Uni : . Une telle preuve peut résulter d'un faisceau d'indices, ou de présomptions non réfutées, suffisanuuent graves, précis et concordants . Le coritporteinent des Parties lors de la recherche des preuves entre en ligne de compte dans ce contexte . • La Commission doit doncexaminer s'il existé un commencement de preuv e d'un traitement d'une gravité telle qu'il souléverait un point litigieux sur le terrain de l'article 3 . Une telle appréciation peut se heurter à des difficultés en pratique lorsqu'elle porte sur le cours probable d'événements à venir ; cependant, certains traitements sont si graves qu'ils doivent en soi tomber sous le coup de l'article 3 . Selon le requérant, un inte rvalle de cinq ans ou davantage entre le prononcé et l'exécution de la peine capitale constitue en soi un traitement et une peine inhumains et dégradants au sens de l'a rticle 3 . Violation alléguée de l'a rt .icle 6 5 Le requérant se réfère à la décision de la Commission sur la recevabilité de l a
requête No 7945/77 (X . c/Norvége, D .R . 14 p . 228) dans laquelle elle a reconnu que, bien que l'examen de la procédure sous l'angle de l'anicle 6 ne puisse se fair e - 212 -
que par rapport à la procédure dans son ensemble, un aspect déterminé de la procédure peut être capital au point que l'équité de la procédure puisse être contestée à un stade précoce . D'aprés le requérant, la procédure d'extradition en droit anglais est une procédure pénale de plein droit et a des conséquences majeures .pour lui, la décision du magistrat portant sur des points de droit et de fait qui sônt couverts par la signification de l'expression «bien-fondé» figurant dans le texte français de l'article 6 . Dans l'affaire Delcoun, la Cour a estimé que l'instance de cassation . peut se révéler capitale pour l'accusé ( . . .) . Panant, on concevrait mal qu'elle échappe à l'empire de l'article 6 par : 1 . .Demê e,danslarequêteNo8269/78(X . c/Autriche), la Corrunission a estimé que, bien que la décision incriminée d'un tribunal autrichien ne constituàt pas une condamnation au sens propre, elle n'en pouvait pas moin s -avoir des effetsjuridiques préjudiciables au requérant . . . Dans ces circonstances, la Commission estime que l'affaire soulève des problémes quant à l'application de l'anicle 6 de la Convention . . De plus, dans une procédure pénale normale préalable à un procès normal, des manquements dans la procédure de mise en prévention peuvent être redressés au procés . Dans une procédure d'extradition, cette faculté n'est pas ouverte dans le cadre du contrôle exercé par la Convention, lorsque le pays de destination n'est pas partie à celle-ci . Enfin, bien que l'article 12 de la Convention européenne d'extradition n'ezige pas des Etats qu'ils instituent des tribunaux appelés à décider s'il y a ou non un commencement de preuve contre un individu avant son extradition, selon le requérant, lorsque de tels tribunaux existent, les dispositions del'article 6 doivent s'appliquer (Affaire Delcourt, mutatis mutandis) . De plus, le fait que les garanties de l'article 5 s'appliquent à la détention du requérant en attendant son expulsion, n'exclut pas en soi que l'article 6 entre lui aussi en jeu . 6. Dentande Le requérant prétend qu'il a ainsi apporté un commencement de preuve d'une affaire méritant un plus ample examen de la part de la Commission conformément aux articles 28 et 42 du Règlement intérieur et/ou il demande que sa requête soit déclarée recevable.
EN DROIT I . Le requérant se plaint que son extradition en Califomie constituerait un traitement inhumain et dégradant contraire à l'article 3 de la Convention puisque, s'il était extradé, il serait jugé de deux chefs d'homicide et d'une tentative d'homicide, probablement reconnu coupable et condamné à mon . Il ne prétend pas que la peine capitale en tant que telle constitue un traitement inhumain et dégradant contraire à l'article 3 mais que les circonstances - en particulier le syndronie du • couloir de la mon . qu i
- 213 -
entourent l'exécution de cette peine capitale, qui se fait pzr trop attendre dans le cas d'une procédure de recours s'étendant snr plusieurs années, pendant lesquelles il serait rongé par l'incertitude quant à l'issue des recours et donc quant à son sort, constitueraient-un traitemént inhumaiqet dégradant . Le Gouvernement défendeur soutient que le requérant ne peut se prétendre victime d'une violation de la Convention, d'abord parce que les é léments qui pourraient donner lieu à une violation alléguée de la Convention sont t rop éloignés et incértains, et en outre, parce que la Commission n'est pas compétente ratione loci ponr se prononcer sur la requéte, tout acte éventuel du Gouvernement défendeur ne contribuant pas assez directement aux circonstances qui pourraient, est-il allégué, donnerJieu à une violati on de l'a rt icle 3 .
2 . Le requérant en tant,que victim e La Commission rappelle d'abord sa jurisprudence relative à l'interprétation d lanotid .victimé• au sens .de l'article 25 par : . l de la Convention .-Selon cett ee jurispmdence, les conditions de l'article 25 par . 1 de la Conventiôn sonCremplies . de la part de l'une des Hautes Parties Contractantes• une violation, des droits énoncés par la Convention . Le requérant doit donc démontrer que l'Etat est responsable des actes dont il tire grief et que ceux-ci se rapportent à la vioÎation alléguée de l'un des droits reconnus dans la Convention . -Danslaprésenteafaire,lerequérantprétendquesonextraditonparl e Royaume-Uni aux Etats-Unis d'Amérique engendrerait, .dans les circonstances particulières de son affaire, une situation qui serait contraire à l'article 3 . II est actuellement détenu en vértu des lois de 1870 et 1935 sur l'extradition, par .lé Gouvernement défendeur à l'autorité duquel il est soumis . Son extradition en Californie a été officiellement requise par le Gouvemement des Etats-Unis, et sa remise aux autorité saméricne,lpoduitsranceGouvmntdéfer . De plus, la remise et l'extradition du requérant sont imminentes . Le ministre a signé les documents pertinents autorisant la remise du requérant, encore que celleci ait été temporairement suspendue par la procédure introduite au Royaume-Uni pour contester l'exercice du pouvoir discrétionnaire du ministre en ce qu'il serait illégal . Dans ces circonstances, le requérant est immédiatement et directement concerné par le risque d'extradition .
Selon lui, son extradition entraînerait des conséquences constituant un traitement inhumain et dégradant contraire à l'article 3 . Cela étant, face à un acte inuninent de l'exécutif dont les conséquences exposeraient le requérant ; selon lui, à un` traitement prohibé par l'article 3, la Commission estime que le requérant peut se prétendre victime d'une violation alléguée de l'article 3 . Reste à la Commission la tâche d'examiner si les faits qui, d'après le requérant, constituent un traitemenfcontrair eàl'artic3,sondugvtéelq'isombn:ulecpdtison -214-
'silerquéantp drequ'ilsbao ,
3 . La tcsponsabWté du Gouvernement défendeu r Le Cmuvernement défendeur soutient néanmoins que la requête est incompatible rarione loci avec la Convention, puisque les faits attaqués par le requérant et qui constitueraient la violation alléguée de l'article 3 de la Convention surviendraient dans un Etat non partie à la Convention, les Etats-Unis d'Amérique, et relèveraient de sa seule responsabdité . Selon le Gouvemement défendeur, dans la mesure où le Royaume-Uni contribuerait tant soit peu à la situation dont le requérant tire grief, cette contribution n'est pas assez directe pour engager la responsabilité de l'Etat .
La Commission a reconnu dans sa jurisprudence antérieure que l'extradition d'une personne peut, dans des cas exceptionnels, poser un problème sur le terrain de l'article 3 de la Convention lorsque l'extradition est envisagée vers un pays où, •en raison de la nature même du régime de ce pays ou de la situation particulière qui y règne, des droits humains fondamentaux, tels que ceux qui sont garantis par la Convention, pourraient étre soit grossièrement violés, soit entièrement supprimés . (X . c/République Fédérale d'Allemagne, requéte No 1802/62, Annuaire 6, pp . 463-481, Altun c/République Fédérale d'Allemagne, requéte No 10308/83, D .R . 36, p . 209) . La Commission a reconnu en outre que : • si, en effet, la matière de l'extradition et du droit d'asile ne compte point, par elle-même, au nombre de celles que régit la Convention . . . les Etats contractants n'en ont pas moins accepté de restreindre le libre exercice des pouvoirs que leur confère le droit international général, y compris celui de cootr0ler l'entrée et la sortie des étrangers, dans la mesure et la limite des obligations, qu'ils ont assumé en vertu de la Convention . (Requête No 2143/64, Annuaire 7, p . 315 p. 329) . Selon la jurisprudence de la Commission relative aux cas d'extradition au regard de l'article 3 de la Convention, le seul facteur entrant en ligne de compte est l'existence d'un danger objectif pour la personne extradée . Etablir qu'un tel danger existe n'implique pas nécessairement une responsabilité étatique, qui pi!serait sur l'Etat requérant l'extradition ; dans certains cas, la Commission a tenu compte de dangers qui n'étaient pas imputables à des actes d'autorités publiques dans le pays de destination (requêtes No 7216/75, D .R . 5 p . 137, No 8581/79, non publiée) . Si la situation qui règne dans un pays est telle que le ri sque qu'un Iraitement répréhensible ne se produise et la gravité d'un traitement tombent sous le coup de l'article 3 de la Convention, une décision d'expulser, d'extrader ou de refouler un individu qui sera confronté à une telle situation fait peser la responsabilité visée à l'a rt icle I de la Convention sur l'Etat contractant qui en décide ainsi (Altun clRépublique Fédérale d'Allemagne, requête No 10308/83, En droit, p ar. 5-10, D.R . 36, p . 209 et 219, 220) .
La Commission confirme cette interprétation qui repose sur le libellé très large de l'ar ticle 3 de la Convention et sur l'obligation faite par cet article combiné à l'article 1 aux Pa rties Contractantes de la Convention de protéger •toute pe rs onne - 215 -
relevant de leur juridiction • contre le`risque réel d'un tel traitément compte tenu de son caractère irrémédiable . L'artide 2 par . 1 empêche-t-il de tenir le syndrome du couloir de la .4 mort pour un traitement Inhumain ° Le Gouvemement défendeur soutient de plus que le « syndrome du couloir de la mort•, c'est-à-dire le retard dont le requérant se plaint au cas où il serait reconnu coupable et condamné à mort, dû à la procédure de recours qui sera inévitablement engagée s'il y a déclaration de culpabilité et condamnation, et qui retardera inévitablement l'exécution de celle-ci, ne saurait constituer un traitement ou une peine inhumaine ou dégradants contraires à l'atticle 3 de la Convention, vu les dispositions de l'article 2 . Aux terrnes du paragraphe 1 de celui-ci : «Le droit de toute personne à la vie est protégé par la loi . La mort ne peut étre infligée à quiconque intentionnellement, sauf en exécution d'une sentence capitale prononcée par un tribunal au cas où le délit est puni de cette peine par la loi . . Le Gouvernement défendeur relève que la deuxième phrase de l'article 2 par . 1 de lâ Convention prévoit expressément l'imposition de la peine capitale par un tribunal, après déclaration de culpabilité concernant une infraction pour laquelle cette peine est prévue par la loi . Selon lui, la référence aux dispositions de la .loi • à propos d'une condamnation pénale suppose nécessairement pour l'application de la peine capitale un système judiciaire comportant des garanties convenables que cette disposition sera respectée, y compris, le cas échéant, un système de recours, de manière que la condamnation à la peine capitale ne puisse être arbitraire . Il précise qu'aux Etats-Unis d'Amérique, et particulièrement en Californie, de telles garanties existent et règlent avec une grande précision l'usage de la peine capitale en cas d'une condamnation pénale . Toutefois, un système qui, tout en prévoyant des garanties et des recours légaux, n'assortirait pas ces derniers d'un effet suspensif, ne tiendrait pas compte de la nature de la peine capitale, sanction ultime . Selon le Gouvernement défendeur, il s'ensuit que tout retard provoqué par les possibilités de recours et de contr6lejudiciaire du prononcéde la peine capitale après déclaration de culpabilité est implicitement prévu par l'article 2 par . 1 de la Convention, et ne saurait donc constituer un traitement inhumain et dégradant contraire à l'article 3 .
' Ia Commission ne saurait souscrire à cet argument . Tout en reconnaissant que la Convention doit se lire comme un tout, il convient de donner à ses dispositions respectives le poids qui leur revient lorsqu'il peut y avoir un chevauchement implicite, ét les organes de la Convention doivent ne doivent pas facilement tirer d'un texte des conclusions qui restreindraient le sens exprès d'un autre texte . Comme la Cour et la Commission l'ont reconnu l'une et l'autre, l'article 3 ne souffre aucune limitation . Ses termes sont absolus . Cet aspect fondamental de I'article 3 reflète sa position clé dans la structure des droits de la Convention ; - 216 -
l'article 15 par . 2 qui n'autorise aucune dérogation à cet article, même en temps de guerre ou autre danger public menaçant la vie de la nation, en témoigne encore davantage . Dans ces circonstances, la Commission considère que, nonobstant les terme s de l'article 2 par . 1, elle ne saurait exclure que les circonstances entourant la protection de l'un des autres droits consacrés par la Convention puissent soulever un point litigieux sous l'angle de l'article 3 .
5 . Nature du traitemen t (a) Le risque d'e.xposition l.a Commission doit donc examiner la nature du traitement auquel le requérant sera soumis, selon lui, s'il est extradé, et la gravité du risque qui en découle, de manière à apprécier s'il est d'une gravité suffisante pour soulever un point litigieux sur le terrain de l'article 3 de la Convention . La Commission doit d'abord envisager l'importance du risque que le requérant court d'étre reconnu coupable des infractions dont il est accusé, et d'être condamné à la peine capitale . Le Gouvemement défendeur prétend qu'il serait inapproprié de préjuger l'issue soit de la procédure destinée à établir la responsabilité pénale, soit de celle relative à la peine, et que cene incertitude a pour conséquence que le requérant n'est pas exposé à un risque réel de traitement contraire à l'article 3 . Selon le requérant, vu les éléments de preuve dont dispose l'accusation, il est hautement probable qu'il sera reconnu coupable des infractions dont il est accusé . Quant à la question de la peine, elle est régie par des dispositions spécifiques du Code pénal califomien . Celui-ci prévoit des "circonstances spéciales" précises que le jury doit prendre en compte pour déterminer la peine, y compris la mise en balance de de circonstances atténuantes et aggravantes qui incombe au jury avant de fixer la peine . II soutient que, vu les circonstances qui entourent sa participation alléguée aux infractions en question, ses antécédents criminels et sa participation supposée à l'organisation connue sous le nom de "Tribal Thumb", il est fort probable qu'il sera reconnu coupable et condamné à mort . L'avis produit par le représentant du requérant et établi par un avocat spécialiste du droit pénal califomien indique qu'il y a 99 % de risques que le requérant soit reconnu coupable et condamné à mort . Au vu des informations dont elle dispose, la Commission juge élevée la probabilité que le requérant, s'il est reconnu coupable, soit condamné à mort, encore qu'elle ne puisse préjuger cette question, qui dépend de l'issue de la procédure . Quoi qu'il en soit, elle estime que le risque est suffisamment réel et immédiat pourjustifier qu'elle examine d'autres aspects de la gravité du traitement auquel le requérant sera selon lui soumis .
(b) La durée et la cause des délais La plainte du requérant est centrée sur la tension psychologique et l'incertitude qu'il éprouvera inévitablement pendant la procédure de recours contre décisio n - 217 -
prononçant la peine capitale . fi soutient que la duré e d'une telle procédure et le caractère vital de son issue créeront des circonstances constituant un traitement ou une peine inhumains et dégradants . La Commission relève d'abord que le recours contre une sentence de mort est automatique en Califomie . 0 est prévu par l'alinéa 7 de l'article 1181 du Code pénal de Californie, en vertu duquel le défendeur est réputé avoir présenté une demande en modification du verdict lorsqu'il s'agit d'un verdict de mon . En se prononçant sur une telle demande, le juge réexamine les éléments de preuve en tenant compte et en se laissant guider par les circonstances aggravantes et atténuantes visées à l'article 190 .3 du Code pénal de Califomie et dit si les conclusions et le verdict du jury vont à l'encontre de la loi ou des éléments de preuve produits . D existe un autre recours automatique en vertu de l'alinéa (b) de l'article 1239 du Code . 0 ressort de l'argumentation des parties que le requérant n'a pas la faculté d'empêcher la présentation d'une telle demande en modification du verdict, qui sera engagée avec ou sans consentement et il n'est pas contesté que le nombre et la complexité de ces recours automatiques provoquent des retards . Le requérant soutient en outre que le manque d'avocats qualifiés disposés à assurer la défense de condamnés à la peine capitale dans ces procédures entraine des retards s'ajoutant à ceux inhérents au système de recours autometique .
Les délais globaux sont importants . Selon les chiffres fournis par le requérant, en mars 1983, 115 personnes attendaient leur exécùtfon en Californie, et 1147 pour l'ensemble des Etats-Unis . Un nombre important de délinquants ont été condamnés à la peine capitale depuis la réintroduction de celle-ci en Califorriie en 1977 . Deux de ceux dont la Cour suprême a confirmé la péine avaient attendu respectivement 9 et 23 mois . Quatre ans et demi plus tard, aucun d'entre eux n'avait été exécuté apparemment en raison de recours au niveau fédéral, alors que l'un et l'autre encouraient encore l'exécution . Pamù les appelants restants se trouvant dans le «couloir de la mort •, l'un avait attendu cinq ans en Californie le résultat de son recours, qui n'a pas encore fait l'objet d'une décision . Depuis 1981, année pendant laquelle 44 personnes ont attendu dans le couloir de la mort l'issue de leurs recours en Californie, lesquels étaient encore pendants, des décisions ont été prises dans très peu de cas et dans l'un d'eux, l'affaire Ramos, dont la peine avait été commuée par la Cour suprême de Califomie, la peine capitale a été prononcée à nouveau sur recours de l'Etat de Californie devant la Cour suprême des Etats-Unis, le 6 juillet 1983 . Les infractions pour lesquelles Ramos était jugé avaient été commises en juin 1979 . D'après le requérant, .le laps de temps moyen entre le prononcé de la peine capitale et sa modification, son annulation ou sa confirmation par la Cour suprême de Californie est jusqu'à présent de deux ans, encore que plusieurs affaires aient demandé quatre ans avant d'être résolues . 7butefois, toujours d'après le requérant, ce laps de temps s'allonge en raison d'une accumulation croissatfte d'affaires qui attendent l'arrêt de IaCour suprême de Californie .-218
6 . l .es assurances obtenuec Le Gouvernement défendeur prétend que, nonobstant le temps que les recours peuvent prendre avant une décision dans le cadre de la procédure .automatique• devant la Cour supréme de Californie, le requérant, vu son cas particulier, ne sera pas exposé à l'angoisse psychologique du syndrome du couloir de la mort, étant donné la forme des assurances que le Gouvernement britannique a obtenue des autorités compétentes des Etats-Unis . Le Gouvernement défendeur soutient que ces assurances (reproduites plus haut) auront pour effet que, si le requérant est reconnu coupable et condamné à la peine capitale, celles-ci seront respectées et il ne sera pas exécuté .
L'attestation sous serment donnée par écrit par le du ministre adjoint de la justice de Californie contenant les assurances a été transmise sous le couvert du Gouverneur de l'Etat de Californie et figure déjà au dossier de celui-ci concernant l'affaire du requérant . L'attestation rappelle que le procureur a donné son accord aux assurances ; celles-ci comme l'attestation écrite y relative seront versées au dossier qui sera déféré au Gouverneur si une demande en grSce est introduite . Le dossier sera examiné par une commission de libération qui fera rapport au Gouverneur, dont la décision sur une commutation éventuelle de la peine, sera définitive . Le requérant a fait valoir que les assurances obtenues ne remplissent pas les conditions de l'article IV du Traité d'extradition entre le Royaume-Uni et les EtatsUnis et ne prendront effet, éventuellement, qu'après épuisement des recours dont dispose le requérant . Il soutient en outre que la valeur des assurances données doit s'interpréter compte tenu du fait qu'il sera loisible aux organes de poursuites de Californie de s'engager à ne pas requérir la peine capitale à l'encontre du requérant et donc de le soustraire au syndrome du couloir de la mort, puisque si la peine capitale n'est pas requise au cours de la procédure de fixation de la peine, elle ne pourra etre prononcée . La Commission relève d'abord que la Convention ne renferme aucune disposition expresse relative à l'obtention d'assurances entre Etats pour la mise en muvre d'accords en matière d'extradition . Elle rappelle qu'elle a pour t3che en pareil cas, conune pour toutes les autres requêtes, d'examiner si les faits incriminés par le requérant constituent la violation qu'd allègue . C'est donc aux différentes Hautes Parties Contractantes qu'il appartient de décider quelles conditions doivent régir leurs accords avec d'autres Etats en matière d'extradition et la manière dont elles veilleront à se conformer aux exigences de la Convention dans l'exercice de la responsabilité de l'Etat, notamment en matiére d'extradition .
ll est clair que l'engagement obtenu par le Gouvernement britannique opérera une fois que le requérant aura épuisé les voies de recours qui lui sont ouvertes au moins en Californie, et éventuellement dans le ressort fédéral des Etats-Unis . A ce propos, le requérant soutient que ledit engagement n'empEche pas le traitement don t - 219 -
il se plaint, c'est-èdire le délai intolérable s'accompagnant d'angoisse et d'incertitade quant à l'issue des recours, à savoir le •syndrome du couloir de la mort » . D'un autre côté, les assurances obtenues ont apparemment été données de bonne foi, émanent du ministre adjoint de la justice de Californie et ont été certifiées par l'office du Gouvemeur . Elles sont versées au dossier relatif à l'affaire du requérantet devront être examinées dans l'éventualité d'une demande en grfice introduite par lui . La Commission arrive à la conclusion que, bien que la portée et la valetir réelle des assumnces ne peuvent que rester incertaines, cette incertitude découle en partie du fait qu'on ignore actuellement si ces assurances devront être ou non invoquées, puisque le requérant n'a pas, pour l'instant, été reconnu coupable ou condamné pour les infractions dont il est accusé . Ls Commission doit aussi recomadtre quele Gouvernement britannique a demandé et obtendces assurances en étant pleinement conscient des obligations que lui imposent les tennes de la Convention, qui exige d'un gouvernement qu'il demande, le cas échéant, des assurances qu'un traitement contraire à l'anicle 3 sera évité en cas d'extradition . La Commission ne peut dire que les assurances obtenues ont supprimé le risque que le requérant soit exposé au syndrome du couloir de la mort . Elles ne représentent pa.s une ganmtie juridique que, si la peine de mort est prononcée à l'encontré du requérant, elle sera commuée . En revanche, vu les dispositions de l'article 2 par . 1 de la Convention, qui reconnatl expressément qu'il peutétre mis fin à la vie par l'exécution d'une sentence capitale à la suite d'une condamnation pénale régulière, les termes de l'article 3 n'exigent ni expressément ni implicitement de telles assurances . De même que les tertnes de l'article 2 par . 1 de la Convention n'excluent pas en soi la possibilité que le syndrome du couloir de la mort constitue un traitement inhumain et dégradant, ils ont en outre pour effet que l'omission de demander des assurances juridiquement contraignantes qu'une peine capitale, si elle est prononcée, sera assurément commuée, ne constitue pas en soi un traitement contraire à l'article 3 .
Appréciatlon de la gravité D reste donc à la Commission la tâche d'apprécier l'effet de l'angoisse à laquelle le requérant demeurera soumis au cours des procédures de recours, puis du risque de sacondamnation et, partant, la question de savoir si, au vu des faits de la présente affaire .le syndrome du couloir de la mort » revêt une gravité telle qu'il emporte un traitement contraire à l'article 3 de la Convention .
Pour les raisons qui suivent, la Commission estime que, quelque graves que puissent étre le risque et le traitement que le requérant pourrait subir, ils n'atteignent pas le degré de gravité visé à l'articlé 3 de la Convention . D'abord, la Commission note l'existence de mesures complexes et détaillées destinées à accélérer l'organisation des recours dans les affaires de peine capirale en Californie .Elle en veut pour preuve la priorité accordée à ce type d'affaires par le parquet du district, en vertu de laquelle les juristes chargés d'un recours concernan t - 220 -
une telle affaire sont relevés de toutes leurs autres responsabilités pour pouvoir s'attacher exclusivement à la préparation de cette procédure, de même que le délai formel imparti it la Cour suprême par l'article 190 .6 du Code pénal, qui exige qu'elle se prononce sur les recours dans un délai de 150 jours à compter de la date où la transcription intégrale du procès lui est transmise . Certes, il subsiste des retards dans l'examen des recours en vertu de la procédure automatique existant en Californie, mais la Commission ne saurait perdre de vue l'énorme importance de ces recours pour chacun de ceux dont la vie dépend de l'issue de l'affaire . Dans ces circonstances, la tradition de la prééminence du droit qui inspire les principes de la Convention exige que l'examen de toute affaire dont les effets seront à ce point irrémédiables pour l'intéressé soit absolument complet . Une partie du retard dont le requérant se plaint est dû à un ensemble de procédures destinées à protéger la vie, cette protection étant la pierre angulaire de tous les autres droits . La Contmission doit aussi voir un effet de l'importance accordée par les tribunaux américains à la protection de la vie et de la dignité de l'homme dans ce que, bien que la peine capitale existe réellement en Californie, les tribunaux veillent constamment à conserver toute son importance à la protection de ces valeurs fondamentales . La Cour suprême de Californie a indiqué dans l'affaire People against Anderson (493 P .2d 880) qu'elle était préte à examiner l'argument selon lequel le délai d'exécution de la peine capitale pourrait être une reison de relever l'intéressé de cette peine et que le syndrome du couloir de la mort, sinon la peine capitale e0eméme, pourrait donc passer pour une peine cruelle ou inhabituelle contraire aux constitutions californienne ou américaine . Le requérant a relevé qu'un tel argument n'a pas encore réussi à mettre un terme au syndrome du couloir de la mort . La Commission n'en reste pas moins consciente des développements rapides de la jurispmdence que permet le système de la conunon law . Elle relève qu'il est établi que le syndrome du couloir de la mort constitue désormais un élément à partir duquel il est possible d'alléguer une peine cruelle ou inhabituelle aux Etats-Unis, et elle ne saurait ignorer la similitude entre cette notion et celle des traitements inhumains et dégradants de l'article 3 de la Convention .
D'ailleurs, et c'est révélateur, le requérant prétend que le syndrome du couloir de la mort s'aggrave en raison de l'accumulation des affaires dont la Cour suprême de Californie est actuellement saisie . R ressort des statistiques produites par le requérant que dans aucune affaire où la peine capitale a été prononcée en premi8re instance en 1981 ou après il n'a encore été statué dans le cadre du recours automatique par la Cour supréme de Californie . Autrement dit, il y a un retard croissant des affaires, et le temps moyen que les détenus du couloir de la mort passeront à attendre l'issue de leurs recours automatiques en Californie risque de s'allonger, sauf si des mesures sont prises pour accélérer ces procédures . Cependant, cet argument même donne à penser que, si ces circonstances surgissent dans une affa've particulière, l'intéress é - 221 -
aura de meilleurs motifs que jusqu'à présent de faire valoir devant les tribunaux californiens que le syndrome du couloir de la mort constitue une peine cruelle ou inhabimelle . Voilit qui met en évidence un autre élément à prendre en compte pour apprécier la gravité du syndrome du couloir de la mort dans le contexte de l'article 3, c'est-àdire l'incertitude quant au point de savoir si le requérant sera ou non exposé à ce syndrome . Au vu des éléments de preuve qui lui ont été fournis, la Commission doit considérer comme probable que, s'il est reconnu coupable, le requérant sera exposé au dit syndrome . Cependant, elle ne peut l'admettre comme un fait, et il est important de relever que le requérant aura un procès équitable respectant des garanties équivalentes à celles que renferme la Convention avant que ne soit arrété une décision qui aurait pour résultat de le soumettre au couloir de la mort . Dans la présente affaire, la Commission n'a pas pour tâche d'apprécier, en tant que probabilité mathématique, le risque que le requérant soit exposé au traitement dont il se plaint, mais d'eiaminer le dispositif judiciaire auquel il sera soumis et d'établir s'il existe des facteurs aggravants pouvant suggérer l'arbitraire ou le caractère déraisonnable de son fonctionnement . Au vu des éléments produits par le requérant, la Conunission estime cependant que les affaires de peine capitâle sont examinées avec la vigllance particulière nécessaire pour assurer le respect des normes de protection reconnues par les Constitutions californienne et américaine, pour que l'arbitraire soit exclu . Dans ces circonstances, la Commission n'estime pas que les retards apportés à l'exécution de la peine capitale en Californie tels qu'ils pourraient s'appliquer au requérant constitue une -situation particuliére• comme celle envisagée dans la requête No 1 802/62 (supra) .
Enfin, le requérant a aussi prétendu que les conditions effectives de détention dans lesquelles il sera placé, au cas où il serait reconnu coupable et condamné à la peine capitale, soulèvent un point litigieux sur le terrain de l'anicle 3 . Le requérant a soumis à cet égard des rapports qui révèlent que les conditions de détention dans le couloir de la mort en Californie peuvent être rigoureuses . D appert que les prisonniers du couloir de la mon en Califomie sont détenus dans une partie séparée du quartier pénitentiaire de haute sécurité . Néanmoins, en dépit des dispositions de sécurité qui s'appliquent, il apparait que les détenus peuvent prendre de l'exercice en dehors de leurs cellules et celles-ci sont, dans certains cas, mieux équipées et plus vastesque celles des détenus purgeant de longues peines . De surcroit, les détenus ont diverses possibilités récréatives, reçoivent un traitement médical, ont accès à des publications et périodiques . Panant, rien ne montre que les conditions de détention des détenus du couloir de la mort soient si rigoureuses qu'elles constituent un aspect très aggravant à prendre en compte pour apprécier la gravité des griefs du requérant . - 222 -
8 . Concluslon La Commission remarque que l'on peut constater une certaine divergence entre les articles 2 et 3 de la Convention . Alors que l'article 3 proscrit toutes les formes de traitement et de peine inhumains et dégradants sans exception d'aucune sorte, le droit à la vie n'est pas protégé d'une manière absolue . L'article 2 par . 1 prévoit expressément la possibilité de prononcer la peine capitale •en exécution d'une sentence capitale prononcée par un tribunal au cas où le délit est puni de cette peine par la loi . Dans ce contexte, le syndrome du couloir de la mort crée un dilemme . D'une part, un système de recours d'une durée prolongée engendre une angoisse aiguë pendant de longues périodes en raison de l'issue incertaine, mais éventuellement favorable, de chacun des recours successifs . En revanche, une accélération du système entraînerait des exécutions plus rapides dans des affaires où les recours n'aboutissent pas . Le système des recours de la Californie a pour but essentiel d'assurer la protection du droit à la vie et d'empêcher l'arbitraire . Bien que son fonctionnement subisse des retards sérieux, ceux-ci sont soumis au contrôle des tribunaux . Dans la présente affaire, le requérant n'a pas étéjugé ni reconnu coupable ci le risque qu'il soit exposé au couloir de la mort est incertain . Vu les raisons qui ont été développées ci-dessus, la Commission estime qu'il n'a pas été établi que le traitement auquel le requérant sera exposé, et le risque qu'il y soit exposé, sont si graves qu'ils constituent un traitement ou une peine inhumains ou dégradants contraires à l'article 3 de la Convention . Il s'ensuit que cet aspect de la requête est manifestement mal fondé au sens de l'article 27 par . 2 de la Convention .
9 . Artlcle 6 Le requérant invoque l'article 6 à propos de la procédure relative à son extradition du Royaume-Uni et prétend n'avoir pas bénéficié des garanties de l'article 6 par . 3 d) et singulièrement de la possibilité de procéder à un interrogatoire croisé des témoins à charge au stade de de la procédure préalable à l'extradition . Il relève que, si au cours d'un procès normal au Royaume-Uni, toute erreur survenue au stade du renvoi peut Etre redressée au cours de la procédure de jugement, dans la présente affaire le strade préalable revét une importance paniculiére, puisque le jugement du requérant aura lieu en dehors de la juridiction du Royaume-Uni .
La Commission rappelle sa décision sur la recevabilité de la requête No 10227/82, H . c/Espagne ( 1), où elle a examiné si la procédure d'extradition supposait •une décision . sur une accusation en matié re pénale . Elle a reconnu que l e (I) Voir p . 93 .
- 223 -
terme • décision . suppose un processus complet du processus d'examen de la culpabilité ou de l'innocence de l'individu . La procédure en Espagne ne comportant pas l'examen de la question de la culpabilité du requérant, mais simplement celui du point de savoir si les conditions formelles de l'extradition avaient été réunies, cette requête avait été déclarée irrecevable . La présente affaire concerne elle aussi l'extradition mais la Commission relève que les t3ches de la Magistrates' Court incluent l'appréciation de la question de savoir si, au vu des éléments de preuve, il existe un minimum de prévention contre le requérant . Cette appréciation suppose nécessairement un examen, limité, des questions qui seront décisives dans le proc8s lui-même du requérant . Néanmoins, la Conunission estime que cette procédure ne faisait pas partie de la décision sur la culpabilité ou l'innocence du requérant, laquelle fera l'objét aux Etats-Unis d'une procédure distincte dont on peut penser qu'elle respectera des normes d'équité équivalent aux conditions del'article 6, y compris la présomption d'innocence, quelle qu'ait éié la procédure de mise en prévention . Dans ces circonstances, la Commission conclut que cette procédure ne faisait pas et ne fait pas partie de la décision sur une accusation en mati8re pénale, au sens de l'article 6 de la Cônvention . Cet aspect du grief du requérant est donc incompatible ratione materiae avec les dispositions de la Convention, au sens de son article 27 par . 2 .
Par ces motifs, la Commissio n DÉCLARE LA REQUÉTEIRRECEVABLE .
- 224 -

Origine de la décision

Formation : Cour (chambre)
Date de la décision : 12/03/1984

Fonds documentaire ?: HUDOC

HUDOC
Association des cours judiciaires suprêmes francophones Organisation internationale de la francophonie

Juricaf est un projet de l'AHJUCAF, l'association des cours judiciaires suprêmes francophones,
réalisé en partenariat avec le Laboratoire Normologie Linguistique et Informatique du droit (Université Paris I).
Il est soutenu par l'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie et le Fonds francophone des inforoutes.