Facebook Twitter Appstore
Page d'accueil > Résultats de la recherche

§ SCOTTS' OF GREENOCK (Estd. 1711) Ltd, LITHGOWS Ltd (formerly LITHGOWS HOLDINGS Ltd) contre le ROYAUME-UNI

Imprimer

Type d'affaire : Décision
Type de recours : Partiellement irrecevable ; partiellement recevable

Numérotation :

Numéro d'arrêt : 9599/81
Identifiant URN:LEX : urn:lex;coe;cour.europeenne.droits.homme;arret;1985-03-11;9599.81 ?

Analyses :

(Art. 13) DROIT A UN RECOURS EFFECTIF, (Art. 14) DISCRIMINATION, (Art. 3) PEINE DEGRADANTE, (Art. 3) PEINE INHUMAINE


Parties :

Demandeurs : SCOTTS' OF GREENOCK (Estd. 1711) Ltd, LITHGOWS Ltd (formerly LITHGOWS HOLDINGS Ltd)
Défendeurs : le ROYAUME-UNI

Texte :

APPLICATION/REQUÉTE N° 9599/8 1 SCOTTS' OF GREENOCK (Estd . 1711) Ltd, ) v/the UNITED KINGDOM LITHGOWS Ltd (formerly LITHGOWS HOLDINGS Ltd) c/ROYAUME-UN I DECISION of I I March 1985 on the admissibility of the application DÉCISION du 11 mars 1985 sur la recevabilité de la requêt e
Article 26 of the Convention : Compensation on nationalisation. 7he six months' period runs from dare of the final decision following effective and adequate remedies or, if there are no remedies, the challenged act or decision if it determines ftnally the individual's position at the domestic level . Applicarion relating to the amount of compensarion following nationalisation of a business : the six months' period runs not from the date of the nationalising legislation but from rhe moment when the compensafion to shareholders is determined . To the extent that the applicants challenge the legal norms governing compensation following nationalisation of their business, but not the way in which such norms were applied by the competent authority in their case, a cou rt appeal purely on points of law is not a remedy which must be exhausted. Article 1 orthe First Protocol : Dispute on compensation to shareholders following nationalisation of a business (Application declared admissible) .
A rticle 26 de la Convention : /ndemnisation après narionalisation . Le délai de six mois court dès la date de la décision interne définitive après exercice des recours intemes efi'icaces et suffisants ou, s'il n'esiste pas de recours, dès l'acte ou la décision incrintinés s'ils fixent définitivement la siruation de l'intéressé au plan interne. S'agissant d'une requéte poriant sur le montant d'une indemnité après nationalisation d'une entreprise, le délai de six mois coun non à partir de la loi ponant nationalisation mais à partir du moment où est fixée l'indemnité à payer aux actionnaires.
33
Dans la mesure où les requérants s'en prennent aux nonnes légales d'indemnisation après nationalisation de leur entreprise, mais non à la manière dont ces normes ont été appliquées dans leur cas par l'aworité comp(tente, un recours judiciaire de pure légalité n'est pas un recours dont !'e.rercice est requis . Article 1 du Protocole additionnel : La'tige portant sur l'indemnisation des actionnaires après nationalisation d'une entreprise (Requête déclarée recevable) .
THE FACTS
(français : voir p . 43)
The facts of the case as submi tt ed by the parties may be stnnrnarised as follows : The first and second applicants . Scotts' of Greenock (Estd . 1711) Limited and Lithgows Limited (formerly Lithgows Holdings Limited), are limited companies incorporated in Scotland with registered offices in Greenock . These two applicants were originally joined by a third, the Bank of Nova Scotia Trust Company (Bahamas) Limited . However, on 22 July 1983 this third applicant notified the Commission of the withdrawal of its application on the ground that its claim was clearly inadmissible following the Commission's decision on admissibility in the Nationalisation Cases (Applications No . 9006/80 and others) (I) . The applicants are represented by Mr . D . Ross Macdonald, solicitor, of Messrs . Neill, Clark & Murray, Solicitors of Greenock and Mr . Neville MaryanGreen, Barrister-at-law and Avocat at the Paris Coun of Appeal . The applicants are long-established companies involved in shipbuilding, submarine construction and related trades . They have been based in Greenock and Port Glasgow on the lower Clyde throughout their history . The report of the Shipbuilding Enquiry Committee established by the Government was published in March 1966 . This recommended that the 9 shipyards in the River Clyde be nationalised, preferably into not more than 2 group companies . In anticipation of this report, and following its publication, the first and second applicants had been cooperating closely with a view to a possible merger in order to avoid the threat of a forced merger with other shipyards on the Upper Clyde which were not all in a sound commercial position . In May 1967 the first and second applicants merged and took equal interest s in a company known as Scott Lithgow Drydocks Limited ("Scon Lithgow Drydocks") . This new company operated a dry dock, repair quay and tank cleaning installation at Greenock . The construction of these facilities was completed in 1965, at a total cost of f 4,534,969 . They were originally owned by the Firth of Clyd e (1) See No . 9266/81, D .R . 30 p . 155 .
34
Drydock Company Limited, but were acquired by Scott Lithgow Drydocks in May 1967 from the liquidator of that company at a price of £ 1,100,000 . This is described by the applicants as a "bargain price" which arose in special circumstances, and is irrelevant to the valuation of the facilities . On I July 1977 the shares of Scott Lithgow Drydocks vested in British Shipbuilders by virtue of the Aircraft and Shipbuilding Industries Act 1977 ("the 1977 Act") under which various companies engaged in the aircraft and shipbuilding industries were nationalised . Compensation for the shares in the company was payable in accordance with the provisions of Part ll of the 1977 Act . The amount payable thereunder was the "base value" of the securities, subject to various deductions (Sections 35 and 39) . The "base value" in the case of securities listed on the Stock Exchange was, broadly speaking, the average amount at which they were quoted over a six month period ("the reference period") mnning from I September 1973 to 28 February 1974 (Sections 37 and 56) . However, in the case of securities not listed on the Stock Exchange the "base value" was to be such as might be determined by agreement between the Secretary of State and a"Stockholders' Representative", or in default of agreement such as might be determined by an Arbitration Tribunal set up under the 1977 Act to be the base value which the securities would have had if they had been listed throughout the reference period (Section 38) . The Scott Lithgow Drydocks shares were not listed on the Stock Exchange . A Stockholders' Representative was immediately appointed by the first and second applicants pursuant to the terms of the 1977 Act and he commenced negotiations on behalf of the applicants with the respondent Government as to the amount of compensation to be paid . Despite protracted negotiations the Stockholders' Representative was unable to alter the view of the respondent Government that the value of Scott Lithgow Drydocks in terms of the 1977 Act was between £ 500,000 and f 600,000 . The f-irst and second applicants consequently instructed the Stockholders' Representative to refer the question of compensation to the Scottish Arbitration Tribunal constituted pursuant to the 1977 Act . The principal dispute in the arbitration proceedings concemed the assumption which ought to be made as to the manner in which the business would have been mn if Scott Lithgow Drydocks had been listed on the Stock Exchange during the reference period rather than being (as was in reality the case) a subsidiary company run largely for the benefit of other companies within the group . On 29 September 1981 the Tribunal issued its decision valuing the company at £ 3 .5 million on the basis of the statutory formula . Pursuant to Section 36 (6) of the 1977 Act two payments to account of compensation were made on 15 May 1978 and 6 December 1978 by the issue of Governmen t
35
stock to a value of £ 150 .000 and £ 300 ,000 respectively . The balance of E 3 .05 million was paid on 14 October 1981 in the form of Government Stock . Interest was also paid from 1]uly 1977 to the date of issue of the Stock at the re levant rates applicable to such stock . The applicants maintain that the compensation they received, which is subject to tax, was grossly inadequate . In the pa rticular circumstances of the present case, the only fair way to value the company was on the basis of its assets . Its asset value was £ 6,660,667 during the reference period . Allowing for inflation the amount payable in July 1981 would have been f 20 .172,111 .
In a telex dated 26 FebrUary 1985 the applicants state that, after nationalisation and while in state ownership, the Drydock, buildings and other land belonging to Scott Lithgow Drydocks was transferred to the ownership of Scott Lithgow Limited . It was later disposed of in 1984 by the respondent Government in the course of the sale of Scon Lithgow Limited to a third party involved in the oil industry .
COMPLAINTS AND INITIAL SUBMISSIONS OF THE APPLICANT S Article 2 5 The applicants do not cease to be "vicitms" of the loss of the company merely because they have received the compensation awarded by the Arbitration Tribunal . This compensation award, although amounting to 6 or 7 times more than the sum offered by the respondent Govemment, was nevertheless unsatisfactory . It was, moreover, inevitable that the tribunal would fail to award a proper sum in compensation because it was tied to the hypothetical stock market base value notion as the criterion for calculating such a sum . In the particular circumstances of Scott Lithgow Drydocks the only criterion capable of producing a fair value for compensation was the real value of the company's assets . Moreover, the tribunal failed to index the compensation in order to retain its value over the period between the reference period and the date of the award (some eight years) . 2 . Article 26 The applicants exhausted the domestic remedies available by referring the question of compensation to the Scottish Arbitration Tribunal pursuant to the 1977 Act . The present application was introduced within 6 months of the handing down of the award by the Arbitration Tribunal . 3 . Article 6 The delay between the vesting day (I July 1977) and the date of payment of compensation (29 September 1981) is not a "reasonable time" within the meaning of Article 6 .
36
Anicle / of Protocol No. l The compensation was unfair, contrary to the expressed intentions of the respondent Govemment and contrary to standard practice in previous nationalisation measures . The Commission is therefore invited to consider whether the applicants have been treated "subject to the conditions provided for by law" . The "general principles of intemational law" are also applicable . This is clear from the text of Article I Protocol No . I which provides that "no one" should be deprived of his possessions save in accordance with the three conditions set out . 1t would do violence to elementary principles of interpretation to give "no one" a different meaning in relation to one of these conditions than that which it bears in relation to the other two . The matter was not sufficiently argued in previous cases where the Commission indicated that these principles were not applicable to nationals (e .g . No . 511/59, Dec . 20 .12 . 60, Gudmundsson v . Iceland, Collection 4) . The text is clear ; to create a distinction in the protection afforded would contradict Article 14 . A close reading of the travaux préparatoires, to which the applicants refer in detail, does not demonstrate that the intention of the parties was to distinguish between nationals and aliens, but rather that the international law standard of compensation was incorporated into the Convention . In any event, under the standard rules of treaty interpretation as set out in Articles . 31 and 32 of the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties it is necessary first to attempt an interpretation under the general mle (Article 31), and only if that proves difficult to resort to the travau .r préparatoires . The search for an interpretation in accordance with the ordinary meaning of the words used leads direcdy to a consideration of the relevant mles of intemational law . Save in the human rights field, such law is concerned only with relations between States . It is not correct to say that it protects aliens, the protection being afforded to the State . It is thus wrong to interpret the reference to intemational law in Article I as applying protection to the property of one class of beneficiaries (aliens) and not that of others . The general principles of international law require the payment of prompt, adequate and effective compensation . The compensation here was not "prompt" in view of the delay between vesting day and payment . It was inadequate, panly because of the effects of delay since the valuation reference period, and partly because of the use of an inappropriate valuation method . As regards the valuation method . the property nationalised was the shares in Scott Lithgow Drydocks . On a practical and realistic view of the company these shares amounted to shares in the assets of the company, namely the dry dock, repair quay and oil tanker cleaning facility . Scott Lithgow Drydocks was no more than a medium of ownership and operation of these facilities . The company was not managed in order to make a profit for itself and its shareholders ; it was organised in
37
order to make these facilities available to other companies within the group free of charge . Thus, to value Scott Lithgow Drydocks one must value the facilities, which were valued on 31 December 1973, in the middle of the reference period, at E 6,196,000 . Together with various other minor assets the real asset value of the company at that date was f 6,660,667 . There was in all the circumstances sufficient evidence of future profitability for it to be realistic to assume that Scon Lithgow Drydocks was in no danger of going into liquidation . Accordingly, compensation on the basis of the real and objective value of the assets is the only valuation method which is fair and equitable . General principles of intemational law require payment of the "value" of assets at the time of taking, or earlier as in this case . The amount of money awarded should reflect this value, and where there is reliable evidence that the currency in which this value is expressed varies, and such variation may be measured, the amount should similarly be varied in order to re0ect the same value at the time of the award as at the time of the taking . Such variation is irrespective of any award of interest, which is meant to compensate the owner for being kept out of his money . In the present case, the value of sterling halved between the end of the reference period and the date of taking and so the award should have been indexed accordingly . Moreover where, as in the present case, a considerable period of time elapses before the final decision as to the value is made, then for the same reasons the amount expressive of this value should once again be indexed upwards . The applicants would nevertheless accept a suitable payment of interest in place of this further indexation . Of the 38 companies nationalised pursuant to the 1977 Act only one was listed on the Stock Exchange . The computation of the remaining 37 was based on a theoretical stock exchange listing . For Scott Lithgow Drydocks and many of the other companies this method was irrelevant and inappropriate . Scott Lithgow Drydocks had always carried on its business with no regard to the needs of a company which was listed on the Stock Exchange (as explained above) . If adequacy of compensation were the only relevant factor the applicants would claim approximately £ 12 .5 million, being the true net asset value at the reference period (approximately £ 6 .6 million) indexed upwards in order to take account of the fall in the value of money during the period up to the vesting date (I July 1977) . However, the delay in paying the compensation means that the sum which should have been payable on the date the compensation actually paid was received by the applicants (I July 1981) is approximately £ 20 million . The applicants would altematively accept interest at an appropriate rate on the sum of E 12 .5 million from I July 1977 until eventual payment, although they do feel that they are entitled to receive indexation up to the time of payment . The tertns in which the Government prefaced Iheir subsequent failure to make prompt payment of compensation indicate that, although the Govemment may have been trying to be fair, there was nevertheless an element of confiscation in their establishment of the compensation formula .
38
Funhertnore, the encashment of the Government Bonds in which form the compensation was paid to the applicants will render them liable to Capital Gains Tax at the rate of 30% of the excess of the realisation price over the original acquisition price . The applicants claim that this amounts to the Government taking back 30% of the compensation paid . The compensation was also not "effective" . This implies payment which is freely transferable and encashable into money, and thus available for reinvestment . Although a Treasury Bond maturing in a reasonably short period exfacie meets these requirements . this is not so in practice because of the effects of the capilal gains taxation . Whilst the applicants have no general objection to taxation, compensation should put them back in the position they were in before the removal of their assets . Compensation should therefore either be free of tax, or increased to allow for tax . The applicants refer to the statement of the Secretary of State for Industry of 7 August 1980 in which he stated that the respondent Government agreed that the compensation "imposed by the 1977 Act" had been "grossly unfair to some of the companies" . This indicates that the respondent Government share their judgment of the compensation received as being inadequate . They summarise their contentions as being that the compensation received pursuant to the terms of the 1977 Act was inadequate both because of the delay be tween the date of assessment of value and the date of payment of compensation and also because of the improper and entirely inadequate guidelines for the contputation of the compensation itself as prescribed by the 1977 Act .
5 . Article 1 3 The 1977 Act provides no remedy against its own tetms, and the applicants have no other national body before which they may challenge the terms of the statute . The Arbitration Tribunal, being a creation of the 1977 Act, provides no remedy . 6 . Article 1 4 Since the basis of computation of compensation was only appropriate for companies quoted on a stock exchange, the respondent Govemmenl discriminated against companies which were not so listed, and in particular against Scott Lithgow Drydocks which belonged to the applicants . Moreover, insofar as the applicants are shown to have received a lower percentage of the asset value of Scott Lithgow Drydocks than that received by the owners of other nationalised concems, this also amounts to discrimination .
39
THE LA W 1. The applicants complain that they were not properly compensated for the taking of their respective shareholdings in Scott Lithgow Drydocks and invoke Article I of Protocol No . I alone and in conjunction with Article 14 of the Convention, and also Articles 6 and 13 of the Convention . The respondent Government maintain that the application is inadmissible under Article 27 para . 3 of the Convention for noncompliance with the conditions in Article 26 . They further submit that it is inadmissible under Article 27 para . 2 of the Convention, as manifestly ill-founded . The Commission has first considered whether the application is inadmissible under Article 26 of the Convention, which provides as follows : "The Commission may only deal with the matter after all domestic remedies have been exhausted, according to the generally recognised mles of international law, and within a period of six months from the date on which the final decision was taken . " The respondent Government maintain that, in so far as the application is directed against the statutory compensation formula itself, it is out of time, not having been introduced within six months of the passing of the 1977 Act or of vesting day under the Act . In the De Becker Case (No . 214/56, Dec . 9 .6 .58 . Yearbook 2 p . 214 at p .242) the Commission made the following observations concerning the interpretation of Artcile 26 of the Convention : "Whereas the Commission notes, in this connection, that the two rules contained in Article 26 concerning the exhaustion of domestic remedies and conceming the six months period, are closely interrelated, since not only are they combined in the same Anicle, but they are also expressed in a single sentence whose grammatical construction implies such correlation ; and whereas the term 'final decision', therefore, in Article 26 refers exclusively to the final decision concemed in the exhaustion of all domestic remedies according to the generally recognised mles of international law, so that the six months period is operative only in this context ; whereas furthermore, the preparatory work of the Convention, in particular the report prepared in June 1950, by the Conference of Senior Officials, confirm this interpretation . " It has subsequently developed this interpretation of Article 26 to the extent of holding that where no domestic remedy exists, the act or decision complained of must itself normally be taken as the "final decision" for the purposes of Article 26 . In this connection, in No . 7379/76, Dec . 10 .12 .76 . D .R . 8 p . 21 1, the Commission made the following observations : "However having considered its previous interpretation of Article 26 of the Convention in the light of the facts of the present case, the Commission has conte to the view that where no domestic remedy is available, the act or
40
decision complained of must itself normalty be taken as the 'final decision' ('décision inteme définitive') for the purposes of Article 26 . The six months rule laid down in Article 26 was clearly intended to require an applicant to decide whether or not to refer his case to the Commission within a period of six months after his position had been finally detennined on the domestic level . Where no question of a continuing violation of the Convention arises, this requirement is equally applicable whether the applicant's position is finally deterrnined by the final decision taken in the course of exhaustion of a domestic remedy or, in the absence of any domestic remedy, by the act or decision which is itself alleged to be in violation of the Convention . " It has followed this interpretation of Article 26 in a number of subsequent cases (for example, No . 8007/77, Dec . 10 .7 .78 . D .R . 13 p . 85 at p . 1 53) . It follows from this case-law that the six months period referred to in Article 26 may begin to mn either from the date of a "final decision" taken in the exhaustion of an effective and sufficient domestic remedy, or from the date of the act or decision complained of where such actor decision finally determines the applicant's position on the domestic level . However, Anicle 26 cannot be interpreted to require an applicant to seize the Commission before his position in connection with the matter complained of has been finally determined or settled on the domestic level . Only when there has been a "final decision" ("décision interne définitive") or some equivalent act or measure, does the six months period start to mn . The Commission notes that in the present case the applicants do not suggest that the taking of their property under the 1977 Act was in itself contrary to the Convention . They complain, in substance, that the property was taken without payment of prompt, adequate and effective compensation and that the payment of the compensation which was paid was discriminatory . Although the applicants criticise the compensation formula in various respects, their complaints are also substantially directed against its application to the circumstances of their company . The 1977 Act did not itself detennine either the amount of compensation, or the promptness with which payments should be made, or other matters relevant to the applicants' complaint, such as the terms on which the compensation stock was issued . On the contrary, the 1977 Act left these matters to be determined subsequently . The Commission cannot therefore accept that either the 1977 Act itself or the taking of the applicants' property on vesting day, can be taken as equivalent to a "final decision" on the question of compensation . The Commission observes in this respect that the situation in the present case is fundamentally different frôm that which it considered in Application No . 7379/76 (sup cit) . In that case the applicant complained of having been deprived of an interest in certain land by an Act of Parliament which had immediate effect and which contained no provision for any subsequent proceedings conceming compensation or other redress . As soon as that Act came into effect the applicant was thus finall y 41
deprived of his interest in the land and no further question relevant to his complaint under Lhe Convention remained to be determined on the domestic level . In the present case, by contrast, the question of compensation, the subject matter of the applicants' complaint, was left to be determined in accordance with a procedure laid down in the 1977 Act, either by agreement or by arbitration . The applicants' position was not finally determined by the 1977 Act itself and in the Commission's view they were entitled, if not bound, to wait until the amount of compensation had been fixed under the statutory compensation procedures before bringing their complaints concerning compensation before the Commission . In this respect the Commission recalls its decision of 28 January 1983 on admissibility of Application No . 9006/80, Lithgow v . the United Kingdom . In the present case the Stockholders' Representative failed to reach an agreement with the Govemment over the amount of compensation due to the applicants following the nationalisation of Scott Lithgow Drydocks . In March 1980 the Stockholders' Representative referred this matter to the Scottish Arbitration Tribunal, the body created by Section 42 of the 1977 Act to decide, in default of any negotiated agreement, upon inter a/ia, the amount of compensation payable following the nationalisation of any panicular concem . After hearing arguments on behalf of Lhe Stockholders' Representative and the Govemment the Tribunal awarded compensation in the sum of £ 3 .5 million pursuant to the statutory formula laid down by the 1977 Act . The Tribunal's award was issued on 29 September 1981 . The present application was introduced on 18 November 1981, within the six months of the issue of the award of the Arbitration Tribunal . Accordingly the Commission does not consider that the application, or any part of it, is out of time . 2 . The Commission must also consider whether the applicants have satisfied the condition as to the exhaustion of the available domestic remedies . The applicants do not claim that the compensation formula as set out in the 1977 Act was applied incorrectly by the Arbitration Tribunal to the facts before it . They claim that such a formula inevitably produced inadequate and discriminatory compensation when applied to Scon Lithgow Drydocks . It is accepted by all parties that the Arbitration Tribunal did not err in law in reaching its decision, and that consequently the possibility of appeal by way of a case stated to the Court of Session was not available to the applicants . It further appears that no alternative national forum existed, before which the applicants could have challenged the Arbitration Tribunal's award . In these circumstances the Commission considers that Lhe applicants have exhausted the domestic remedies available to them under the 1977 Act as required by the tertns of Article 26 of Lhe Convention . The Conunission concludes therefore that the requirements of Article 26 have been satisfied as regards both applicants .
42
3 . The Contmission has made a preliminary examination of the parties' submissions under the Articles of the Convention and Protocol No . I invoked by the applicants . It finds that the case raises complex and important issues conceming the interpretation and application of the Convention and Protocol No . I and that it cannot be considered manifestly ill-founded . The case must therefore be declared admissible, no ground of inadmissibility having been established . For these reasons, the Commissio n DECLARES THE APPLICATION ADMISSIBLE .
(/RADUCTION)
EN FAIT Les faits de la cause, tels qu'ils ont été exposés par les panies, peuvent se résumer comme suit : Les premiére et seconde requérantes, Scotts' of Greenock (Estd . 1711) et Lithgows Limited (anciennement Lithgows Holdings Limited), sont des sociétés commerciales écossaises ayant leur siége social à Greenock . A ces deux requérantes s'était jointe initialement une troisième société, la Bank of Nova Scotia Trust Company (Bahamas) Limited . Cependant, le 22 juillet 1 983, la troisième requérante a indiqué à la Commission qu'elle retirait sa requête, estimant son grief manifestement irrecevable après la décision rendue par la Commission sur la recevabilité des affaires de nationalisation (Requêtes No 9006/80 et autres) (I) . Les requérantes sont représentées par M . D . Ross Macdonald, solicitor, du cabinet Neill, Clark Murray, Solicitors à Greenock et Me Neville Maryan-Green, avocat à la Cour d'appel de Paris . Les requérantes sont des sociétés établies depuis longtemps dans la construction de bateaux et sous-marins et dans des activités commerciales connexes . De tout temps elles ont été basées à Greenock et au port de Glasgow sur la Basse-Clyde . Le rapport de la commission d'enquète sur les industries aéronavales, créée par l e (I) Voir No 9266/81, D.R . 30 p . 155
43
Gouvernement, fut publié en mars 1966 . Il recommandait la nationalisation de neuf chantiers navals sur la Clyde, de préférence regroupés en deux sociétés au maximum . Suite à la publication de ce rapport et devançant ses propositions, les première et deuxiéme requérantes ont renforcé leur collaboration de façon à fusionner éventuellement pour éviter la menace d'une fusion forcée avec d'autres chantiers navals de la Haute-Clyde qui n'avaient pas tous une situation commerciale saine . En mai 1967, les première et seconde requérantes ont fusionné et pris des participations égales dans une société appelée Scott Lithgow Drydocks Limited ("Scott Lithgow Drydocks") . Cette société nouvelle exploitait à Greenock des installations de cale sèche, de radoub et de nettoyage de pétroliers . La construction de ces installations fut achevée en 1965, pour un coût total de 4 .534 .969 livres sterlings . Initialement propriété de la Firth of Clyde Drydock Company Limited, ces installations furent acquises en mai 1967 par Scott Lithgow Drydocks auprès du liquidateur de la première société pour un prix de 1, 1 million de livres . Les requérantes qualifient ce chiffre de • prix exceptionnel » dû aux circonstances spéciales et sans aucun rapport avec la valeur des installations . Le 1°' juillet 1977 les actions de Scott Lithgow Drydocks se trouvèrent transférées à British Shipbuilders en vertu de la loi de 1977 sur les industries de construction navale et aéronavale (« La loi de 1977 » ) en vertu de laquelle furent nationalisées diverses sociétés de constrvction aéronautique et de chantiers navals . Une indemnisation pour les actions de la société devait être versée conformément aux dispositions du Titre II de la loi de 1977 . Le montant à verser à ce titre était la -valeur de base» des titres, après diverses déductions (articles 35 et 39) . Pour les titres cotés en bourse, la « valeur de base . représentait en gros la moyenne des cotations pendant une période de six mois ( « la période de référence-) allant du I^' septembre 1973 au 28 février 1974 (articles 37 et 56) . Cependant, lorsque les titres n'étaient pas cotés en bourse, la •valeur de base• devait être fixée par accord entre le ministre et un . représentant des actionnaires• ou, à défaut, par un tribunal d'arbitrage créé en vertu de la loi de 1977, auquel cas la valeur de base serait celle que les titres auraient eue s'ils avaient été cotés pendant la période de référence (anicle 38) . Les actions de Scott Lithgow Drydocks n'étaient pas cotées en bourse. Conformément à la loi de 1977, les première et deuxiéme requérantes désignèrent un - Représentant des actionnaires - qui entama en leur nom des négociations avec le Gouvemement défendeur sur le montant de l'indemnisation à verser . En dépit de longues négociations, le représentant des actionnaires ne fut pas en mesure de modifier le point de vue du Gouvemement défendeur selon lequel, par application de la loi de 1977, la valeur de Scott Lithgow Drydocksse situait entre 500 .000 et 600 .000 livres sterlings . Les première et deuxième requérantes chargèrent donc leur représentant de saisir le tribunal écossais d'arbitrage constitué conformément à la loi de 1977 . Dans la procédure d'arbitrage, le point litigieux principal concernait l'hypothèse à formuler sur la manière dont l'affaire aurait été menée s i
44
4 . Anicle I of Protocol No. I The compensation was unfair, contrary to the expressed intentions of thé respondent Government and contrary to standard practice in previous nationalisation measures . The Commission is therefore invited to consider whether the applicants have been treated "subject to the conditions provided for by law" . The "general principles of international law" are also applicable . This is clear from the text of Article I Protocol No . I which provides that "no one" should be deprived of his possessions save in accordance with the three conditions set out . It would do violence to elementary principles of interpretation to give "no one" a different meaning in relation to one of these conditions than that which it bears in relation to the other two . The matter was not sufficiently argued in previous cases where the Commission indicated that these principles were not applicable to nationals (e .g . No . 51I/59, Dec . 20 .12 .60, Gudmundsson v . Iceland, Collection 4) . The text is clear ; to create a distinction in the protection afforded would contradict Article 14 . A close reading of the [ravaur préparatoires, to which the applicants refer in detail, does not demonstrate that the intention of the parties was to distinguish between nationals and aliens, but rather that the international law standard of compensation was incorporated into the Convention . In any event, under the standard rules of treaty interpretation as set out in Articles . 31 and 32 of the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties it is necessary first to attempt an interpretation under the general mle (Article 31), and only if that proves difficult to resort to the rravaa .r pr(paratoires . The search for an interpretation in accordance with the ordinary meaning of the words used leads directly to a consideration of the relevant rvles of international law . Save in the human rights field, such law is concerned only with relations between States . It is not correct to say that it protects aliens, the protection being afforded to the State . It is thus wrong to interpret the reference to international law in Article I as applying protection to the property of one class of beneficiaries (aliens) and not that of others . The general principles of intemational law require the payment of prompt, adequate and effective compensation . The compensation here was not "prompt" in view of the delay between vesting day and payment . It was inadequate, partly because of the effects of delay since the valuation reference period, and partly because of the use of an inappropriate valuation method . As regards the valuation method, the propeny nationalised was the shares in Scott Lithgow Drydocks . On a practical and realistic view of the company these shares amounted to shares in the assets of the company, namely the dry dock, repair quay and oil tanker cleaning facility . Scott Lithgow Drydocks was no more than a medium of ownership and operation of these facilities . The company was not managed in order to make a profit for itself and its shareholders ; it was organised i n
37
order to make these facilities available to other companies within the group free of charge . Thus, to value Scott Lithgow Drydocks one must value the facilities, which were valued on 31 December 1973, in the middle of the reference period, at £ 6,196 .000 . Together with various other minor assets the real asset value of the company at that date was f 6,660,667 . There was in all the circumstances sufficient evidence of future profitability for it to be realistic to assume that Scott Lithgow Drydocks was in no danger of going into liquidation . Accordingly, compensation on the basis of the real and objective value of the assets is the only valuation method which is fair and equitable . General principles of international law require payment of the "value" of assets at the time of taking, or earlier as in this case . The amount of money awarded should reflect this value, and where there is reliable evidence that the currency in which this value is expressed varies, and such variation may be measured, the amount should similarly be varied in order to reflect the same value at the time of the award as at the time of the taking . Such variation is irrespective of any award of interest, which is meant to compensate the owner for being kept out of his money . In the present case, the value of sterling halved between the end of the reference period and the date of taking and so the award should have been indexed accordingly . Moreover where, as in the present case, a considerable period of time elapses before the final decision as to the value is made, then for the same reasons the amount expressive of this value should once again be indexed upwards . The applicants would nevertheless accept a suitable payment of interest in place of this further indexation . Of the 38 companies nationalised pursuant to the 1977 Act only one was listed on the Stock Exchange . The computation of the remaining 37 was based on a theoretical stock exchange listing . For Scott Lithgow Drydocks and many of the other companies this method was irrelevant and inappropriate . Scott Lithgow Drydocks had always carried on its business with no regard to the needs of a company which was listed on the Stock Exchange (as explained above) . If adequacy of compensation were the only relevant factor the applicanLs would claim approximately £ t2 .5 million, being the true net asset value at the reference period (approximately £ 6 .6 million) indexed upwards in order to take account of the fall in the value of money during the period up to the vesting date (I July 1977) . However, the delay in paying the compensation means that the sum which should have been payable on the date the compensation actually paid was received by the applicants (I July 1981) is approximately £ 20 million . The applicants would ahernatively accept interest at an appropriate rate on the sum of £ 12 .5 million from I July 1977 until eventual payment, although they do feel that they are entitled to receive indexation up to the time of payment . The terms in which the Government prefaced their subsequent failure to make prompt payment of compensation indicate that, although the Govertuoent may have been trying to be fair, there was nevertheless an element of confiscation in their establishment of the compensation formula .
38
Furthermore, the encashment of the Government Bonds in which form the compensation was paid to the applicants will render them liable to Capital Gains Tax at the rate of 30% of the excess of the realisation price over the original acquisition price . The applicants claint that this amounts to the Government taking back 30 % of the compensation paid . The compensation was also not "effective" . This implies payment which is freely transferable and encashable into money, and thus available for reinvestment . Although a Treasury Bond maturing in a reasonably short period exfacie meets these requirements, this is not so in practice because of the effects of the capital gains taxation . Whilst the applicants have no general objection to taxation, compensation should put them back in the position they were in before the removal of their assets . Compensation should therefore either be free of tax, or increased to allow for tax . The applicants refer to the statement of the Secretary of State for Industry of 7 August 19 80 in which he stated that the respondent Government agreed that the compensation "imposed by the 1977 Act" had been "grossly unfair to some of the companies" . This indicates that the respondent Government share their judgment of the compensation received as being inadequate . They summarise their contentions as being that the compensation received pursuant to the terms of the 1977 Act was inadequate both because of the delay betweon the date of assessment of value and the date of payment of compensation and also because of the improper and entirely inadequate guidelines for the computation of the compensation itself as prescribed by the 1977 Act .
5 . Anicle 1 3 The 1977 Act provides no remedy against its own terms, and the applicants have no other national body before which they may challenge the terms of the statute . The Arbitration Tribunal, being a creation of the 1977 Act, provides no remedy . 6 . Article 1 4 Since the basis of computation of compensation was only appropriate for companies quoted on a stock exchange, the respondent Government discriminated against companies which were not so listed, and in particular against Scott Lithgow Drydocks which belonged to the applicants . Moreover, insofar as the applicants are shown to have received a lower percentage of the asset value of Scott Lithgow Drydocks than that received by the owners of other nationalised concems, this also amounts to discrimination . ...............
39
THE LAW The applicants complain that they were not properly compensated for the taking 1. of their respective shareholdings in Scott Lithgow Drydocks and invoke Article I of Protocol No . I alone and in conjunction with Article 14 of the Convention, and also Articles 6 and 13 of the Convention . The respondent Government maintain that the application is inadmissible under Article 27 para . 3 of the Convention for noncompliance with the conditions in Article 26 . They funher submit that it is inadmissible under Article 27 para . 2 of the Convention, as manifestly ill-founded . The Commission has first considered whether the application is inadmissible under Article 26 of the Convention, which provides as follows : "The Commission may only deal with the matter after all domestic remedies have been exhausted, according to the generally recognised rules of international law, and within a period of six months from the date on which the final decision was taken . " The respondent Government maintain that, in so far as the application is directed against the statutory compensation fortnula itself, it is out of time, not having been introduced within six months of the passing of the 1977 Act or of vesting day under the Act . In the De Becker Case (No . 214/56, Dec . 9 .6 .58, Yearbook 2 p . 214 at p .242) the Commission made the following observations concerning the interpretation of Ancile 26 of the Convention : "Whereas the Commission notes, in this connection, that the two mles contained in Article 26 conceming the exhaustion of domestic remedies and concerning the six months period, are closely interrelated, since not only are they combined in the same Article, but they are also expressed in a single sentence whose grammatical construction implies such correlation ; and whereas the term 'final decision', therefore, in Article 26 refers exclusively to the final decision concerned in the exhaustion of all domestic remedies according to the generally recognised rules of intemational law, so that the six months period is operative only in this context ; whereas furthermore, the preparatory work of the Convention, in particular the report prepared in June 1950, by the Conference of Senior Officials, confirm this interpretation . " It has subsequently developed this interpretation of Article 26 to the extent of holding that where no domestic remedy exists, the act or decision complained of must itself normally be taken as the "final decision" for the purposes of Article 26 . In this connection, in No . 7379/76, Dec . 10 .12 .76, D .R . 8 p . 21 1, the Commission made the following observations : "However having considered its previous interpretation of Article 26 of the Convention in the light of the facts of the present case, the Commission has come to the view that where no domestic remedy is available, the act o r
40
decision complained of must itself normally be taken as the 'final decision' ('décision inteme définitive') for the purposes of Article 26 . The six months rule laid down in Article 26 was clearly intended to require an applicant to decide whether or not to refer his case to the Commission within a period of six months after his position had been finally determined on the domestic level . Where no question of a continuing violation of the Convention arises, this requirement is equally applicable whether the applicant's position is finally determined by the final decision taken in the course of exhaustion of a domestic remedy or, in the absence of any domestic remedy, by the act or decision which is itself alleged to be in violation of the Convention . " It has followed this interpretation of A rt icle 26 in a number of subsequent cases ( for example, No . 8007177, Dec . 10 .7 .78 . D .R . 13 p . 85 at p . 153) . It follows from this case-law that the six months period referred to in A rt icle 26 may begin to mn either from the date of a "final decision" taken in the exhaustion of an effective and sufficient domestic remedy, or from the date of the act or decision complained of where such act or decision finally determines the applicant's position on the domestic level . However, Art icle 26 cannot be interpreted to require an applicant to seize the Commission before his position in connection with the matter complained of has been finally determined or settled on the domestic level . Only when there has been a "final decision" ( "décision inteme définitive") or some equivalent act or measure, does the six months period start to run . The Commission notes that in the present case the applicants do not suggest that the taking of their prope rt y under the 1977 Act was in itself contra ry to the Convention . They complain, in substance, that the prope rt y was taken without payment of prompt, adequate and effective compensation and that the payment of the compensation which was paid was discriminato ry . Although the applicants criticise the compensation formula in various respects, their complaints are also substantially directed against its application to the circumstances of their company . The 1977 Act did not itself determine either the amount of compensation, or the promptness with which payments should be made, or other matters relevant to the applicants' complaint, such as the terms on which the compensation stock was issued . On the contra ry , the 1977 Act left these ma tt ers to be determined subsequently . The Commission cannot therefore accept that either the 1977 Act itself or the taking of the applicants' property on vesting day, can be taken as equivalent to a"final decision" on the question of compensation . The Commission observes in this respect that the situation in the present case is fundamentally different from that which it considered in Application No . 7379/76 (sup cit) . In that case the applicant complained of having been depri ved of an interest in cenain land by an Act of Parliament which had immediate effect and which contained no provision for any subsequent proceedings concerning compensation or other redress . As soon as that Act came into effect the applicant was thus finall y 41
deprived of his interest in the land and no further question relevant to his complaint under the Convention remained to be deternùned on the domestic level . In the present case, by contrast, the question of compensation, the subject matter of the applicants' complaint, was left to be determined in accordance with a procedure laid down in the 1977 Act, either by agreement or by arbitration . The applicants' position was not finally determined by the 1977 Act itself and in the Commission's view they were entitled, if not bound, to wait until the amount of compensation had been fixed under the statutory compensation procedures before bringing their complaints conceming compensation before the Commission . In this respect the Commission recalls its decision of 28 January 1983 on admissibility of Application No . 9006/80, Lithgow v . the United Kingdom .
In the present case the Stockholders' Representative failed to reach an agreement with the Government over the amount of compensation due to the applicants following the nationalisation of Scott Lithgow Drydocks . In March 1980 the Stockholders' Representative referred this matter to the Scottish Arbitration Tribunal, the body created by Section 42 of the 1977 Act to decide, in default of any negotiated agreement, upon inter a(ia, the amount of compensation payable following the nationalisation of any particular concern . After hearing arguments on behalf of the Stockholders' Representative and the Government the Tribunal awarded compensation in the sum of f 3 .5 million pursuant to the statutory formula laid down by the 1977 Act . The Tribunal's award was issued on 29 September 1981 . The present application was introduced on I8 November 1981, within the six months of the issue of the award of the Arbitration Tribunal . Accordingly the Commission does not consider that the application, or any part of it, is out of time . 2 . The Commission must also consider whether the applicants have satisfied the condition as to the exhaustion of the available domestic remedies . The applicants do not claim that the compensation fotmula as set out in the 1977 Act was applied incorrectly by the Arbitration Tribunal to the facts before it . They claim that such a formula inevitably produced inadequate and discriminatory compensation when applied to Scott Lithgow Drydocks . It is accepted by all parties that the Arbitration Tribunal did not err in law in reaching its decision, and that consequently the possibility of appeal by way of a case stated to the Court of Session was not available to the applicanis . It further appears that no alternative national forum existed, before which the applicants could have challenged the Arbitration Tribunal's award . In these circumstances the Commission considers that the applicants have exhausted the domestic remedies available to them under the 1977 Act as required by the terms of Article 26 of the Convention . The Conunission concludes therefore that the requirements of Article 26 have been satisfied as regards both applicants .
42
3 . The Commission has made a preliminary examination of the parties' submissions under the Articles of the Convention and Protocol No . I invoked by the applicants . It finds that the case raises complex and important issues conceming the interpretation and application of the Convention and Protocol No . I and that it cannot be considered manifestly ill-founded . The case must therefore be declared admissible, no ground of inadmissibility having been established . For these reasons, the Commission DECLARES THE APPLICATION ADMISSIBLE .
(TRADUCTION) EN FAI T Les faits de la cause, tels qu'ils ont été exposés par les parties, peuvent se résu mer comme suit : Les premiére et seconde requérantes, Scotts' of Greenock (Estd . 1711) et Lithgows Limited ( anciennement Lithgows Holdings Limited), sont des sociétés commerciales écossaises ayant leur siège social à Greenock . A ces deux requérantes s'était jointe initialement une troisième société, la Bank of Nova Scotia Tmst Company (Bahamas) Limited . Cependant, le 22 juillet 1983, la troisième requérante a indiqué à la Commission qu'elle retirait sa requête, estimant son grief manifestement irrecevable après la décision rendue par la Commission sur la recevabilité des affaires de nationalisation (Requêtes No 9006/80 et autres) (I) . Les requérantes sont représentées par M . D . Ross Macdonald, solicitor, du cabinet Neill, Clark Murray, Solicitors à Greenock et Me Neville Maryan-Green, avocat à la Cour d'appel de Paris . Les requérantes sont des sociétés établies depuis longtemps dans la construction de bateaux et sous-marins et dans des activités commercia)es connexes . De tout temps elles ont été basées à Greenock et au port de Glasgow sur la Basse-Clyde . Le rapport de la commission d'enquête sur les industries aéronavales, créée par l e (I) Voir No 9266/91, D .R . 3 0 p . 155.
43
Gouvernement, fut publié en mars 1966 . II recommandait la nationalisation de neuf chantiers navals sur la Clyde, de préférence regroupés en deux sociétés au maximum . Suite à la publication de ce rapport et devançant ses propositions, les première et deuxième requérantes ont renforcé leur collaboration de façon à fusionner éventuellement pour éviter la menace d'une Posion forcée avec d'autres chantiers navals de la Haute-Clyde qui n'avaient pas tous une situation commerciale saine . En mai 1967, les première et seconde requéranles ont fusionné et pris des participations égales dans une société appelée Scott Lithgow Drydocks Limited ("Scott Lithgow Drydocks") . Cette société nouvelle exploitait à Greenock des installations de cale séche, de radoub et de nettoyage de pétroliers . La construction de ces installations fut achevée en 1965, pour un coût total de 4 .534 .969 livres sterlings . Initialement propriété de la Firth of Clyde Drydock Company Limited, ces installations furent acquises en mai 1967 par Scott Lithgow Drydocks auprès du liquidateur de la première société pour un prix de 1,1 million de livres . Les requérantes qualifient ce chiffre de « prix exceptionnel . dû aux circonstances spéciales et sans aucun rapport avec la valeur des installations . Le 1° 1 juillet 19771es actions de Scott Lithgow Drydocks se trouvérenl transférées à British Shipbuilders en vertu de la loi de 1977 sur les industries de construction navale et aéronavale (« l-a loi de 1977») en vertu de laquelle furent nationalisées diverses sociétés de construction aéronautique et de chantiers navals . Une indemnisation pour les actions de la société devait étre versée confonnément aux dispositions du Titre Il de la loi de 1977 . Le montant à verser à ce titre était la « valeur de base » des titres, après diverses déductions (articles 35 et 39) . Pour les titres cotés en bourse, la « valeur de base- représentait en gros la moyenne des cotations pendant une période de six mois (. la période de référence •) allant du 1°' septembre 1973 au 28 février 1974 (articles 37 et 56) . Cependant, lorsque les titres n'étaient pas cotés en bourse, la •valeur de base - devait étre fixée par accord entre le ministre et un - représentant des actionnaires - ou, à défaut, par un tribunal d'arbitrage créé en vertu de la loi de 1977, auquel cas la valeur de base serait celle que les titres auraient eue s'ils avaienl été cotés pendant la période de référence (article 38) . Les actions de Scott Lithgow Drydocks n'étaient pas cotées en bourse . Conformément à la loi de 1977, les premiére et deuxième requérantes désignérenl un - Représentant des actionnaires • qui entama en leur nom des négociations avec le Gouvernement défendeur sur le montant de l'indemnisation à verser . En dépit de longues négociations, le représentant des actionnaires ne fut pas en mesure de modifier le point de vue du Gouvemement défendeur selon lequel, par application de la loi de 1977, la valeur de Scott Lithgow Drydocks se situait entre 500.000 et 600 .000 livres sterlings . Les première et deuxième requérantes chargèrent donc leur représentant de saisir le tribunal écossais d'arbitrage constitué conformément à la loi de 1977 . Dans la procédure d'arbitrage, le point litigieux principal concernait l'hypothése à formuler sur la mani8re dont l'affaire aurait été menée s i 44
Scott Lithgow Drydocks avait été cotée à la bourse pendant la période de référence au lieu d'ètre (comme c'était le cas en réalité) une fi liale gérée essentiellement au profit d'autres sociétés au sein du groupe . Le 29 septembre 1981, le t ri bunal rendit sa sentence évaluant la société à 3,5 millions de livres sur la base de la formule prévue par la loi . Confortnément à l'article 36 par . 6 de la loi de 1977, deux versements furent effectués à titre d'indemnisation les 15 mai et 6 décembre 1978 grâce à l'émission de bons du Trésor pour une valeur de 150 .000 et 300 .000 livres respectivement . Le solde de 3,05 millions de livres fut payé le 14 octobre 1981 sous forme de bons du Trésor . Un intérét fut également versé à partir du I°' juillet 1977 jusqu'à la date d'émission des bons, au taux applicable à ce type de bons . Les sociétés requérantes soutiennent que l'indemnisation qu'elles ont reçue, imposable de surcroit, était tout à fait insuffisante . Dans les circonstances de l'espèce, le seul moyen équitable d'évaluer leur entreprise était de partir de ses avoirs . Or, la valeur de ces avoirs était de 6 .660 .667 livres pendant la période de référence . Compte tenu de l'inflation, le montant qui aurait d0 être versé en juillet 1981 était de 20 .172 .111 livres . Dans un télex du 26 février 1985, les sociétés requérantes déclarent qu'aprés nationalisation et pendant qu'elles étaient propriété de l'Etat, les installations, bâtiments et terrains appartenant à Scott Lithgow Drydocks furent transférés à la société Scott Lithgow Limited . Le Gouvemement défendeur en disposa par la suite en 1984 lorsqu'il vendit Scott Lithgow Limited à un tiers de l'industrie pétroliére .
GRIEFS ET ARGUMENTATION INITIALE DES REQUÉRANTES Anicle 2 5 Les requérantes n'ont pas cessé d'être •victimes• de la perte de leur société pour avoir simplement reçu l'indemnisation accordée par le tribunal d'arbitrage . En effet, l'indemnisation offerte, bien que six à sept fois plus élevée que la somme proposée par le Gouvernement défendeur, n'en demeure pas moins insuffisante . Il était du reste inévitable que le tribunal n'accorde pas une indemnité convenable puisque, pour calculer cette somme, il était tenu de prendre pour base une valeur boursiére hypothétique . Or, dans les circonstances propres à Scott Lithgow Drydocks, le seul critère pouvant conduire à une valeur équitable d'indemnisation était la valeur réelle des avoirs de la société . En outre, le tribunal n'a pas indexé l'indemnisation, ce qui aurait permis d'en maintenir la valeur pendant la période se situant entre la période de référence et la date de l'octroi de l'indemnisation (environ huit ans) . 45
2 . Article 2 6 Les sociétés requérantes ont épuisé les recours intemes à leur disposition puisque, conformément à la loi de 1977, elles ont saisi le tribunal écossais d'arbitrage de la question de l'indemnisation . Elles ont par ailleurs introduit la présente requête dans les six mois suivant la décision du tribunal d'arbitrage .
3 . Article 6 Le délai écoulé entre le jour de l'octroi de l'indemnisation (1°juillet 1977) et la date du versement de l'indemnité (29 septembre 1981) n'est pas un «délai raisonnable au sens de l'article 6 . 4 . Article / du Protocole additionne l L'indemnisation n'était pas équitable . contrairement aux intentions exprimées par le Gouvernement défendeur et à la pratique habituellement suivie pour les nationalisations . La Commission est dès lors invitée à examiner le point de savoir si les sociétés requérantes ont été traitées «dans les conditions prévues par la loi . . Les .principes généraux du droit international• sont également applicables . Cela ressort clairement du texte de l'article I du Protocole additionnel, qui prévoit que -nul • ne peut être privé de sa propriété que conformément aux trois conditions prévues . Ce serait violer les principes élémentaires d'interprétation que de donner au mot - nul » un sens différent par rapport à l'une de ces conditions qu'il n'en a pour les deux autres . La question n'a pas été suffisamment examinée dans la jurispmdence antérieure de la Commission qui a indiqué que ces principes n'étaient pas applicables aux nationaux (par exemple No 511/59, déc . 20 .12 .60, Gudmundsson c/Islande, Recueil 4) . Le texte est clair : créer une distinction dans la protection offerte serait contraire à l'article 14 . La lecture attentive des travaux préparatoires, auxquels les sociétés requérantes se réf8rent en détail, ne fait pas apparaître l'intention des parties de distinguer entre nationaux et étrangers, mais montre plutôt que la règle d'indemnisation prévue par le droit international a été incorporée à la Convention . Quoi qu'il en soit, selon les règles habituelles d'interprétation des traités telles qu'énoncées aux articles 31 et 32 de la Convention de Vienne sur le droit des traités, il faut tout d'abord s'efforcer d'interpréter le texte selon la règle générale (article 31) et ne recourir aux travaux préparatoires qu'en cas de difficultés . La recherche d'une interprétation conforrne au sens ordinaire des mots employés conduit directement à examiner les règles pertinentes du droit international . Hormis le domaine des droits de l'homme, ce droit ne concerne que les relations entre Etats . Il n'est pas exact d'affirmer que ce droit protège les étrangers, car c'est plutôt à l'Etat qu'il accorde sa protection . Il est donc erroné d'interpréter la référence au droit international ftgurant à l'article I comme concemant la protection de la propriété d'un type de bénéficiaires (les étrangers) et pas celle des autres .
46
Les principes généraux du droit international exigent le versement d'une indemnisation rapide, adéquate et effective . Or ici, l'indemnisation n'a pas été • rapide . compte tenu du délai qui s'est écoulé entre le jour de la nationalisation et la date du paiement . Elle a été inadéquate, en partie en raison des effets du délai écoulé depuis la période de référence choisie pour l'évaluation et en partie par le recours à une méthode d'évaluation inappropriée . Pour ce qui est de la mélhode d'évaluation, les biens nationalisés étaient les actions de la société Scott Lithgow Drydocks . Si l'on envisage la société sous un angle pratique et réaliste, ces actions équivalaient à des parts des avoirs de la société . à savoir la cale sèche, le bassin de radoub et les installations de nettoyage de pétroliers . Scott Lithgow Drydocks n'était rien d'autre qu'un moyen de posséder et d'exploiter ces installations . La société ne servait pas à réaliser des bénéfices pour elle-méme et ses actionnaires ; elle était organisée pour mettre ces installations gratuitement à la disposition d'autres sociétés membres du groupe . Dès lors, pour évaluer Scott Lithgow Drydocks, il fallait évaluer les installations, estimées au 31 décembre 1973 - milieu de la période de référence - à 6 . 196 .0001ivres sterling . Si l'on y ajoute divers autres avoirs mineurs, la valeur réelle en capital de la société était à cette date de 6 .660 .667 livres . Il y avait dans tous les cas suffisamment d'éléments prouvant la renlabilité future de la société pour qu'il soit réaliste de supposer que Scott Lithgow Drydocks ne risquait absolument pas la déconfiture . Aussi l'indemnisation calculée à partir de la valeur réelle et objective des biens était-elle l'unique méthode pour parvenir à une évaluation juste et équitable . Les principes généraux du droit international exigent le versement de la .valeur• de l'actif au moment de la dépossession, ou plus tôt, comme dans ce cas précis . Le montant de la somme accordée doit refléter cette valeur et lorsque des éléments valables prouvent les fluctuations de la monnaie exprimant cette valeur et que cette variation est mesurable, la somme doit être modulée en conséquence de façon à refléter la méme valeur à l'époque de l'octroi de l'indemnisation qu'à l'époque de la dépossession . Cette variation est indépendante de l'intérêt éventuellement fixé, intérêt qui sert à indemniser le propriétaire qui est privé de son argent . En l'occurrence, la valeur de la livre sterling ayant été réduite de moitié entre la fin de la période de référence et la date de la dépossession, l'indemnisation accordée devait être indexée en conséquence . Lorsqu'en outre- comme c'est le cas ici, il s'écoule un délai considérable avant que ne soit prise la décision définitive sur l'évaluation, il faut là encore et pour les mêmes raisons indexer à la hausse le montant exprimant cette valeur . A la place de cette nouvelle indexation, les sociétés requérantes accepteraient cenendant le versement d'un intérêt convenable . Sur les trente-huit sociétés nationalisées en venu de la loi de 1977, une seule é tait cotée en bourse . Pour évaluer l'actif des trente-sept autres, le Gouvemement s'est fondé sur une cotation boursière théorique . Pour Scott Lithgow Drydocks e t 47
bon nombre d'autres sociétés, cene méthode n'était ni valable ni adaptée . Sco tt Lithgow Drydocks en effet a toujours mené ses activités sans tenir compte des besoins d'une société cotée en bourse ( comme expliqué supra) . S'il fallait considérer uniquement le montant suffisant de l'indemnisation, les sociétés re quérantes réclameraient environ 12,5 millions de livres : ce chiffre représente la valeur réelle ne tte des biens lors de la période de référence ( environ 6,6 millions de livres), indexée à la hausse de façon à tenir compte de la chute de valeur de la livre pendant la pé ri ode de référence et jusqu'à la date de versement de l'indemnisation (1°1 juillet 1977) . Cependant, vu le délai mis à verser l'indemnisation, la somme qui aurait dù étre versée au moment où l'indemnisation a été effectivement perçue par les requérants ( 1°' juillet 1981) avoisine 20 millions de livres . Les requérants accepteraient à titre subsidiaire le versement d'un intérêt appropri é pour la somme de 12 .5 millions à pa rt ir du 1^' juillet 1977 et jusqu'au versement final, bien qu'ils estiment avoir droit à percevoir le montant d'une indexation calculée jusqu'à la date du versement . Les explications que donne le Gouvernement du fait de n'avoir pas effectué un versement rapide de l'indemnisation indiquent que, même s'il a peutêtre essayé d'étre juste, il a néanmoins fait place à un élément de confiscation dans le mode d'établissement de sa formule d'indemnisation . En outre, l'encaissement des bons du trésor - mode de versement de l'indemnisation - assujettit les sociétés requérantes à l'impôt sur les gains en capital au taux de 30 % dans la mesure où le prix de réalisation dépasse le prix d'acquisition à l'origine . Les sociétés requérantes estiment que cela revient pour le Gouvemement à reprendre 30 % de l'indemnité versée . L'indemnisation n'a pas non plus été - effective- . Il aurait fallu pour cela que le versement fût une somme librement transférable et encaissable en argent, disponible pour réinvestissement . A première vue, un bon du trésor venant à échéance dans un temps relativement court répond à ces conditions, mais il n'en est pas ainsi en pratique en raison des effets de l'imposition sur les gains en capital . Les requérantes n'ont certes pas d'objection à ce que leur indemnité soit imposée, mais l'indemnisation doit les replacer dans la situation où elles étaient avant que leurs avoirs ne leur soient enlevés . Il faut donc ou bien que le montant de l'indemnisation ne soit pas imposable ou bien qu'il soit augmenté pour tenir compte de l'impôt . Les requérantes renvoient à la déclaration faite le 7 août 1980 par le ministre de l'Industrie, disant que le Gouvernement défendeur reconnaissait le caractère . très inéquitable pour certaines des sociétés » de l'indemnisation - imposée par la loi de 1977» . Ceci montre bien que le Gouvemement défendeur partage leur analyse quant à l'insuffisance de l'indemnité perçue . Les sociétés requérantes résument leur argumentation en disant que l'indenutisation reçue en vertu de la loi de 1977 était insufftsante, tant en raison du délai écoul é
48
entre la date d'évaluation et celle du versement de l'indemnité qu'en raison du caract8re impropre et tout à fait inadéquat des régles de calcul de l'indemnisation prévues par la loi de 1977 . Article 1 3 La loi de 1977 ne prévoit pas de recours contre les conditions qu'elle prescrit et les sociétés requérantes ne voient aucun organe national devant lequel elles pourraient contester les termes de la loi . Le t ribunal d'arbitrage é tant une création de la loi de 1977 ne constitue pas un recours valable .
6 . Anicle 1 4 Etant donné que la base du calcul de l'indemnisation ne valait que pour les sociétés cotées en bourse, le Gouvemement défendeur a pratiqué une discrimination à l'enconlre des sociétés qui n'étaient pas cotées et notamment de la Scott Lithgow Drydocks, propriété des sociétés requérantes . Du reste, dans la mesure où les sociétés requérantes apport ent la preuve qu'elles ont reçu un pourcentage plus faible de la valeur en capital de Scott Lithgow Drydocks que n'en ont reçu les propriétaires d'autres entreprises nationalisées, il y a là également une discrimination .
EN DROI T 1 . Les sociétés requérantes se plaignent de n'avoir pas été convenablement indemnisées pour la nationalisation de leurs participations respectives à Scott Lithgow Drydocks et invoquent à cet égard l'article 1 du Protocole additionnel lu isolément et en liaison avec l'article 14 de la Convention, ainsi que les articles 6 et 13 de la Convention . Le Gouvemement défendeur soutient que la requête est irrecevable en vertu de l'article 27 par . 3 de la Convention puisque les conditions énoncées à l'anicle 26 n'ont pas été remplies . II soutient également que la requéte est irrecevable en vertu de l'article 27 par . 2 de la Convention, pour défaut manifeste de fondement . La Commission a d'abord examiné si la requ2te était irrecevable au regard de l'article 26 de la Convention, ainsi libellé : « La Commission ne peut être saisie qu'après l'épuisement des voies de recours intemes, tel qu'il est entendu selon les principes de droit intemational généralement reconnus et dans le délai de six mois, à partir de la date de la décision interne définitive . Le Gouvernement défendeur soutient que, dans la mesure où la requéte s'attaque à la formule d'indemnisation prévue par la loi elle-même, elle est tardive puisqu'elle n'a pas été introduite dans les six mois suivant le vote de la loi de 1977 ou suivant le jour du transfert des participations en vertu de la loi .
49
Dans l'affaire De Becker (No 214/56, déc . 9 .6 .58, Annuaire 2 p . 214 à p . 242), la Commission a formulé sur l'interprétation de l'article 26 de la Convention les observations suivantes : « Que la Commission constate, à cet égard, qu'il existe une étroite corrélation entre les deux règles qu'énonce ledit article 26, à savoir celle de l'épuisement des voies de recours intemes et celle du délai de six mois, car les deux règles, non seulement font l'objet d'un article unique, mais figurent côte à côte dans une seule et méme phrase dont la structure grammaticale impose l'idée de pareille corrélation ; que par décision inteme définitive, l'article 26 désigne donc exclusivement la décision définitive rendue dans le cadre normal de l'épuisement des voies de recours intemes, tel qu'il est entendu selon les principes de droit intemational généralement reconnus, de sorte que le délai de siX mois ne peut fonctionner que dans ce cas ; au surplus les indications qui se dégagent des travaux préparatoires de la Convention, notamment du rapport rédigé en juin 1950 par la Conférence des Hauts Fonctionnaires, confirment cette interprétation . . La Commission a ultérieurement développé cette interprétation de l'article 26 en déclarant que lorsqu'il n'existe pas de recours inteme, l'acte ou la décision incriminés doivent eux-mêmes étre nortnalement considérés comme « la décision inteme définitive» visée à l'article 26 . A cet égard, dans l'affaire No 7379/76, déc . 10 .12 .76, D .R . 8 p . 211, la Commission a fonnulé les observations suivantes : •Toutefois, envisageant sa précédente interprétation de l'anicle 26 de la Convention à la lumière des faits de la présente affaire, la Commission parvient à la conclusion que, lorqu'il n'existe pas de voie de recours inteme, l'acte ou la décision incriminés doivent eux-mèmes ètre normalement considérés comme la décision inteme définitive visée à l'article 26 . La règle des six mois énoncée à l'article 26 vise manifestement à contraindre tout requérant à décider, dans un délai de six mois à panir de la décision interne fixant définitivement sa situation, de saisir ou de ne pas saisir la Commission . Lorsque la question d'une violation continue de la Convention ne se pose pas, cette condition s'applique au même titre, que la situation du requérant soit définitivement fixée par une décision définitive rendue dans le cadre normal de l'épuisement d'une voie de recours interne ou, en l'absence de toute voie de recours inteme, par l'acte ou la décision prétendument incompatibles avec la Convention . » La Commission a confirmé cette interprétation de l'anicle 26 dans un certain nombre d'affaires ultérieures (par exemple No 8007/77, Chypre c/Turquie, déc . 10 .7 .78, D .R . 13 p . 85 à p . 153) . Il découle de cette jurispmdence que le délai de six mois prévu à l'article 26 peut commencer à courir soit à dater de la •décision interne définitive - prise dans le cadre de l'épuisement d'un recours inteme effectif et suffisant, soit à dater d e
50
l'acte ou de la décision incriminés lorsque cet acte ou cette décision fixent définitivement la situation du requérant au niveau inteme . L'article 26 ne saurait cependant s'interpréter comme exigeant d'un requérant qu'il saisisse la Commission avant que sa situation au regard du point litigieux n'ait été définitivement fixée ou réglée au niveau interne . Ce n'est que lorsqu'il y a eu une « décision interne dé,(+nirive . ou un acte ou une mesure équivalents que le délai de six mois commence à courir . La Comntission relève qu'en l'espèce les sociétés requérantes ne prétendent pas que la nationalisation de leurs biens en vertu de la loi de 1977 ait été en soi contraire à la Convention . Elles se plaignent pour l'essentiel d'une part de ce que la dépossession de leurs biens n'a pas été assortie du versement d'une indemnité rapide, adéquate et effective et, d'autre part, de ce que l'indemnisation a été discriminatoire . Si les sociétés requérantes critiquent à divers égards la méthode d'indemnisation, elles dirigent essentiellement leurs griefs contre son application au cas de leurs sociétés . La loi de 1977 ne fixe elle-même ni le montant de l'indemnité, ni les délais de paiement, ni aucune autre question touchant aux griefs des requérantes, par exemple les conditions d'émission des bons tenant lieu d'indemnisation . Au contraire, la loi de 1977 indiquait que ces questions seraient tranchées ultérieurement . La Commission ne saurait donc accepter que le jour de l'entrée en vigueur de la loi de 1977 ellemême ou celui de la nationalisation des biens des requérantes puisse être considéré comme équivalant à une •décision interne définitive » sur la question de l'indemnisation . La Commission remarque à cet égard que la situation est en l'espèce fondamenlalement différente de celle qu'elle a examinée dans la requête No 7379/76 (cit . supra) . Dans cette derniére affaire, le requérant se plaignait d'avoir été privé de son droit de propriété sur un ce rtain terrain par une loi entrée immédiatement en vigueur et qui ne prévoyait aucune procédure d'indemnisation ou autre type de remède . Dès l'entrée en vigueur de la loi, le requérant avait donc é té définitivement privé de sa propriété sur le terrain et il ne restait à trancher au plan inteme aucune autre question touchant à son grief sous l'angle de la Convention . En l'espèce au contraire, la queslion de l'indemnisation, objet du grief des sociétés requérantes, devait être tranchée ultérieurement selon une procédure prévue par la loi de 1977, c'est-à-dire soit par accord, soit par arbitrage . La situation des sociétés requérantes n'a donc pas été fixée définitivement par la loi de 1977 elle-même et aux yeux de la Commission, les intéressés étaient en droit, voire dans l'obligation d'attendre jusqu'à la fixation du montant de l'indemnité conformément aux procédures prévues par la loi avant de saisir la Commission de la question de l'indemnisation . La Commission rappelle à cet égard la décision qu'elle a rendue le 28 janvier 1983 sur la recevabilité de la requête No 9006/80, Lithgow c/Royaume-Uni . En l'espèce, le représentant des actionnaires n'a pas pu pa rv enir à un accord avec le Gouvernement sur le montant de l'indemnité due aux sociétés requérantes après la nationalisation de Scott Lithgow D rydocks . En mars 1980, il porta l'affaire devant le tribunal écossais d'arbitrage, organe créé par l'article 42 de la loi de 197 7
51
pour décider notamment, à défaut d'un accord négocié, du montant de l'indemnité à verser apr8s nationalisation . Après avoir entendu l'argumentation présentée au nom du représentant des actionnaires et du Gouvemement, le tribunal fixa l'indemnité à 3,5 millions de livres sterling, conformément à la méthode prévue par la loi de 1977 . La sentence arbitrale du tribunal fut rendue le 29 septembre 1981 . La présente requête a été introduite le 18 novembre 1981, donc dans les six mois qui suivaient la sentence arbitrale . En conséquence, la Commission n'estime pas que la requète soit tardive, ni en tout ni en panie . 2 . La Commission doit également examiner si les sociétés requérantes ont rempli la condition de l'épuisement des recours intemes disponibles . Les sociétés requérantes ne prétendent pas que la méthode d'indemnisation fixée par la loi de 1977 ait été appliquée de manière incorrecte par le tribunal d'arbitrage aux faits dont il était saisi . Elles prétendent que cette méthode a conduit inévitablement à une indemnisation insuffisante et discriminatoire lorsqu'elle a été appliquée à Scott Lithgow Drydocks . Les parties reconnaissent que le tribunal d'arbitrage n'a pas commis d'erreur de droit lorsqu'il s'est prononcé et les requérantes n'avaient donc pas la possibilité de se pourvoir devant la Court of Session . Il apparaît en outre qu'il n'existait pas d'autre organe inteme devant lequel les sociétés requérantes auraient pu contester la sentence arbitrale . Dans ces conditions, la Commission estime que les requérantes ont épuisé les recours intemes que leur offrait la loi de 1977, comme l'exige l'article 26 de la Convention . La Commission en conclut que les conditions posées à l'article 26 ont été remplies en ce qui conceme les deux sociétés requérantes . 3 . La Commission a procédé à un examen préliminaire de l'argumentation avancée par les parties sous l'angle des articles de la Convention et du Protocole additionnel invoqués par les sociétés requérantes . Elle constate que la requête pose des questions importantes et complexes concemant l'interprétation et l'application de la Convention et du Protocole additionnel et qu'elle ne saurait dès lors être considérée comme manifestement mal fondée . La requête doit donc dtre déclarée recevable, aucun motif d'irrecevabilité n'ayant été établi . Par ces motifs, la Commissio n DÉCLARE LA REQUÉTE RECEVABLE .
52

Origine de la décision

Formation : Commission (plénière)
Date de la décision : 11/03/1985

Fonds documentaire ?: HUDOC

HUDOC
Association des cours judiciaires suprêmes francophones Organisation internationale de la francophonie

Juricaf est un projet de l'AHJUCAF, l'association des cours judiciaires suprêmes francophones,
réalisé en partenariat avec le Laboratoire Normologie Linguistique et Informatique du droit (Université Paris I).
Il est soutenu par l'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie et le Fonds francophone des inforoutes.