Facebook Twitter Appstore
Page d'accueil > Résultats de la recherche

§ X. et Y. c. SUISSE

Imprimer

Type d'affaire : Decision
Type de recours : Partiellement recevable ; partiellement irrecevable

Numérotation :

Numéro d'arrêt : 7289/75
Identifiant URN:LEX : urn:lex;coe;cour.europeenne.droits.homme;arret;1977-07-14;7289.75 ?

Analyses :

(Art. 14) DISCRIMINATION, (Art. 9-1) LIBERTE DE RELIGION


Parties :

Demandeurs : X. et Y.
Défendeurs : SUISSE

Texte :

APPLICATIONS/REOUÉTES N° 7289/75 & N° 7349/7 6 X . and Y . v/SWITZERLAND X . et Y . c/SUISS E DECISION of 14 July 1977 on the admissibility of the applications DECISION du 14 juillet 1977 sur la recevabilité des requéte s
Articfe 1 of the Convention : a) The responsibility of a High Contracting Party can be engaged by acts of its authorities, producing effects outside its own territory Icompetence ratione focil . b) Effects in Liechtenstein of a decision taken by a Swiss authority . Analysis of the refarions berween the two States. In the present case, measure taken by Switzerland in the framework of its "jurisdiction", within the meaning of Article 1 .
Article 3 of the Convention : a) Prohibition of entry into a State where the applicant claims to have a famityquestion governed by Articfe 8 rather than Article 3 . b) Prevention from consulting a particular medical expert, if appropriate medical treatment can be obtained elsewhere, does not constitute inhuman treatment. Articfe 6, paragraph 1 of the Convention : Not applicable to administrative proceedings on prohibition of entry. Article 8 of the Convention : The relationship of a father with his illegitimate children is included in the concept of family life . Extra-marital relationships not invotving permanent co-habitation are not included in the concept of family life . Where the family ties are already fairly loose, a measure obliging members of the family to meet at some dfstance from their residence, does not constitute an interference with family life . Article 27, paregreph 2 of the Convention : An apptication is not abusive as lacking any practical purpose merely because, if successful, the result pursued by the applicant could be thwarted by the action of a State who ls not a Contracting Party to the Convention .
- 57 -
Rights not guaranteed by the Convention : No right to the free choice of medical asststance is, as such, guaranteed by the Convention .
Article 1 de la Convention : al La responsabilité d'une Haute Partie Contractante peut être engagée à raison d'actes de ses organes déployant leurs effets en-dehors du territoire Icompétence ratione locil . b) Effet au Liechtenstein d'une décision rendue par une autorité suisse . Analyse des relations entre les deux Etats . En l'espèce, mesure prise par la Suisse dans le cadre de sa "juridiction", au sens de l'article 1 . Article 3 de la Convention : a) S'agtssant d'une interdiction d'entrée dans un Etat où le requérant prétend avoir de la famille, l'article 3 s'efface devant l'article 8 . b) Ne constitue pas un traitement inhumain le fait d'être empêché de consulter un certain médecin spécialiste, alors que des soins médicaux appropriés peuvent étre obtenus ailleurs. Article 6, paragraphe 1 de la Convention : Inapplicable à une procédure administrative d'interdiction d'entrée . Article 8 de la Convention : Ressortissent B/a vie familiale les relations d'un pére avec ses enfants illégitimes Ne ressortissent pas à la vie famili®le des relations extra-conjugales non accompagnées d'une vie commune permanente . Lorsque les relations familiales sont déjà relativement lâches, ne constitue pas une atteinte é/a vie familiate une mesure qui oblige les membres de la famille à se rencontrer à quelque distance de leur domicile . Article 27, paragraphe 2 de la Convention : Une requête n'est pas abusive, comme pratiquement dénuée de but, du seul fait qu'en cas de succès, le résultat voulu par le requérant pourrait être contrecarré par l'action d'un Etat non Partie à la Convention . Droits non garantis par la Convention : Aucun droit au libre choix de son médecin n'est, comme tel, garanti parla Convention .
THE FACTS
I franGais : voir p . 76)
The facts of the case may be summarised as follows The first applicant is a German citizen born in 1917 . He is working as an economic adviser in Munich . He is married and has two legitimate children in Munich .
- 58 -
The second applicant is an Austrian citizen born in 1944 . She is resident in Liechtenstein since 1958 and works as administrator of various companies with seats in Liechtenstein She has two illegitimate children from the first applicant who were born in 1971 and 1973 respectively . The first applicani has recognised the fatherhood of these children . He used to pay frequent weekend visits to the second applicant and his children . According to Liechtenstein law a foreigner is allowed to stay in the country for ninety days a year without a residence permit . In 1971 the applicant asked the aliens' police of Liechtenstein to extend this period to 180 days a year . The request, however, was rejected on . . April 1972 . In January 1973 the applicani fell seriously ill and had to be taken to hospital in Germany . It was discovered that he had Parkinson's Disease . In April 1973 the second applicant transported him to her house at B . Liechtenstein, in order to alleviate his depressive state of mind . A specialist in Zürich whom he then consulted recommended plenty of fresh air and exercise, and stated that recovery could only be achieved after several months . Thus the first applicant stayed in Liechtenstei n During the whole period April 1973 to October 1974 he remained in Liechtenstein without a residence permit . After that date he resumed his work in Munich and visited the second applicant and his illegilimate children at weekends only . On . . June 1975 a member of the Liechtenstein aliens' police had an interview with the first applicant in the second applicant's house . He was asked how long and for what reasons he had stayed in Liechtenstein . On . July 1975 the Federal Aliens' Police of Switzerland at Bern issued an order prohibiting the applicant's entry into the territory of Switzerland and Liechtenstein during a period of 2 years lexpiring on . . . July 1977), for gross violation of the regulations applicable to aliens (illegal residence and failure to reporl to the authorities) . The measure was based on Art . 13 para . 111 of the 1931 Swiss Federal Law on the residence and establishment of foreigners . This Swiss law is applicable, and the Swiss authorities are competent in matters of the aliens' police in Liechtenstein according to the Swiss-Liechtenstein Treaty of 6 November 1963 on the exercise of the aliens' police in respect of third country nationals in the Principality of Liechtenstein, and on co-operation in matters of the aliens' police . IVereinbarung zwischen der Schweiz und dem Fürstentum Liechtenstein über die Handhabung der Fremdenpolizei für Drittauslander im Fürstentum Liechtenstein und über die fremdenpolizeiliche Zusammenarbeit) . The applicant appealed against the order to the Federal Department for Justice and Police IEidgenbssisches Justiz- und Polizeidepartement) at Bern . The appeal was based on the ground that the failure to report to the aliens' polic e
- 59 -
during the period April 1973 to October 1974 was excusable because of the applicant's serious disease at that time . He also referred to his need of medical assistance from Swiss doctors and to the fact that the second applicant and his children were resident in Liechtenstein and needed his presence . The Federal Department, however, rejected the appeal on . . . October 1975 . This decision was based on the following grounds : the applicant had illegally resided in Liechtenstein from April 1973 until November 1974 ; his excuse that he had not been in a position to report to the police was not credible, and at least the second applicant could have acted for him ; he was not necessarily dependent on the assistance of Swiss doctors ; and the relationship to the second applicant and the children did not justify a repeal of the order insofar as they could themselves visit or join him in the Federal Republic . The decision of the Federal Department of . . . October 1975 is final . There is no possibility of appeal to the Federal Court . There is, however, a possibility of suspension of the order i .a . for humanitarian reasons . The first and second applicants have lodged a number of petitions to the Swiss and Liechtenstein authorities, with a view to obtaining such suspensions . On . . . November 1975 the Aliens' Police at Bern issued a decision of suspension for the period from . . . to . . December 1975, by which the applicant was allowed "to visit his children in the Principality of Liechtenstein" The authorities later granted a number of further suspensions on such occasions as Easter and Christmas holidays or birthdays .
COMPLAINTS The applicants now complain of a violation of Articles 2, 3, 5, 6 and 8 of the Convention . They consider Articles 2 and 5 are violated because the first applicant has been deprived of the free choice of his medical assistance . They consider Article 3 is violated because the separation of a father from his children, especially in the age of the first applicant, in their view amounts to an inhuman treatment . At the same time they complain of a violation of Art . 8 by the authorities' interference with their private and family lite . In their view this interference cannot be justified in the circumstances, especially since children between the age of 2 and 4 need both parents . The applicants finally consider that Art . 6 has also been violated because there has not been a public hearing before the order was issued .
- 60 -
WRITTEN SUBMISSIONS OF THE PARTIE S a) The respondent Government 1 . The respondent Government submitted that Switzerland could not be held responsible for acts of the aliens' police in Liechtenstein because these acts were, in relation to third countries, acts imputable to Liechtenstein . The Principality and Switzerland were two sovereign States which by virtue of their sovereignty had concluded mutual international agreements in the field of the aliens' police . In this respect the Governmeni referred to the decision of the Permanent Court of International Justice in the Wimbledon case where it had been stated "La Cour se refuse à voir dans la conclusion d'un traité quelconque, par lequel un Etat s'engage à faire ou à ne pas faire quelque chose, un abandon de sa souveraineté . Sans doute, toute convention engendrant une obligation de ce genre, apporte une restriction à l'exercice des droits souverains de l'Etat, en ce sens qu'elle imprime à cet exercice une direction déterminée . Mais la faculté de contracter des engagements internationaux est précisément un attribut de la souveraineté de l'Etat "
(Recueil des arrèts, Serie A, No 1, 17 August 1923, p .25 ) The fundamental provision regulating the relationship between Switzerland and Liechtenstein was Art . 33 of the Treaty of 29 March 1923 concerning the inclusion of the Principality of Liechtenstein in the Swiss customs territory . According to this Article Switzerland was prepared io waive the control of aliens at the Swiss-Liechtenstein border "insofar and as long as the Principality of Liechtenstein assureldl the observance, on its territory, of the Swiss laws on the aliens' police, establishment, residence etc ." ("sofern und solange das Fürstentum Liechtenstein dafilr Sorge trégt, dass die Umgehung der Schweizerischen Vorschriften iiber Fremdenpolizei, Niederlassung, Aufenthalt usw. vermieden wird") . The Swiss-Liechtenstein agreement of 6 November 1963 on the exercise of the aliens' police in respect of third country nationals in the Principality of Liechtenstein and on co-operation in matters of the aliens' police was expressly based on the above treaty provision and pursued the same purpose . The law on the aliens' police in respect of third couniry nationals should be largely the same in both countries . This aim could be achieved it one of the two States was prepared to apply in its territory, within precise limits fixed by public international law, the law of the other State on matters of ihe aliens' police (cf . D .J . Niedermann, Liechtenstein und die Schweiz . Eine vdlkerrechtliche Untersuchung . Liechtenstein Politische Schriften Vol . 5, Vaduz 1976, p . 128) . Liechtenstein sovereignty was not affected by the circumstance that in some areas of the aliens' police in respect of third country nationals the Principality was, according to ihe agreement, treated in the same way as a Swiss canton .
- 61 -
According to Art . 1 (1) of the 1963 agreement on the exercise of the aliens' police in respect of third country nationals Swiss law was applicable with regard to the entry, exit, residence and establishment of non-Swiss foreigners in Liechtenstein . This explained why the order against the first applicant was based on Art . 13 111 of the 1931 Federal Law on the residence and establishment of foreigners, and why it was issued by the Swiss aliens' police . Liechtenstein had delegated certain functions of the aliens' police to the Swiss authorities, but thereby it had not generally renounced its sovereignty in the matters of the aliens' police . The Swiss authorities exercised these functions not on the basis of the Federal Constitution, but pursuant to the above agreement and in exercise of Liechtenstein sovereignty (für die Hoheit des Fürstentums Liechtenstein, pour la souveraineté de la Principauté de Liechtenstein ) The European Convention on Human Rights was not ap licable with regar d to Liechtenstein . The Convention could not even indirectly be applied in Liechtenstein, for the reason that the Swiss law on aliens had to be applied there by virtue of an international treaty . Switzerland could therefore not be held responsible for the prohibition of entry into Liechtenstein pronounced against the first applicant . In the Government's view the Commission held no competence ratione personae to deal with the applicants' complaints in this respect (alleged violations of Articles 3, 6 and 8 of the Conventionl . 2 Even if Switzerland could be obliged to revoke the prohibition of entry pursuant to a decision of the European Court of Human Rights or the Committee of Ministers, this could not bind the Liechtenstein authorities . The latter could themselves pronounce a prohibition of entry which would be limited in its effect to Liechtenstein . Such measures were possible on the basis of Art . 2 (b) of the above-mentioned agreement of 6 November 1963 on the exercise of . the aliens' police in respect of third country nationals . Similar measures were even possible in respect of Swiss citizens, on the basis of Art . 1 para . (4) of the parallel agreement of the same date, concerning the exercise of the aliens' police in respect of the citizens of each of the Contracting States in the territory of the other . This meant that the applicants could not have a legal interest in the outcome of the proceedings before the Commission, because it could not change the situation underlying their complaint . In these circumstances, the Government was of the opinion that the applications amounted to an abuse of the right of petition within the meaning of Art . 27 of the Convention . 3 . The delegation of certain functions of the aliens' police in Liechtenstein to Swiss authorities did not, on the other hand, remove the obligation of the second applicant to make use of the domestic remedies available to her in respect of any violations of the Convention allegedly affecting herself committed by the authorities acting on behalf of Liechtenstein The second applicant, however, had not made use of such remedies, and therefore Application No . 7349/76 was inadmissible for non-exhaustion of the domestic remedies .
- 62 -
4 . As regards the free choice of medical assistance, the second applicant could not pretend to be a victim, and this part of the application was therefore incompatible with the provisions of the Convention ratione personae . Insofar as this complaint was made by the first applicant, it was inadmissible because the right invoked by the applicant was not guaranteed by the Convention, and the complaint therefore incompatible with the Convention ratione mareriae . The right invoked by the applicant was certainly not included in the right to life as guaranteed by Art . 2 of the Convention, and the right to liberty and security as guaranteed by Art . 5 . "Security" in Art . 5 had no meaning of its own . What the applicant essentially claimed was the right to free movement IFreiziigigkeitl . This however, was not included in Art . 5, but was regulated in the Fourth Protocol (not ratified by Switzerlandl . Moreover, the applicant's complaint was also manifestly ill-founded . His right to life was not in danger as a consequence of the prohibition of entry issued against him, nor was there any interference with his freedom within the meaning of Art . 5 . 5 . As regards the allegation that the prohibition of entry into Liechtenstein amounted to inhuman or degrading treatment IAn . 31, the Commission was not competent ratione loci because the Convention was not applicable with regard to Liechtenstein . The Commission's competence ratione loci coincided with the territorial application of the Convention and the Commission could only take into account those tacts which had occurred within the area of application of the Convention . Since the applicants complained of a prohibition to enter a country in which the Convention was not in force, their complaint was not admissible . The complaint under Art . 3 was also manifestly ill-founded . In its Report on the First Greek Case the Commission had circumscribed the notion of degrading treatment as meaning a treatment which grossly humiliates a person before others or drives him to act against his will or conscience . This did certainly not apply in the present case The applicant was free to meet his children at any time outside the Principality of Liechtenstein, and already for this reason his complaint was totally unfounded . 6 . The above argument that the Commission was incompetent ratione /oci was applicable also in regard to the applicants' complaints under Art . 8 of the Convention . The applicants complained that the prohibitlon of entry deprived them of the possibility of leading their family life in Liechtenstein . Since the Convention was not in torce in Liechtenstein any violation of its Article 8 was out of the question . Moreover, also this grievance was manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Art . 27 of the Convention . The Government did not deny that the concept of family life (Art . 8 111) applied to the relationship between a father and his illegitimate children (cf . the Commission's decision on Application No . 1475/62, and Fawcett, "The application of the European Convention on Human Rights" ,
- 63 -
Oxford 1969, p .1891 . The Swiss law had only recently been amended in order to assimilate the legal status of illegitimate children as far as possible to the status of legitimate children . The Government therefore did not see a reason to object in principle to the Commission's approach . But the prohibition of entry did not hinder the applicant from living with his children outside the Principality of Liechtenstein, and therefore the complaint was manifestly ill-founded (cf . the Commission's decision on Application No 3325/67, Yearbook 10, 1967, at p .5371 . 7 . Finally, as regards the applicants' complaint under Art . 6 that the prohibition had been pronounced without a public hearing, the Government first observed that this complaint was incompatible ratione personae insofar as the second applicant was concerned, because she could not validly claim to be a victim of any defects of the procedure concerning the first applicant . The complaint was also incompatible with the Convention rarione materiae, because the procedural guarantees of Art . 6 applied only in the case of the determination of civil rights and obligations, or of any criminal accusation . However, the entry and residence of a person in a particular country was a matter of public law, as the Commission had expressly confirmed in its above-mentioned decision on Application No . 3325/67 (Yearbook 10, p .5391 . The relevant procedures therefore did not come under Art . 6 of the Convention . It was not admissible to treat the proceedings in matters of the aliens' police as proceedings determining civil rights and obligations simply because they affected the persons concerned in their possibility of lree movement . In the last resort this could lead to the result that every administrative procedure could be regarded as concerning civil rights, because it always concerned the liberty of persons in one or the other way . In the Government's opinion the complaint under Art . 6 was therefore also manifestly ill-founded .
b) The applicants' observations in reply to the Government's observations on admissibility The first applicant objected to the Government's opinion that Liechtenstein had remained sovereign in the administration of its aliens' police and that the Swiss authorities were only accomplishing ancillary functions on the basis of a treaty relationship . In the applicant's opinion it was wrong to conclude from the non-applicability of the Convention in Liechtenstein that also the functions delegated by Liechtenstein to Swiss authorities escaped the control of the Commission . In public international law one had to base oneself on the facts . If certain facts had existed and had been recognised by the international community for a certain period of time they created new customary law . In fact Liechtenstein had delegated a part of its sovereignty to Switzerland with the result that Switzerland was competent and responsible under international law with regard to these areas . The situation was similar with regard to the monetary, customs and postal union existing between Liechtenstein and Switzerland Liechtenstein wa s
-6q-
not free to introduce its own money, or to establish a customs area ot its own, without the consent of Switzerland . It was also not tree to establish its own broadcasting and television stations which was normally a right connected with a State's sovereignty . In the same way Liechtenstein had delegated to Switzerland most of its sovereign rights in the field of the aliens' police . This was a delegation similar to the delegation of functions to the supranational organs of the EEC by the member States of the EEC which meant the renunciation by these States of a part of their sovereiqnty . The decision of the P .C .I .J . in the Wimbledon case was not therefore applicable .
The Swiss Government had apparently made their observations on behalf of Liechtenstein . It was true that Liechtenstein was a sovereign State and had not ratified the Convention . But Liechtenstein had signed the agreements of Helsinki which contained provisions similar to those of the Convention and were only a development and expansion of the latter . In the applicants' view it was incomprehensible that a Western European State which had signed the Final Protocol of the Conference of Helsinki did not recognise the obligations under the Convention for merely formal reasons . In the present case, it was not Liechtenstein authorities which had acted . It was an act by the Swiss authorities, and the Swiss authorities alone, of which the applicants complained . This measure had been taken although no infraction in Switzerland had been committed, or had even been alleged . In the applicant's view there was no doubt that measures which the Swiss authorities took with effect for Liechtenstein either on the basis of a treaty, or in exercise of functions otherwise delegated by Liechtenstein, were fully covered by I the Convention . As regards the allegation that the second applicant had not exhausted the domestic remedies available to her in Liechtenstein, the first applicant referred to her petitions to the Deputy Prime Minister of Liechtenstein and the Head of the Liechtenstein aliens' police . The second applicant herself, who had submitted her complaints in her own name and on behalf of her children supported the opinion of the first applicant . In addition, she submitted that the iniormation about legal remedies given in the order of prohibition itself concerned only remedies in Switzerland . These had been taken with a negative result . There were no remedies available in Liechtenstein . Nevertheless she had contacted the competent authorities and informed them of her grievances . The Head of the Liechtenstein Aliens' Police had inter alia stated that even if the first applicant had applied to the authorities for an extension of the permission to stay beyond the 90 days' period until his recovery trom his disease he would not have been granted it . Instead he would have been ordered to leave the country as soon as he was fit for transport .
- dti -
The Head of the aliens' police had further remarked that he could not consider the second applicant and her children as the first applicant's family . If they wanted to live together, they were free to do so outside Liechtenstein . The second applicant objected that this would mean renouncing her residence permit in Liechtenstein and would destroy her professional existence which was connected with the administration of foreign companies with seats in Liechtenstein . This required that she reside in Liechtenstein . The Head of the aliens' police, however, did not accept this argument . He stated that the law must be strictly applied, and that he fully agreed with the measure taken by the Swiss . authorities As regards an application to the Commission, the Head of the aliens' police had stressed that Liechtenstein was not bound by the Convention . Even if Switzerland revoked the prohibition of entry pursuant to a decision of the Commission, this would therefore have no effect for Liechtenstein . In her submissions to the Commission the second applicant again stressed her wish to remain in Liechtenstein where her parents and family also lived . She had built up her existence there which depended on residence in the country . The applicants asked the Commission to declare the application admissible .
ORAL SUBMISSIONS OF THE PARTIES a) The respondent Governmen t At the oral hearing on 14 July 1977 the Government generally restated the arguments which it had already put forward in writing .
In addition, it dealt at great length with the particular relationship existing between Switzerland and Liechtenstein since the end of World War I when Liechtenstein's monetary and customs union with the Austrian Empire was dissolved . By an exchange of notes of 1919 Switzerland assumed the diplomatic representation of Liechtenstein vis-à-vis third countries . The only diplomatic representation in another country which Liechtenstein still maintains is the one in Bern . But in each case the Swiss diplomatic service undertakes interventions on behalf of Liechtenstein only at the particular request of the Liechtenstein authorities and in accordance with their instructions . It is to be noted that this system is limited to the diplomatic relations with other States . In multilateral diplomacy Liechtenstein, while occasionally relying on the representation through the Swiss diplomatic service, generally acts by itself . Thus it has its own representatives to international organisations of which it is a member and often sends its own delegations to multilateral conferences . It is itself a party to numerous international conventions, including Council of Europe conventions . The Swiss-Liechtenstein customs union was established by a treaty of 29 March 1923 . It had the effect of including the Liechtenstein territory within th e
- 66 -
Swiss customs area, thus pushing the customs line from the Swiss-Liechtenstein to the Liechtenstein-Austrian border . This situation requires that the whole of the Swiss federal legislation in customs matters is applicable in Liechtenstein in the same way as in the Swiss territory itself . Liechtenstein has not reserved any powers to collect customs duties or to have customs authorities of its own . For all practical purposes Liechtenstein forms therefore part of Switzerland insofar as the import, export and transit of goods is concerned . Still, Liechtenstein has reserved its sovereignly in this field The customs treaty can be denounced, and it contains a clause on the submission of disputes between the parties to arbitration . Although customs treaties concluded by Switzerland are automatically applicable to Liechtenstein, Liechtenstein's adherence to EFTA and the extension to its territory of the special arrangements concluded between Switzerland and the EEC and between Switzerland and the members of the ECCS were made the subject of special protocols to which Liechtenstein itself is a party . Already the Swiss-Liechtenstein customs treaty of 1923 contains provisions on the aliens' police . Its Article 33 moves also the border control of passengers to the Liechtenstein-Austrian border on the condition that the Principality prevents the circumvention of the Swiss regulations on the aliens' police, the establishment and residence of foreigners . The first special agreement on the exercise of the aliens' police in Liechtenstein was concluded in 1923 . It extended the Swiss regulations on entry, refusal of entry and declaration of arrival to the territory of Liechtenstein, but reserved the legislation of both States on the residence of aliens . This agreement was replaced by new agreements in 1941 and 1948 They extended in addition the Swiss legislation on the residence of aliens to third country nationals in Liechtenstein . But the individual decisions on residence, establishment or toleration taken in either Switzerland or Liechtenstein are only valid in the territory of the State concerned . Liechtenstein thus has kept its sovereignty in matters of the aliens' police, including the possibility to expel third-country nationals from its territory The contractual extension to Liechtenstein of the Swiss regulations on aliens does not change anything in this respect . In Liechtenstein these regulations are to be considered as Liechtenstein law . In the Government's view it is also irrelevant which organs exercise the aliens' police in Liechtenstein Even if they are Swiss authorities they act on behalf of Liechtenstein and it is only the Principality which is internationally responsible . Since Liechtenstein has not ratitied the Convention, it cannot be bound by it either directly or indirectly . In reply to a question by the Commission, the Government clarified that by virtue of Article 3 of the 1963 agreement a prohibition of entry pronounced for Switzerland would normally have automatic effect also in Liechtenstein . It was only the Swiss Federal authorities which could limit the measure to Swiss territory alone, while the Liechtenstein authorities had no right to overrule the Federal authorities' decision even with regard to Liechtenstein territory . There was also no practice to the effect that Liechtenstein allowed the entry to its territory o f
- 67 -
persons which the Swiss aliens' police had excluded from Switzerland without expressly limiting the measure to Swiss territory . The applicants in the present case had not applied to the Federal aliens' police to limit the prohibition of entry to Swiss territory alone, and even if they had done so it is almost certain on the basis of the current practice that they would not have been granted such limitation of the measure atfeciing the first applicant . In reply to another question from the Commission the Government stated that they did not consider the exercise of the aliens' police in Liechtenstein as an exercise of Swiss jurisdiction within the meaning of Art . 1 of the Convention .In their view, it was Liechtenstein jurisdiction, and therefore not jurisdiction of one of the Contracting Parties within the meaning of that Article . The Government admitted that the provisions contained in Article 3 of the 1963 agreement might not only be understood as a delegation of Liechtenstein jurisdiction to Swiss authorities - theoretically they might as well be construed as an extension of Swiss jurisdiction to the territory of Liechtenstein . However, this was not the interpretation which the parties to the agreement had adopted . In the Government's view the legal situation in respect of the aliens' police differs significally from that concerning the customs union where Liechtenstein has altogether renounced the exercise of its sovereignty . In matters of the aliens' police Liechtenstein cannot simply be considered as part of the Swiss territory . In this respect a distinction must be drawn between questions concerning the entry of aGenson the one hand, and questions concerning their residence on the other . Decisions concerning residence are wholly reserved to the Liechtenstein authorities . As regards entry, the situation is different according to whether entry to Switzerland is or is not granted by the Swiss authorities . Where they grant entry to Swiss territory, Liechtenstein still remains free to exclude the persons concerned from its territory alone IArt . 2b and c of the 1963 agreement) . Where the Swiss authorities, however, pronounce a prohibition of entry, this decision in principle produces effect in both Switzerland and Liechtenstein by virtue of Article 3 of the agreement . In the present case the prohibition of entry has been pronounced as a sanction for the violation of the law of Liechtenstein which is identical with the Swiss law . Since the law is the same, it is only normal that sanctions for its violation are pronounced with validity for both Switzerland and Liechtenstein which for this purpose are considered as forming one territory . It is true that the competences reserved for the Liechtenstein authorities in Article 2 of the agreement are formulated as exceptions to the general rule which is laid down in Article 1 of the agreement, namely that the competence of the Swiss aliens' police is in principle extended to Liechtenstein . But the exceptions contained in Article 2 are of such importance that they deprive the general rule of much of its importance . In tFie Government's view the construction of thes e
-68-
provisions does not necessarily imply that Liechtenstein has in principle renounced to its jurisdiction in favour of Switzerland . In the Government's view there can therefore be no question of a tacit reservation of Switzerland regarding the exercise of its jurisdiction in Liechtenstein . If there was a reservation it would have been necessary to state it expressly . However, the non-applicability of the Convention is derived from the provisions of the Convention itself, the case concerning Liechtenstein and not Swiss jurisdiction . It cannot be imagined that Liechtenstein would have consented to a declaration by Switzerland that it felt bound by the Convention even where it exercised Liechtenstein jurisdiction . Liechtenstein would not be bound by such a declaration . Since Liechtenstein was in any event free to expel the first applicant even if the Swiss federal aliens' police revoked its decision, the application pursued no practical purpose and was in this sense abusive . The Government admitted that Liechtenstein was equally free to tolerate the applicant after such revocation, although this was not probable after the statement of the head of the Liechtenstein aliens' police which had been reported in the note of the second applicant . In any case, the Swiss Government could not speak for the Liechtenstein authorities on this issue . As regards the Government's contention that the complaints of an interference with the applicants' private and family life are manifestly ill-founded, the Government put particular emphasis on the fact that the first applicant had on altogether nine occasions been granted suspensions from the prohibition to enter, for periods between two and ten days . He thus had been able to visit the second applicant and his children in Liechtenstein . Article 8 of the Convention is in principle applicable to extra-marital relations, on the condition that they are of a permanent nature which had not been shown in the present case . In any case Article 8 121 allows an interference with private and family life by a lawful measure which is necessary i .a . tor the ordre public . There is no question that the prohibition of entry in the present case was based on law . And it was necessary because, in the situation prevailing in Liechtenstein where one third of the population are aliens (8000 out of 24000, 4000 being third country nationals), the ordre public required a strict applicalion of the regulations on aliens which in the present case had been grossly violated . The sanction imposed on the first applicant was not out of proportion in regard to the gravity of the violation of the law, and was considerably alleviated by the repeated suspensions . The kind ot sanction imposed-prohibition on entry rather than e .g . a fine-corresponded to the character of the offence and was the most effective means to ensure the compliance with the aliens regulations . Moreover Article 5111 ( f) of the Convention implied that expulsion was as such permissible under the Convention and the interference with private and family life in the presehi case had been kept to a minimum . In this respect, it must also be mentioned that the applicants were certainly free to meet outside Liechtenstein and Switzerland .
- 69 -
b) The applicant s The first applicant who was himself present at the oral hearing stated that the second applicant earned her livelihood in the administration of various companies in Liechtenstein which necessitated that she maintained her residence there . He admitted that he had been granted suspensions from the prohibition of entry on several occasions . However, this was not only for the purpose of visiting his family, but also in order to see his doctor in Ziirich and his dentist in Liechtenstein . Each time his application had been submitted to the head of the Liechtenstein aliens' police, and when he raised no objections it was granted by the Swiss federal aliens' police without reference to the latter's consultation . The applicant stated that he had won the impression that the so-called gross violation of the regulations on aliens was not the only reason for the measure taken against him . He had had business relations in Liechtenstein for about 17 years . The Liechtenstein Government had always known that and he had at no time been asked to report to the police in order to comply with the regulations . The difficulties only began when he had his first child in Liechtenstein and asked for an extension of the 90 days period . This was refused, but even after that date the Liechtenstein aliens' police did not seek to prevent his entry . The authorities knew when he was there, and did not undertake anything to expel him while he was there . By the way he did not stay in Liechtenstein as a foreign worker . In the relevant period he had overstayed the permitted time only for the reason of his state of health . In this period he undertook long excursions in a remote part of the country, where he happened to meet the head of the aliens' police who was hunting there . Immediately afterwards the Liechtenstein police undertook enquiries how long he had stayed in the country, and when he had left . He understood that it was necessary to enforce the regulations on aliens, but personally he did not feel guilty of any gross violations, and he considered the sanction imposed on him post factum totally out of proportion, in that it meant separating him from his children, and was inhuman in view of his own and his children's age and in view of his bad state of health . He had written to the competent Federal Minister to revoke the measure by an act of grace . But the reply was that the case did not concern a penal sanction, and therefore there was no room for an act of grace . Originally he had not considered that the law had not been applied in a formally correct way . But with the lapse of time he had won the conviction that there must be some other reason behind this application of the law . In particular he did not find it correct that the authorities had reverted to the use of police spies . He did not know who was behind all this, and was unable to furnish elements of proof . As regards the relationship between Switzerland and Liechtenstein the applicant submitted that international law is based on the principle of effectivity . In his view Liechtenstein had de facto renounced the exercise of its jurisdiction . If Liechtenstein allowed Switzerland to exercise jurisdiction in its territory in a certain respect, then Switzerland must also be held responsible for the acts concerned . A Swiss official had mentioned to the second applicant that in case s
- 70 -
of this kind the Liechtenstein authorities used to hide behind the back of the Swiss authorities, while expecting that the Swiss authorities hid behind theirs, and this in his view was a correct description of the confused legal situation between the two countries . He did not know whether the Swiss or Liechtenstein authorities intended to issue a new prohibition of ent ry against him . He saw no reason for this, but if the Convention did not apply, they would of course be free to do so . He hoped that this could be prevented .
THE LA W 1 . The applicants complain of a prohibition of entry pronounced against the first applicant by the Swiss Federal aliens' police with effect for Swiss and Liechtenstein territory . They allege an interference with their private and family life, which in their view is contrary to Articles 8 and 3 of the Convention, insofar as the above measure prevented the first applicant's entry into Liechtenstein . They further allege a breach of Articles 2, 3 and 5 of the Convention insofar as the measure prevented his entry into Switzerland and thereby interfered with the free choice of his medical assistance . They finally allege a breach of Article 6 of the Convention because there had been no public hearing in a court before the above decision was taken . 2 . The Commission first examined the question whether the applicants in the present case are persons within the jurisdiction of Switzerland in the meaning of Article 1 of the Convention . This Article provides that the High Contracting Parties secure the rights and freedoms defined in Section I of the Convention "to everyone within their jurisdiction" . The Commission first recalls its earlier case law where it has already been established that the Contracting Parties' responsibility under the Convention is also engaged insofar as they exercise jurisdiction outside their territory and thereby bring persons or property within their actual authority or control (cf . the Commission's decisions on the admissibility of applications No . 1611/62, Yearbook 8, p . 158 11681 ; No . 6231/73, Ilse Hess v . U .K ., Decisions and Reports 2, p . 72 1731 ; and Nos . 6780/74, 6950/75, Cyprus v . Turkey, Decisions and Reports 2, p . 125 (137) .) . The circumstance that the present case concerns facts in Liechtenstein does not therefore necessarily exclude the Commission's competence to examine the application . However the responsibility of Switzerland under the Convention can only be engaged if the measures of which the applicants complain are imputable to Switzerland rather than to Liechtenstein .
- 71 -
Liechtenstein is a sovereign State which has not ratified the Convention . It is clear that the Convention is not binding upon the Liechtenstein authorities themselves . In the present case, however, it is exclusively the Swiss authorities which have acted, although with etfect in the territory of Liechtenstein . The Swiss authorities exercised their functions on the basis of the treaty relationship between the two countrie s The basic instrument is the treaty of 1923 concerning the inclusion of Liechtenstein within the Swiss customs area . Article 33 ( 1) of this treatv orovides that Switzerland waives the control of foreigners on the Swiss-Liechtenstein border while Liechtenstein undertakes to ensure that the Swiss regulations on aliens are not circumvented on its territor y This treaty provision has been implemented by successive agreements on the exercise of the aliens' police in Liechtenstein The two aqreements at present in force date from 1963 . One of them concerns the treatment of the citizens of each of the contractinq States in the territorv of the other . It has no relevance to the oresent case as neither applicant possesses the nationalitv of the contracting States . The second agreement, which has been applied in the present case, concerns the exercise of the aliens' police in respect ot third-country nationals in Liechtenstein, and Swiss-Liechtenstein co-operation in matters of the aliens' police . This agreement provides the following : a. The Swiss laws and decrees (Erlasse) concerning the entry, exit, residence and establishment of foreigners are in principle applicable with regard to thirdcountry nationals in Liechtenstein (Art . 1 ( 1) 1st sentence) . b . The administration of these matters is in principle entrusted to the Swiss Federal authorities . The authorities of Liechtenstein have only the powers and functions of the corresponding authorities of a Swiss canton in this respect (Art . 1 11 I 2nd sentence) . c. Expulsions and restrictions or prohibitions of entry pronounced for the whole of Switzerland have automatically effect in Liechtenstein This effect can be excluded by a special decision of the Swiss aliens' police . The Liechtenstein authorities themselves cannot derogate from such a measure pronounced by the competent Swiss authority IArt . 3) . d. The Liechtenstein authorities have, however, reserved certain functions of the aliens' police . They can eg . expel a person from Liechtenstein territory alone fwith no effect for Swiss territory) (Art . 2b of the agreement), and they are not under an obligation to admit or tolerate a third-country national on their territory although he has been admitted to Switzerland IArt . 2c1 .
- 72 -
What matters in the Commission's opinion is the circumstance that according to the system established by the above agreement a prohibition of entry pronounced by the Swiss authorities while producing its effect first of all in Swiss territory is automatically extended to Liechtenstein by virtue of Article 3 of the agreement and the Liechtenstein authorities themselves have no possibility to exclude this effect . On the contrary, the exclusion of Liechtenstein from the territorial application of a prohibition of entry is expressly reserved to the Swiss authority . Switzerland is certainly responsible, under Article 1 of the Convention, for the procedure and for the effect which the prohibition of entry produced in its own territory . But it must also be held responsible insofar as the prohibition of entry produced an effect in Liechtenstein . According to the special treaty relationship existina between Switzerland and Liechtenstein Swiss authorities when acting for Liechtenstein do not act in distinction from their national competences . In fact on the basis of the treaty they act exclusively in conformity with Swiss law and it is only the effect of this act which is extended to Liechtenstein territory . That means that it was Swiss iurisdiction which was used and extended to Liechtenstein . Acts bv Swiss authorities with effect in Liechtenstein bring all those to whom they apply under Swiss jurisdiction within the meaning of Article 1 of the Convention . It follows that the present applications are not rdtione personae incompatible with the orovisions of the Convention . The Commission therefore considers that it is fully competent ratione loci and ratione personae to deal with the applications . 3 . The Commission has next considered the respondent Government's argument that the applications are abusive in view of the fact that they allegedly lack any practical purpose, Liechtenstein being able to issue a new prohibition of entry against the first applicant even if the Convention organs stated that the measure taken by the Swiss authorities was in breach of the Convention . However, even assuming that the concept of abuse within the meaning of Article 27121 in line may be understood as including the case of an application serving no practical purpose, the Commission is unable to follow the above argument . Under Article 2b of the 1963 Swiss-Liechtenstein agreement the Liechtenstein authorities were as free to issue a new prohibition of entry as they were free to tolerate the first applicant following any final decision of a Convention organ finding a breach of the Convention . It cannot be assumed that the Liechtenstein authorities while not being formally bound by any such decision would not take it into account in reconsidering their position . If the Swiss prohibition of entry had been revoked as a consequence of the present proceedings, this would in any event have removed the obstacle which prevented the Liechtenstein authorities from over-rulino the exterritorial effect in Liechtenstein of lho measure comolainetl ot .
- 73 -
The Commission therefore does not consider that the applications are abusive within the meaning of Article 27121 in fine . 4 . The Commission has then considered both applicants' main complaint that the prohibition of entry interfered with their private and family life in Liechtenstein . Insofar as the applicants consider this to be an inhuman treatment withi n the meaning of Article 3 of the Convention the Commission finds that there is no room for the application of Article 3 in the present case, given the existence of special provisions concerning private and family life which are contained in Article 8 of the Convention . The Commission therefore limits its examination to the latter Article . Article 8 of the Convention ensures i .a . everyone's right to respect for his private and family life, and forbids any interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except under certain conditions . The Commission must first examine whether the special relationship existing between the applicants in the present case comes under the protection of the above Article, and if so, whether there has been interference by a public authority . As regards the first question, the Commission observes that it should distinguish between the relationship of the first applicant to the second applicant, and that to his illegitimate children . In the Commission's opinion, the relationship between a father and his illegitimate children is always included in the concept of family life within the meaning of Article 8 of the Convention while this is not necessarily the case with extra-marital relationships even if they have led to the birth of children . The Commission does not deny that extra-marital relationships may constitute "family life" within the meaning of the above provision . In the present case, however, there is no common household of the applicants and they do not permanently live together, the first applicant being married and normally staying with his family in Munich . The Commission therefore considers that the relationship between the first and second applicants only amounts to "private life" within the meaning of Article 8 of the Convention . This is of special importance when judging whether in the present case there has been an interference with a right guaranteed in Article 8 . In this respect the Commission recalls its earlier case law according to which the Convention does not as such guarantee an alien's right to be admitted to, or to reside in a particular country . A measure of prohibition of entry can therefore only be considered as interfering with a person's private or family life where the private and family life of that person is firmly established in the territory concerned . It is true that in the present case the situation of the second applicant was a special one in that she could not reasonably be expected to give up her livelihood in order to follow the first applicant in view of the latter's family situation, and having regard to the special kind of work in which she was engaged, namely th e
_74_
administration of companies which necessitated the maintenance of her residence in Liechtenstein . However, the Commission notes that the private relationship between the applicants, and their family life with the children, consisted of rather loose ties being by that very nature reduced to occasional visits of the first applicant in Liechtenstein . Having regard to this special character of the applicants' private and family life, having further regard to the possibility for the applicants and their children to meet at a reasonable distance from the second applicant's residence in either Austria or the Federal Republic of Germany, and having finally regard to the suspensions from prohibition of entry which the first applicant was on numerous occasions (nine times in two years) granted for the very purpose of visiting his children, the Commission considers that there has been no interference with the applicants' private and family life within the meaning of Article 8 of the Convention . It follows that this part of the application is manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 27121 of the Convention . 5 As regards the remainder of the applicants' complaints (interference with the free choice of medical assistance and complaints regarding the procedure) the Commission would first observe that they are of direct concern to the first applicant only, while the second applicant cannot pretend to be a direct victim of breaches of the Convention in this respect (cf . Art . 25 of the Convention) . It follows that this part of the application is ratione personae incompatible with the provisions of the Convention insofar as it has been brought by the second applicant (Art . 27121 of the Conventionl . 6 . As to the first applicant's complaint that the prohibition of entry to Switzerland interfered with the free choice of his medical assistance, since he needed treatment of his Parkinson's Disease by a specialist in Ziirich, the Commission observes that the right to the free choice of medical assistance is not as such included among the rights and freedoms guaranteed by the Convention . The applicant has invoked Articles 2, 3 and 5 in this respect . Article 2 protects everyone's right to life, Article 3 guarantees i .a . freedom from inhuman treatment, and Article 5 the right to liberty and security of person . However, the Commission finds that none of these provisions is applicable in the present case . In particWar, the Commission does not consider that there can be an issue of inhuman treatment by withholding access to a particular medical expert if there is a possibi3ity of obtaining medical treatment elsewhere . The Commission therefore considers this part of the application as ratione mareriae incompatible with the provisions of the Convention . It follows that it must equally be rejected under Article 27(2) of the Convention . 7 . The Commission has finally examined the first applicant's complaint that the procedure preceding the issue of a prohibition of entry was not in conformity with the provisions of Article 6 of the Convention .
-75-
This Article ensures to evervone in the determination of his civil riahts and obligations or of any criminal charge against him i .a . a fair and public hearing by an independent and impartial tribunal . However, the procedure in the present case did neither concern the determination of civil rights and obligations, nor of a criminal charge (cf . e .g . the Commission's decisions on admissibility of applications No . 3325/67, Yearbook 10, p .528 ; No . 3788/68, Yearbook 12, p . 306 ; and the Commission's decision of 19 May 1977 concerning fifteen applications by foreign students against the United Kingdom, not yet published) . It follows that Article 6 is not applicable, and the applicant's above complaint therefore is equally incompatible with the provisions of the Convention within the meaning of Article 27(2) . For these reasons, the Commissio n DECLARES THIS APPLICATION INADMISSIBLE .
( TRADUCTIDN )
EN FAIT Les faits de la cause peuvent se résumer comme suit : Le premier requérant, ressortissant allemand, est né en 1917 . II est conseiller économique à Munich . II est marié et a deux enfants légitimes à Munich . La seconde requérante, ressortissante autrichienne, est née en 1944 . Elle réside au Liechtenstein depuis 1958 et travaille en qualité d'administrateur de diverses sociétés qui ont leur siége au Liechtenstein . Elle a du premier requérant deux enfants illégitimes nés en 1971 et 1973, qu'il a reconnus . Le premier requérant avait coutume de rendre fréquemment visite, en fin de semaine, à la seconde requérante et à ses enfants . Selon la loi du Liechtenstein, un étranger est autorisé à séjourner dans ce pays 90 jours par an sans permis de séjour . En 1971, le requérant a demandé à la police des étrangers du Liechtenstein d'étendre cette période à 180 jours par an . La demande a été rejetée le . . avril 1972 . En janvier 1973, le requérant est tombé gravement malade et a d0 ètre hospitalisé en Allemagne . II s'avéra qu'il était atteint de la maladie de Parkinson . En avril 1973, la seconde requérante l'a transporté à son domicile à B ., au Liechtenstein . Pour l'aider à surmonter son état dépressif, un spécialiste de Zurich, qu'il a lors consulté, lui a recommandé beaucoup de grand air et d'exercice et a déclaré que sa quérison prendrait plusieurs mois . Le premier requérant est oonc reste au uecntenstein . - iü-
D'avril 1973 à octobre 1974 il a séjourné au Liechtenstein sans permis de séjour . Puis il reprit ses activités à Munich et, dès lors, ne rendit plus visite à la seconde requérante et à ses enfants illégitimes que pendant les fins de semaine . Le . . . juin 1975, un membre de la police des étrangers du Liechtenstein a interrogé le premier requérant au domicile de la seconde requérante . Il lui a demandé pendant combien de temps et pour quelles raisons il était resté au Liechtenstein . Le . . . juillet 1975, la police fédérale suisse des évangers, à Berne, a pris une ordonnance interdisant au requérant de pénétrer sur le territoire suisse et sur celui du Liechtenstein pour une durée de deux ans Idevant expirer le . . . juillet 1977), pour violation grave de la réglementation applicable aux étrangers Iséjour illégal et omission de s'annoncer aux autoritésl . La mesure se fondait sur l'article 13, § 1, de la loi fédérale suisse de 1931 sur le séjour et l'établissement des étrangers . La loi suisse est applicable et les autorités suisses sont compétentes en matiére de police des étrangers au Liech . tenstein en vertu de l'accord du 6 novembre 1963 entre la Suisse et la Principauté de Liechtenstein sur la réglementation applicable en matiére de police des étrangers aux ressortissants d'Etats tiers dans la Principauté de Liechtenstein ainsi que sur la collaboration dans le domaine de la police des étrangers (Vereinbarung zwischen der Schweiz und dem Fürstentum Liechtenstein über die Handhabung der Fremdenpolizei für Drittauslénder im Fürstentum Liechtenstein und ùber die fremdenpolizeiliche Zusammenarbeitl . Le requérant a recouru contre l'ordonnance auprès du Département fédéral de justice et police IEidgenbssisches Justiz- und Polizeidepartement) à Berne . Il faisait valoir que l'omission de se présenter à la police des étrangers entre avril 1973 et octobre 1974 était excusable en raison de sa grave maladie à l'époque . Il représentait en outre qu'il avait eu besoin de soins de médecins suisses et que la seconde requérante et ses enfants résidaient au Liechtenstein et avaient besoin de sa présence . Le Département fédéral a cependant rejeté le recours le . . . octobre 1975 . Cette décision se fondait sur les motifs suivants : le requérant avait illégalement résidé au Liechtenstein d'avril 1973 à novembre 1974 ; on ne pouvait ajouter foi a son argument selon lequel il n'avait pas été en mesure de se présenter à la police, et du moins la seconde requérame aurait-elle pu agir en son nom ; il n'était pas indispensable que des soins lui soient donnés par des médecins suisses ; enfin ses relations avec la seconde requérante et les enfants ne justifiaient pas l'abrogation de l'ordonnance, puisque ceux-ci pouvaient lui rendre visite eux-mêmes ou le rejoindre en République Fédérale d'Allemagne . La décision du Département fédéral du . . . octobre 1975 est définitive . Il n'y a pas de possibilité de recours au Tribunal tédéral . L'ordonnance peut cependant être suspendue par exemple pour des raisons numanitaires .
_77_
Les premier et second requérants ont présenté plusieurs requètes aux autorités de la Suisse et du Liechtenstein, visant à une telle suspension . Le . . . novembre 1975, la police fédérale des étrangers à Berne a rendu une décision accordant une suspension pour la période du . . . au . . . décembre 1975, qui permettait au requérant « de rendre visite à ses enfants dans la Principauté de Liechtenstein » . Les autorités devaient accorder de nouvelles suspension à des occasions ielles que les vacances de Pâques et de Noël ou les anniversaires .
GRIEFS Les requérants se plaignent d'une violation des articles 2, 3, 5, 6 et 8 de la Convention . Ils estiment qu'il y a violation des articles 2 et 5 du fait que le premier requérant s'est vu privé du libre choix de son médecin . Ils estiment qu'il y a violation de l'article 3 en ce que la séparation d'un pére de ses enfants, en particulier vu l'âge du premier requérant, constitue à leurs yeux un traitement inhumain . Ils se plaignent en méme temps d'une violation de l'article 8 du fait que les autorités ont porté atteinte à leur vie privée et familiale . Selon eux, une telle ingérence ne saurait se justifier dans les circonstances de l'espéce, surtout parce qu'entre deux et quatre ans les enfants ont besoin des deux parents . Les requérants estiment enfin qu'il y a aussi violation de l'article 6 parce que leur cause n'a pas été entendue publiquement avant que l'ordonnance fût rendue .
ARGUMENTATION ÉCRITE DES PARTIE S a . Gouvernement défendeu r 1 . Le Gouvernement défendeur soutient que la Suisse ne peut étre tenue pour responsable des actes de la police des étrangers au Liechtenstein parce que ces actes sont, à l'égard des Etats tiers, imputables au Liechtenstei n LaPrincipauté et la Suisse seraient deux Etats souverains qui, en vertu de leur souveraineté, auraient conclu entre eux des accords internationaux en matiére de police des étrangers . A cet égard, le Gouvernement se référe à l'arrêt de la Cour Permanente de Justice Internationale dans l'affaire Wimbledon, où il est dit : « La Cour se refuse à voir dans la conclusion d'un traité quelconque, par lequel un Etat s'engage à faire ou à ne pas faire quelque chose, un abandon de sa souveraineté . Sans doute, toute convention engendrant une obligation de ce genre, apporte une restriction à l'exercice des droits souverains de l'Etat, en en sens qu'elle imprime à cet exercice une direction déterminée . Mais la faculté de contracter des engagements internationaux est précisément un attribut de la souveraineté de l'Etat . » (Recueil des arréts, Série A, N° 1, 17 août 1923, p . 25)
_78_
La disposition fondamentale qui régit les relations entre la Suisse et le Liechtenstein serait l'article 33 du Traité du 29 mars 1923 concernant la réunion de la Principauté de Liechtenstein au territoire douanier suisse . Conformément à cet article, la Suisse était prête à renoncer au contrôle de la police des étrangers à la frontiére entre la Suisse et le Liechtenstein, « pour autant et aussi longtemps que la Principauté de Liechtenstein assurera l'observation, sur son territoire, des prescriptions suisses concernant la police des étrangers, l'établissement, le séjour, etc . x(sofern und solange das Fürstentum Liechtenstein dafür Sorge trégt, dass die Umgehung der schweizerischen Vorschriften über Fremdenpolizei, Niederlassung, Aufenthalt, usw . vermieden wird) . L'accord entre la Suisse et le Liechtenstein du 6 novembre 1963 sur la réglementation applicable en matiére de police des étrangers aux ressortissants d'Etats tiers dans la Principauté de Liechtenstein ainsi que sur la collaboration dans le domaine de la police des étrangers serait expressément fondé sur la disposition conventionnelle ci-dessus et poursuivrait la même fin . La législation sur la police des étrangers à l'égard des ressortissants de pays tiers devrait être pour l'essentiel la même dans les deux pays . Ce but pourrait être atteint si l'un des deux Etats est disposé à appliquer sur son territoire, dans des limites précises fixées par le droit international public, la législation de l'autre Etat sur les questions de police des étrangers (cf . D .J . Niedermann, Liechtenstein und die Schweiz . Eine viilkerrechtliche Untersuchung . Liechtenstein Politische Schriften, Vol . 5 Vaduz 1976, p . 128) . La souveraineté du Liechtenstein ne serait en rien affectée par le fait que, pour certaines question de police des étrangers concernant les ressortissants d'Etats tiers, la Principauté est, en vertu de l'accord, traitée comme un canton suisse . Selon l'article 1, § 1, de l'accord de 1963 sur la réglementation applicable en matiére de police des étrangers aux ressortissants d'Etats tiers, la législation suisse serait applicable à l'entrée, à la sortie, au séjour et à l'établissement d'étrangers non suisses au Liechtenstein . Ceci expliquerait pourquoi l'ordonnance contre le premier requérant se fondait sur l'article 13, § 1, de la Loi fédérale de 1931 sur le séjour et l'établissement des étrangers, et pourquoi elle a été rendue par la police suisse des étrangers . Le Liechtenstein aurait délégué certaines fonctions de police des étrangers aux autorités suisses, mais il n'aurait pas par là renoncé d'une maniére générale à sa souveraineté en matière de police des étrangers . Les autorités suisses exerceraient ces fonctions en vertu non de la Constitution fédérale mais de l'accord précité et dans l'exercice de la souveraineté du Liechtenstein (für die Hoheit des Fürstentums Liechtenstein) . La Convention européenne des Droits de l'Homme n'est pas applicable au Liechtenstein . Elle ne pourrait pas même être indirectement appliquée au Liechtenstein pour la raison que la législation suisse sur les étrangers doit y étre appliquée en vertu d'un traité international . La Suisse ne pourrait donc être tenue pour responsable de l'interdiction d'entrée au Liechtenstein prononcée contre l e
_79_
premier requérant . Selon le Gouvernement, la Commission n'est oas comoétente ratione personae pour connaitre des griefs des requérants à cet égard Iviolations alléguées des articles 3, 6 et 8 de la Conventionl . 2 . Même si la Suisse pouvait être contrainte de révoquer l'interdiction d'entrée en application d'une décision de la Cour européenne des Droits de l'Homme ou du Comité des Ministres, cette décision ne pourrait s'imposer aux autorités du Liechtenstein . Ces dernières pourraient elles-mêmes prononcer une interdiction d'entrée dont les effets se limiteraient au Liechtenstein . De telles mesures seraient possibles en vertu de l'article 2 .b de l'accord prAcité du 6 novembre 1963 sur la réglementation applicable en matiére de police des étrangers aux ressortissants d'Etats tiers . Des mesures identiques pourraient même être prises à l'égard de citoyens suisses, en vertu de l'article 1, § 4, de l'accord parallAle de la même date sur le statut de police des étrangers des ressortissants de chacun des deux Etats dans l'autre . Autrement dit, les requérants ne pourraient avoir un intérét juridique à l'issue de la procédure devant la Commission, parce qu'elle ne pourrait en rien changer la situation qui a donné lieu à la plainte . Dans ces conditions, le Gouvernement estime que les requêtes constituent un abus du droit de requête, au sens de l'article 27 de la Convention . 3 . La délégation aux autorités suisses de certaines fonctions de la police des étrangers du Liechtenstein ne reléverait d'ailleurs pas la seconde requérante de l'obligation de se prévaloir des voies de recours internes disponibles concernant toute violation de la Convention commise par les autorités agissant pour le compte du Liechtenstein et par laquelle elle prétendrait être atteinte . Or, la seconde requérante ne s'est pas prévalue de ces voies de recours, et la requête N° 7349/76 est donc irrecevable pour non-épuisement des voies de recours internes . 4 . Pour ce qui est du libre choix du médecin, la seconde requérante ne pourrait se prétendre victime, et cette partie de la requête est donc incompatible ratrbne personae avec les dispositions de la Convention . Pour autant que ce griel a été présenté par le premier requérant, il est irrecevable parce que le droit invoqué par le requérant n'est pas garanti par la Convention ; le grief est donc incompatible rarione mareriae avec les dispositions de la Convention . Le droit invoqué par le requérant n'est certainement compris ni dans le droit à la vie tel que le garantit l'anicle 2 de la Convention, ni dans le droit à la liberté et é la sûreté tel que le garantit l'article 5 . Le terme « sOreté », à l'article 5, n'a pas de signification propre . Ce que le requérant revendique essentiellement est le droit à la liberté de circulation (Freizügigkeit) . Ce droit ne figure toutefois pas à l'article 5 mais reléve du Duatriéme Protocole Inon ratifié par la Suisse) . En outre, le qrief du requérant est aussi manifestement mal fondé . Son droit à la vie n'a pas été compromis par l'interdiction d'entrée prononcée à son encontre n'y a pas eu non plus ingArence dans sa liberté, au sens de l'article 5 .
- 80 -
5 . Quant à l'allégation selon laquelle l'interdiction d'entrer au Liechtenstein constituait un traitement inhumain ou dégradant (article 3), la Commission n'est pas compétente ratione /oci, parce que la Convention n'est pas applicable au Liechtenstein . La compétence ratione loci de la Commission coïncide avec l'application territoriale de la Convention et la Commission ne pourrait tenir compte que des faits survenus dans le domaine d'application de celle-ci . Comme les requérants se plaignent d'une interdiction de pénétrer dans un pays où la Convention n'est pas en vigueur, leur grief est irrecevable . Le grief tiré de l'article 3 est, lui aussi, manifestement mal fondé . Dans son rapport sur la premiére Affaire grecque, la Commission a défini un traitement dégradant comme un traitement qui humilie grossiérement un individu devant autrui ou le pousse à agir contre sa volonté ou sa conscience . Tel n'est certainement pas le cas en l'espéce . Le requérant était libre de rencontrer ses enfants à tout moment en dehors de la Principauté de Liechtenstein, et ne serait-ce que pour cette raison, son grief est totalement dénué de fondement . 6 . L'argument ci-dessus, selon lequel la Commission est incompétente 2trbne /oci, s'applique également aux griefs des requérants tirés de l'article 8 de la Convention . Ils se plaignent que l'interdiction d'entrée les prive de la possibilité de mener leur vie familiale au Liechtenstein . Comme la Convention n'est pas en vigueur au Liechtenstein, il ne peut étre question de violation de l'article 8 . En outre . ce grief est lui aussi manifestement mal fondé, au sens de l'article 27 de la Convention . Le Gouvernement ne nie pas que le concept de vie familiale (article 8, § 1) recouvre les relations entre un pére et ses enfants illégitimes (cf . la décision de la Commission sur la requête N° 1475/62 et Fawcett, "The application of the European Convention on Human Rights", Oxford 1969, p . 189) . La législation suisse n'a été modifiée que récemment en vue d'assimiler autant que possible le statut juridique des enfants illégitimes à celui des enfants légitimes . Le Gouvernement ne saurait donc s'opposer, en principe, à la maniére de voir de la Commission . Mais l'interdiction d'entrée n'empèche pas le requérant de vivre avec ses enfants en dehors de la Principauté de Liechtenstein, et le grief est donc manifestement mal fondé (cf . la décision de la Commission sur la requète N° 3325/67, Annuaire 10, 1967, p . 537) . 7 . Enfin, quant au grief des requérants tiré de l'article 6, selon lequel l'interdiction a été prononcée sans que leur cause ait été entendue publiquement, le Gouvernement fait d'abord observer que ce grief est incompatible ratione personae avec les dispositions de la Convention dans la mesure où il concerne la seconde requérante, parce qu'elle ne peut valablement se prétendre victime d'un vice entachant la procédure relative au premier requérant . Le grief est également incompatible rarione materiae avec les dispositions de la Convention, parce que les garanties procédurales de l'article 6 ne s'appliquent qu'en cas de décision sur des droits et obligations de caractére civil, ou sur une accusation en matiére pénale . Or, l'entrée et le séjour d'une personne dans un pays déterminé relévent du droit public, comme la Commission l'a expressémen t
- 81 -
confirmé dans sa décision précitée sur la requête N° 3325/67 (Annuaire 10, p . 539) . Les procédures en cause ne tombent donc pas sous le coup de l'article 6 de la Convention . On ne saurait considérer les procédures portant sur des questions de police des étrangers comme des procédures tendant à décider de contestations sur des droits et obligations de caractére civil du seul fait qu'elles atteindraient les intéressés dans leur possibilité de libre circulation . A la limite, on pourrait alors en déduire que toute procédure administrative porte sur des droits de caractère civil, parce qu'elle concerne toujours d'une manière ou d'une autre la liberté des personnes . Selon le Gouvernement, le grief tiré de l'article 6 est donc lui aussi manifestement mal fondé . Observations des requérants en réponse aux obse rvations du Gouverne.b
ment sur la recevabilit é Le premier requérant conteste l'opinion du Gouvernement selon laquelle le Liechtenstein est resté souverain dans l'administration de sa police des étrangers et que les autorités suisses n'assument que des fonctions auxiliaires sur la base d'une relation conventionnelle . Selon le requérant, il est erroné de déduire de l'inapplicabilité de la Convention au Liechtenstein que les fonctions déléguées par celui-ci aux autorités suisses échappant au contrBle de la Commission . En . droit international public, il convient de se fonder sur les faits . Si certains faits existent et sont reconnus par la communauté internationale depuis un certain temps, ils créent, selon les requérants, un nouveau droit coutumier . En fait, le Liechtenstein a délégué une partie de sa souveraineté à la Suisse, ce qui a pour résultat que la Suisse est compétente et responsable en droit international dans ces domaines . La situation est analogue pour ce qui concerne l'union monétaire, douanière et postale entre le Liechtenstein et la Suisse . Le Liechtenstein ne serait pas libre de créer sa propre monnaie ni d'établir une zone douaniére qui lui soit propre, sans le consentement de la Suisse . Il ne serait pas libre non plus de créer ses propres stations de radiodiffusion et de télévision, droit normalement attaché é la souveraineté d'un Etat . De même, le Liechtenstein aurait délégué à la Suisse la plupart de ses droits souverains dans le domaine de la police des étrangers . Il s'agirait d'une délégation analogue à la délégation de fonctions aux organes supranationaux de la C .E .E . par les Etats membres de celle-ci, et qui reviennent pour ces Etats à renoncer à une partie de leur souveraineté . La jurisprudence de la CPJI dans l'affaire Wimbledon n'est donc pas applicable . Le Gouvernement suisse a apparemment formulé ses observations pour le compte du Liechtenstein . Certes, le Liechtenstein est un Etat souverain et n'a pas ratifié la Convention . Mais le Liechtenstein a signé les Accords d'Helslnki qui contiennent des dispositions analogues à celles de la Convention et ne constituent qu'un développement et une extension de cette dernière . Aux yeux des requérants, il serait incompréhensible qu'un Etat de l'Europe occidentale qui a signé l'Acte final de la Conférence d'Helsinki ne reconnaisse pas les obligations prévues par la Convention pour de simples raisons formelles .
- 82 -
En l'espèce, ce ne sont pas les autorités du Liechtenstein qui ont agi . C'est d'un acte des autorités suisses, et d'elles seules, que les requérants se plaignent . La mesure incriminée a été prise alors qu'aucune infraction n'avait été commise en Suisse, ni même alléguée . Selon les requérants, il ne fait pas de doute que les mesures prises par les autorités suisses avec effet pour le Liechtenstein soit sur la base d'un traité, soit dans l'exercice de fonctions déléguées de quelque autre maniére par le Liechtenstein, sont pleinement couvertes par la Convention . Quant à l'allégation selon laquelle la seconde requérante n'a pas épuisé les voies de recours internes qui lui étaient ouvertes au Liechtenstein, le premier requérant se référe aux demandes qu'elle a adressées au Premier Ministre adjoint du Liechtenstein et au chef de la police des étrangers du Liechtenstein . La seconde requérante elle-même, qui a formulé ses griefs en son nom propre et pour le compte de ses enfants, partage l'avis du premier requérant . Elle prétend en outre que les informations sur les voies de recours contenues dans l'ordonnance d'interdiction d'entrée elle-même ne mentionnaient que des voies de recours en Suisse . Elle s'en est prévalue sans résultat . Elle ne disposait d'aucune voie de recours au Liechtenstein, mais n'en aurait pas moins pris contact avec les autorités compétentes et leur aurait fait part de ses doléances . Le chef de la police des étrangers du Liechtenstein aurait notamment déclaré que même si le premier requérant avait demandé aux autorités une extension de l'aulorisation de séjour au-delé de la période de 90 jours, jusqu'à ce qu'il guérisse, il ne l'aurait pas obtenue . Au contraire, on lui aurait ordonné de quitter le pays dés qu'il aurait été en état d'être transporté . Le chef de la police des étrangers aurait en outre fait observer qu'il ne pouvait considérer la seconde requérante et ses enfants comme la famille du premier requérant . S'ils souhaitaient vivre ensemble, ils étaient libres de le faire en dehors du Liechtenstein . La seconde requérante aurait objecté qu'elle devrait alors renoncer à son permis de séjour au Liechtenstein, ce qui lui ferait perdre sa situation professionnelle liée à l'administration de sociétés étrangéres ayant leur siége au Liechtenstein . Celle-ci exigerait qu'elle réside au Liechtenstein . Le chef de la police des étrangers n'aurait toutefois pas admis cet argument . Il aurait déclaré que la loi devait être strictement appliquée et qu'il approuvait pleinement la mesure prise par les autorités suisses . En ce qui concerne une requête éventuelle à la Commission, le chef de la police des étrangers aurait relevé que le Liechtenstein n'était pas lié par la Convention . Même si la Suisse révoquait l'interdiction d'entrée pour se conformer à une décision de la Commission, celle-ci n'aurait pas d'effet pour le Liechtenstein . Dans ses observations à la Commission, la seconde requérante a insisté sur son désir de rester au Liechtenstein, où ses parents et sa famille vivent eux aussi . Elle y aurait aménagé son existence, qui serait tributaire de sa résidence dans ce pays .
- 83 -
Les requérants ont demandé à la Commission de déclarer la requête recevable .
ARGUMENTATION ORALE DES PARTIE S a . Gouvernement défendeu r A l'audience contradictoire du 14 juillet 1977, le Gouvernement a, d'une manière générale, repris les arguments qu'il avait déj9 présentés par écrit . En outre, il a longuement traité des relations spécifiques qui existent entre la Suisse et le Liechtenstein depuis la fin de la premiére guerre mondiale, époque de la dissolution de l'Union monétaire et douanière entre le Liechtenstein et l'Empire autrichien . Aprés un échange de notes en 1919, la Suisse a assumé la représentation diplomatique du Liechtenstein auprés des Etats tiers . La seule représentation diplomatique dans un autre pays que le Liechtenstein conserve aujourd'hui est celle de Berne . Dans tous les cas, le service diplomatique suisse n'entreprend des interventions pour le compte du Liechtenstein qu'à la demande des autorités de celui-ci et conformément à leurs instructions . Il faudrait préciser que ce systéme se limite aux relations diplomatiques avec d'autres Etats . Pour la diplomatie multilatérale, le Liechtenstein, tout en s'appuyant à l'occasion sur la représentation par l'intermédiaire du service diplomatique suisse, agit généralement seul . C'est ainsi qu'il a ses propres représentations auprès des organisations internationales dont il est membre et qu'il envoie ses propres délégations aux conférences multilatérales . Il est lui-méme partie à nombre de conventions internationales, notamment du Conseil de l'Europe . L'union douaniére entre la Suisse et le Liechtenstein a été constituée par un Traité du 29 mars 1923 . Elle a eu pour effet de réunir le Liechtenstein au territoire douanier suisse, repoussant ainsi la douane de la frontière entre la Suisse et le Liechtenstein à la frontiére entre le Liechtenstein et l'Autriche . De ce fait, l'ensemble de la législation fédérale suisse en matiére douanière s'applique au Liechtenstein de la même manière qu'au territoire suisse lui-même . Le Liechtenstein ne s'est nullement réservé le pouvoir de lever des droits de douane ou d'avoir des services douaniers qui lui soient propres . Pour toutes les questions pratiques, le Liechtenstein fait donc partie de la Suisse en ce qui concerne l'importation, l'exportation et le transit des marchandises . Le Liechtenstein n'en a pas moins conservé sa souveraineté en ce domaine . Le Traité douanier pourrait être dénoncé et il contient une clause sur la soumission à arbitrage des différends entre les Parties . Bien que les Traités douaniers conclus par la Suisse soient automatiquement applicable au Liechtenstein, l'adhésion du Liechtenstein à l'A .E .L .E . et l'extension à son territoire des accords spéciaux conclus entre la Suisse et la C .E .E . et entre la Suisse et les Etats membres de la C .E .E . font l'objet de Protocoles particuliers auxquels le Liechtenstein est lui-m@me partie .
- 84 -
Le Traité douanier de 1923 entre la Suisse et le Liechtenstein contient déj9 des dispositions sur la police des étrangers . Son article 33 repousse aussi le contr6le frontalier des passagers 8 la frontiére entre le Liechtenstein et l'Autriche à condition que la Principauté empêche que les prescriptions suisses concernant la police des étrangers, l'établissement, le séjour, etc . soient éludées . Le premier accord spécial sur l'exercice de la police des étrangers au Liechtenstein a été conclu en 1923 . II étendait au territoire du Liechtenstein les prescriptions suisses sur l'entrée, l'interdiction d'entrée et la déclaration d'arrivée, mais réservait aux deux Etats le soin de légiférer sur la résidence des étrangers . Cet accord a été remplacé en 1941 et 1948 par de nouveaux accords qui étendaient en outre au Liechtenstein la législation suisse sur le séjour des étrangers aux ressortissants d'Etats tiers . L'accord de 1963 prévoit de méme que les lois et arrétés de la Confédération suisse concernant l'entrée la sortie, le sélour et l'établissement des étrangers sont applicables aux ressortissants d'Etats tiers dans la Principauté de Liechtenstein . Mais les différentes décisions sur le séjour, l'établissement ou la tolérance prises soit en Suisse, soit au Liechtenstein ne sont valables que sur le territoire de l'Etat qui les a prises . Le Liechtenstein a donc conservé sa souveraineté en matiére de police des étrangers, y compris la possibilité d'expulser de son territoire les ressortissants d'Etats tiers . L'extension contractuelle au Liechtenstein de la réglementation suisse sur les étrangers ne change rien à cet égard . Au Liechtenstein, cette législation doit être considérée comme la législation du Liechtenstein . Aux yeux du Gouvernement, peu importe également quels organes exercent la police des étrangers au Liechtenstein . Même si ce sont les autorités suisses, elles agissent pour le compte du Liechtenstein et seule la Principauté est responsable au plan international . Comme le Liechtenstein n'a pas ratifié la Convention, il ne saurait être lié par elle, ni directement ni indirectement . En réponse à une question de la Commission, le Gouvernement a précisé qu'en vertu de l'article 3 de l'accord de 1963, une interdiction d'entrée prononcée pour la Suisse déploie en principe automatiquement ses effets au Liechtenstein . Seules les autorités fédérales suisses peuvent limiter l'effet d'une telle mesure au seul territoire suisse, tandis que les autorités du Liechtenstein ne peuvent faire échec à une décision des autorités fédérales, méme en ce qui concerne le territoire du Liechtenstein . II n'existe aucune pratique selon laquelle le Liechtenstein aurait autorisé l'entrée sur son territoire de personnes que la police fédérale des étrangers n'avait pas autorisées à entrer en Suisse sans limiter expressément la mesure au territoire suisse . En l'espéce, les requérants n'ont pas demandé à la police fédérale des étrangers de limiter l'interdiction d'entrée au seul territoire suisse, et, méme s'ils l'avaient fait, il serait presque certain, vu la pratique actuelle, qu'ils n'eussent pas obtenu que la mesure touchant le premier requérant fùt ainsi limitée . En réponse à une autre question de la Commission, le Gouvernement a déclaré ne pas considérer l'exercice de la police des étrangers au Liechtenstein comme celui de la juridiction suisse, au sens de l'article 1 de la Convention . I l
- 85 -
s'agit, à ses yeux, de la juridiction du Liechtenstein et non de la juridiction de l'une des Parties Contractantes, au sens dudit articl e Le Gouvernement admet que les dispositions de l'article 3 de l'accord de 1963 pourraient se comprendre non seulement comme une délégation de la juridiction du Liechtenstein aux autorités suisses, mais qu'elles pourraient aussi s'interpréter théoriquement comme une extension de la juridiclion suisse au territoire du Liechtenstein Cependant, telle n'est pas l'interprétation retenue par les Parties à l'accord . Selon le Gouvernement, la situation juridique en matiére de police des étrangers est sensiblement différente de celle qui prévaut en matiére d'union douaniére, où le Liechtenstein a renoncé globalement à exercer sa souveraineté . En matiére de police des étrangers, le Liechtenstein ne peut pas être purement et simplement considéré comme une partie du territoire suisse . A cet égard, il convient de distinguer entre les questions relatives d'une part à l'entrée des étrangers et d'autre part à leur séjour . Les décisions concernant le séjour sont entièrement réservées aux autorités du Liechtenstein . Quant à l'entrée, la situation est différente selon que l'autorisation d'entrée en Suisse est ou n'est pas accordée par les autorités suisses . Lorsque celles-ci accordent l'entrée sur le territoire suisse, le Liechtenstein demeure libred'interdire aux intéressés l'entrée sur son propre territoire (article 2 .b etc de l'accord de 19631 . En revanche, lorsque les autorités suisses prononcent une interdiction d'entrée, cette décision produit en principe ses effets en Suisse comme au Liechtenstein, en vertu de l'article 3 de l'accord . En l'espéce, l'interdiction d'entrée a été prononcée à titre de sanction de la violation de la législation duLiechtenstein, qui est identique à la législation suisse . Puisque la loi est la même, il n'est que normal que les sanctions prononcées en cas de violation soient valables pour la Suisse comme pour le Liechtenstein, qui, à cette fin, sont considérés comme formant un seul territoire . Cenes, les compétences réservées aux autorités du Liechtenstein par l'article 2 de l'accord sont énoncées comme des exceptions à la règle générale édictée par l'article 1 du méme accord, aux termes duquel la compétence de la police suisse des étrangers est en principe étendue au Liechtenstein . Mais les exceptions contenues à l'article 2 sont d'une telle importance qu'elles vident la régle générale d'une grande partie de sa substance . Selon le Gouvernement, l'interprétation de ces dispositions n'aboutit pas nécessairement à la conclusion que le Liechtenstein a renoncé en principe à sa juridiction en faveur de la Suisse . Aux yeux du Gouvernement, il ne peut donc être question d'une réserve tacite de la Suisse concernant l'exercice de sa juridiction' au Liechtenstein . S'il existait une réserve, elle aurait dù être formulée expressément . Cependant, l'inapplicabilité de la Convention découle de ses propres dispositions, le cas relevant de la juridiction du Liechtenstein et non de celle de la Suisse . On ne saurait imaginer que le Liechtenstein ait accepté que la Suisse fasse une déclaration aux termes de laquellé elle serait liée par la Convention même lorsqu'elle exerce la juridiction du Liechtenstein . Le Liechtenstein ne saurait être lié par une telle déclaration .
- 86 -
Puisque le Liechtenstein serait libre, quoi qu'il en soit, d'expulser le premier requérant même si la police fédérale suisse des étrangers révoquait sa décision, la requEte serait dépourvue de but pratique et serait de ce fait abusive . Le Gouvernement admet que le Liechtenstein pourrait aussi tolérer le requérant aprés la révocation d'une telle décision, encore que cela soit improbable aprés la déclaration du chef de la police des étrangers du Liechtenstein, telle que la seconde requérante la rapporte dans sa note . En tout cas, le Gouvernement suisse nesaurait•s'exprimer au nom des autorités du Liechtenstein sur cette question . Ouant à sa thése selon laquelle les allégations d'une ingérence dans la vie privée et familiale des requérants sont manifestement mal fondées, le Gouvernement insiste particuliérement sur le fait que le premier requérant a bénéficié à neuf reprises d'une suspension de l'interdiction d'entrée, pour une période variant de deux à dix jours . Il a ainsi pu rendre visite à la seconde requérante et à ses enfants au Liechtenstein . L'article 8 de la Convention est en principe applicable aux relations extra-conjugales, à la condition qu'elles aient un caractère permanent, qui n'aurait pas été démontré en l'espéce . En tout cas, l'article 8, § 2 permet une ingérence dans la vie privée et familiale s'il s'agit d'une mesure conforme à la loi et nécessaire notamment à la protection de l'ordre public . Il ne fait pas de doute que l'interdiction d'entrée en l'espèce était conforme à la loi . Et elle était nécessaire, parce que, dans la situation où se trouve le Liechtenstein, dont la population est pour un tiers composée d'étrangers 18 .000 sur 24 .000 habitants, dont 4 .000 sont des ressortissants d'Etats tiers), l'ordre public exigerait que soit strictement appliquée la réglementation sur les étrangers, qui, en l'espéce, a été gravement violée . La sanction infligée au premier requérant n'était pas disproportionnée à la gravité de la violation de la loi, et a été considérablement atténuée par les suspensions réitérées . Le type de sanction infligée - interdiction d'entrée, et non pas une amende, par exemple - correspondait à la nature de l'infraction et constituait le moyen le plus efficace pour garantir le respect de la réglementation sur les étrangers . En outre, on peut déduire de l'article 5, § 1 (f), de la Convention que l'expulsion est, en tant que telle, autorisée par la Convention . De plus, l'ingérence dans la vie privée et familiale a été réduite au minimum en l'espéce . On rappellera aussi, à cet égard, que les requérants étaient, bien entendu, libres de se rencontrer en dehors du Liechtenstein et de la Suisse . b . Les requérants Le premier requérant, qui a comparu en personne à l'audience contradictoire, a déclaré que la seconde requérante gagnait sa vie en assurant l'administration de différentes sociétés au Liechtenstein ; elle devait donc continuer à y résider Il a admis avoir bénéficié à plusieurs reprises d'une suspension de l'interdiction d'entrée non seulement dans le but de rendre visite à sa famille mais aussi afin de voir son médecin à Zurich et son dentiste au Liechtenstein . A chaque fois sa demande a été soumise au chef de la police des étrangers du Liechtenstein, et quand celui-ci n'élevait aucune objection, c'était la police fédérale suisse des étrangers qui accédait à sa demande sans préciser qu'elle avait pris l'avis de ce riPrnipr
Le requérant a déclaré avoir eu le sentiment que la violation prétendument grave de la réglementation sur les étrangers n'était pas la seule raison de la mesure prise à son encontre . Il a eu des relations d'affaires au Liechtenstein depuis 17 ans environ . Le Gouvernement du Liechtenstein l'a toujours su mais ne l'a jamais invité à se présenter à la police pour se conformer à cette réglementation . Les difficultés n'ont commencé que lorsqu'il a eu son premier enfant au Liechtenstein et a demandé une prolongation de la période de 90 jours . Celle-ci lui a été refusée mais, même aprés, la police des étrangers du Liechtenstein n'a pas cherché à l'empêcher d'entrer . Les autorités étaient au courant de sa présence et n'ont rien fait pour l'expulser alors . D'ailleurs, il n'a pas séjourné au Liechtenstein en tant que travailleur étranger . Au cours de la période en cause, il n'est resté au-delé du délai autorisé qu'en raison de son mauvais état de santé A cette époque, il a fait de longues excursions dans une région reculée du pays où il a rencontré par hasard le chef de la police des étrangers, qui chassait . Immédiatement aprés, la police du Liechtenstein aurait enqu@té pour savoir combien de temps il était resté dans le pays et quand il l'avait quitté . Il admet qu'il est nécessaire d'appliquer la réglementation sur les étrangers, mais il ne se sent lui-m@me coupable d'aucune violation grave, et considére la sanction infligée post factum comme étant tout à fait disproportionnAe, en ce qu'elle a abouti à le séparer de ses enfants, et qu'elle était inhumaine vu son âge, celui de ses enfants et aussi son mauvais état de santé . Il a écrit au Conseiller fédéral compétent pour qu'il annule la sanction par mesure de grâce, mais on lui a répondu qu'il ne s'agissait pas d'une sanction pénale et qu'il ne pouvait être question d'une mesure de grâce . Au début, l'idée ne lui est pas venue que la loi n'avait pas été appliquée d'une manière absolument correcte ; mais au bout d'un certain temps, il aurait acquis la conviction qu'une autre raison devait avoir dicté cette application de la loi . En particulier, il ne juge pas correct que les autorités aient recouru à l'emploi d'espions policiers . Il déclare ignorer quels peuvent en étre les motifs cachés et s'estime incapable de fournir des éléments de preuve . Quant aux relations entre la Suisse et le Liechtenstein, le requérant soutient que le droit international est fondé sur le principe de l'effectivité . Selon lui, le Liechtenstein a renoncé de facto à exercer sa juridiction . Si le Liechtenstein a autorisé la Suisse à exercer sa juridiction sur son territoire dans un certain domaine, la Suisse doit aussi Ptre tenue pour responsable des actes incriminés . Un fonctionnaire suisse aurait dit à la seconde requérante que, dans des cas de ce genre, les autorités du Liechienstein ont pour habitude de se retrancher derriére les autorités suisses, tout en s'attendant à ce que les autorités suisses se retranchent derriére elles . Selon le requArant, cela décrit bien la situation juridique confuse entre les deux pays . II ignore si les autorités suisses ou celles du Liechtenstein ont l'intention de prononcer une nouvelle interdiction d'entrée à son encontre . Il n'en voit pas la raison mais si la Convention ne s'applique pas, elles seraieni évidemment libres de le faire . Il espére qu'il est possible d'empêcher une telle mesure .
- 88 -
EN DROI T 1 . Les requérants se plaignent d'une interdiction d'entrée prononcée contre le premier requérant par la police fédérale suisse des étrangers, produisant effet sur le territoire suisse et sur celui du Liechtenstein . Ils alléguent une ingérence dans leur vie privée et familiale, ingérence qui, selon eux, est contraire aux articles 8 et 3 de la Convention, pour autant que la mesure précitée a empêché le premier requérant d'entrer au Liechtenstein . Ils alléguent en outre une violation des articles 2, 3 et 5 de la Convention pour autant que la mesure incriminée l'a emp@ché de pénétrer en Suisse et a donc porté atteinte au libre choix de son médecin . Ils alléguent enfin une violation de l'article 6 de la Convention en ce que leur cause n'a pas été entendue publiquement par un tribunal avant que la décision sus-visée ait été prise . 2 . La Commission a examiné en premier lieu si les présents requérants sont des personnes relevant de la juridiction de la Suisse, au sens de l'article 1 de la Convention . Cette disposition stipule que les Hautes Parties Contractantes reconnaissent les droits et libenés définis au Titre 1 de la Convention « à toute personne relevant de leur juridiction n . La Commission rappelle tout d'abord sa jurisprudence antérieure dans laquelle elle a déjà affirmé que la responsabilité des Parties Contractantes au regard de la Convention est engagée méme lorsqu'elles exercent leur juridiction en dehors de leur territoire et placent de ce fait des personnes ou des biens sous leur autorité ou leur contrôle effectif (cf . décisions de la Commission sur la recevabilité des requètes N° 1611/62, Annuaire 8, p . 159 11691 ; N° 6231/73, Ilse Hess contre Royaume-Uni, Décisions et Rapports 2, p . 72 17511 ; et N° 6780/74, 6950/75, Chypre contre Turquie, Décisions et Rapports 2, p . 125 113711 . Que la présente affaire concerne des faits survenus au Liechtenstein n'exclut donc pas nécessairement la compétence de la Commission pour examiner la requête . Cependant, la responsabilité de la Suisse sur le terrain de la Convention ne peut étre engagée que si les mesures dont les requérants se plaignent sont imputables à la Suisse et non au Liechtenstein . Le Liechtenstein est un Etat souverain qui n'a pas ratifié la Convention . Celle-ci, à l'évidence, ne s'impose pas aux autorités du Liechtenstein elles-mêmes . En l'espéce, toutefois, ce sont exclusivement les autorités suisses qui ont agi, encore qu'avec effet sur le territoire du Liechtenstei n Les autorités suisses ont exercé leurs fonctions en se fondant sur des relations conventionnelles entre les deux pays . L'instrument fondamental est le traité de 1923 concernant la réunion de la Principauté de Liechtenstein au territoire douanier suisse . L'article 33, alinéa 1, de ce traité prévoit que la Suisse renonce au contrôle de la police des étrangers à l a
- 89 -
frontière entre la Suisse et le Liechtenstein alors que le Liechtenstein s'enqaqe à faire en sorte que les prescriptions suisses sur les étrangers ne soient pas éludées sur son territoire . Cette disposition du traité a été mise en application par des accords successifs sur l'exercice de la police des étrangers au Liechtenstein . Les deux accords actuellement en vigueur datent de 1963 . L'un concerne le traitement des citoyéns de chacun des Etats contractants sur le territoire de l'autre . Il ne prAsenre pas d'intér@t pour la présente affaire, puisque ni l'un ni l'autre des requérants ne posséde la nationalité des Etats contractants . L'autre accord, qui a été appliqué en l'espéce, porte sur la réglementation applicable en matière de police des étrangers aux ressortissants d'Etats tiers dans la Principauté de Liechtenstein ainsi que sur la collaboration de la Suisse et du Liechtenstein dans le domaine de la police des étrangers . Cet accord prévoit ce qui suit : a . Les lois et arrétés IErlassel de la Confédération suisse concernant Pentrée, la sortie, le séjour et l'établissement des étrangers sont en principe applicables aux ressortissants d'Etats tiers dans la Principauté de Liechtenstein (article 1, § 1, 1 1 e phrase) . b . La gestion de ces matiéres est en principe confiée aux autorités fédérales suisses . Les autorités de la Principauté de Liechtenstein ont les mêmes tâches et les mêmes attributions que les autorités cantonales correspondantes (article 1, § 1, seconde phrasel . . c . Les expulsions et restrictions ou interdictions d'entrée prononcées pou r l'ensemble de la Suisse déploient automatiquement leurs effets au Liechtenstein . Ces effets peuvent être exclus par une décision spéciale de la police suisse des étrangers . Les autorités du Liechtenstein ne peuvent elles-mPmes déroger à une mesure de ce genre prononcée par l'autorité suisse compétente (article 3) . d. Les autorités du Liechtenstein se sont cependant réservé certaines attributions dans le domaine de la police des étrangers . Elles peuvent par exemple expulser une personne du territoire du Liechtenstein uniquement Isanseffet pour le territoire suisse) (article 2 .b de l'accordl et elles ne sont pas tenues de recevoir et de tolérer sur leur territoire un ressortissant d'un Etat tiers même s'il a été reçu par la Suisse (article 2 .c) . Ce qui, de l'avis de la Commission, parait décisif est le fait qu'en vertu d u systéme établi par l'accord précité, une interdiction d'entrée prononcée par les autorités suisses, s'il est vrai qu'elle déploie ses effets d'abord sur le territoire suisse, est automatiquement étendue au Liechtenstein en vertu de l'article 3 de l'accord, et que les autorités du Liechtenstein n'ont elles-mémes aucune possibilité d'exclure ces effets . Au contraire, l'exclusion du Liechtenstein de l'application territoriale d'une interdiction d'entrée est expressément réservée à l'autorité suisse .
_pn
-
La Suisse est certainement responsable, au titre de l'article 1 de la Convention, de la procédure et de l'effet que l'interdiction d'entrée a produit sur son propre territoire . Mais elle doit étre également tenue pour responsable dans la mesure o ù l'interdiction d'entrée a produit effet au Liechtenstein . Conformément aux relations conventionnelles particuliéres existant entre la Suisse et le Liechtenstein, les autorités suisses, lorsqu'elles agissent pour le compte du Liechtenstein, n'agissent pas autrement qu'en vertu de leurs compétences nationales . En réalité, d'après le traité, elles agissent exclusivement en conformité avec la loi suisse et c'est seulement l'effet de leur acte qui est étendu au territoire du Liechtenstein . Autrement dit, l'acte a été accompli en vertu de la juridiction suisse, qui a été étendue au Liechtenstein . Les actes des autorités suisses prenant effet au Liechtenstein font relever toutes les personnes auxquelles ils s'apliquent de la juridiction suisse, au sens de l'article 1 de la Convention . Il s'ensuit que les présentes requétes ne sont pas incompatibles ratione personae avec les dispositions de la Convention .
La Commission estime donc qu'elle est pleinement compétente ratione loci et ratione personae pour connaitre des requétes . 3 . La Commission a examiné ensuite l'argument du Gouvernement défendeur selon lequel les requ@tes sont abusives du fait qu'elles sont, selon lui, dépourvues de tout but pratique, le Liechtenstein pouvant prononcer une nouvelle interdiction d'entrée à l'encontre du premier requérant même si les organes de la Convention déclarent que la mesure prise par les autorités suisses était contraire à celle-ci .
Toutefois, même à supposer que le concept d'abus au sens de l'article 27, § 2 in fine puisse être compris comme incluant le cas d'une requête dépourvue de but pratique, la Commission ne peut souscrire à l'argument précité . En vertu de l'article 2 .b de l'accord de 1963 entre la Suisse et le Liechtenstein, les autorités du Liechtenstein seraient aussi libres de prononcer une nouvelle interdiction d'entrée qu'elles seraient libres de tolérer le premier requérant aprés une décision définitive d'un organe de la Convention concluant à une violation de celle-ci . On ne peut partir de l'hypothése que les autorités du Liechtenstein, tout en n'étant pas formellement liées par une décision de ce genre, n'en tiendraient pas compte en reconsidérant leur position . Si l'interdiction suisse d'entrée était révoquée à la suite de la présente procédure, cela aurait en tout cas supprimé l'obstacle qui empêchait les autorités du Liechtenstein de passer outre à l'effet extra-territorial au Liechtenstein de la mesure incriminée .
La Commission n'estime donc pas que les requêtes sont absuives au sens de l'article 27, § 2 in fine . 4 . La Commission a étudié ensuite le principal grief des deux requérants, selon lequel l'interdiction d'entrée constituait une ingérence dans leur vie privée et familiale au Liechtenstein .
_u- _
Dans la mesure où les requérants considèrent qu'il s'agit d'un traitement inhumain au sens de l'article 3 de la Conventiod, la Commission estime qu'il n'y a pas place pour application de l'article 3 en l'espéce, étant donné l'existence de dispositions spécifiques sur la vie privée et familiale, qui figurent à l'article 8 de la Convention . La Commission borne donc son examen à ce dernier article . L'article 8 de la Convention garantit notamment le droit de toute personne au respect de sa vie privée et familiale, et interdit toute ingérence d'une autorité publique dans l'exercice de ce droit, sauf sous certaines conditions . La Commission doit d'abord déterminer si les relations particuliéres existant entre les présents requérants bénéficient de la protection dudit article, et dans l'affirmative, s'il y a eu ingérence de la part d'une autorité publique . Quant à la premiére question, la Commission fait observer qu'elle doit distinguer entre les relations du premier requérant avec la seconde requérante, d'une part, et avec ses enfants illégitimes, d'autre part . De l'avis de la Commission, les relations entre un pére et ses enfants illégitimes sont toujours couvertes par le concept de vie familiale, au sens de l'article 8 de la Convention, alors qu'il n'en va pas nécessairement de même des relations extra-conjugales, méme si des enfants en sont nés . La Commission ne nie pas que les relations extra-conjugales peuvent constituer « une vie familiale », au sens de la disposition précitée . En l'espéce, cependant, les requérants n'ont pas d'habitation commune et ils ne vivent pas ensemble en permanence, le premier requérant étant marié et habitant normalement avec sa famille à Munich . La Commission estime donc que les relations entre le premier requérant et la seconde requérante ne relévent que de la « vie privée », au sens de l'article 8 de la Convention . Cet élément revêt une importance particuliére lorsque l'on examine si, en l'espéce, il y a eu ingérence dans le droit garanti par l'article 8 . A cet égard, la Commission rappelle sa jurisprudence antérieure selon laquelle la Convention ne garantit pas, comme tel, le droit d'un étranger à étre admis ou à séjourner dans un Etats déterminé . Une mesure d'interdiction d'entrée ne peut donc être considérée comme une ingérence dans la vie privée et familiale d'une personne que si cette vie privée et familiale est fermement établie sur le territoire de l'Etat dont il s'agit . Certes, en l'espéçe, la situation de la seconde requérante est particuliére en ce que l'on ne pouvait raisonnablement s'attendre à ce qu'elle renonce à son gagne-pain pour suivre le premier requérant en raison de la situation familiale de ce dernier, et compte tenu de ses occupations précises, à savoir l'administration de sociétés qui exige qu'elle conserve sa résidence au Liechtenstein . Toutefois, la Commission relève que les relations privées entre les requérants,- et leur vie familiale avec leurs enfants, consistaient en des liens assez lâches qui, en raison de ce caractére même, se réduisaient à des visites occasionnelles du premier requérant au Liechtenstein . Eu égard au caractére particulier de la vie privée et familiale des requérants, eu égard en outre à la possibilité pour les requérants et leurs enfants de se rencontrer à une distance raisonnable de la résidence de l a
- 92 -
seconde requérante, soit en Autriche soit en République Fédérale d'Allemagne, eu égard enfin aux suspensions de l'interdiction d'entrée dont le premier requérant a bénéficié à plusieurs reprises (neuf fois en deux ans), précisément pour pouvoir rendre visite à ses enfants, la Commission estime qu'il n'y a pas eu ingérence dans la vie privée et familiale des requérants au sens de l'article 8 de la Convention . Il s'ensuit que cette partie de la requête est manifestement mal fondée, au sens de l'article 27, § 2, de la Convention . 5 . Pour le surplus des griefs des requérants (ingérence dans le libre choix de son médecin et griefs concernant la procédurel, la Commission fait d'abord observer qu'ils ne présentent un intér@t direct que pour le premier requérant, tandis que la seconde requérante ne peut se prétendre la victime directe d'une violation de la Convention à cet égard Icf . article 25 de la Convention) . Il s'ensuit que cette partie de la requéte est incompatible ratione personae avec les dispositions de la Convention pour autant qu'elle a été introduite par la seconde requérante (article 27, § 7, de la Convention) . 6 . Quant au grief du premier requérant, selon lequel l'interdiction d'entrer en Suisse porterait atteinte au libre choix de son médecin puisque sa maladie de Parkinson exigeait les soins d'un spécialiste de Zurich, la Commission relève que le droit au libre choix de son médecin ne figure pas, comme tel, au nombre des droits et libertés garantis par la Conventio n Le requérant a invoqué les articles 2, 3 et 5 à cet égard . L'article 2 protége le droit de toute personne à la vie . L'article 3 garantit entre autres la protection contre tout traitement inhumain et l'article 5 le droit à la liberté et à la sécurité . Cependant, la Commission estime qu'aucune de ces dispositions n'est applicable en l'espéce . En particulier, la Commission ne trouve pas que l'on puisse parler de traitement inhumain lorsque l'accés à un spécialiste déterminé a été refusé s'il est possible d'obtenir ailleurs un traitement médical . La Commission considére donc cette partie de la requête comme incompatible ratione mareriae avec les dispositions de la Convention . Il s'ensuit que cette partie doit, elle aussi, ètre rejetée en vertu de l'article 27, § 2, de la Convention . 7 . La Commission a examiné enfin le grief du premier requérant, selon lequel la procédure qui a abouti à l'interdiction d'entrée n'était pas conforme aux prescrip . tions de l'article 6 de la Convention . Cet article garantit notamment à toute personne, s'agissant de contestations sur ses droits et obligations de caractère civil ou du bien-fondé de toute accusation en matiére pénale dirigée contre elle, le droit à ce que sa cause soit entendue équitablement et publiquement par un tribunal indépendant et impartial . Cependant, la procédure dont il s'agit en l'espéce n'avait trait ni à une contestation sur des droits et obligations de caractére civil, ni à une accusation en matière pénale Icf . par exemple les décisions de la Commission sur la recevabilit é
- 93 -
des requêtes N° 3325/67, Annuaire 10, p . 529 . N° 3798/68, Annuaire 12, p 307, et la décision de la Commission du 19 mai 1977 concernant 15 requêtes d'étudiants étrangers contre le Royaume-Uni, à paraitrel . Il s'ensuit que l'article 6 n'est pas applicable et que le présent grief des requérants est, lui aussi, incompatible avec les dispositions de la Convention, au sens de l'article 27 . § 2 Par ces motifs , la Commissio n DÉCLARELA REQUÈTEIRRECEVABLE .
_yG -

Origine de la décision

Formation : Commission (plénière)
Date de la décision : 14/07/1977

Fonds documentaire ?: HUDOC

HUDOC
Association des cours judiciaires suprêmes francophones Organisation internationale de la francophonie

Juricaf est un projet de l'AHJUCAF, l'association des cours judiciaires suprêmes francophones,
réalisé en partenariat avec le Laboratoire Normologie Linguistique et Informatique du droit (Université Paris I).
Il est soutenu par l'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie et le Fonds francophone des inforoutes.