Facebook Twitter Appstore
Page d'accueil > Résultats de la recherche

§ X. c. ROYAUME-UNI

Imprimer

Type d'affaire : Decision
Type de recours : Partiellement recevable ; partiellement irrecevable

Numérotation :

Numéro d'arrêt : 9261/81
Identifiant URN:LEX : urn:lex;coe;cour.europeenne.droits.homme;arret;1982-03-03;9261.81 ?

Analyses :

(Art. 6-1) ACCUSATION EN MATIERE PENALE, (Art. 6-1) PROCES EQUITABLE


Parties :

Demandeurs : X.
Défendeurs : ROYAUME-UNI

Texte :

APPLICATION/REQUETE N° 9261 /8 I X . v/the UNITED KINGDO M X . c/ROYAUME-UN I DECISION of 3 March 1982 on the admissibility of the application DÉCISION du 3 mars 1982 sur la recevabilité de la requête Artlcle 3 of the Convention : Emotional stress and anxiety suffered as a result of the expropriation of a person's home do not confer to the expropriation the churacter of inhuman treatmer :t . Artlcle 6, paragraph I of the Convention : This provision concerns all proceedings which determine a dispute over the expropriation of private property (or its compulsory sale to a public authority) . Where there is judicial review of administrative acts affecting civil rights, the cornrol of legal conformiry combined with a limited review of the facts satisfies the requirements of Article 6 . paragraph I . Article 8, paragraph I of the Convention : The expropriation of a house in which one lives constitutes an interference with the exercise of the right guaranteed by this provision . Article 8, paragraph 2 of the Convention : For ar : interference to be in accordance with the law, it is not sufficient that rhe interference is in conformity with the law : the law must also set up conditions and procedures for such interference. Assessment of the "necessity" in a democratic society not taken in the light of the applicatit in isolation but of the group of which she forms part . Article 13 of the Convention : This provision does not require judicial review of dornestic legislation to ensure its conformity with the Convention . Article 13 of the Convention In coNunctlon with Artlcle 8 of the Convention An appeal against the expropriation of a person's home in the majority of cases also concerrts the interference which this constitutes w•ith the occupants' exercise of the right to respect of his home . Examination of the particular facts of the case . Article 13 of the Convention In co nj unctlon with Article I of the Flret Protocof Where there is a remedv against expropriation meeting the requirements of - 177 -
Article 6. paragraph 1, it is super,/luous to ensure that this remedy also meets the - less stricter-requirements ojArt icle 13. Article 1, paragraph 1, of the Flnt Protocol : The second sentence of this paragraph does not concern denial or restriction of the use of property . The terms "subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of irrterrrational law" imply the existence of specijc national provisions and of a procedure designed to ensure that these conditions have . been fulftlled.
Arllcle 3 de la Conventlon : L'émotion et 1'anxiété ressenties par celui dont on exproprie la maison ne confèrent pas à l'expropriation le caractère d'un traitement inhumaùt . Artlcle 6, paragraphe 1, de la Couventlon : Cette disposition couvre toute procédure par laquelle il est décidé d'une contestation relative à l'expropriation d'un bien de l'intéressé (ou sa vente forcée à une collectivité publique) . S'agissant du contrôle judiciaire d'actes administratifs affectant des droits de caractère civil, un contrôle de légalité assorti d'une appréciation limitée des jaits répond aux exigences de l'anicle 6, paragraphe 1 . Article 8, paragraphe t, de la Conventlon : L'ezpropriation de la maison où l'on a son domicile est une ingérence dans l'exercice du droit garanti par cet article . Artlcle 8, paragraphe 2, de la Conventlon : Pour qu'une ingérence soit "prévue par la toi" . il ne suffit pas qu'elle soit conforme à la loi mais il faut encore que celle-ci frxe les conditions et procédures de pareille ingérence. Appréciation de la "nécessité" dans une société démocratique en fonction non de la situation du requérant pris isolément mais de celle du groupe dont il fait partie .
Article 13 de la Convention : Cette disposition n'exige pas un contrôle de la conformité de la loi nationale à la Convention . Artlcle 13 de la Convention, combiné avec l'article 8 de la Convention : Un recours contre l'expropriation d'une maison porte aussi, le plus souvent, sur l'irrgérence ainsi créée dans l'exercice du droit au respect du domicile . Examen du cas particulier . Mtlcle 13 de la Convenllon, combiné avec l'article 1 du Protocole addltlonnel : Lorsqu'il existe, contre une expropriation, un recours répondant aux exigences de l'article 6 . paragraphe 1 . il est superJlu de s'assurer que ce recours répond aussi aux exigences - moins strictes - de l'article 13. Article 1, paragraphe 1, du 1lrotocole additlonnel : La seconde phase de ce paragraphe ne vise pas les obstacles ou restrictions à l'usage d'un bien . - 178 -
Les termes "dans les conditions prévues par la loi et les principes gérréraux du droit internationa(" impliquent l'existence de dispositions nationales spécifiques et d'une procédure permettant d'assurer que les conditions sont remplies .
(%rancais : voir p . 191) .
THE FACTS
The facts as they have been submitted by the applicant who is a British citizen, born in 1928, may be summarised as follows : The applicant lives at . . ., Hull, a property which she owned since 1975, having moved there from an adjacent area which was made subject to a compulsory purchase order . On . . . April 1977 the Kingston upon Hull City Council ("the Council") passed a resolution pursuant to Section 42' of the Part III of the Housing Act 1957 0 declaring 16 clearance areas in the . . . area of Hull, in one of which the applicant's house is situated, and at the same time made a single Compulsory Purchase Order in respect of all three areas . The applicant, amongst others, objected to the Order and on the Council's application for its confirmation, a public local enquiry was held from . . . to . . . September 1978 . pursuant to paragraph 3 (3) Part 1, Third Schedule, Housing Act 1957 .• *
• Seclion 42 (1) Housing Act 1957 as far as material provides : "Where a local authority, . . . . are satisfied as respects any area in their district n . that the houses in that area are unfit for human habitation . . ., an d b . that the most satisfactory method of dealing with the conditions in the area is the demolition of all the buildings in the area : the authority . . . shall pass a resolution declaring the area so defined to be a clearance area . . . Provided that . . . . the authority shall satisfy themselves-(i) that, in so far as suitable accommodation . . . does not already exist, the authority can provide . . . such accommodation . . .
•• Paragraph 3 (3) Part I First Schedule Housing Act 195 7 If any objection duly made is not withdrawn, the Minister shall, before confirming the order, either cause a public local inquiry to be held or afford to any person by whom an objection has been duly made as aforesaid and not withdrawn an opporlunily of appearing before and being heard by a person appointed bv Ihe Minister for the purpose, and, after considering any objection not withdrawn and the report of the person who held the inquiry or of the person appointed as aforesaid may, subject to the provisions of this Part of this Schedule, confirm the order with or without modification .
- 179 -
Before the enqui ry the applicant, and the . . . Resident's Association of which she was a member, put forward detailed counter-proposals to those of the Council . proposing that a combined policy of renovation and selected demolition should be pursued . The applicant personally maintained that she was quite satisfied with her house which, although in need of some repair, could _ rovide the level of accommodation which she could afford in an area D where she had always lived without wasteful expenditu re being incurred in providing unnecessa ry new housing . The Inspector conducting the enqui ry neve rt heless recommended in hi s Report of . . . December 1978 that the Order be confirmed subject to slight modification, and included the applicant's home amongst those houses which he found to be unfit . The Repo rt was submitted to the Secreta ry of State for the Environment ( "the Minister"), who was empowered, under Part I Third Schedule Housing Act 1957, to con fi rm, amend or reject the Order . He confirmed the Order with the amendments proposed in the Report by a decision letter of . . . August 1979, which was published on . . . August 1979 . The applicant issued proceedings under the Fou rt h Schedule, Housing Act 1957 to quash the Order, or alternatively that pa rt of it which related to prope rties which the . . . Resident's Association had argued could be rehabilitated, and for an order that the Order be stayed while the outcome of the substantive proceedings was awaited . The applicant contended that the Inspector and the Minister had taken into account irrelevant factors and had failed to take relevant factors into account, especially the financial advantage and appropriateness of allowing residents who so wished to improve their houses to a modest level which was nevertheless fit for human habitation . The application to stay the Order was granted by vi rtue of paragraph 2 (i) Fou rt h Schedule Housing Act 1957 in respect of the houses where clearance had been opposed by their owners or the . . . Residents' Association on . . . November 1979 and the substantive issue was heard by the High Court on . . . April 1980 and dismissed . The applicant appealed from this decision to the Court of Appeal . On . . . May 1980 she applied for the appeal to be expedited, since she was anxious that rehousing of occupiers of the undisputed pa rt s of the clearance areas should not be delayed and because she was being threatened by local residents who wished to leave the area, but whom the Council refused to rehouse, despite the terms of the staying order of . . . November 1979, until the applicant's proceedings were determined . Th is application was granted and the applicant's appeal was heard and rejected on . . . July 1980 . By vi rt ue of paragraph 4 Fou rt h Schedule Housing Act 1957 no appeal is possible to the House of Lords under this Schedule without the leave of th e
- 180 -
Court of Appeal . The applicant sought leave from the Master of the Rolls who refused it in a personal letter to the applicant of . . . September 1980 . On . . . July 1980 the applicant was served with a Notice of Entry under Section 11 Compulsory Purchase Act 1965, notifying her that the Council intended to take possession of her home . On . . .September 1981 the Council wrote to the applicant in connection with the possible provision of suitable alternative accommodation but the applicant replied that the existing accommodation was quite suitable for her needs .
COMPLAINT S The applicant complains that her home has been compulsorily purchased by the Council and that she will be compelled to leave her home which she regards as suitable for her requirements . She maintains that the question of the necessity of the measure has not been established in relation to her rights as guaranteed by Article 8(I) in the following respects . The statutory test for declaring a clearance area under the Housing Ac t :1 1957 is not necessity for one of the objects enumerated in Article 8 (2) but that the Council considers declaring a clearance area as the most satisfactory method of dealing with conditions in an area containing houses which are unfit . Hence she claims that her right to respect for her home is not considered in deciding whether or note the whole area in question should be demolished . 2 . She further ntaintains that the necessity for this interference should be measured against her home requirements, which she claims will cease to be fulfilled . In particular she regards her present home as capable of providing the modest level of accommodation which she requires and thinks appropriate to her means . She does not wish to be compelled to live in accommodation which she cannot afford and where she will have to receive State subsidies to pay the rent and rates .
3 . Finally, the applicant and others affected by the Order made alternative proposals to complete demolition which she regards as viable ; these she contends show that the Order is not necessary . She further complains that she has had inadequate opportunity to challenge the factual basis and assumptions of the Report of the public local enquiry which led to the confirmation of the Order . She invokes Articles 3, 8 and 13 of the Convention and Atticle I of the First Protocol . - 181 -
THE LA W 1 . The applicant complains that her house has been compulsorily purchased from her and that she will therefore have to leave her home . She maintains that the decision of the Council to demolish her house and the surrounding buildings as unfit for human habitation, which was ultimately confirmed by the Minister, was taken without adequate respect for her rights as guaranteed by the Convention and that the resultant expropriation of her home constitutes inhuman and degrading treatment . She invokes Article 3 of the Convention, which provides : "No one shall be subjected to torture or to inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment . " The Commission recalls its constant case-law interpreting Article 3 and that of the Court and in particular the case of Ireland v . the United Kingdom (Judgments and Decisions Series A . No . 25, para . 162) where the latter stressed that "ill-treatment must attain a minimum level of severity if it is to fall within the scope of Article 3" . Similarly in the Tyrer case (Judgments and Decisions Series A, No . 26, paras . 29 and 30) the Court stressed that the suffering and the humiliation and debasement involved must attain a particular level for a breach of Article 3 to arise . In the present case, however, the Commission finds that the applicant has not alleged more than that shesuffered the emotional stress and anxiety arising from the expropriation of her home which did not in its opinion attain the degree of severity to raise an issue under Article 3 of the Convention . It follows that this aspect of the applicant's complaint is manifestly illfounded within the meaning of Article 27 (2) of the Convention . 2 . The applicant further complains that the decision to compulsorily purchase her house for demolition, which was confirmed by the Minister on . . . August 1979, violated her right to respect for her home as guaranteed by Article 8(1) of the Convention . She argues that such an interference cannot be justified for any of the reasons set out in Article 8 (2) of the Convention and in particular that it has not been shown that it was 'necessary' within the meaning of this provision for her home to be expropriated . She refers to the statutory provisions regulating the decision to declare a clearance area (Section 42 (1) Housing Act 1957) and points out that the relevant criteria do not include a consideration of the specific necessity of interfering with her right to respect for her home guaranteed by Article 8(1) of the Convention . Article 8 provides : "1 . Everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, his home and his correspendence .
- 182 -
2 . There shall be no interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except such as is in accordance with the law and is necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security, public safety or the economic well-being of the country, for the prevention of .disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals or for the protection of the rights or freedoms of others" . The Commission accepts that the compulsory acquisition of the applicant's home was an interference with the rights guaranteed by Article 8 (1) of the Convention which falls to be justifed under Article 8 (2) thereof. The Commission has considered first whether the interference in question is "in accordance with the law" within the meaning of Artiele 8 (2) . It recalls that this requirentent is to a certain extent autonomous and is not necessarily satisfied by mere conformity of a given interference with domestic law . Nevertheless, such conformity is a necessary, if not a sufficient requirement and the Commission notes that the applicant's proceedings before the High Court established that the Clearance Order and the consequential compulsory purchase of her home was lawful in English law . The Commission held in its Report in the Klass case ( Application No . 5029/71, Repo rt adopted on 9 March 1977, para . 63) that this provision also required that : "the (domestic) law sets up the conditions and procedures for an interference . " Since in that case the impugned legislation set up a detailed system of restricted interferences the Commission found the requirement satisfied . In the present case Section 42 Housing Act 1957 sets out detailed provisions as to the conditions which are prerequisites for a local authority to declare a clearance area which at the time form pa rt of the continuing du ty on the local authority to control the quality and standard of housing in their district . It follows that the requirement that the interference is "in accordance with the law" was satisfied in the present case . As far as the necessity of the interferences with the rights guaranteed under Article 8(1) of the Convention is concerned, the applicant has maintained first that the interference is not necessary in relation to her particular housing needs . The Commission notes however that the applicant does not dispute that her home was technically unfit for human habitation and that a large proportion of the houses in her neighbourhood were at an advanced stage of delapidation, making them beyond repair .
-183-
She complains however that her personal housing requirements could be fulfilled better by her present home, if a grant was made available for modest improvements, than by its demolition . Furthermore, she argues that alternative proposals for the neighbourhood, which were presented to the local enquiry, would have catered better for her needs (by preserving her home) and those of others that the wholesale demolition now proposed . - The Commission recalls the Court's consideration of the meaning of the phrase "necessary in a democratic sogiety" in the Handyside case where (in the context of Article 10 (2) of the Convention) it concluded tha t "the adjective 'necessary' . . . is not synonymous with 'indispensable', neither has it the flexibility of such expressions as . . . 'useful', reasonable' or desirable' and that it implies the existence of a pressing social need ." (Handyside Judgment page 22, para . 48) . In the present case the Commission considers that the whole tenor of Section 42 Housing Act 1957 is to impose obligations on a local authority to respond to a pressing social need arising from inadequate housing in an area containing large numbers of properties which are unfit for human habitation . In such circumstances the Section requires the local authority to take measures which are clearly for the protection of the health of the habitant both of the area in question and of surrounding areas . The Commission also takes account of the position of other inhabitants in the clearance area, apart from the applicant, some of whom as the applicant herself states . were very anxious to move out of housing which was clearly in far worse condition than the applicant's home . The applicant expressly applied to expedite her appeal to the Court of Appeal in order to alleviate the position of such other residents, but the Commission considers that their rights must also be taken into account in evaluating the necessity of the eventual interference which the applicant suffered . The Commission finds therefore, in the light of the general risk to health which the area in question posed and the pressing need to rehouse those living in these conditions, that the interference in question was justified under the terms of Article 8 (2) of the Convention as in accordance with the law and necessary in a democratic society for the protection of health and the rights of others . It follows that this aspect of the applicant's complaint is manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 27 (2) of the Convention . 3 . The applicant has also invoked Article I First Protocol and complained that her right to peacefully enjoy her property has been interfered with .
- 184 -
Article I First Protocol provides : "Every natural or legal person is entitled to the oeaceful enioyment of his possession . No-one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law . The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties . " It is clear from the facts as they have been submitted that the aoplicant's right to the peaceful enjoyment of her home, which she had bought in June 1975, was interfered with by the Minister's decision to confirm the Clearance Area in her neighbourhood and the subsequent service of a Notice of Entry on the applicant on . . . July 1980 . The Commission recalls the Court's interpretation of this provision in the Handyside case (Judgments and Decisions, Series A, Vol . 24), where the majority restricted the operation of the second sentence of the first paragraph of this article to cases of deprivation of ownership rather than denial or restriction of the use of property (ibid ., para . 62) . The present case clearly concerns deprivation of property and the Commission must therefore consider whether the interference was "in the public interest" and "subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law", as required by the first paragraph of this article .
The Commission has already considered the conformity of the expropriation of the applicant's home with the requirements of Article 8 (2) of the Convention and has concluded that the interference with her right to respect for her home was justified, being in accordance with the law and necessary in a democratic society for the protection of health and the rights of others . The Commission recognises that where, as here, adniinistrative actions impinge on two separate but partially overlapping provisions of the Convention . the application of the relevant provisions must be reconciled . Furthermore it considers that the provisions of Section 42 Housing Act 1957 clearly relate to administrative action which is justified in the public interest, as the Commission has found in relation to Article 8 of the Convention . At the same time the requirement that the deprivation of the applicant's property must be "subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law" must import further requirements beyond mere conformity with domestic law . ln the Commission's view, implicitly, these include the opportunity to ensure in domestic proceedings tha t
-t85-
the conditions imposed by domestic law have been applied . Furthermore, the reference in both the French and the English texts to 'conditions' ('les conditions') confirms the necessity for specificity and foresecability of the provisions of domestic law . In the present case the applicant has challenged the domestic lawfulness of the deprivation of her property in domestic proceedings at which the conformity of the deprivation with the detailed conditions of domestic law was specifically at issue . The Commission therefore concludes that the deprivation of the applicant's property was in conformity with the requirements of the second sentence of the first paragraph of Article I First Protocol . It follows that this aspect of the applicant's complaint must be declared manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 27 (2) of the Convention . 4 . The applicant has also complained that she was denied an effective means of challenging the Inspector's findings of fact resulting from the local Public Enquiry and that the remedies available under English law did not permit her to challenge the necessity of the interference with her property and her right to respect for her home or the merits of the solution recommended by the Inspector and adopted by the Minister . The Commission have considered this complaint first under Article 6(1) of the Convention, which provides (irrter alia) : "In the determination of his civil rights . . . everyone is entitled to a fair and public hearing within a reasonable time by an independent and impartial tribunal established by law . . . " The Commission recalls its decision on the admissibility of Application No . 3651/68 (Yearbook 13 page 477), where it expressly left open the question whether theproceedings for challenging a Compulsory Purchase Order involved the determination of 'civil rights', since in that case domestic remedies had not been exhausted . No such impediment arises in the present case, however, and the Commission must therefore decide this issue . It is clear from the facts of the present application that the Order affected the applicant's private rights by imposing a compulsory sale of her interest in her house to a single possible purchaser, the Council . Although the question of the "compensation" which the applicant will receive for her house under the provisions of the Housing Act 1957 remains open, the applicant's private right of ownership was directly affected an indeed, totally circumscribed, by the Order . The Commission concludes that the rights in question were 'civil rights' by virtue of their private nature and accordingly that, as in all proceeding s
- 186 -
which determine such rights, the applicant was therefore entitled to the protection of Article 6 (1) of the Convention . The Commission recalls its interpretation of this provision in its Report in Application No . 7598/76 Kaplan v . the United Kingdom (DR 21, p . 5) where it considered the scope of review which Article 6(1) requires in the judicial review of administrative action which affects an individual's civil rights. It concluded that "an interpretation of Article 6(1) under which it was held to provide a right to a full appeal on the merits of eve ry administrative decision affecting private rights would therefore lead to a result which was inconsistent with the existing and long-standing legal position in most of the Contracting States" . Thus the Commission relied upon the common feature of the judicial review of administrative action in the States members of the Council of Europe referred to in its majority opinion in the Ringeisen case (Series B, Vol . 11, p . 72) that : "If the administrative authority has acted properly and within the limits of the law, the judge can very rarely, if ever, decide whether or not the administrative decision was well-founded in substance . " In the present case the Commission notes that the applicant challenged the lawfulness of the Secretary of State's decision in proceedings under the Fourth Schedule of the Housing Act 1957, maintaining that the Inspector, and subsequently the Minister, had failed to take account of certain of the arguments and had been inFluenced by other considerations which had not been canvassed before the Inquiry and which the applicant had therefore been unable to challenge . Furthermore the applicant appealed from the decision of the High Court to the Court of Appeal where the Master of the Rolls described the grounds upon which the applicant could challenge the decision in the following terms : "A resident may make an application to the Court to have the Order quashed on the ground that the requirements of the statute have not been complied with . . . He can complain if the Minister has taken into account something he ought not to have done, or failed to take into account something he ought to have done or he has misdirected himself in law or he has given reasons which on the facts cannot stand . " The scope of review was not only therefore of legal conformity with the requirements of the Housing Act 1957 but also permitted a limited review of the facts, to the extent that any decision which "on the facts cannot stand" could be quashed . This allowed both the High Court and the Court of Appeal to specifically consider the Inspector's Report which they held was incorporate d
- 187 -
into the Minister's decision . On the basis of the facts found by the Inspector they therefore balanced the applicant's interests against those of the community as a whole . The Commission concludes that the combination of the power to examine the whole finding of fact in the administrative decision with the power to quash the decision for legal irregularity, or . for drawing unreasonable conclusions from the facts so found, satisfies the requirements of Article 6(1) of the Convention as to the scope of review which is required in the determination of civil rights referred to by the majority of the Commission in the Ringeisen case (supra) .
It follows that this aspect of the application does not reveal any appearance of a violation of Article 6 of the Convention and must be declared manifestly ill-founded, within the meaning of Aticle 27 (2) of the Convention . S . The Commission has also considered the applicant's contentions in connection with Article 13 of the Convention, which provides : "Everyone whose rights and freedoms as set forth in this Convention are violated shall have an effective remedy before a national authority notwithstanding that the violation has been committed by persons acting in an official capacity . " The Court has interpreted this provision in the Klass case to the effect that everyone who claims that his rights and freedoms have been violated should have a domestic remedy (Judgments and Decision, Vol 28, para . 64) and the Commission must therefore consider whether the applicant was afforded an effective remedy in connection with the interferences which she alleges with her right to the peaceful enjoyment of her possessions as guaranteed by Article I First Protocol and to respect for her home as guaranteed by Article 8 of the Convention, notwithstanding the fact that the Commission has found both these specific complaints manifestly ill-founded under Article I First Protoml and Article 8 respectively . In so far as the application relates to Article I First Protocol and Article 13, the Commission has already found that the applicant was provided with the guarantees of Article 6 of the Convention in the proceedings which she took to challenge the Minister's decision under the Fourth Schedule, Housing Act 1957 (para . 4 supra) . These proceedings dealt specifically with the legal propriety of the Minister's decision and the attendant Compulsory Purchaser Order, which included the applicant's home . Since the Commission has found that the applicant had the benefit of the guarantees of Article 6 in those proceedings, it is superfluous to consider the operation of Article 13 in relation to Article 1 First Protocol, since it provides a less thorough guarantee of procedural rights than Article 6 .
- 188 -
However the Commission must consider the application of Article 13 in conjunction with Article 8 and in particular whether the applicant was able to challenge the necessity of the alleged interference with her right to respect for her home protected by that provision . The applicant has also contended that the statutory test applied by the Council in declaring her neighbourhood a ctearance area was that demolition was "the most satisfactory method of dealing with the conditions in the area" (Section 42 Housing Act 1957) but that this test does not correspond with the level of necessity required to justify a prima facie interference with Article 8 (1) of the Convention . The Commission first refers to its Report under Article 31 of the Convention in the case of Young, James and Webster v . the United Kingdom (Applications Nos . 7601/76 and 7806/77) where it concluded that Article 13 does not require judicial review of legislation to ensure its conformity with the provisions of the Convention . Accordingly, to the extent that the applicant contends that the requirements of Section 42 Housing Act 1957 fail to respect her rights as guaranteed by Article 8 of the Convention in themselves and are not open to challenge under domestic law, her complaints are beyond the scope of the protection afforded by Article 1 3 . However the Commission must nevertheless consider whether the applicant had the protection of Article 13 in respect oP the decision of the local authority implementing Section 42 Housing Act 1957 which was later confirmed by the Minister .
Although Article 13 cannot be taken to require judicial review of alleged interferences with the rights and freedoms guaranteed by the Convention, where such review is available it may satisfy the requirements of Article 13 . Furthermore, in deciding whether or not such proceedings do satisfy Article 13, the Contmission must take into account that when it considers the proportionality of an alleged interference with rights guaranteed by e .g . Article 8(I) of the Convention and the possible justification of such an interference, it recognises that the priniary obligation relating to the observance and implementation of the Convention rests upon the Member States themselves . The Commission has already referred to the extent of the High Court's jurisdiction in the domestic proceedings which the applicant took, which included a consideration of whether the,requirements of the statute including those of Section 42 Housing Act 1957 have been complied with . It appears to the Commission inevitable that, where a Court is faced with a challenge to a Compulsory Purchase Order which involves the expropriation of peoples' homes, the Court must take account of the prima facie interference which this constitutes with the occupants' rights under Article 8(t) of the Convention . In this case both the High Court and the Court of Appeal niust therefore have taken account of the applicant's personal right to respec t
-t89-
for her home and private life by balancing her rights against the public interest in assessing the legal reasonableness of the Inspector's Report and the Minister's decision . As the Contmission has already established, the High Court and the Court of Appeal were able to examine the whole of the Inspector's finding of fact upon which the Minister's decision was based . The Commission notes in particular that the High Court specifically considered paragraph 364 of the Inspector's Report, including the section entitled "The Most Satisfactory Method Generally" where the Inspector examined . iriter alia . the advantages for local residents of retaining the established community structure rather than of demolishing the entire area (Judgntent of Mr Justice Willis of I April 1980, p . 7, DH) . Nevertheless the applicant's application to the High Court, and her subsequent appeal to the Court of Appeal, were unsuccessful .
The Commission also refers to the judgment of the Master of the Rolls in the Court of Appeal (page 7 F-H) where he said : "These enquiries are conducted by laymen experienced, good laymenand they set out their reasons (in this case exceedingly well and in detail) for coming to their decision . As long as it is broadly correct, and no injustice has been done, then the order should not be upset by the Courts . Looking at the report of the Inspector and the decision letter of the Minister as a whole, it seems to me that no reasonable objection should be made to them . " The Comntission takes account of the fact that, since the Convention is not part of the domestic law of the United Kingdom, the High Court and the Court of Appeal as the 'national authorities' referred to in Article 13 of the Convention in this case did not receive or decide upon arguments which were made with express reference to the Convention . However the Commission concludes that in the present case the substance of the relevant rights was relied upon by the aggrieved party and that the national authority was capable of affording the complainant an 'effective remedy' . Thus the High Court and the Court of Appeal were able to consider the substance of the applicant's complaint under Article 8 of the Convention and would have been able to quash the Minister's decision had they found for the applicant in the proceedings in question . The Commission concludes that the proceedings concerned therefore satisfied the requirements of Article 13 read in conjunction with Article 8 of the Convention and it follows that this aspect of the applicant's complaint is manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 27 (2) of the Convention . For these reasons, the Commissio n DECLARES THE APPLICATION INADMISSIBLE .
-190-
(TRADUCTION) EN FAI T Les faits, tels qu'ils ont été exposés par la requérante, ressortissante britannique née en 1928 . peuvent se résumer comme suit ; La requérante habite au 5 . . . à Hull, une propriété qu'elle possède depuis 1975 et où elle a déménagé après avoir quitté le quartier adjacent, . frappé d'expropriation . Le . . . avril 1977, le conseil municipal de Kingston-sur-Hull ( .Ie conseil .) prit, en vertu de l'a rt icle 42 . paragraphe 1 de la section 111 de la loi de 1957 sur le logement' une délibération fixant 16 zones à réaménager dans le quartier . . . de Hull, la maison de la requérante é tant située dans l'une de ces zones, et édicta simultanément un arrêté d'expropriation unique pour l'ensemble d'entre elles . La requérante fut l'une des personnes qui s'opposèrent à l'arrêté d'expropriation et, le conseil ayant demandé la confirmation de l'arrété, une enquête publique locale eut lieu du . . . au . . . septembre 1978, conformément au paragraphe 3 (3), Section 1, troisième chapitre de la loi de 1957 sur le Iogement• * . Avant 1'enquéte, la requérante et l'Association des résidents de . . . dont elle est membre, opposèrent aux propositions du conseil des contre-proposition s • La partie pertinente de l'article 42, paragraphe 1 de la loi de 1957 sur le logement est ainsi libellée : • Lorsqti une collectivité publique . . . est convaincue, en ce qui conceme un quartier de son ressort . a . que les maisons dudit quartier sont inhabitables . . . e t b . que le moyen le plus satisfaisant de parer à la situation est de démolir tous les bàtintents du quartier, la collectivité . . . prendra une délibération déclarant le quartier zone à réaménager à la condition que . . . la collectivité ait la conviction (i) que, dans la mesure où il n'existe pas de logement convenable, elle puisse en foumir . . . •• Le paragraphe 3 (3) de la Section 1 du premier chapitre de la loi de 1957 sur le logement dispose : •Lorsqu'une opposition dûment présentée n'est pas retirée, le ministre doit, avant de confirmer l'arrêté d'expropriation soit provoquer une enquête publique locale, soit permettre à l'auteur de l'objectiôn susdite non retirée de comparailre devant une personne désignée par le ministre pour l'entendre . Après avoir examiné toute objection non retirée ainsi que le rapport de la personne qui aura mené l'enquête ou de celle qui aura été désignée comme indiqué ci-dessus . le ministre pourra, sous réserve des dispositions du présent chapitre, confirmer l'arrêté d'expropriation avec ou sans modification .
- 191 -
détaillées préconisant une politique combinée de rénovation et de démolition sélective. La requérante soutenait être personnellement très contente de sa maison qui, malgré les quelques réparations nécessaires, lui assurait le logement qu'elle pouvait souhaiter dans le quartier où elle avait toujours vécu et sans qu'il soit nécessaire de gaspiller de l'argent à rechercher inutilement un nouveau logement . L'inspecteur qui mena l'enquête recommanda néanmoins dans so n rapport du . . . décembre 1978 de confirmer l'arrêté d'expropriation moyennant de légères modifications et inclut le domicile de la requérante parmi les maisons qu'il déclara insalubres . Le rapport fut soumis au ministre de l'Environnement (• le ministre .), habilité aux termes de la Section 1, troisième chapitre de la loi de 1957 sur le logement à confirmer, amender ou annuler un arrété d'expropriation . Le ministre confirma l'arrêté en l'assortissant des amendements proposés dans le rapport et fit connaitre sa décision par une lettre du . . . août 1979, qui fut publiée le . . . août 1979 . La requérante eneaeea, conformément au chapitre IV de la loi, une procédure d'annulation de l'arrêté ou, à titre subsidiaire, de la partie concernant les propriétés dont l'Association des résidents de . . . soutenait qu'elles pouvaient étre réhabilitées, et demanda un sursis à l'exécution en attendant l'issue de la procédure sur le fond . La requérante soutenait que l'inspecteur et le ministre avaient tenu compte d'éléments étrangers au cas d'espèce et omis de considérer des éléments pertinents, notamment l'avantage financier et l'opportunité qu'il y avait à permettre aux résidents qui le désiraient d'améliorer leur logement actuel, modeste certes, mais néanmoins habitable . Le . . . novembre 1979 . il fut fait droit à la demande de surseoir à l'exécution de l'arrêté d'expropriation, conformément au paragraphe 2(i), quatrième chapitre de la loi de 1957 sur le logement, pour les maisons à la déntolition desquelles s'opposaient leurs propriétaires ou l'Association des résidents de . . . . La question fut examinée au fond par la High Court le . . . avril 1980 et les demandeurs déboutés . La requérante interjeta appel de cette décision devant la Court of Appeal . Le . . . mai 1980, elle demanda d'accélérer la procédure d'appel car elle ne voulait pas retarder le relogement des occupants des îlots insalubres non litigieux et parce qu'elle avait reçu des menaces de résidents qui désiraient quitter le quartier mais qu'en dépit des termes de l'ordonnance de sursis en date du . . . novembre 1979, le conseil se refusait à reloger tant qu'il n'avait pas été statué sur l'action engagée par la requérante . Il fut fait droit à cette demande et l'appel de la requérante fut entendu et rejeté le . . . juillet 1980 . Aux termes du paragraphe 4 du quatrième chapitre de la loi de 1957 sur le logement, il n'est pas possible d'interjeter appel devant la Chambre de s
-192-
Lords sans l'autorisation de la Court of Appeal . La requérante demanda cette autorisation au Président, qui la refusa par une lettre personnelle adressée à la requérante le . . . septembre 1980 . Le . . . juillet 1980, la requérante se vit signifier un avis d'envoi en possession, conformément à l'article II de la loi de 1965 sur l'expropriation, lui notifiant que le conseil se proposait de prendre possession de sa maison . Le . . . septembre 1981, le conseil écrivit à la requérante qu'il pouvait lui fournir un autre logement convenable mais elle répondit que le logement existant convenait parfaitement à ses besoins .
GRIEF S La requérante se plaint d'avoir été forcée de vendre son logement au conseil et obligée de quitter sa maison qu'elle estime convenir à ses besoins . Elle soutient que la nécessité de la mesure n'a pas été établie en liaison avec les droits que lui garantit l'article 8, paragraphe 1, notamment : 1 . Le critère légal utilisé pour décider de l'expropriation d'une zone conformément à la loi de 1957 sur le logement n'est pas nécessaire à l'un des objectifs énumérés à l'article 8 . paragraphe 2 : le conseil estime seulement que la décision d'exproprier est le ntoyen le plus satisfaisant de parer à Ia situation dans un quartier contenant des maisons insalubres . La requérante prétend en conséquence qu'il n'a pas été tenu compte de son droit au respect de son domicile pour décider si tout le quartier devait ou non être démoli .
2 . Elle soutient en outre qu'il faut comparer la nécessité de cette ingérence à ses propres exigences en matière de logement qui, prétend-elle, n'ont pas été respectées . Elle estime notamment que la ntaison qu'elle occupe peut lui fournir le logement modeste dont elle a besoin et qu'elle estinte adapté à ses moyens . Elle ne souhaite pas qu'on l'oblige à vivre dans un logement qu'elle ne peut pas se permettre et où elle sera obligée de recevoir des allocations de l'Etat pour acquitter le loyer et les impôts . 3 . Enfin, la requérante et d'autres personnes touchées par l'arrêté d'expropriation ont formulé des propositions de remplacement de la démolition totale, propositions qu'elle estime viables et qui, selon elle, montrent bien que l'arrêté d'expropriation n'était pas nécessaire . Elle se pleint en outre de n'avoir pas eu la possibilité de contester convenablement les faits sur lesquels s'appuient les hypothèses formulées dans le rapport d'enquête publique qui a conduit à confirmer l'arrêté . Elle invoque les articles 3, 8 et 13 de la Convention et l'article I du Protocole additionnel .
- 193 -
EN DROI T 1 . La requérante se plaint d'avoir été obligée de vendre sa maison et donc de quitter son domicile . Elle soutient d'une part que la décision du conseil municipal, confirmée par le ministre, de démolir sa maison et les bâtiments avoisinants pour cause d'insalubrité, a été prise au mépris des droits que lui garantit la Convention et . d'autre part, que l'expropriation qui en est résultée pour elle constitue un traitement inhumain et dégradant . Elle invoque l'article 3 de la Convention qui dispose : •Nul ne peut être soumis à la torture ni à des peines ou traitements inhumains ou dégradants . • la Commission rappelle sa jurisprudence constante sur l'interpretation de l'article 3 et celle de la Cour, notamment dans l'affaire Irlande c/RoyaumeUni (Arrêts et Décisions . Série A . N° 25 . par . 162) où la Cour a souligné que . .pour tomber sous le coup de l'article 3, un mauvais traitement doit atteindre un minimum de gravité . . De même, dans l'affaire Tyrer (Arrêts et Décisions, Série A, N° 26 . par . 29 et 30) . la Cour a souligné que la souffrance et l'humiliation en jeu doivent se situer à un niveau particulier pour qu'il y ait violation de l'article 3 . En l'espèce cependant . la Commission estime que la requérante n'a pas allégué davantage que la tension et l'angoisse affective qu'elle a subies du fait de l'expropriation de son logement, ce qui n'atteint pas, à son avis, le degré de gravité nécessaire pour faire problème au regard de l'article 3 de la Convention . Il s'ensuit que le grief de la requérante est, sur ce point, manifestement mal fondé au sens de l'article 27, paragraphe 2, de la Convention . 2 . La requérante se plaint en outre de ce que la décision l'ayant obligée à vendre sa maison pour la faire démolir, confirmée par le ministre le . . . août 1979, a enfreint son droit au respect de son donticile tel que le garantit l'article 8, paragraphe l, de la Convention . Elle fait valoir que cette ingérence n'est pas justifiée par l'un des motifs énumérés à l'article 8, paragraphe 2, de la Convention et notamment qu'il n'a pas été établi qu'il était -nécessaire•, au sens de cette disposition . de l'exproprier de son logement . Elle renvoie aux dispositions légales régissant la décision d'exproprier un quartier (article 42, paragraphe 1 . de la loi de 1957 sur le logement) et souligne que parmi les critères pertinents ne figure pas l'examen de la nécessité spécifique de porter atteinte au droit au respect du domicile garanti par l'article 8 . paragraphe 1 . de la Convention . L'article 8 est ainsi libellé : . 1 . Toute personne a droit au respect de sa vie privée et familiale, de son domicile et de sa correspondance . -194-
2 . 11 ne peut y avoir ingérence d'une autorité publique dans l'exercice de ce droit que pour autant que cette ingérence est prévue par la loi et qu'elle constitue une mesure qui . dans une société démocratique, est nécessaire à la sécurité nationale, à la sûreté publique, au bien-être économique du pays, à la défense de l'ordre et à la prévention des infractions pénales, à la protection de la santé ou de la morale ou à la protection des droits et libertés d'autrui . • La Commission reconnait que la vente forcée de la maison de la requérante était une ingérence dans l'exercice des droits garantis par l'article 8, paragraphe 1, de la Convention, qui doit se justifier au regard du paragraphe 2 de cette disposition . La Commission a examiné d'abord si l'ingérence en question est •prévue par la loi • au sens de l'article 8, paragraphe 2 . Elle rappelle que cette condition est, dans une certaine mesu re , autonome et qu'elle n'est pas nécessairement satisfaite par la simple conformité d'une ingérence donnée avec la législation interne . Néanmoins, cette conformité est une condition nécessaire, sinon suffisante, et la Commission relève que la procédure engagée par la requérante devant la High Court a permis d'établir que l'arrêté d'exprop ri ation et la vente forcée de la maison qui l'a suivi étaient légales en droit anglais . La Commission a déclaré dans son rapport sur l'affaire Klass ( Requé ( e N° 5029/71, rapport adopté le 9 mars 1977, par . 65) que cette disposition exige également que :
.La législation ( interne) fixe les conditions et les procédures d'ingérence . • Or, en l'espèce . la législation contestée créant un système détaillé d'ingérence limitées, la Commission estime la condition remplie . En effet, l'article 42 de la loi de 1957 sur le logement fixe des dispositions détaillées quant aux conditions que doit remplir une collectivité publique pour décider d'exproprier un quartier . Ces conditions font en même temps partie de l'obligation qui pèse en permanence sur la collectivité de veiller à la qualité et aux normes de l'habitat sur son territoire . Il s'ensuit que l'exigence selon laquelle l'ingérence est • prévue par la loi • était satisfaite en l'occurrence . Quant à la nécessité des ingérences dans l'exercice des droits garantis par l'article 8 . paragraphe 1, de la Convention, la requérante a soutenu tout d'abord que l'ingérence n'était pas nécessaire quant à ses besoins propres en matière de logement . La Commission relève cependant que la requérante ne conteste pas que sa maison fût, techniquement, insalubre et qu'une vaste proportion de s
- 195 -
maisons du voisinage se trouvaient dans un état avancé de délabrement qui les iendait irréparables . Elle soutient toutefois que ses besoins personnels en la matière seraient mieux servis par son logement actuel à condition de bénéficier d'une subvetition lui permettant de procéder à de modestes améliorations sans le démolir . En outre, elle fait valoir que les proposition~ de rechange présentées pour le quartier à l'enquête publique locale auraient mieux répondu à ses propres besoins (en préservant son domicile) et à ceux des autres résidents, plutôt que la démolition générale qui est à préseijt envisagée . La Commission rappelle que la Cour a examiné le sens de l'expressio n . nécessaire dans une société démocratique . à propos de l'affaire Handyside où (dans le contexte de l'article 10, paragraphe 2, de la Convention), elle a conclu que : • L'adjectif 'nécessaire' . . . n'est pas synonyme d"indispensable' . . . et n'a pas non plus la souplesse de termes tels qu"utilé ,'raisonnablé ou 'opportun' et qu'il suppose la réalité d'un besoin social impérieux . (Arr@t Handyside, p . 22 . par . 48) . En l'espèce, la Commission estime que le sens général de l'article 42 de la loi de 1957 est d'imposer à la côllectivité publique l'obligation de répondre à un besoin social impérieux né des conditions inadéquates de logement .dans un quartier où existent quantité de propriétés insalubres . En, pareilles circonstances, cet article exige de la collectivité publique qu'elle prenne des mesures visant manifestement à protéger la santé des habitants, tant dans le quartier en question que dans la zone avoisinante . La Commission tient également compte, à côté de la situation de la requérante . de celle d'autres habitants du quartier exproprié dont certains, selon les propres déclarations de la requérante, étaient pressés de quitter un logement manifestement bien plus délabré que celui de la requérante . Cette demière a expressément demandé d'accélérer la procédure d'examen de son appel devant la Court of Appeal afin d'adoucir la situation de ces autres résidents . Cependant, la Commission estime qu'il faut aussi tenir compte des droits de ces résidents pour apprécier la nécessité de l'ingérence dont la requérante a finalement souffert . La Commission estime en conséquence, compte tenu du risque général pour la santé que représentait le quartier en question et du besoin impérieux de reloger ceux qui y vivaient dans ces conditions insalubres, que l'ingérence en question était justifiée au regard de l'article 8, paragraphe 2, de la Convention, puisqu'elle était prévue par la loi et nécessaire dans une société démocratique à la protection de la santé et des droits d'autrui . Il s'ensuit que le grief de la requérante est, sur ce point, manifestement mal fondé, au sens de l'article 27, paragraphe 2 . de la Convention .
-196-
3 . La requérante a également invoqué l'article 1 du Protocole additionnel et s'est plainte de ce qu'il a été porté atteinte à l'exercice de son droit au respect de ses biens . L'article 1 du Protocole additionnel est ainsi libellé : •Toute personne physique ou morale a droit au respect de ses biens . Nul ne peut être privé de sa propriété que pour cause d'utilité publique et dans les conditions prévues par la loi et les principes généraux d . udroitneal Les dispositions précédentes ne portent pas atteinte au droit que possèdent les Etats de mettre en vigueur les lois qu'ils jugent nécessaires pour réglementer l'usage des biens conformément à l'intérêt général ou pour assurer le paiement des impôts ou d'autres contributions ou des amendes . • Il ressort des faits tels qu'ils ont été exposés que le droit de la requérante au respect de la maison qu'elle avait achetée en juin 1975 a été entravé par la décision du ministre de confirmer l'expropriation du quartier alentour et par la signification ultérieure à la requérante, le 11 juillet 1980, d'un avis d'envoi en possession . La Commission rappelle l'interprétation de cet article donnée par la Cour dans l'affaire Handyside (Arréts et Décisions, Série A, Vol . 24), où la majorité de la Cour a limité l'application de la deuxième phrase du premier paragraphe de cet article aux cas de privation de propriété, à l'exclusion du refus ou de la limitation de l'usage de biens (ibid . . par . 62) .
La présente affaire concernant manifestement une privation de propriété . la Commission doit donc examiner si l'ingérence a été pratiquée • pour cause d'utilité publique . et •dans les conditions prévues par la loi et les principes généraux du droit international ., comme l'exige le premier paragraphe de cet article . La Commission a déjà exaniiné la conformité de l'expropriation de la maison de la requérante avec les exigences de l'article 8 . paragraphe 2, de la Convention et conclu que l'ingérence dans l'exercice du droit au respect de sa maison était justifiée, puisqu'elle était prévue par la loi et nécessaire dans une société démocratique à la protection de .la santé et des droits d'autrui . La Comntission reconnait que lorsque, comme en l'espèce, des mesures administratives se heurtent à deux dispositions de la Convention, distinctes mais se recouvrant, il faut concilier l'application des textes en question . De plus, elle estime que les dispositions de l'article 42 de la loi de 1957 sur le logement ont manifestement trait à des mesures administratives justifiées par l'intérêt général, comme la Commission l'a constaté à propos de l'article 8 de la Convention .
- 197 -
Simultanément, la condition que la privation de propriété de la requérante doit se faire . dans les conditions prévues par la loi et les principes généraux du droit international . implique des exigences supplémentaires dépassant la simple conformité avec le droit interne . Selon la Commission, parmi ces conditions figure implicitement la possibilité de s'assurer dans la procédure interne que les conditions posées par la législation nationale ont bien été remplies . En outre, la référence du texte français comme de la version anglaise aux .conditions . ( .conditions .) confirme la nécessité que les dispositions du droit interne soient spécifiques et prévisibles .
En l'espèce, la requérante a contesté la légalité interne de la privation de sa propriété par une procédure interne dans laquelle était spécifiquement en jeu la conformité de cette privation avec les conditions détaillées de la législation nationale . La Commission en conclut donc que la privation de propriété de la requérante était bien conforme aux exigences de la deuxième phrase de l'article l, paragraphe 1 du Protocole additionnel . Il s'ensuit que . sur ce point, le grief de la requérante doit être déclaré manifestement mal fondé, au sens de l'article 27, paragraphe 2, de la Convention . 4 . La requérante se plaint également de s'être vu refuser un ntoyen efficace de contester les conclusions de l'inspecteur après l'enquête publique locale et de ce que les voies de recours existant en droit anglais ne lui permettaient de contester ni la nécessité de porter atteinte à ses biens et au droit au respect de son domicile . ni le bien-fondé de la solution préconisée par l'inspecteur et adoptée par le ministre . La Contmission a examiné ce grief d'abord au regard de l'article 6, paragraphe I, de la Convention, dont la partie pertinente est ainsi libellée : .Toute personne a droit à ce que sa cause soit entendue équitablement, publiquement et dans un délai raisonnable, par un tribunal indépendant et impartial, établi par la loi, qui décidera . . . des contestations sur ses droits et obligations de caractère civil . . . . La Commission rappelle sa décision sur la recevabilité de la requ@te N° 3651/ 68 (Annuaire 13 . p . 477), où elle a expressément laissé en suspens la question de savoir si la procédure par laquelle le requérant contestait une ordonnance d'expropriation emportait détermination de ses . droits de caractère civil ., puisque dans cette affaire-là les voies de recours internes n'avaient pas été épuisées . Cependant, aucun obstacle de ce genre n'existant en l'espèce, la Commission doit décider de la question . Il ressort clairement des faits de la présente requête que l'arrêté affectait les droits privés de la requérante en lui imposant de vendre obligatoirement son titre de propriété à un unique acheteur possible, le conseil municipal . Si la
- 198 -
question de • l'indemnisation » que la requérante recevra pour la perte de sa maison conforméntent à la loi de 19S7 sur le logement denteure ouverte, le droit de propriété privée de la requérante a été directement affecté et, en fait, totalement restreint par l'arrèté d'expropriation . La Commission en conclut que les droits en question étaient bien des • droits de caractère civil • en raison de leur caractère privé et que, dès lors, comnie dans toute procédure qui décide d'une contestation sur ce genre de droits, la requérante devait bénéficier de la protection de l'article 6, paragraphe 1, de la Convention . La Commission rappelle l'interprétation de cette disposition, donnée dans son rapport sur la requête N° 7598/76 . Kaplan c/Royaume-Uni (D .R . 21, p . 5), où elle a examiné la portée du contrôle que l'article 6, paragraphe 1, exige lors du réexamen de l'acte administratif qui affecte les droits civils d'un individu . Elle en a conclu que : • Une interprétation de l'article 6, paragraphe 1, selon laquelle cet article confèrerait un droit d'appel sur le fond de chaque décision administrative affectant des droits privés aboutirait donc à un résultat incompatible avec la situation juridique prévalant depuis longtemps dans la plupart des Etats contractants . La Contmission s'est donc fondée sur la caractéristique commune au contrôle judiciaire des actes administratifs dans les Etats membres du Conseil de l'Europe, telle que l'a évoquée l'opinion majoritaire dans son rapport Ringeisen (Série B ., Vol . 1-11, p . 72) selon laquelle : . Si l'autorité administrative agit correctement et dans les limites de la légalité, le juge ne peut que très rarement, sinon jamais, décider si la décision administrative a été ou non bien fondée quant au fond . • En l'espèce, la Commission relève sur la requérante â contesté la légalité de la décision prise par le ministre en application du quatrième chapitre de la loi de 1957 sur le logement, en soutenant que l'inspecteur d'abord, le ministre ensuite, avaient méconnu certains arguments et été influencés par d'autres considérations dont la commission d'enquête n'avait pas débattu et que la requérante n'avait donc pas pu contester . En outre, la requérante a interjeté appel de la décision de la High Court devant la Court of Appeal, dont le vice-président a décrit en ces termes les motifs permettant à l'appelante de contester la décision : • Un résident peut demander à la cour d'annuler l'arrêté d'expropriation au motif que les conditions prévues par la loi n'ont pas été remplies . . . Il peut se plaindre de ce que le ministre a tenu conrpte d'un élément qu'il n'aurait pas dû exantiner, ou au contraire en a méconnu un qu'il aurait dû prendre en considération ou encore qu'il a mal appliqué la loi ou donné des motifs qui ne correspondent pas aux faits . •
- 199 -
Dès lors, le contrôle ne portait pas seulement sur la conformité de l'arrêté aux exigences de la loi de 1957 sur le logement, mais permettait aussi une certaine vérification des faits dans la mesure où toute décision qui . ne correspond pas aux faits . peut être annulée . La High Court comme la Court of Appeal étaient donc autorisées à examiner expressément le rapport de l'inspecteur . qu'elles estimaient être incorporé dans la décision du ministre . Sur la base des faits constatés par l'inspecteur, les deux juridictions ont donc mis en balance les intérêts de la requérante et éeux de l'ensemble de la collectivité .
La Commission estime que la combinaison du pouvoir d'examiner l'ensemble des constatations de fait sur lesquelles s'appuie l'acte administratif et du pouvoir d'annuler l'acte pour irrégularité ou pour conclusions déraisonnables tirées des faits ainsi établis, répond aux exigences de l'article 6, paragraphe 1 . de la Convention quant à la portée du contrôle requis pour statuer sur les droits de caractère civil, comme l'évoquait la majorité de la Commission dans l'affaire Ringeisen (cf . supra) . . Il s'ensuit que, sur ce point, la requête ne révèle aucune apparence de violation de l'article 6 de la Convention et doit dès lors être déclarée manifestement mal fondée au sens de l'article 27, paragraphe 2, de la Convention . 5 . La Commission a également examiné l'argumentation que la requérante présente au regard de l'article 13 de laConvention, ainsi libellé : «Toute personne dont les droits et libertés reconnus dans la présente Convention ont été violés, a droit à Coctroi d'un recours effectif devant une instance nationale, alors même que la violation aurait été commis e par des personnes agissant dans l'exercice de leurs fonctions officielles . . Dans l'affaire Klass, la Cour a interprété cette disposition en ce sens que quiconque allègue une violation de ses droits et libertés doit disposer d'un recours interne (Arrêts et Décisions, Vol . 28, par . 64) . La Commission doit donc examiner si la requérante disposait d'un recours effectif pour se plaindre des ingérences qu'elle allègue dans son droit au respect de ses biens, tel que garanti par l'article 1 du Protocole additionnel et au droit au respect de son domicile tel que garanti par l'article 8 de la Convention, nonobstant le fait qu'elle a déclaré ces deux griefs ntanifêstement mal fondés au regard de ces deux dispositions spécifiques . Dans la mesure où la requête a trait à l'article 1 du Protocole additionnel et à l'article 13, de la Convention, la Commission a déjà constaté que la requérante avait bénéficié des garanties offertes par l'article 6 de la Convention dans la procédure engagée pour contester la décision du ministre conformément au quatrième chapitre. de la loi de 1957 sur le logement (cf . supra par . 4) . Cette procédure a porté précisément sur la régularit é
-2pp-
juridique de la décision du ministre et de l'arr@té d'exprop ri ation qui l'accompagnait, concernant notamment la maison de la requérante . La Commission ayant constaté que la requérante avait bénéficié des garanties de l'article 6 en l'espèce, il est superflu d'examiner l'application de l'article 13 en liaison avec l'article 1 du Protocole additionnel puisque ces dispositions prévoiem une garantie procédurale moindre que l'article 6 . Cependant . la Commission doit examiner l'application de l'article 13 en liaison avec l'article 8 et . notamment, le point de savoir si la requérante a pu contester la nécessité de l'ingérence alléguée dans l'exercice du droit au respect de son domicile, droit protégé par cette disposition . La requérante a également soutenu que le critère légal appliqué par le conseil municipal pour déclarer son quartier frappé d'expropriation était que sa démolition était .le ntoyen le plus satisfaisant de parer à la situation dans le quartier . ( article 42 de la loi de 1947 sur le logentent) mais que ce critère ne correspondait pas au degré de nécessité requis pour justifier une atteinte, m@nie à première vue, à l'article 8 . paragraphe I, de la Convention . La Conintission renvoie tout d'abord au rapport qu'elle a établi conformément à l'article 31 de la Convention dans l'affaire Young, James et Webster c/Royaunie-Uni (Requête N° 7601/76 et 7806/77) où elle a conclu que l'article 13 n'exige pas un contrôle judiciaire de la législation pour s'assurer de .ca conformité avec les dispositions de la Convention . En conséquence . dans la mesure où larequérante prétend que les exigences de l'article 42 de la loi de 1957 sur le logement n'ont pas respecté les droits que lui garantit l'a rt icle 8 de la Convention et ne peuvent être contestées en droit interne, ses griefs ou trepassent la protection offerte par l'article 13 . Cependant, la Comntission doit néanmoins examiner si la requérante a bénéficié de la protection dc l'article 13 en ce qui concerne la décision de la collectivité publique de nieure en æuvre l'article 42 de la loi de 1957, décision ultérieurement confirmée par le ntinistre . Certes, l'article 13 ne peut être interprété comme exigeant un contrôle judiciaire des ingérences alléguées dans l'exercice des droits et libertés garantis par la Convention, ntais lorsqu'un tel contrôle judiciaire existe néanntoins, il pcut fort bien satisfaire aux exigences de l'article 13 . En outre, pour décider si une telle procédure répond effectivenient aux conditions de l'article 13 . la Coniniission doit tenir compte de ce que . en examinant le rapport de proportionnalité entre l'ingérence alléguée dans l'exercice des droits garantis par exentple par l'article 8 . paragraphe 1, de la Convention et la justification éventuelle de cette ingérence, elle reconnait que c'est aux Etats membres eux-nt@mes qu'incombe l'obligation première de respecter et de ntettre en œ uvre la Convention .
- 201 -
La Comnmission a déjà évoqué le dontaine de compétence de la High Court dans la procédure interne que la requérante a engagée et qui comportait l'exanien du point de savoir si les exigences de la loi avaient bien été respectées . notamntent celles de l'article 42 de la loi de 1957 sur le logement . Il apparaît inévitable à la Commission que lorsqu'une juridication doit traiter de la contestation d'un arrété d'exproprialion portant sur des logentents . elle doit tenir contpte de l'atteinte que cela constitue à première vue aux droits que l'article 8, paragraphe 1, de la Convention garantit aux occupants . En l'espèce done, pour apprécier le caractère juridiquement raisonnable du rapport de l'inspecteur et de la décision du ministre, la High Court et la Court of Appeal ont dit tenir compte du droit de la requéranle au respect de son doniicile el de sa vie privée en mettant en balance ses droits personnels et l'intérêt général .
Conime la Comniission l'a déjà constaté, la High Court et la Court of Appeal ont pu exantiner l'ensemble des conclusions de l'inspecteur sur lesquelles le minislre a fondé sa décision . La Conimission relève notamment que la High Court a précisément exantiné le paragraphe 364 du rapport de l'inspecteur, notamntent la partie intitulée • le moycn le plus salisfaisant en général . . où l'inspecteur a notantment exaniiné les avantages pour les résidents de conserver la slructure existante plutbt que de voir déntolir tout le quartier (Arrêt du juge Willis en date du I« avril 1980, p . 7 . D .H .) . Néanntoins, la dentande adressée par la requérante à la High Court et son appel ultérieur à la Court of Appeal n'ont pas été couronnés de succès . La Contntission renvoie également à l'arrêt du vice-président de,la Court of Appeal (p . 7 F-H) déclarant : .Ccs enquétes sont menées par des hommes d'expérience qui indiquent leurs raisons (en l'occurrence de manière excellente et avec beaucoup de dé(ails) pour en arriver à leur décision . Si l'ensemble est exact et n'est entaché d'aucune injuslice, les tribunaux ne doivent pas annuler l'arrêté . Or, si je considère le rapport de l'inspecteur et la décision du ministre dans leur ensentble, il ne me sentble pas pouvoir y élever d'objection raisonnable . • La Commission tient compte du fait que . la Convention n'ayant pas été imégrée dans le droit interne au Royaunte-Uni . la High Court et la Court of Appeal . qui sont les -instances nationales» évoquées à l'article 13 de la Convcntion, ne se sont pas fondées en l'espèce sur des arguments faisanl expressément référence à laConvention . Cependant, la Comntission estime qu'en l'espèce la partie lésée a pu invoquer l'essentiel des droits concernés et que l'instance nationale a été en mesure d'offrir au plaignant un - recours effectif» .
- 202 -
Dès lors, la High Court et la Court of Appeal ont pu examiner la substance du grief tiré par la requérante de l'article 8 de la Convention et auraient pu annuler la décision du ministre si elles s'étaient prononcées en faveur de la requérante dans la procédure litigieuse . La Commission en conclut que la procédure en question a donc satisfait aux exigences de l'articlc 13 . lu en liaison avec l'article 8 de la Convention . Il en découle que, sur ce point, le grief de la requérante est manifestement mal fondé, au sens de l'article 27, paragraphe 2, de la Convention . Par ces motifs, la Conimissio n
DECLARE LA REOUETEIRRECEVABLE .
-203-

Origine de la décision

Formation : Commission (plénière)
Date de la décision : 03/03/1982

Fonds documentaire ?: HUDOC

HUDOC
Association des cours judiciaires suprêmes francophones Organisation internationale de la francophonie

Juricaf est un projet de l'AHJUCAF, l'association des cours judiciaires suprêmes francophones,
réalisé en partenariat avec le Laboratoire Normologie Linguistique et Informatique du droit (Université Paris I).
Il est soutenu par l'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie et le Fonds francophone des inforoutes.