Facebook Twitter Appstore
Page d'accueil > Résultats de la recherche

§ GILLOW c. ROYAUME-UNI

Imprimer

Type d'affaire : Decision
Type de recours : Partiellement irrecevable ; partiellement recevable

Numérotation :

Numéro d'arrêt : 9063/80
Identifiant URN:LEX : urn:lex;coe;cour.europeenne.droits.homme;arret;1982-12-09;9063.80 ?

Analyses :

(Art. 13) DROIT A UN RECOURS EFFECTIF, (Art. 35-1) EPUISEMENT DES VOIES DE RECOURS INTERNES, (Art. 6-1) DELAI RAISONNABLE


Parties :

Demandeurs : GILLOW
Défendeurs : ROYAUME-UNI

Texte :

/ APPLICATION/REQUE PE N° 9063/80 Y Joseph and Yvonne GILLOW v/the UNITED KINGDOM Joseph et Yvonne GILLOW c/ROYAUME-UN I DECISION of 9 December 1982 on the admissibility of the applicatio n DÉCISION du 9 décembre 1982 sur la recevabilité de la requêt e
Article 6, peragraph I of the Conventlon : Has this provision been breached on the grounds that a . criminal proceedings are brought for unlawful occupation of prentises while an appeal is pendirrg against the refusal of (icerrces ? b) the court who decides on the criminal proceedings has aMrost the sam e composition as the one who decides on the appeal against the refusal of licenses ? (Complaints declared admissible) . Article 8, paragraph I of the Conven tion :Can a house which has not been occupied by its owner during his absence for many years abroad for professional reasons be considered as his "home" when he wishes to reoccupy it for his retirernent .'
Ar ti cle 8 of the Convention end Article I of the Flrat Protocol : Does refusing a person permission to occupy a house of which he is the owner constitute a violation of these provisions ? Artlcle 26 of the Convention : When a law is concerned the inrplententation of which is based on a system of licenses with a possibility to challenge these decisions, the sir-manths tirne limit nmst be calculated not from the date of the enactment of the law but that of the final decision taken by virtue of the law on the particular case of the applicant .
Article 6, peragraphe 1, de la Convention : Ya-t-i! violation de cette disposition du fai t
a) que des poursuites pénales sont exercées pour abserrce d'autorisation officielle alors qu'un recours est par ailleurs pendant coatre le refus d'autorisation ?
- 76 -
b) que le tribunal qui statue sur l'action pénale a presque la méme cornposition que celui qui statue sur le recours contre le refus d'autorisatiort 9 (Griefs déclarés recevables ) Article 8, paragraphe I, de la Convention : Une maison que son propriétaire n'u pas habilée pendant de longues années de séjour professionnel à létranger petu-elle étre considérée comme sorr domicile au monrent où il désire y revenir pour s ÿ retirer ?
Adlcle 8 de la Convention et arlicle I du P rotocole additionnel : L'interdiction faite à une personne d'liabiter une maison dotit elle est propriétaire constitue1-elle utre violation de ces dispositions? (Grief déclaré recevable) . Arilcle 26 de la Convention : S'agissarn d'une loi dom la mise en oeuvre repose sur un régime d'autorisations avec voies de recours . le délai de six mois couri à partir non de la prontulgalion de la loi mais de la décision définitive, prise en application de la loi, sur le cas particulier du requérant .
(/'rancais : .voir p . 98)
THE FACTS
The facts as they have been subniitted by the applicant may be suntmarised as tollows :
Mr and Mrs Gillow are husband and wife and were born respectively in 1916 and 1918 in England : both are British citizens . In April 1956 Mr Cillow was appointed to the post of Director of the Slates of Guernsey Horlicultural Advisory Service . The applicants therefore sold their home in Lancashire and moved with their family and furniture to Guerusev . Since they initially occupied a house owned by the States the applicants were therefore not ali'ected by the terms of the Housing Control (Entergency Provisions) Guernsey Law 1948, which had come into force on 17 July 1948 and limited the right of residence in Guernsey without a licence to persons who had been ordinarily resident there at some point from 1 January 1938 to 30 June 1940 . In October 1957 this law was superseded by the Housing Control (Extension and Amendment) (Guernsey) Law 1957 (the "Housing Law 1957") which extended the final date of 30 June 1940 to 30 June 1957 so that any person ordinarily resident in Guernsey on or before that date had 'residence qualitications' and was permitted to live in Guernsey free from control . As a result the applicants, who had been ordinarily resident in Guernsey front April 1956, had residence qualifications . The Housing Law 1957 treed from control all houses with a 'rateable value' (a value for the purposes of local taxation on land and buildings) i n -77_
excess of £ 50 per annum . Such properties become what is still described as 'open ntarket houses' in which anyone ntay live without control or restriction . Houses with a lower rateable value became controlled and could be occupied only by persons with residence qualifications or who had been granted a residence licence . In 1957 the applicants bought a piece ol land on Guernsey, and with the requisite planning permission built a house "Whiteknights" . for themselves and their fantily which they occupied on I September 1958 . Its rateable value was £ 49 and it was thus then and has ever since been . 'controlled housing' . The applicants did not require a licence to occupy Whiteknights since thev had residernce qualitications by virtue ol the housing Law 1957 .
In August 1960 the applicants and their family unexpectedly left Guernsey to take up employment for the United Nations . Mr Gillow transferred ownership of Whiteknights to his wife in November 1963, but from 1960 until July 1978 the house was let to persons under licence from the States of Guernsey Housing Authority, or to persons possessing a specitied residential qualitication contained in the Housing Law 1957 aud as subsequently aniended . The applicants corresponded with the Housing Authoritv periodically atter their departure trom Guernsey from various addresses . in the United Kingdom and elsewhere irrter alia to enquire as to the operation of the Housing Laws if they sold Whiteknights . In a letter to the applicants dated 9 June 1967 the States of Guernsey Housing Authority stated inter alia that the dwelling could "only be occupied by persons licensed by the Authority bv virtue of their essentiality to the well-being of the community as a whole" . At that time Mr and Mrs Gillow both possessed the necessarv residential quatitications to occupy the house themselves by virtue of'the Housing Law 1957, although they continued to live abroad . On 2 February 1970 the Housing Control (Guernsey) Law 1969 (the "Housing Law 1969") came into force, which established a Housing Control Register relating to open market housing . In respect of the grant of licences to persons without residence qualitications in respect of controlled housing . the Law gave the Housing Authority a discretionary power based on enumerated l'actors to be considered in deciding applications . The law also provided an appeal from decisions ol' the Housing Authority to the Courts . In addition the Housing Law 1969 imposed a new condition in order to establish residence qualitications without the requirement of a licence that the person concerned should have been resident on 31 July 1 968 or be the spouse or child of someone so resideut . subject to a saving provision in favour of anyone in lawlul occupatiou of controlled housing on 29 Januarv 1969 . Bv virtue of this provisinu ot' the Housing Law 1969 the applicants ceased to posséss the necessarv residence qualitications to entitle thetn to occupy their house . although thev rentaiued unaware of this fact until September 1978 . The hous e
- 78 -
continued to be let in accordanec with a licence granted by Ihe States of Guerusey Housiug Authority under the provisions of Section 3 of the Housing Law 1969 or under the provisions of Section 3 of the Housing (Control of Occupatiou) (Guernsey) Law 1975 (the "Housing Law 1975") . The Housing Law 1969, which was originally enacted for three years . was extended until 31 December 1975 . when it was replaced by the Housing Law 1975 . While preserving the distinction between open market housing . open to all, and controlled housing for which residence qualitications or a licence are required, the Housing Law 1975 altered the basis ot' calculating residence qualitications which ntay now also be acquired by a certain period ot' lawful . licenced, residence in controlled housing . Persons who had been ordinarilv resident in Guernsev between I January 1938 and 30 June 1957 (such as the applicants) retained Iheir residence qualitications provided that thev had also been resident on 31 July 1968 . On 31 August 1978 Mrs Gillow wrote to the Housing Authority in connection with the applicants' proposed return to Guernsey . On 15 September 1978 the Housing Authority replied to Mrs Gillow, then in Hong Kong, to the effect that it appeared that the applicants were not entitled to occupy Whiteknights without a fresh licence granted by the Housing Authority, which would replace the existing tenant's licence under Section 3 Housing Law 1975 . Whiteknights remained empty after the tenant, whose departure had prompted the Authority to write to the applicants, had left on 31 July 1978 and in April 1979 the applicants returned to England . On 21 April 1979 Mrs Gillow wrote to the Authority, notifying them of their intention to return to Whiteknights to retire, and adding that she was currently seeking a teaching post in Guernsey . She also notified the Authority that Whiteknights required various repairs which the applicants themselves proposed to carry out . She therefore also requested a short term licence until September 1979 to permit this work to be done and while the longer term licence was considered . On 7 May 1979 Mrs Gillow again wrote to the Authority, repeating her request, which had not been answered, and notifying the Authority that she and her husband had returned to Guernsey . On 14 May 1979 the Authority replied to Mrs Gillow . notifying her that on 3 May 1979 the Authority had considered her application for a long term licence to occupy Whiteknights and had rejected it in the light o( the "present adverse housing situation" . The letter continued by reminding the applicants that at no time had the Authority granted them a licence to occupy Whiteknights and that, even assuntingthat Mrs Gillow took up employment entitling her to an essential licence, she and her husband would not be permitted to continue in occupation of Whiteknights for their retirenient, since she was too old to complete a minimum of 10 consecutive years of such employment, which would otherwise entitle her to this possibility under the Housing Law 1975 . No reference was made to the applicants' request for a temporary licence .
- 79 -
After a meeting with a representative of the Authority, Mrs Gillow applied for a licence on 9 July 1979, which application was refused on 19 July 1979 by the Authority . The Authority wrote to Mrs Gillow on 27 July 1979, notifying her of the refusal of her licence application, the reasons for which were : a . that Mrs Gillow had failed to provide evidence to show that she would be employed in a position which could be regarded as essential to the community . that;b Whiteknights was a house which was likely to be sought after by persons fulfilling the residence qualifications which the applicants lacked ; an d c . that in the "present adverse housing situation" the Authority was unable in principle to justify the granting of a licence to the applicants . The applicants were further informed of their right of appeal from this decision to the Royal Court under Section 19 of the Housing Law 1975 and notified that, unless they could show good reason why the Authority should not do so, the latter would refer their occupation of Whiteknights to the Guernsey Law Officers unless they vacated the property within 7 days . The applicants replied on 29 July 1979, repeating their request for a temporary licence, at least until the end of August 1979, in which to complete the necessary repairs to the property, and in order to put it on the market for sale . In particular they disputed that they had been "occupying" the property within the meaning of the Housing Law 1975, and maintained that whatever interpretation was given to the law, it could not reasonably prevent them from carrying out repairs which had become necessary owing to the fact that the property had been let for the previous nineteen years and from taking the necessary steps to sell the property, which precluded anyone else from occupying it in the meantime . The applicants also pointed out that, notwithstanding the Authority's previous position they had not been informed of the requirement of a licence for their occupation of Whiteknights before September 1978, and in particular they had not been notified of the introduction of the Housing Law 1969 on 2 February 1970, with its retrospective residence qualification provision . On 15 August 1979 the Authority replied to Mrs Gillow, notifying her that her letter had been considered at a meeting on 9 August 1979 and confirming that she had not been notified of the change in the law and accepting that she was not notified of the necessity for a licence before 15 September 1978 . The Authority agreed however to take no action in respect of the applicants' unlawful occupation of Whiteknights, provided they vacated the property by I September 1979 . On 23 August 1979 Mrs Gillow requested a further extension of the applicants' permission to stay in Whiteknights until the end of September 1979, since no sale had yet been achieved .
-80-
On 30 August 1979 the Authority refused this application, and notified Mrs Gillow on 3 Septentber 1979 . The applicants were given 7 days to vacate Whiteknights, or face prosecution . The applicants subsequently arranged to have a meeting with a representative of the Authority, at which they requested, inter aliu, perntission to continue to occupy Whiteknights for a further 6 month period to effect the sale and at which they raised the question of contpensation for their loss of residence rights . The Authority wrote to the applicants on 20 Septentber 1979, reporting that at a meeting on 13 September 1979 their case had been considered again, but their application had been ret'used . Accordingly they were informed that unless they vacated Whiteknights by 31 October 1979 . proceedings would be instituted against theni . Thereupon the applicants consulted an advocate in early October, who requested the Authority to take no action against the applicants until he had had a further opportunity to advise them as to their position . On 9 November 1979 the advocate submitted a further application on behalf of the applicants to occupy Whiteknights until 30 April 1980, which application was refused by the Authority on 12 November 1979 . who then referred Ihe applicants' continued occupation of Whiteknights to the prosecuting authorities . On 13 October 1979 the applicants had instructed their advocate, as they were not permitted to appeal in person, to appeal to the Royal Court against all the Authority's decisions . Such appeals had to be lodged before 31 October 1979 and could only be lodged by an advocate of the Royal Court . The applicants' advocate failed to lodge the appeal in time, but notified the prosecuting authorities ot'this fact and on 20 Noventber 1 979 requested them not to take proceedings against the applicants since an, appeal would be lodged in due course . Nevertheless on 17 December 1979 the applicants were visited by the police at Whiteknights and, notwithstanding the applicants' Ietter to the chiet' ot' police of 19 December 1979 explaining that an appeal was being lodged, proceedings were issued against the applicants who were suntmoned to appear in court on I February 1980 . Mrs Gillow's appeal against the decision of the Authority refusing the licences which had been applied for was finally lodged on I February 1980 and accepted although out of time, and on her appearance for the summons with her husband on I February 1980 they therefore sought an adjournment on the grounds that their appeal to the Royal Court went to the heart of the question whether their occupation of Whiteknights was unlawful . The adjournntent was ret'used . The applicants' cases could not however be heard together and the charges against Mr Gillow were therefore pursued first . He was convicted of occupying Whiteknights without a licence and was fined . He appealed to the Royal Court . Mrs Gillow's prosecution was adjourned, eventually sine die.
- 81 -
Mrs Gillow's appeal challenged the Authority's refusals of a licence to the applicants to occupy Whiteknights, communicated to them by the Authority on 14 May 1979 and 27 July 1979, and the Authority's refusal to permit the applicants to continue to occupy Whiteknights until 30 April 1980, which was communicated to the applicants' advocate on 16 November 1979 and sought the grant of either an unrestricted licence, or alternatively permission to occupy Whiteknights until 30 April 1980 . The appeal alleged that the decisions in question were an unreasonable exercise of the Authority's power . This appeal was dismissed by the Royal Court on 8 July 1980 unanimously in respect of the decisions of 14 May and 27 July 1979 and by a majority (8 to 3) in respect of that of 16 November 1979 . By virtue of Section 19 (4) of the Housing Law 1975, "the decision of the Royal Court . . . (was) tinal and conclusive" . The applicants finally completed the sale of their property on 15 April 1980, at a price of £ 33 000, which they maintain was an undervalue . Mr Gillow's appeal from his conviction on I February 1980 was heard by the Royal Court on 26 August 1980 . In his appeal Mr Gillow challenged the accuracy of the transcript of the original proceedings against him, having asked repeatedly to be able to hear the original tape . This request was refused but the President of the Court listened to the tape during a recess and pronounced the transcript accurate . Mr Gillow also contended that the Court was inherently biased in that its composition was substantially similar to that which rejected his wife's appeal from the refusal of her licence applications on 8 July 1980 (only one Jurat out of eleven being different) . He also maintained that the composition of the Court itself was archaic . His appeal was rejected on 26 August 1980 . In the meantime the applicants had lodged a complaint to the Chambre de Discipline on 26 January 1980 against their advocate for his delay in filing the appeals against the Authority's decisions, which complaint was found to be substantiated by the Chambre de Discipline on 9 September 1980 .
COMPLAINT S The applicants first complain that they have lost their rights of residence in Guernsey without notification or compensation by virtue of the retrospective element of the 1969 Housing Law . They further complain that they were refused the right to return an d lawfully occupy their home, or to lawfully carry out repairs on it by the decisions of the States of Guernsey Housing Authority .
- 82 -
They further complain that they were harassed and prosecuted with crintinal sanctions, notwithstanding that they were appealing from the decisions of the above Authority and they contend that these prosecutions were intended to prevent them from pursuing their appeal . Furthermore they submit that this prosecution took no account of the fact that while they repaired their house with a view to its sale, and during their attempts to sell it, it was impractical for it to be occupied by anyone else . They submit that the Procureur told them that they should pursue their appeals from a hotel or off the island and that they could sell their house without being on the island at all . They complain that the Court proceedings in which they were involved were unfair and biased . They linally complain that they were compelled to sell their house at an undervalue as a result of the decisions of the above Authority .
BEFORE THE COMMISSIO N The application was introduced on 25 January 1980 and registered on 5 August 1980 . On 6 October 1981 the Commission decided to bring the application to the notice of the respondent Government and to request them to submit written observations on its admissibility and merits pursuant to Rule 42 (2) (b) of the Commission's Rules of Procedure .
The Government's observations are dated 8 March 1982 and those of the applicant in reply 15 April and 8 May 1982 . On 6 July 1982 the Commission decided to invite the parties to submit observations orally on the admissibility and merits of the application at a hearing pursuant to Rule 42 (3) (b) of its Rules of Procedure . The hearing was held on 9 December 1982 at which the parties were .represented as follows : For the Government : Mr M .R . Eaton, Agen t Mrs A . Glover . Deputy Agen t Mr de V .G . Carey, Attorney General for Guernsey, Counsel Mr N . Bratza, Counse l Mr R .J . Falla, President, States of Guernsey Housing Authority, Adviser Mr . L . Barbé, Administrator, States of Guernsey Housing Authority, Advise r Mr R .W . Tomlinson, Home Officer, Advise r For the applicants : The applicants in person
- 83 -
SUBMISSIONS OF THE PARTIES SUBMISSIONS OF THE GOVERNMEN T 1.
Housing position In Guemsey
The Government submit that under the constitutional convention which exists between the United Kingdom and Guernsey the United Kingdom Parliament does not legislate in the ordinary course without the concurence of the island Government in respect of matters that are entirely domestic to the islands . Hence the legislation relating to the control of housing and its occupation in Guernsey has been passed from time to time by the States of Guernsey . The necessity of such legislation arose from the lack of housing on the island for former Guernsey residents returning there after the Second World War . The accommodation problems which arose led to the passing of the Housing Control (Emergency Provisions) Guernsey Law 1948, granting residence qualification to persons ordinarily resident in Guernsey between 1 January 1939 and 30 June 1940 . The object of this and subsequent restrictions on the right of residence in Guernsey was to ntake existing accommodation available for Guernsey families and for people who had come to the island to fill posts considered essential to the well being of the community . The introduction of the "open market" housing sector resulted from the Housing Law 1957, which freed from control all houses with a rateable value exceeding £ 50 per annum . In 1976 such housing accounted for 9% of the total, and it was considered that to free these houses from control would not seriously ePfect the housing shortage . Further legislation was necessary in 1962, since controlled housing was being enlarged to increase its rateable value and thus bring it into the "open market" sector . Subsequently concern arose that accommodation for people with the qualifications needed to occupy controlled dwellings without a licence was inadequate, which led to the introduction of further legislation in 1965, which imposed control on furnished accommodation, which had been exempted by the Housing Law 1948 . In 1966 further legislation extended control to properties with a rateable value under £ 100 per annum, with saving provisions for persons already in occupation of properties which came under control for the first time . Controversy arose over Ihis change and further legislation was past in 1976 exempting properties with a rateable value in excess of £ 85 per annum from control . In order to prevent the reduction in controlled accomntodation by the encorporation of existing controlled accommodation into other propertie s
- 84 -
which combined had a sutïicient rateable value to be "open market", further legislation was introduced in 1967 . In the 1960s there was a continued growth in the nuniber of persons wishing to conte to Guernsey as new entrants, or having skills which the island required, or being people who had lived in Guernsey at periods giving them residence qualifications, who had since left . The qualifying dates for residence qualiticalions ot 30 Jute 1940 and 30 June 1957, which had been reasonable and reatistic tests when adopted, had become arbritrary and artificial in their efl'ects . The law was therel'ore antended by the Housing Law 1969 which, inter alia . added the requirement ot' lawful residence on the island on 31 July 1968 to the preexisting elements of residence qualifications . In 1973 the States of Guernsey resolved that it would be desirable to ntake it possible for persons of Guernsey origin to return to the island and for persons who had served the island in an essential capacity for a number of years to beconte free from housing controls . Nevertheless the island's housing problem was increasingly critical, since land for building was diminishing in the light of requiremenls of agriculture, horticulture and tourism . The law was therefore further amended by the Housing Law 1975, which removed from control certain persons who had been in continuous residence in Guernsey for ten consecutive years . ' In adniinistering the law the Housing Authority must respect a Resolution on the States ol' Guernsey of September 1974 that housing licences should be granted in such a way as to ensure the growth of the population does not exceed 7% over the period up to and including 1984 . In the Government's subniission the housing shortage is still a major cause for concern, the latest ligures showing 420 families waiting to rent houses from the States, and 700 t'amilies on the waiting list for loans for purchase or construction .
The population of Guernsey in April 1981 was 53 303 and its area is approxintately 24 square miles . Its density of population is therefore 2 179 per square mile, contpared with 611 per square mile in England and Wales . Furthermore, population pressures are exacerbating the unemployment problents experienced on the island . The complaints under Artlcle 8 The Governntent subniit first that the applicants' residence in Guernsey and their occupation of Whiteknights lacks the necessary element of duration aud stability which is essential in the concept of "home" under Article 8 of the Convention . They point out that the applicants had no previous association with Guernsey, and thereaRer left it for a very considerable period, both of which t'acts support the contention that Whiteknights was not the applicants' "home" .
- 85 -
In the Government's view such a contention does not rely upon the existence of any other "home" within the meaning of Article 8 either in any particular place or at all at any time subsequent to the applicants' departure from guernsey, but the Government contend that it is incumbent upon the applicants to demonstrate that they had no such home . In this respect the Government refer to the correspondence conducted with the applicants from time to time by the Housing Authorities, including correspondence with an address in the United Kingdom .
Moreover Article 8 protects a"homé' considered as an existing entity, but does not confer a right to establish a home in any particular place, or to reside in any particular place . A"homé' must refer to an actual situation of genuine residence, implying a real connection with a particular dwelling . The Government refers in this respect to application No . 7456/76 (Wiggins v . the United Kingdom) but points out that Mr Wiggins ahd been living in his house for a total of five years . In the alternative the Government contend that, if Whiteknights was the applicants' home there was no interference with the applicant's right to respect for it, since at no time after their return to Guernsey was their occupation of the house anything but precarious . Furthermore they contend that any interference suffered by the applicants as a result of the Housing Law 1969 and the Housing Law 1975 must have been "in accordance with the law" and was in the Government's submission, "necessary in a democratic society in the interests of . . . the economic well-being of the country . . . or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others", and was therefore justified under Article 8, paragraph 2 . ln this connection the Government submit that the Housing Laws are for a legitimate purpose and employ measures proportionate to their aim and that no grounds have been adduced for finding that the laws have been applied to the applicants in such a way as to exceed what is permitted under Article 8, paragraph 2 . In respect of the criminal sanctions imposed upon Mr Gillow as a result of the proceedings on I February 1980, the Government maintains that it was clear to the applicants when they retumed to Guernsey in April or May 1979 that they would be in breach of the Housing Law 1975 if they occupied Whiteknights without a licence . The sanctions which were imposed were proper and reasonable measures to enforce the Housing Law 1975 . If that law is itself legitimate, so also must be measures of enforcement . The Government point out that the applicants cannot have improved their position by taking up residence in contravention of the Housing Law 1975, nor should their position under the Convention be strengthened by the Housing Authorities' restraint in not implementing criminal sanctions sooner .
-86-
Nor did the fact that an appeal for a licence was outstanding conflict with the t'act that at the time of the prosecution, the re was a clear existing breach of the Housing Law 1975 . The complelnta In respect of Artlcle I First Protoco l The Government submit that the applicants have at no stage been deprived of any possession and that therefore only the first sentence of this article would be applicable . Whilst reserving their position as to whether the present application in fact raises an issue under the first sentence of this article, the Government submits that any interference with the right thereby protected is permissible by virtue ot'the second paragraph of the article . The Government refer in support of this view to the Commission's decision in Application No . 7456/76, which establishes that this paragraph sets up the Contracting States as the sole judges of "the necessity" of such an interference . In the light of the housing and demographic position in Guernsey the Governntent contend that the laws in question are deemed "necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest" . 4 . Complainla In rcepect of Arlicle 6, paragraph I of the Conventlo n The Government do not regard the present application as raising an issue under this article . In their view the criminal proceedings taken against the applicant in no way inhibited the pursuit of an appeal against the refusal of a licence . On the other hand that appeal was not in itself relevant to the criminal proceedings against the applicants, where the issue was whether the applicants' occupation of Whiteknights without a licence was in breach of the Housing Law 1975 . S . Complalnts In relatlon to the operellon of the Housing Law 1969 . In as far as the applicants complain of the operation of this law in itself, the Government contend that their application is inadmissible for failure to comply with the six months' rule contained in Article 26 of the Convention, since the law came into operation on 2 February 1970 and the applicants' application was introduced on 25 January 1980 . 6 . Conclualon s The respondent Government therefore submit that the application is either inadmissible for non compliance with the six months' rule contained in Article 26 of the Convention, or alternatively manifestly ill-founded in as far as its relates to Article 6, paragraph I and Article I First Protocol as well as Article 8 . either in that it discloses no issue under Article 8, paragraph 1, or alternatively because any interference which arises with the applicants' rights as guaranteed by Article 8, paragraph I was justified under Article 8, paragraph 2 of the Convention .
-87_
SUBMISSIONS OF THE APPLICANT S I . As to the housing position in Guernsey The applicants first submit that the accommodation difficulties which arose in Guernsey atter the Second World War were essentially no different Gom those which were experienced throughout the United Kingdom . Neverthetess only Guernsey, Jersey . and the isle of Man resorted to the imposition of residence restrictions as a means of controlling demand for housing . The remainder ol' the British Isles did not resort to similar licensing requirements, which the applicants describe as "surrogate immigration controls" .
According to the statistics submitted to the Commission by the respondent Governnrent in the Wiggins case, the population of Guernsey grew from 43, 500 to 54, 256 between 1951 and 1976 . The applicants compare these tigures with the present population of Guernsey, submitted by the respondent Government to be 53 303 (in April 1981), a net decline since 1976 . Since the population of Guernsey has therefore fallen during the past frve years, poputation pressure cannot, in itself, be a justification for the operation of the Housing Laws . The applicants further contend that any reliance upon demographic evidence would require (urther analysis before it could be taken to justify the Housing Laws . The rise in population between 1951 and 1976 was blamed on an intlux of non-Guernsey Britons to the islands, but no evidence has been provided that this is the true composition of any such influx . Nor has any evidence been given of whether any. and if so how many . Guernsey Britons have left the island over a recent period, or for the reasons for any such departures . In this respect the applicants refer to the "tax haven" nature of Guenuey . and the encouragement which the Guernsey authorities have given, not least by the creation of the "open market" housing sector by the Housing Law 1957, to "non-Guernsey Britons" to settle in ."open market" accomnrodation in Guernsey . Thus the applicants maintain that the Housing Laws themselves have, to some extent, encouraged the very increase in population bv which the respondent Government seeks to justify their existence . The applicants contend that the Housing Laws have therefore permitted the wealthy to purchase uncontrolled housing on the "open market" in Guernsey, without restriction, whilst discriminating against less wealthy nonGuernsey Britons . including those, like the applicants, who had made their home in Guernsev . The applicarrts refer in this connection to the statistics submitted by the respondent Gnvernment in the present case, and in the Wiggins case, relating to those awaiting rented accommodation from the States of Guernsey . In 1976 the uunrber on the relevant waiting list was 290 . whereas it is now 420, despit e
-88-
a decrease in the total of population . The applicants therefore submit that changes in the absolute population are not necessarily the dominant factor in housing problems in Guernsey . With reference to the 700 families stille awaiting loans for purchase or construction, the applicants point out that in 1980 the States of Guernsey stated that I 500 building plots were available in the island . In addition, in 1976 there were a further 1 040 vacant dwellings on the island, but the Government has not provided any ntore up to date stal ist ics .
-fo the extent that unemployment is referred to as a justification for cwntrol . Ihe applicants question whether those who apply for licences come in search of eniployment in Guernsey or, e .g . for retirement . ' As far as the Housing Laws in general are concerned, the applicants point out that they are highly complex, as is illustrated by the frequency with which they have been amended . Their characteristics however ntay be suntntarised in the applicants' view as providing uncontrolled accontntodation t'or Ihe wealthy on the "open market", and exhibiting positive discrimination in favour of Guernsey-born Britons against other Britons on the controlled niarket . They point out in addition that "occupation" of a controlled property withoul either residence qualifications or a licence is a criminal offence, notwithstanding Ihat "occupation" is not itself defined by the Housing Laws . Furthermore, the Housing Law 1969 abolished the residence rights of persons such as the applicants retrospectively without compensation . They point out however that a recent antendment to the Housing Laws allows a serviceman's absence froni Guernsey to be regarded as qualifying occupation lo establish residence qualifications, although no siniilar concession is made for those involved in development work overseas like themselves .
2 . Complalnts under Article 8 of the Conventio n The applicants submit tirst that they ntoved to Guernsey in April 1956, having sold their home in Lancashire, and brought their turniture to establish their honte in Guernsey perntanently following Mr Gillows' appointment to the perntanent post ol' Director of the Horticullural Advisory Service . They were accomntodated briefly by the States whilst Whiteknights was being built, and thereafter established Whiteknights as their home . Thus they did not take from the existing Guernsey housing stock, but added to it . When in 1960 they left the island they left their furniture at Whiteknights, to which they always intended to return after their service overseas . During the 18 vear period that followd they provided accommodation for persons approved by the Housing Authority at modesl rents, without, for exantple . seeking to benefit from the holiday island nature of Guernsey b y
_89_
having short lets of their property . During this period they therefore provided additional accommodation to the Guernsey housing stock . The applicants' inquiries as to the regulations governing the sale of Whiteknights were merely for information and were in no way pursued . They did not theretore affect their abiding intention to return to Whiteknights as their home . During their period ot' employntent overseas with aid agencies, they had various "homes" in Malta, Hong Kong, Jordan, Yugoslavia, Bangladesh, Lesotho and Lybia . however they regarded non of these as "home" in the sense that Whiteknights remained home for them .
As far as the Government distinguish the length of their occupation of Whiteknights from the 5 year period at issue in the Wiggins case, they point out first that two and a half years of the period in the Wiggins case was of unlawtûl occupation . and that in any event the test of the establishment of a "home" for the purposes of Article 8 of the Convention depends upon the demonstrable intention of the applicant rather than any particular period of occupation . They therefore submit that Whiteknights was their home for the purposes of Article 8 of the Convention . They turther submit that the operation of the Housing Laws to them was disproportionate and unjustifiable under Article 8, paragraph 2 of the Con . vention . In this respect they refer particularly to the "cat and mouse" attitude ol' the Housing Authority during their negotiations during 1979 . They refer to the repeated letters of condonation of their "occupation" of Whiteknights during these negotiations, which created a continuous sense of uncertainty . contrasting with the Authority's recommendations on two occasions that the applicants apply for a short term licence, both of which recommendations were followed, although the licences in question were refused . The applicants submit that it was unreasonable and unjustifiable in the light of the accommodation which they had provided in Guernsey for 18 years for the authority to refuse to permit them to stay in Whiteknights on anything but a "hand to mouth" basis while negotiations for a longer licence continued, while the applicants carried out necessary repairs arising from the fact that the house had been tenanted for a considerable period, and subsequently while the applicants prepared the property for sale and put it on the market . In particular during this latter period, it was inconceivable that the applicants should allow anvone else to occupy the property but they were nevertheless told in their appeal to the Royal Court on 8 July 1980 that, during the period in question, they should stay in a hotel or leave the island . In addition they maintain that the utilisation of criminal sanctions against them during the period ot' their appeal from the decisions of the Housing Authority was a further unjustifiable interference .
-90-
CompllinLV in respect of Article I Flnt Protoco l The applicants submit that they have suffered interference both with their peaceful enjoyntent of their possessions and have further been deprived ot'their possessions contrary to the provisions of this article . In respect of the intert'erence with the peaceful enjoyment of their home . Whiteknights, they submit that the United Kingdom Government must have accepted certain obligations in respect of the first sentence of this article when it was ratitied, notwithstanding the apperently broad terms of its second paragraph . In their subntission the Government could not have done less than contirnt that it would justi(y no interference which had not been justified by the United Kingdom Parliament and which denied rights which were established t'or British citizens as a whole . They point out that rights of residence, as questions of nationality, are questions ot national importance and not a local issue, which should therefore have been considered by the United Kingdom Parliament . They submit that these conditions have not been t'ultitled . In addition they maintain the criticisnts which they have made of the respondent Governntent's attempted justifications under Article 8, paragraph 2 of the Convention relating to the housing position in Guernsey as a whole, which they submit are insuHicient to justify interference with their rights as guaranteed by the tirst sentence of Article I First Protocol .
They further submit that the Housing Laws in Guernsey have rendered the right of residence on the island a possession . They illustrate this by reference to the "open market" housing sector, where the right to live on the island is a marketable commodity for which the rich can pay . By contrast they lost their rights of residence under the Housing Law 1969, without compeusatiou and by a retrospective condition with which they could not comply . In as far as the respondent Government rely on Article 26 in relation to such an argument, the applicants maintain that the "victim" requirements of Article 25 and the requirement of the exhaustion of domestic remedies in Article 26 ot' the Convention necessitated that they show that the law or an aspect of its operation had caused them injury . This was established by the decisions ot' the Royal Court in July and August 1980, when local remedies were exhausted, and the applicants therefore maintained that by lodging their application in January 1980, they have complied with the requirements of . Article 26 of the Convention . 4 . Complalnts under Artlcle 6 of the Conventlon The applicants submit that their rights guaranteed by this article were violated both in the civil proceedings of appeal from the decisions of the Housing Authority, and in the criminal proceedings taken against them for
- 91 -
occupation of Whiteknights . In respect of the civil proceedings . they contend that thev were harassed in order to prevent them from pursuing their appeal to the Roval Court by the requirentent that they leave Whiteknights and stay either in a hotel, or leave the island entirely . In this respect they refer to the comntents ot'the Procureur, reported in the press report of their civil appeal on 8 July 1980 . In addition they contend that the criminal prosecution for occupation of Whiteknights which was instituted against them notwithstanding the fact that the prosecuting authorities were aware that an appeal was being lodged against the decisions ot'the Housing Authority, constituted further harassment . In addition the prosecution of Mr Gillow on I February 1980 before the Magislrates' Court inevitablv prejudiced their civil appeal which was heard two months later .
In relation to the criminal proceedings taken against Mr Gillow, the applicants maintain that the reference in the charge to occupation of Whiteknights "between 31 October 1979 and 17 December 1979" did not include the day in respect of which evidence of alleged occupation was taken, namely 17 December itself . In addition the applicants maintain that the structure of the Magistrates' Court of Royal Court in Guernsey is archaic and that the proceedings are dominated by the prosecuting authorities . They point out that since Mr Gillows' interpretation of the words "between 31 October 1979 and 17 December 1979" was not accepted by the Court, the Court accepted that the Law Otlicers could charge the applicants with occupation of Whiteknights without a Iicence in respect of a period, viz 31 October 1979 . when the Housing Authority had authorised the applicants to be present in Whiteknights by their letter o( 20 Septentber 1979 . It is furlher submitted that the concept of' "occupation" is nowhere detined in the Housing Laws and is insulliciently precise to form the basis of a crintiual charge . Finally, in respect of Mr Gillow's appeal to the Royal Court from his conviction on I February 1980 . which was heard on 26 August 1980 . the applicants contend that the Royal Court was unable to give Mr Gillow a fair hearing, since its composition was identical, save for the ommission of one Jurat, to that which had considered the applicants' appeal from the decisions of the Housing Authority on 8 July 1980 .
THE LA W I . The applicants complain that they have been prevented from living in or using their house, Whiteknights, and that they were ultimately compelled t o
-9z-
sell it and were prosecuted for occupying it, and that thereby they have been denied the peaceful enjoyntent of their possessions contrary to Article I First Protocol . They subntit that they have been deprived of their rights of residence in Guernsey, which the Housing Laws render a possession in itself, and prevented from using Whiteknights as their home, or front repairing it or preparing it for sale, by virtue of the refusal of their applications for discretionary licences of various durations by the Housing Authority . They maintain that these restrictions are not justifiable under the terms of the second paragraph of Article I First Protocol and that it cannot be established that the refusal of their use of' their own house is in the general interest, bearing in ntind that they themselves built it, thus contributing to the housing stock and later providing rented accommodation to persons approved by the Housing Authority and that the House was empty following the voluntary departure of its last tenant . The respondent Governntent contend that in as far as the applicants coniplain of their loss of residence qualifications in Guernsey their application is out of time . since it was lodged more than six months after the entry into f'orce of the Housing Act 1969 . which resulted in the applicants ceasing to have residence qualifications . They further contend that the applicants have not been deprived of their possessions but that the Housing Laws constitute laws to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest within the nteaning of the second paragraph of Article I First Protocol which the respondent Government deems necessary .
Article I First Protocol provides : "Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions . No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of international law . The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right of a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties . " The Commission recalls that in accordance with Article 26 of the Convention it may only examine complaints (inter a/ia) "within a period of six months from the date on which the final decision was taken" . The respondent Governntent has argued that this provision precludes the Commission from exantining the applicants' complaint that they were deprived of an aspect of their possessions by the enactment of the Housing Law 1969 .
-93-
However the Commission's constant case law interpreting Article 25 of the Convention has established that an application may only be examined by the Commission where the applicant can claim to be a victim of a violation of the Convention and cannot be considered in abstracto . The Commission must therefore decide when the applicants became able to claim to be victims of the violation which they allege within the meaning of Article 25 of the Convention . The present complaints concern restrictions on applicants' ri ght to visit, repair and live in Whiteknights and to prepare it for sale, which involved the application of the Guernsey Housing Laws to their pa rt icular circumstances and to their property, Whiteknights . Th e applicants challenged these restrictions, ultimately before the Royal Court on 8 July 1980, challenging the decisions taken by the Housing Authority in applying the Housing Laws . The Commission finds that this was the final decision on their complaints concern ing the operation of the Housing Laws to their property as a whole and that since their application to the Commission was in fact introduced on 25 January 1980, the applicants have complied with the requirements of Article 26 of the Convention in respect of these complaints .
The Commission must therefore examine the applicants' va rious complaints under Article 1 First Protocol . In the present case the applicants have alleged that the Housing Laws are 'surrogate immigration laws' which are fu rt hermore disc ri minato ry . Th ey point out that no account was apparently taken of the fact of the ownership of Whiteknights either in the refusal of licences to occupy or use it or in the decision to prosecute them for occupation without a licence, and the question arises whether in these circumstances the rest ri ctions imposed on the applicants were propo rt ionate and in conformi ty with the terms of Article 1 First Protocol or in substance deorived them of their possession or limited their use excessively . Th e respondent Government have contended that the rest rictions on the applicants' use of Whiteknights did not amount to a dep ri vation of their possessions, as is illustrated by the fact that they were able to sell the house, and that the restrictions were 'controls on the use of property' which were in conformity with Article I First Protocol . The Commission considers that these are complex questions conceming the interpretation of the Convention, which may also raise issues under Articles 14 and 1 8 of the Convention taken in conjunction with Article I First Protocol, the determination of which should depend upon an examination of the merits of the case . It follows that this pa rt of the application cannot be regarded as manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 27, paragraph 2 of the
- 94 -
Convention and must be declared admissible, no other ground for declaring it inadmissible having been established . 2 . The applicants also complain that the refusal of their application for licences to occupy Whiteknights was a lack of respect for their home in breach of Article 8 of the Convention . They contend that they established their home in Whiteknights while they lived in Guernsey and that it remained their home within the meaning of Article 8 of the Convention during their absence overseas while they were involved in development work, by virtue of their enduring intention to return to it, ultimately to retire, which was evidenced by Iheir leaving their furniture in the house during their absence, and by their return there in 1979 . The respondent Government contend that the applicants' links with Whiteknights were insufficiently close and permanent for it to have remained their home within the meaning of Article 8 of the Convention after the applicants' departure from Guernsey in 1960 and they also refer to the applicants' two enquiries as to the possiblity of selling Whiteknights as evidence that they did not regard it as their home . They further submit that if an interference with the applicants' right to respect for their home arose, it was justifiable under Article 8, paragraph 2 of the Convention as being in accordance with the law and necessary in a democratic society in the interests of the economic well-being of the country and for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others . Article 8 of the Convention provides : "1 . Everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, his home and his correspondence . 2 . There shall be no interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except such as it in accordance with the law and is necessary in a democratic society in the interests of national security, public safety or the economic well-being of the country, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others" . The Commission recalls first that it has had to consider the operation of similar licencing provisions in previous applications concerning Guernsey, including Application No . 7456/76, Wiggins v . the United Kingdom (DR 13, p . 40), in which it found an interference with the applicant's right to respect of his home which fell to be justified under Article 8, paragraph 2 of the Convention . In the present case the Commission must consider whether Whiteknights continued to be the applicants' home within the meaning of Article 8 of th e
-95-
Convention, despite their physical absence from it and if so, whether the refusal of a licence to occupy it was an interference with their right to respect for their home which was justified under Article 8, paragraph 2 of the Convention . It is clear that Whiteknights was the applicants' home until their departure from Guernsey in 1960 . The respondent Government contend that thereafter the applicants lost sufficient nexus with the house for it to remain their home while it was let to various tenants and during a prolonged period when they never returned to it . However the Commission also notes that the applicants maintained certain connections with the house during an absence which was rendered inevitable by the nature of their work overseas and that their intention to return to Whiteknights was ultimately realised in 1979 . In these circumstances the Commission considers that it may be that Whiteknights remained the applicants' home within the meaning of Article 8, paragraph I of the Convention, in which case the further question arises as to whether the refusal of licences to occupy it was an interference with the applicants' right to respect for their home which was justified on the particular facts of the case . However the Commission considers that these are complex questions concerning the interpretation of the Convention, the determination of which should depend on an examination of the merits of the case . It follows that this part of the application cannot be regarded as ntanit'estly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 27, paragraph 2 of the Convention and must therefore be declared admissible, no other ground of inadmissibility having been established . 3 . The applicants also complain that criminal proceedings were issued against thent for their unlawful occupation of Whiteknights, although they had taken all steps available to them to appeal against the refusal of licences l'or temporary or long term occupation, which forced them to pursue their civil appeal l'rom a hotel or off the island . They contend that the proceedings against Mr Gillow were unfair, being based upon a misdrawn charge and an undetined oflénce of' 'occupation' . They further submit that his criminal conviction prejudged their civil appeal against the refusal of licences and that his subsequent appeal against the conviction was vitiated by being examined by a Court with substantially the same composition as had heard the civil appeal the previous monlh, and without an adequate opportunity for the applicants to examine the record of the proceedings at first instance . The respondent Government contend on the other hand that the criminal proceedings were instigated against the applicants as a proper measure of enforcement of the Housing Laws after considerable allowances had been ntade for the applicants who had been given repeated 'stays of execution' o f
- 96 -
the threat to implement the criminal sanctions, which finally became inevitable . The Commission must consider these complaints in the context of Article 6, paragraph I of the Convention which provides (inter alia) : "In the determination of his civil rights and obligations or of any criminal charge against him, everyone is entitled to a fair and public hearing within a reasonable time by an independent and impartial tribunal established by law" . However the applicants' cnmplaints concerning their civil appeal and the criniinal proceedings are intimately connected with their complaints under Article 8 of the Convention and Article I Frist Protocol . The proceedings about which they complain were the culmination of the enforcement procedure for implementing the provision of the Housing Law to the applicants' particular circumstances . Furthermore these are the very measures about which the applicants' complaints under other provisions of the Convention have already been declared admissible . The Commission considers that the question of the application of, and the scope of the guarantees provided by Article 6 under these circumstances raises difficult questions of the interpretation of the Convention, which should be resolved by an examination of the merits of the case . It follows that this part of the application cannot be regarded as manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Article 27, paragraph 2 of the Convention and must be declared admissible, no other ground for declaring it inadmissible having been established . For these reasons the Commissio n DECLARES THE APPLICATION ADMISSIBLE, without prejudging the merits .
-97_
(TRADUCTION) EN FAIT Les faits de la cause, tels qu'ils ont-été exposés par les requérants . peuvent se résumer comme suit : Ixs époux Gillow sont nés en Angleterre respectivement en 1916 et 1918 . 11s sont tous deux citoyens britanniques . En avril 1956 . M . Gillow ayant été nommé directeur du Service consultatif horticole de l'Assemblée législative de Guernesey, les requérants ont vendu leur maison du Lancashire et se sont installés à Guernesey avec leur famille et leurs meubles . Occupant au début une maison appartenant à l'Assemblée législative . les requérants n'étaient pas visés par les termes de la loi locale de 1948 sur le logement (Dispositions d'urgence) . qui était entrée en vigueur le 17 juillet 1948 et limitait le droit de résider à Guernesey sans autorisation aux personnes qui y avaient eu leur résidence habituelle à un moment quelconque entre le P, janvier 1938 et le 30 juin 1940 . En octobre 1957, cette loi a été remplacée par la loi locale (Extension et réforme) de 1957 sur le logement (la •loi de 1957 sur le logenient=) qui a repoussé du 30 juin . 1940 au 30 juin 1957 la dernière date, afin que toute personne ayant eu sa résidence habituelle à Guernesey à cette date ou antérieurement remplisse les .conditions de rési . dence= et soit autorisée à vivre à Guernesey en toute liberté . Par conséquent, les requérants, qui avaient leur résidence habituelle à Guernesey depuis avril 1956 . remplissaient les conditions de résidence . La loi de 1957 sur le logement a soustrait à la réglementation toutes les habitations dont la • valeur locative - (valeur aux fins de l'imposition locale des terrains et immeubles) dépassait 50 livres par an . Ces propriétés sont devenues ce qu'on appelle encore des • habitations du marché libre •, dans lesquelles n'iniporte qui peut vivre sans contrôle ni restriction . Les habitations dont la valeur locative était inférieure ont été réglementées . ne pouvant être occupées que par des personnes satisfaisant aux conditions de résidence ou avant obtenu une autorisation de résidence . En 1957, les requérants ont acheté un terrain à Guernesey et, après avoir obtenu le permis de construire nécessaire, ont bâti, pour eux-même et leur fantille, une ntaison appelée • Whiteknights ~ dans laquelle ils ont emnténagé le 1^ septenibre 1958 . Celle-ci ayant une valeur locative de 49 livres, elle était alors, et elle est toujours, un «logement réglementé» . Les requérants n'avaient pas besoin d'autorisation pour habiter à Whiteknights puisqu'ils remplissaient les conditions de résidence fixées par la loi de 1957 sur le logentent .
- 98 -
En août 1960, les requérants et leur famille ont brusquement quitté Guernesey afin de travailler pour les Nations Unies . M . Gillow a cédé la propriété de Whiteknights à sa femme en novembre 1963 ; mais, de 1960 à juillet 1978 . la maison a été louée à des personnes niunies d'une autorisation des services du logement de l'Assemblée législative de Guernesey ou répondant à une certaine condition de résidence prévue par la loi de 1957 sur le logement et ses amendements . Après leur départ, les requérants ont correspondu régulièrement, de différents endroits du RoyaumeUni et de l'étranger, avec les services du logement, notantment pour s'informer des mécanismes des lois sur le logement dans le cas où ils vendraient Whiteknights . Dans une lettre aux requérants en date du 9 juin 1967 . les services du logement de l'Assemblée législative de Guernesey ont déclaré notamment que l'habitation ne pouvait .étre occupée que par des personnes réunissant les conditions de résidence nécessaires ou par des personnes autorisées par les services du logement en raison des services essentiels qu'elles peuvent rendre à l'ensemble de la communauté pour assurer son bien-@tre . . A l'époque . M . et Mme Gillow réunissaient tous deux les conditions de résidence nécessaires pour occuper eux-même la maison en vertu de la loi de 1957 sur le logement, bien qu'ils aient continué de vivre à l'étranger . Le 2 février 1970 . la loi locale de 1969 sur le logentent (la .loi de 1969 sur le logement .) est entrée en vigueur ; elle institutait un registre de contrôle du logement pour les habitations du marché libre . S'agissant de l'octroi d'autorisations aux personnes ne réunissant pas les conditions de résidence requises pour les logements réglementés, la loi donnait aux services du logement un pouvoir discrétionnaire fondé sur une liste d'éléments à prendre en considération pour se prononcer stir les demandes . La loi prévoyait aussi la possibilité de faire appel devant les tribunaux des décisions des services du logement . En outre, la loi de 1969 sur le logement ajoutait une nouvelle condition à celles permettant d'etre résident sans autorisation . à savoir que l'intéressé devait être résident le 31 iuillet 1968 ou être le conjoint ou l'enfant d'un tel résident . sous réserve d'une clause dérogatoire en faveur de toute personne occupant légalement un logetnent réglementé le 29 janvier 1969 . En vertu de cette disposition de la loi de 1969 sur le logement, les requérants ont cessé de réunir les conditions de résidence nécessaires pour avoir le droit d'occuper leur ntaison, bien qu'ils aient été dans l'ignorance de ce fait jusqu'en septembre 1978 . La ntaison a continué d'être louée conforniément à tine autorisation accordée par les services du logentent de l'Assemblée législative de Guernesey, aux termes des dispositions de l'article 3 de la loi de 1969 sur le logement puis de l'anicle 3 de la loi locale de 1975 sur le logement (réglententation de l'occupation) (la .loi de 1975 sur le logement .) .
La loi de 1969 sur le logement, prontulguée d'abord pour trois ans, a été prorogée jusqu'au 31 décembre 1975, où elle a été remplacée par la loi d e
_99 -
1975 sur le logement . Tout en maintenant la distinction entre les logements du marché libre, ouverts à tous, et les logements réglementés, pour lesquels des conditions de résidence ou une autorisation sont nécessaires, la loi de 1975 sur le logement a modifié la base de calcul des conditions donnant droit à la résidence, droit qu'il est maintenant aussi possible d'acquérir au terme d'une certaine période de résidence légale et autorisée dans un logement réglementé . Les personnes qui avaient eu leur résidence habituelle à Guernesey entre le 1 - janvier 1938 et le 30 juin 1957 (tels les requérants) continuaient de réunir les conditions de résidence sous réserve qu'elles aient été aussi résidentes le 31 juillet 1968 . Le 31 août 1978, Mme Gillow a écrit aux services du logement au sujet du projet de retour des requérants à Guernesey . Le 15 septembre 1978, les services du logement ont répondu à Mme Gillow, qui était alors à Hong-kong, pour lui apprendre que les requérants ne semblaient plus avoir le droit d'occuper Whiteknights sans une nouvelle autorisation accordée par ces services pour remplacer l'actuelle autorisation du locataire aux termes de l'article 3 de la loi de 1975 sur le logement . Whiteknights est restée vide après le départ du locataire le 31 juillet 1978, départ qui avait incité les services du logement à écrire aux requérants ; et, en avril 1979, ceux-ci sont rentrés en Angleterre . Le 21 avril 1979, Mme Gillow a écrit aux services du logement pour leur faire part de son intention de retourner à Whiteknights avec son mari pour leur retraite, en ajoutant qu'elle était à la recherche d'un poste d'enseignante à Guernesey . Elle a aussi déclaré à ces services que Whiteknights avait besoin de diverses réparations que les requérants eux-mêmes se proposaient d'effectuer . Elle a donc demandé aussi une autorisation à court terme jusqu'en septembre 1979 pour permettre l'exécution de ces travaux et en attendant qu'il soit statué sur la demande d'autorisation de longue durée . Le 7 mai 1979, Mnte Gillow a écrit de nouveau aux services du logement pour réitérer sa demande, restée sans réponse, et leur signaler que son mari et elle étaient de retour à Guernesey . Le 14 mai 1979, les services du logement ont répondu à Mme Gillow pour l'informer que, le 3 mai 1979, ils avaient étudié sa demande d'autorisation de longue durée pour occuper Whiteknights et qu'ils l'avaient rejetée, compte tenu de la . situation du logement, actuellement défavorable • . La lettre rappelait aux requérants qu'à aucun moment les services du logement ne leur avaient accordé l'autorisation d'occuper Whiteknighls et qu'à supposer que Mme Gillow obtienne un emploi lui donnant droit à une autorisation pour services essentiels, son mari et elle ne seraient pas autorisés à continuer d'habiter Whiteknights pendant leur retraite car elle était trop âgée pour occuper un tel emploi pendant au moins 10 années consécutives, ce qui lui aurait donné droit à cette faculté en vertu de la loi de 1975 sur le logement . Nulle mention n'a été faite de la demande d'autorisation temporaire présentée par les requérants .
- 100 -
Après un entretien avec un représentant des services du logement, Mnie Gillow a demandé le 9 juillet 1979 une autorisation, qui lui a été refusée le 19 juillet 1979 par les services du logement . Ceux-ci ont écrit le 27 juillet 1979 à Mme Gillow pour lui signifier le rejet de sa demande d'autorisation, au motif : a . Que Mme Gillow n'avait pas apporté la preuve qu'elle occuperait un poste pouvant être considéré comme essentiel pour la communauté ; b . Que Whiteknights était une maison susceptible d'être recherchée par des personnes réunissant les conditions de résidence qui faisaient défaut aux requérants ; et c . Que, compte tenu de la •situation du logement actuellement défavorable, les services du logement étaient, en principe, incapables de justifier l'octroi d'une autorisation aux requérants. Les requérants ont en outre été informés de leur droit de faire appel de cette décision auprès de la cour royale (•Royal Court•) aux termes de l'article 19 de la loi de 1975 sur le logement . II leur fut également signalé qu'à moins qu'ils ne fassent état de raisons valables pour les en empêcher, les services du logement signaleraient aux conseillers juridiques de la Couronne pour Guernesey qu'ils occupaient Whiteknights, sauf s'ils vidaient les lieux dans un délai de sept jours . Les requérants ont répondu le 29 juillet 1979, réitérant leur demande d'autorisation temporaire, au moins jusqu'à la fin août 1979, afin de pouvoir achever les réparations dont la propriété avait besoin et mettre celle-ci en vente . Ils contestaient notamment l'allégation selon laquelle ils • occupaient • la propriété, au sens de la loi de 1975 sur le logement, et soutenaient que, quelle que soit l'interprétation qu'on lui donne, cette loi ne saurait raisonnablement leur interdire, d'une part, d'effectuer des réparations devenues indispensables car la propriété avait été louée pendant les 19 années précédentes ni, d'autre part, de prendre les mesures nécessaires pour vendre la propriété . tout cela empêchant qui que ce soit d'autre de l'occuper entre temps . Les requérants ont aussi fait remarquer que, nonobstant la position antérieure des services du logement . ils n'avaient été informés qu'en septembre 1978 de l'obligation d'avoir une autorisation pour occuper Whiteknights et que, notamment, ils n'avaient pas été avertis de l'entrée en vigueur le 2 février 1970 de la loi de 1969 sur le logement, avec sa disposition rétroactive concernant la condition de résidence .
Le 15 août 1979, les services du logement ont répondu à Mme Gillow pour lui signaler que sa lettre avait été examinée lors d'une réunion le 9 août 1979, confirmer qu'elle n'avait pas été avisée de la modification législative et reconnaître qu'on ne lui avait fait part que le 15 septembre 1978 de la nécessité d'une autorisation . lls ont accepté de ne pas prendre d e
- IOI -
mesures à l'égard de l'occupation illicite de Whiteknights par les requérants . à condition que ceux-ci évacuent les lieux avant le 1° 1 septembre 1979 . Le 23 août 1979, Mme Gillow a demandé une nouvelle prorogation, jusqu'à la fin de septembre 1979, de l'autori sation qu'avaient les requérants de rester à Whiteknights, car ils n'avaient pas encore réussi à vendre la propriété . Le 30 août 1979, les se rv ices du logement ont rejeté cette demande et ils en ont avisé Mme Gillow le 3 septembre 1979 . Les requérants avaient sept jours pour évacuer Whiteknights . sous peine de poursuites . Les requérants ont obtenu par la suite un entretien avec un représentant des services du logement, entretien au cours duquel ils ont, d'une part, demandé notamntent l'autorisation de continuer à occuper Whiteknights pendant encore six mois pour pouvoir réaliser la vente, et, d'autre part, posé la question du dédommagement pour la perte de leur droit de résidence . Les services du logement ont écrit aux requérants le 20 septembre 1979 pour leur signaler que leur dossier avait été étudié à nouveau lors d'une réunion tenue le 13 septembre 1979, ntais que leur demande avait été rejetée . On les a donc avisés qu'à moins de quitter Whiteknights avant le 31 octobre 1979, ils feraient l'objet de poursuites . Les requérants ont alors consulté début octobre un avocat qui a demandé aux se rv ices du logement de ne prendre aucune disposition à l'encontre des requérants jusqu'à ce qu'il ait pu mieux les conseiller sur leur position . Le 9 novembre 1979 . l'avocat a présenté, au nom des requérants, une nouvelle demande en vue d'occuper Whiteknights jusqu'au 30 avril 1980, demande qui a été rejetée le 12 novembre 1979 par les se rvices du logement . Ceux-ci ont alors saisi le ministère public au motif que les requérants continuaient d'occuper Whiteknights . Le 13 octobre 1979, les requérants, n'étant pas auto risés à interjeter appel en personne, ont chargé leur avocat de faire appel de toutes les décisions des se rvices du logement auprès de la . Royal Court . . Ces recours devaient être introduits avant le 31 octobre 1979 et ils ne pouvaient l'être que par un avocat près la . Royal Court . . L'avocat des requérants ne s'est pas pou rv u en appel dans les délais, mais il en a avisé le ministère public et lui a demandé, le 20 novembre 1979, de ne pas engager de poursuites à l'encontre des requérants car un recours serait introduit prochainement . Néanmoins, le 17 décembre 1979, les requérants ont re ç u à Whiteknights la visite de la police et, nonobstant la lettre en date du 19 décembre 1979 adressée par les requérants au chef de la police pour expliquer qu'un appel était en instance, des poursuites ont été intentées à l'encontre des requérants, qui ont été cités à comparaitre le 1° , fév rier 1980 . Le recours de Mme Gillow contre la décision de refus par les se rv ices du logement des autorisations demandées fut finalement déposé le Icr fév rier 1980 et déclaré recevable bien que tardif . Lorsque les époux Gillow ont comparu l e
- 102 -
1 - février 1980, ils ont donc demandé l'ajournement du procès au motif que leur appel à la =Royal Court . visait le cœur de la question de la légalité de leur occupation de Whiteknights . L'ajournement a été refusé . Comme il ne pouvait y avoir jonction des instances, le tribunal a commencé par exantiner les charges pesant contre M . Gillow . Celui-ci a été reconnu coupable d'occuper Whiteknights sans autorisation, et condamné à une antende . Il a interjeté appel devant la ~Royal Court . . Le procès de Mme Gillow a finalement été ajourné sine die . Mme Gillow faisait appel pour contester, d'une part, les refus des services du logement d'accorder aux requérants l'autorisation d'habiter Whiteknights, refus qui leur avaient été communiqués par ces services le 14 mai 1979 et le 27 juillet 1979, et, d'autre part, le refus de ces services de permettre aux requérants de continuer à occuper Whiteknights jusqu'au 30 avril 1980, refus contmuniqué à l'avocat des requérants le 16 novembre 1979 . L'appel tendait également à l'octroi d'une autorisation illimitée ou, subsidiairement d'une permission d'occuper Whiteknights jusqu'au 30 avril 1980 . 11 y était allégué que les décisions incriminées auraient constitué un abus de pouvoir de la part des services du logement . Cet appel a été rejeté le 8 juillet 1980 par la . Royal Court ., à l'unanimité s'agissant des décisions des 14 mai et 27 juillet 1979 et à la majorité (huit contre trois) s'agissant de celle du 16 novenibre 1979 . En vertu de l'article 19, paragraphe 4 de la loi de 1975 sur le logement, .la décision de la Royal Court . . . (était) définitive et exécutoire . .
Les requérants ont fini par vendre leur propriété le 15 avril 1980 au prix de 33 000 livres, ce qui, selon eux, était inférieur à sa valeur réelle . La . Royal Court . a examiné le 26 août 1980 le recours intenté par M . Gillow contre sa condamnation du 1« février 1980 . Dans son appel . M . Gillow contestait l'exactitude des ntinutes du procès de première instance, demandant à plusieurs reprises à pouvoir écouter la bande originale . Cette demande a été rejetée niais le Président de la . Royal Court ., qui avait écouté la bande pendant une suspension d'audience, a déclaré que les minutes étaient exactes . M . Gillow prétendait aussi que le tribunal ne pouvait qu'@tre de parti pris car sa composition était pratiquement la même que lorsqu'il avait débouté sa femme de son recours contre le rejet de ses demandes d'autorisation le 8juillet 1980 . un seul assesseur ( .Jurat .) sur onze étant différent . Il soutenait également que la composition de la . Royal Court . elle-même était archaïque . Il a été débouté le 26 août 1980 . Entretemps . les requérants avaient porté plainte, contre leur avocat, le 26 janvier 1980, devant la Chambre de Discipline, pour le retard mis à
- 103 -
introduire les recours contre les décisions des services du logement, plainte que la Chambre de Discipline a jugée fondée le 9 septembre 1980 .
GRIEF S Les requérants se plaignent en premier lieu d'avoir perdu leur droit de résider à Guernesey, sans notification ni indemnisation, du fait de l'élément rétroactif de la loi de 1969 sur le logement .
lls se plaignent aussi de s'être vu refuser le droit de retourner occuper légalement leur maison, ou d'y effectuer légalement des réparations, du fait des décisions des services du logement de l'Assemblée législative de Guernesey . lls se plaignent en outre d'avoir été harcelés et poursuivis au pénal, nonobstant leur appel contre les décisions des services susmentionnés, et ils soutiennent que ces poursuites étaient destinées à les empêcher de maintenir leur appel . En outre, ils allèguent que ces poursuites n'ont tenu aucun compte du fait que, pendant qu'ils réparaient leur maison pour pouvoir la vendre, et pendant qu'ils essayaient de la vendre, il n'était pas possible qu'elle fût occupée par qui que ce soit d'autre . lls prétendent que le Procureur leur a dit qu'ils devaient suivre la procédure d'appel d'un hôtel ou hors de lile et qu'ils pouvaient vendre leur maison sans se trouver sur Iile . lls allèguent que la procédure judiciaire suivie à leur encontre était inéquitable et partiale . Enfin, ils se plaignent d'avoir dû vendre leur maison pour un prix inférieur à sa valeur réelle, par suite des décisions des services susmentionnés .
PROCÉDURE DEVANT LA COMMISSIO N La requéte a été introduite le 25 janvier 1980 et enregistrée le 5 août 1980 Le 6 octobre 1981, la Commission a décidé, conformément à l'article 42, paragraphe 2 (b) de son Règlement intérieur, de donner connaissance de la requête au Gouvernement défendeur et d'inviter celui-ci à lui présenter par écrit ses observations sur la recevabilité et sur le fond . Les observations du Gouvernement sont datées du 8 mars 1982 et celles des requérants en réponse des 15 avrilet 8 mai 1982 . Le 6 juillet 1982, la Commission a décidé conformément à l'article 42, paragraphe 3 (b) de son Règlement intérieur, d'inviter les parties à lui présenter oralenient des observations sur la recevabilité et le bien-fondé de l a - 104 -
requête au cours d'une audience . Celle-ci s'est déroulée le 9 décembre 1982, les parties étant représentées comme suit : Pour le Gouvernement : M . M .R . Eaton, Agen t Mme A . Glover . Agent adjoint M . de V .G . Carey . Procureur Général de Guernesey, Conseil M . M . Bratza, Consei l M . R .J . Falla, Président des se rv ices du logement de l'Assemblée législative de Guernesey, consei l M . L . Barbé . Administrateur des serv ices du logement de l'Assemblée législative de Guernesey, consei l M . R .W . Tontlinson . du Ministère de l'Intérieur, conseil . Pour les requérants : Les requérants ont comparu en personne .
OBSERVATIONS DES PARTIES OBSERVATIONS DU GOUVERNEMEN T I.
Situation du logcment à Guernesey Le Gouvernement allègue qu'aux termes de la convention constitution-
nelle qui lie le Royaume-Uni et Guemesey, le Parlement du Royaume-Uni ne légifère pas, d'ordinaire, sans l'approbation du Gouvernement de lile pour les questions entièrement internes à celle-ci . Aussi est-ce par l'Assemblée législative de Guernesey qu'a été votée, à plusieurs reprises, la législation relative à la régulation et à l'occupation des logements de Guernesey .
Cette législation est devenue nécessaire à la suite du manque de logements sur lile pour les anciens résidents de Guernesey qui y sont retournés après la Deuxième guerre mondiale . Les problèmes de logement qui se sont posés ont abouti au vote de la loi locale de 1948 sur le logentent (Dispositions d'urgence) accordant le droit de résidence aux personnes qui avaient eu leur résidence habituelle à Guernesey entre le 1° 1 janvier 1938 et le 30 juin 1940 . Cette limitation du droit de résider à Guernesey et celles qui ont suivi avaient pour but de mettre les logements existants à la disposition des familles de Guernesey et des personnes venues sur 1i1e pour occuper des emplois considérés comme essentiels au bien-@tre de la communauté . La création du secteur du • marché libre • du logement est due à la loi de 1957 sur le logentent, qui a soustrait à la réglementation toutes les maisons dont la valeur locative était supérieure à 50 livres par an . En 1976 ces logements représentaient 9 % du total, et l'on estimait qu'en les exemptant de contrôle on ne porterait pas gravement atteinte au manque de logements .
- 105 -
Une nouvelle législation est devenue nécessaire en 1962, car on agrandissait les logements réglententés pour accroitre leur valeur locative et les intégrer ainsi au secteur du - marché libre . . Par la suite, on s'est inquiété de voir que les possibilités de l'hébergement des personnes réunissant les condilions nécessaires pour occuper sans autorisation des logements réglementés étaient insuffisantes . Aussi a-t-on promulgué en 1965 une nouvelle loi soumettant à la réglenientation les logements meublés, jusqu'alors exemptés par la loi de 1948 sur le logement . En 1966 . une nouvelle législation a étendu la réglementation aux propriétés dont la valeur locative était inférieure à 100 livres par an, avec des dispositions dérogatoires pour les personnes occupant déjà les prop ri étés soumises pour la première fois à la réglementation . Cette modification ayant fait naitre des controverses, une nouvelle loi a été votée en 1976 pour soustraire à la réglementation les prop ri étés dont la valeur locative était supé rieure à 85 livres par an . Une nouvelle loi a été votée en 1967 . Pour empêcher la diminution du nombre des logements réglenientés du fait de l'intégration de ce rtains d'entre eux à d'autres propriétés afin que l'ensemble ait une valeur locative suffisante pour faire partie du - marché libre . . Dans les années 60, i ly a eu une augmentation continue du nombre de personnes désirant venir à Guernesey en tant que nouveaux entrants, ou ayant des conipétences dont lile avait besoin, ou ayant vécu à Guernesey à des périodes leur donnant droit à la résidence et qui étaient parties depuis . Les dates retenues pour donner droit à la résidence - le 30 juin 1940 et le 30 juin 1957 -, qui étaient des points de repère raisonnables et réalistes au moment de leur adoption, étaient devenues arbitraires et a rt ificielles dans leurs effets . Aussi la loi a-t-elle été amendée par la loi de 1969 sur le logement qui a notamment ajouté aux autres conditions de résidence l'exigence de résidence légale sur lile le 31 juillet 1968. En 1973, l'Assemblée législative de Guernesey a estimé qu'il conviendrait de permettre aux personnes originaires de Guernesey de rentrer dans lile et aux personnes ayant rendu à Ifle des services essentiels pendant un certain nombre d'années d'échapper à la réglementation du logement . Le problème du logement sur lile était toutefois de plus en plus critique car les terrains à bâtir diminuaient en raison des exigences de l'agriculture, de l'horticulture et du tourisme . La loi a donc été à nouveau amendée par la loi de 1975 sur le logenient qui a soustrait à la réglementation certaines personnes ayant eu leur résidence à Guernesey pendant dix années consécutives. . En appliquant la loi, les services du logement doivent respecter une Résolution de l'Assemblée législative de Guernesey de septembre 1974, selon laquelle 'les autorisations de logement doivent être accordées de manière à veiller à ce que la croissance de la population ne dépasse pas 7 % jusqu'e n
- 106 -
1984 inclus . Le Gouvernement estime que le manque de logements est encore un très grave sujet de préoccupation, les derniers chiffres connus faisant état de 420 fantilles attendant de l'Etat de pouvoir louer des maisons et de 700 familles sur liste d'attente pour obtenir des prêts à l'achat ou à la constmction . En avril 1981, Guernesey avait une population de 53 303 habitants, alors que sa superficie est d'environ 62 km2 . Sa densité est donc de 860 habitants au km2 . contre 320 en Angleterre et au Pays de Galles . En outre, la pression démographique exacerbe les problèmes de chbntage que connaît 1ile . 2 . Gricfs au titre de l'article 8 Le Gouvernement soutient en premier lieu que la résidence des requérants à Guernesey et leur occupation de Whiteknights manquent de l'élément de durée et de stabilité qui est essentiel à la notion de .domicile » prévue à l'article 8 de la Convention . Il souligne que les requérants n'avaient aucun lien antérieur avec Guernesey et qu'ils sont partis ensuite pendant très longtemps, ces deux faits venant corroborer l'argument selon lequel Whiteknights n'était pas le • domicile • des requérants . Selon le Gouvernement, cet argument ne repose pas sur l'existence d'un autre « domicile » au sens de l'article 8, à un endroit déterminé ou non, à tout montent postéri eur au départ des requérants de Guernesey, mais il soutient qu'il appartient aux requérants d'établir qu'ils ne disposaient pas d'un tel domicile . A cet égard, le Gouvernement renvoie à la correspondance entretenue de temps à autre par les se rv ices du logement avec les requérants, y compris le courrier po rt ant une adresse au Royaume-Uni . En outre, si l'article 8 protège un domicile+ considéré comme une entité existante, il ne donne pas le droit d'établir son domicile à un endroit déterminé ni de résider en un endroit déterminé . Le - domicile e doit concemer une résidence authentique, impliquant un lien réel avec une habitation donnée . Le Gouvernentent renvoie à cet é gard à la requête N° 7456/76 (Wiggins c/Royaume-Uni) mais souligne que M . Wiggins vivait dans sa maison depuis cinq années en tout . A titre subsidiaire, le Gouvernement soutient qu'en admettant que Whiteknights fût le domicile des requérants, il n'y avait pas eu d'ingérence dans l'exercice du droit des requérants à son respect car après leur retour à Guernesey leur occupation de la maison avait toujours été précaire . Il soutient en outre que toute ingérence subie par les requérants en raison des lois de 1969 et de 1975 sur le logement était nécessairement . prévue par la loi» et constituait, de l'avis du Gouve rn ement, une mesure •qui . dans une société démocratique, est nécessaire . . . au bien-être économique du pays . . . ou à la protection des droits et libertés d'autmi•, et elle était donc justifiée aux termes de l'a rt icle 8, paragraphe 2 . - 107 -
A cet égard, le Gouvernement allègue que les lois sur le logement ont un but légitime et prévoient des mesures proportionnées à leur objectif, et que rien ne permet de dire qu'elles ont été appliquées aux requérants de manière excessive par rapport à ce qu'autorise l'article 8, paragraphe 2 . S'agissant des sanctions pénales infligées à M . Gillow à la suite du procès du 1'1 février 1980, le Gouvernement soutient que les requérants savaient fort bien, lorsqu'ils sont retournés à Guernesey en avril ou mai 1979, qu'ils violeraient la loi de 1975 sur le logement s'ils occupaient Whiteknights sans autorisation . Les sanctions infligées étaient des mesures adéquates et raisonnables destinées à mettre en o_uvre la loi de 1975 sur le logement . Si cette loi elle-même est légitime, il doit en aller de même pour les mesures destinées à la faire respecter . Le Gouvernement fait observer que les requérants n'ont pas servi leur cause en établissant leur résidence en contravention avec la loi de 1975 sur le logement, et que leur position vis-à-vis de la Convention ne saurait être renforcée par la modération des services du logement, qui n'ont pas mis plus tôt à exécution les sanctions pénales . En outre, le fait qu'un appel relatif à l'autorisation ait été en instance n'était pas incompatible avec le fait qu'à l'époque des poursuites il y avait une violation flagrante de la loi de 1975 sur le logement . Griefs .3au titre de l'article 1 du Protocole additionne l Le Gouvernement soutient que les requérants n'ont été à aucun moment privés de leur propriété et que donc seule la première phrase de cet article serait applicable . Tout en réservant sa position sur le point de savoir si la présente requête pose en fait un problème au titre de la première phrase de cet article, le Gouvernenient allègue que toute ingérence dans l'exercice du droit qui y est protégé est autorisée en vertu du deuxiènte paragraphe de cet article . Le Gouvernement renvoie, à l'appui de cette thèse, à la décision de la Commission dans la requête N° 7456/76, selon laquelle ce paragraphe fait des Etats contractants les seuls juges de =la nécessité~ d'une telle ingérence . Compte tenu du marché du logement et de la situation démographique de Guernesey, le Gouvernement soutient que les lois en question sont jugées •nécessaires pour réglementer l'usage des biens conformément à l'intérêt général» . 4 . Griefs au titre de l'article 6, paragraphe 1 de la Conventio n Le Gouvernement ne considère pas que la présente requête pose un problènte au titre de cet article . A son avis . l'action pénale engagée à l'encontre des requérants ne gênait en rien la poursuite d'un appel contre le refus d'autorisation . Par ailleurs, cet appel n'était pas pertinent en lui-même pour les poursuites pénales exercées contre les requérants, la question litigieus e - 108 -
consistant à savoir si l'occupation de Whiteknights par ces derniers sans autorisation constituait une violation de la loi de 1975 sur le logement . 5 . Griefs relatifs aux effets de la loi de 1969 sur le logemen t Dans la mesure où les requérants se plaignent des effets inhérents à cette loi, le Gouvernement soutient que leur requête est irrecevable car elle ne respecte pas la règle des six mois prévue à l'article 26 de la Convention . En effet, la loi est entrée en vigueur le 2 février 1970 et la requéte n'a été introduite que le 25 janvier 1980 .
6. Conclusion s Le Gouvernement défendeur soutient donc que la requête est soit irrecevable pour méconnaissance de la règle des six mois prévue à l'article 26 de la Convention, soit, à titre subsidiaire, manifestement mal fondée dans la niesure où elle invoque l'article 6, paragraphe 1 et l'article 1 du Protocole additionnel ainsi que l'article 8 de la Convention, soit parce qu'elle ne pose aucun problème juridique au titre de l'article 8, paragraphe 1 soit, subsidiairement, parce que toute ingérence que les requérants auraient subie dans leurs droits garantis par l'article 8 . paragraphe 1 était justifiée aux termes de l'article 8, paragraphe 2 de la Convention .
OBSERVATIONS DES REQUÉRANTS 1 . Sur la situation du logement à Guernesey Les requérants soutiennent en prentier lieu que les difficultés de logement qu'a connues Guernesey après la Deuxième guerre mondiale n'étaient pas fondanientalement différentes de celles de l'ensemble du Royaunte-Uni . Néanmoins, seules Guernesey . Jersey et 1i1e de Man ont eu recours à l'intposition de conditions de résidence pour faire face à la demande de logements . Les autres iles britanniques n'ont pas instauré de telles conditions d'autorisation, que les requérants décrivent comme • l'équivalent d'un contrôle de l'immigration • . D'après les statistiques fournies à la Commission par le Gouvernenient défendeur dans l'affaire Wiggins . la population de Guernesey est passée de 43 500 à 54 256 habitants entre 1951 et 1976 . Les requérants comparent ces chiffres à la population actuelle de Guernesey qui serait, selon le Gouvernement défendeur, de 53 303 habitants (en avril 1981), ce qui indique un net déclin depuis 1976 . La population de Guernesey ayant donc diminué au cours des cinq dernières années, la pression démographique ne saurait justifier par elle-même la niise en o_uvre des lois sur le logement . Les requérants soutiennent en outre que, si on invoque des éléments d'ordre démographique, il faut les analyser en détail avant d'en faire usag e
- 109 -
pour justifier les lois sur le logement . On a att ri bué la croissance de la population entre 1951 et 1976 à un afflux dans lile de B ri tanniques non o ri ginaires de Guernesey, mais on n'a apporté aucune preuve montrant que telle était bien lacomposition de cet afflux . On n'a pas non plus établi si des Britanniques de Guernesey ( et, le cas échéant, combien) avaient quitté I'7e récemntent, ni donné les motifs de ces départs éventuels . A cet égard, les requérants soulignent le caractère de •paradis fiscal » de Guernesey , et l'encouragement donné par les auto rités de Guernesey - notantntent en créant, avec la loi de 1957 sur le logement, le secteur du •marché libre• du logement - aux •B ri tanniques non o ri ginaires de Guernesey • pour qu'ils occupent à Guernesey des logements du • marché libre» . C'est pourquoi les requérants soutiennent que ce sont les lois sur le logentent qui ont, dans une ce rt aine mesure, favorisé l'augmentation même de la population par laquelle le Gouvernement défendeur entend justifier leur existence . Les requérants allèguent que les lois sur le logement ont donc permis aux riches d'acheter des habitations non réglementées sur le • marché libre • de Guernesey, sans restr iction, tout en exer ç ant une disc ri mination à l'encontre des B ri tanniques moins riches non o ri ginaires de Guernesey . parmi lesquels ceux qui, comme les requérants, avaient élu domicile à Guernesey . Les requérants renvoient à cet égard aux statistiques fournies par le Gouvernement défendeur , en l'espèce comme dans l'affaire Wiggins, concernant les personnes attendant de l'Etat de pouvoir Ibuer un logement à Guernesev . En 1976 . le nombre de personnes figurant sur la liste d'attente pertinente était de 290 alors qu'il est actuellement de 420, en dépit d'une diminution de la population totale . Les requérants soutiennent donc que l'évolution de la population absolue n'est . pas nécessairement le facteur dominant des problèmes du logement à Gernesev . Faisant allusion aux 700 familles qui attendent encore des prêts à l'achat ou à la construction, les requérants font observer qu'en 1980 l'Assemblée législative de Guernesey a déclaré qu'il y avait sur I île 1500 terrains à bâtir disponibles . En outre, il y avait, en 1976, 1040 autres propriétés vacantes sur Iile, mais le Gouve rn ement n'a pas fourni de statistiques plus récentes . Dans la mesure où le chômage est cité à l'appui de la réglementation, les requérants doutent que ce soit pour chercher un emploi que les deniandeurs d'autori sations viennent à Guernesey . pensant plutôt que c'est . par exentple , pour y prendre leur retraite . S'agissant des lois sur le logement en général, les requérants soulignent qu'elles sont fort complexes, comme en témoigne la fréquence de leurs amendements . lls estiment néanntoins qu'on peut résumer leurs caractéristiques de la tnanière suivante : elles offrent des logements non réglementés aux riches sur le • marché libre •, et accordent un traitement de faveur aux Britannique s - 110 -
nés à Guernesey . par opposition aux autres Britanniques . sur le marché réglementé . lls font observer en outre que l'•occupation= d'une propriété réglementée par des personnes ne réunissant pas les conditions de résidence ou ne possédant pas d'autorisation constitue un délit bien que l' .occupation . ne soit pas elle-même définie par les lois sur le logement . De plus, la loi de 1969 sur le logement a supprimé rétroactivement et sans indemnisation le droit de résidence de personnes telles que les requérants . Ceux-ci font toutefois observer qu'un récent amendement aux lois sur le logement permet à un militaire absent de Guernesey d'être considéré comme occupant un logentent d'une manière lui permettant de réunir les conditions requises pour avoir le droit de résidence, alors qu'aucune concession analogue n'est prévue pour les personnes . telles qu'eux-mêmes, participant à des travaux de développement à l'étranger . 2 . Griefs au titre dc l'article 8 de la Conventio n Ixs requérants soutiennent en premier lieu qu'ils ont emniénagé à Guernesey en avril 1956, après avoir vendu leur niaison du Lancashire et apporté leurs nieubles, afin de s'établir définitivement dans cette ile à la suite de la nomination de M . Gillow au poste permanent de directeur du Service consultatif horticole . lls ont été logés peu de temps par l'Assemblée législative pendant la construction de Whiteknights, où ils ont ensuite élu domicile . lls n'ont donc rien pris au parc immobilier existant de Guernesey ; ils ont au contraire développé celui-ci .
Lorsqu'ils ont quitté Iile en 1960 . ils ont laissé leurs meubles à Whiteknights . où ils ont toujours eu l'intention de retourner après leur service outre-mer . Pendant les 18 années qui ont suivi . ils ont fourni un logement à des personnes agréées par les services du logement moyennant des loyers modestes, sans chercher, par exemple . à tirer parti du caractère di7e de villégiature de Guemesey en louant leur propriété pour de courtes périodes . Pendant ce temps-là, ils ont donc élargi le parc imniobilier de Guernesey . Les dentandes de renseignentents forntulées par les requérants au sujet de la réglenientation régissant la vente de Whiteknights n'avaient qu'un caractère inforniatif et ponctuel . Elles n'ont done pas joué sur leur détermination à retourner à Whiteknights, qu'ils considéraient conime leur domicile . Pendant la période où ils ont travaillé à l'étranger pour des organisntes d'assistance . ils ont eu plusieurs ~ domiciles . à Malte . à Hong-kong, en Jordanie, en Yougoslavie . au Bangladesh . au Lesotho et en Libye . Pourtant, ils ne considéraient aucun d'entre eux comnte leur «domicile» au sens que Whiteknighls gardait pour eux . S'agissant de la distinction opérée par le Gouvernenient entre la durée de leur occupation de Whiteknights et la période dinq ans sur laquelle portait l'affaire Wiggins, ils font observer tout d'abord que . dans l'affaire Wiggins,
l'occupation avait été illégale pendant deux ans et demi sur cinq, et qu'en tout état de cause le critère de l'établissement d'un • donticile • au sens de l'article 8 de la Convention réside dans l'intention démontrable du requérant plutôt que dans une certaine période d'occupation . Ils soutiennent donc que Whiteknights était leur domicile au sens de l'article 8 de la Convention . Ils allèguent . en outre, que l'application à leur égard des lois sur le logement était disproportionnée et injustifiable aux termes de l'article 8 . paragraphe 2 de la Convention . A cet égard, ils visent notamment l'attitude .du chat et de la souris= qu'ont eue les services du logement lors des négociations de 1979 . IIs font référence aux nombreuses lettres acceptant de fermer les yeux sur leur •occupation• de Whiteknights pendant ces négociations, d'où un sentiment permanent d'incertitude, contrastant avec les recommandations formulées à deux reprises par les services du logement pour conseiller aux requérants de demander une autorisation à court terme, ce qu'ils ont fait, mais en vain . Les requérants soutiennent qu'il était abusif et injustifiable, de la part des services du logement, compte tenu des possibilités d'hébergement qu'ils avaient fournies à Guernesey pendant 18 ans, de leur refuser l'autorisation de résider à Whiteknights autrement qu'à titre précaire pendant que se poursuivaient les négociations pour une autorisation de plus longue durée, pendant que les requérants effectuaient les réparations devenues nécessaires parce que la ntaison avait été louée pendant très longtemps, et, ensuite, pendant que les requérants préparaient la propriété pour la vendre et qu'elle était sur le marché . Il était inconcevable, notamment au cours de cette dernière période . que les requérants permettent à qui que ce soit d'autre d'occuper leur propriété . On leur a pourtant dit, lorsqu'ils ont fait appel à la • Royal Court » le 8 juillet 1980, que, pendant la période en question, ils devaient résider à l'hôtel ou quitter lile . De plus, ils soutiennent que l'emploi de sanctions pénales à leur encontre pendant que leur recours contre les décisions des services du logement était en instance constituait une autre ingérence injustifiable . 3 . Griefs au titre de l'article 1 du Protocole additionne l Les requérants soutiennent qu'ils ont subi des ingérences dans l'exercice du droit au respect de leurs biens et qu'ils ont en outre été privés de leur propriété contrairement aux dispositions de cet article . S'agissant de l'ingérence dans le droit au respect de leur domicile, Whiteknights, ils allèguent que le Gouvernement du Royaume-Uni a dû accepter certaines obligations à l'égard de la première phrase de cet article lorsqu'il a ratifié celui-ci, nonobstant les termes apparemment larges de son second paragraphe . Ils estiment que le Gouvernement n'aurait pas pu faire nioins que confirmer qu'il ne justifierait aucune ingérence qui n'aurait pas ét é - 112 -
justifiée par le Parlement du Royaume-Uni et qui refuserait des droits établis pour l'ensemble des citoyens britanniques . Ils soulignent que le droit de résidence, touchant à la nationalité, constitue une question d'importance nationale et non un problème local, et qu'il aurait donc dû être examiné par le Parlement du Royaume-Uni . Ils allèguent que ces conditions n'ont pas été remplies . De plus, ils niaintiennent les critiques qu'ils ont forntulées à l'égard des tentatives de justification du Gouvernement défendeur au titre de l'article 8, paragraphe 2 de la Convention concernant la situation du logentent à Guernesey dans son ensenible . Elles seraient . en effet, insuffisantes pour justifier une ingérence dans l'exercice de leurs droits garantis par la première phrase de l'article I du Protocole additionnel . Ils allèguent, en outre, que les lois sur le logentent de Guernesey ont transfornié le droit de résidence sur Ii1e en un bien . Pour illustrer cela, ils font référence au secteur du . ntarché libre • du logentent, où le droit d'habiter dans l'ile constitue un produit négociable que les riches peuvent s'offrir . Par contre, ils ont, eux, perdu leur droit de résidence du fait de la loi de 1969 sur le logentent . sans indemnisation et en raison d'une condition rétroactive qu'ils ne pouvaient respecter . Dans la niesure où le Gouvernentent défendeur se fdnde sur l'article 26 à propos de ce nioyen, les requérants soutiennent que les exigences de l'anicle 25, concernant la «victime•, et celle de l'article 26 de la Convention, concernant l'épuisentent des voies de recours internes les obligeaient à démontrer que la loi ou un de ses effets les avait lésés . Cela a été établi par les décisions de la . Royal Court - en juillet et août 1980, lorsque les voies de recours internes se sont trouvées épuisées : aussi les requérants maintiennent-ils qu'en introduisant leur requéte en janvier 1980 . ils ont satisfait aux exigences de l'article 26 de la Convention .
4 . Griefs au titre dc l'article 6 de la Conventio n Les requérants soutiennent que leurs droits garantis par cet article ont été violés tant pendant la procédure civile de recours contre les décisions des services du logentent que pendant la procédure pénale engagée à leur encontre parce qu'ils occupaient Whiteknights . S'agissant de la procédure civile, ils prétendent avoir été harcelés pour les empêcher de poursuivre leur appel devant la +Royal Court», en les obligeant à partir de Whiteknights pour soit résider à l'hôtel soit quitter 171e . Ils renvoient à cet égard aux observations du Procureur, rapportées dans le contmuniqué de presse concernant leur appel du 8 juillet 1980 . De plus, ils soutiennent que les poursuites pénales intentées à leur encontre parce qu'ils occupaient Whiteknights - alors même que le parque t
- 113 -
savait qu'un appel était en cours contre les décisions des services du logement constituaient aussi un harcèlement . En outre, le procès de M . Gillow le 1 -1 février 1980 devant la »Magistrales' Court . a inévitablement été préjudiciable à leur appel civil exaniiné deux mois plus tard . S'agissant de la procédure pénale à l'encontre de M . Gillow . les requérants soutiennent que la référence, dans les chefs d'accusation, à l'occupation de Whiteknights «entre le 31 octobre 1979 et le 17 décembre 1979» n'englobait pas le jour où a été constatée l'occupation alléguée, à savoir le 17 décembre 1979 proprement dit .
De plus . les requérants soutiennent que la structure de la «Magistrates' Court - et de la « Royal Court » de Guernesey est archaïque et que la procédure est dominée par le ministère public . Ils font observer que, l'interprétation donnée par M . Gillow des termes -entre le 31 octobre 1979 et le 17 décembre 1979» n'ayant pas été retenue par le tribunal, celui-ci a admis que les conseillers juridiques de la Couronne accusent les requérants d'avoir occupé Whiteknights sans autorisation à un moment, à savoir le 31 octobre 1979, où les services du logement avaient, par leur lettre du 20 septembre 1979 . autorisé les requérants à être présents à Whiteknights . lls allèguent en outre que la notion d'=occupation= n'est définie nulle part dans les lois sur le logement et qu'elle est insuffisamment précise pour constituer le fondement d'une accusation pénale . Enfin, s'agissant du recours intenté par M . Gillow devant la «Royal Court» contre sa condamnation du 1° février 1980, recours examiné le 26 août 1980, les requérants soutiennent que la » Royal Court » était incapable d'entendre équitablement M . Gillow . En effet, sa composition était identique . à l'exception d'un assesseur, à celle qui avait connu de l'appel des requérants contre les décisions des services du logement, le 8 juillet 1980 . .
EN DROI T 1 . Les requérants se plaignent d'avoir été empêchés de vivre dans leur ntaison . » Whiteknights », ou d'en faire usage et d'avoir dù finalement la vendre, d'avoir été poursuivis pour l'avoir occupée, et de s'être vu refuser par là même le droit au respect de leurs biens, contrairement à l'article 1 du Protocole additionnel . Ils soutiennent qu'ils ont été privés de leur droit de résider à Guernesey, droit dont les lois sur le logement font un bien en soi, et de se servir de Whiteknights comme de leur domicile, ou de la réparer, ou de la préparer à sa ntise en vente, à cause du rejet, par les services du logement, de leurs demandes d'autorisations discrétionnaires de durées diverses . Ils soutiennent que ces restrictions ne sont pas justifiables aux termes du deuxième paragraphe de l'article 1 du Protocole additionnel et qu'il n'est pas possible d'établir que le refus de les laisser se servir de leur propre maison soi t - 11-i -
conforme à l'intérêt général, étant donné, d'une part, qu'ils l'ont construite eux-mêmes, accroissant ainsi le parc immobilier et fournissant plus tard des possibilités d'hébergement locatif à des personnes agréées par les services du logement, et, d'autre part, que la maison était vide à la suite du départ volontaire de son dernier locataire . Le Gouvernement défendeur soutient que, dans la mesure où les requérants se plaignent de la pe rt e de leur droit de résider à Guernesey, leur requête est tardive car elle a été introduite plus de six mois après l'entrée en vigueur de la loi de 1969 sur le logement, en ve rt u de laquelle les requérants ont perdu leur droit de résidence . Il soutient, en outre, que les requérants n'ont pas été privés de leurs biens ntais que les lois sur le logement constituent des lois que le Gouvemement défendeur juge nécessaires pour réglementer l'usage des biens conformément à l'intérét général au sens du deuxième paragraphe de l'article 1 du Protocole additionnel . L'article 1 du Protocole additionnel dispose : •Toute personne physique ou morale a droit au respect de ses biens . Nul ne peut être privé de sa propriété que pour cause d'utilité publique et dans les conditions prévues par la loi et les principes généraux du droit international . Les dispositions précédentes ne portent pas atteinte au droit que possèdent les Etats de mettre en vigueur les lois qu'ils jugent nécessaires pour réglementer l'usage des biens, conformément à l'intérêt général ou pour assurer le paiement des impôts ou d'autres contributions ou des amendes . .
La Cotnmission rappelle que, conformément à l'article 26 de la Convention, elle ne peut être saisie que .dans le délai de six mois, à partir de la date de la décision interne définitive• . Le Gouvernement défendeur a soutenu que cette disposition empêchait la Commission de connaître du grief des requérants selon lequel ceux-ci auraient été privés d'un élément de leurs biens, du fait de la promulgation de la loi de 1969 sur le logement . Toutefois, selon la jurisprudence constante de la Commission concemant l'interprétation de l'article 25 de la Convention, la Commission ne peut connaitre d'une requête que lorsque le requérant peut se prétendre victime d'une violation de la Convention, et qu'elle ne peut l'examiner in abstracto . La Commission doit donc déterminer à quel moment les requérants ont été en mesure de se prétendre victimes de la violation qu'ils allèguent au sens de l'article 25 de la Convention . Les présents griefs concernent des restrictions apportées au droit de s requérants de se rendre à Whiteknights . de réparer cette maison, de l'habiter et de la préparer à la vente, restrictions résultant de l'application des lois d e - 115 -
Guernesey sur le logement à leur cas particulier et à leur propriété, Whiteknights . Les requérants ont contesté ces restrictions, en dernier lieu le 8 juillet 1980, devant la « Royal Court • . pour s'opposer aux décisions prises par les services du logement en application des lois sur le logement . La Conimission constate que cette décision a été la décision définitive portant sur leurs griefs concernant l'application des lois sur le logement à leur propriété dans son ensemble et que, leur requête à la Commission ayant été en fait introduite le 25 janvier 1980, les requérants ont satisfait aux exigences de l'article 26 de la Convention s'agissant de ces griefs . La Comniission doit donc examiner les différents griefs des requérants au titre de l'article 1 du Protocole additionnel . En l'espèce, les requérants ont soutenu que les lois sur le logement étaient «I'équivalent de lois sur l'immigration . et qu'elles étaient en outre discrintinatoires . Ils font observer qu'il n'a apparemment été tenu aucun compte du fait qu'ils étaient propriétaires de Whiteknights, ni lorsqu'on leur a refusé l'autorisation d'occuper cette maison ou d'en faire usage . ni lorsqu'il a été décidé de les poursuivre pour occupation non aulorisée : on peut se demander si, dans ces conditions . les restrictions imposées aux requérants étaient proportionnées au but visé et conformes aux ternies de l'article 1 du Protocole additionnel ou si elles les privaient en fait de leur propriété ou liniitaient exagéréntent son usage . Le Gouvernement défendeur a allégué que, d'une part . les restrictions apportées à l'usage de Whiteknights par les requérants n'étaient pas équivalentes à une privation de leur propriété, comme en témoigne le fait qu'ils avaient pu vendre la maison, et que, d'autre part, les restrictions constituaient des • réglementations de l'usage des biens =, au sens de l'article 1 du Protocole additionnel . La Commission estime qu'il s'agit là de questions complexes concernant l'interprétation de la Convention, questions pouvant aussi poser des problèmes au titre des articles 14 et 18 de la Convention en combinaison avec l'article 1 du Protocole additionnel, et dont la solution doit dépendre d'un examen du fond de l'affaire . Il s'ensuit que cette partie de la requête ne saurait être considérée comme manifestement ntal fondée, au sens de l'article 27, paragraphe 2, de la Convention et qu'elle doit être déclarée recevable, aucun autre motif d'irrecevabilité n'ayant été établi . 2 . Les requérants soutiennent aussi que le rejet de leur .demande d'autorrisation d'occuper Whiteknights constituait un manque de respect de leur domicile violant l'article 8 de la Convention . lls allèguent qu'ils ont établi leur domicile à Whiteknights lorsqu'ils vivaient à Guernesey et que cette maison est restée leur domicile, au sens d e - 116 -
l'article 8 de la Convention, pendant leur séjour à l'étranger où ils pa rt icipaient à des travaux d'aide au développement, et ce en raison de leur ferme intention d'y retourner pour y prendre leur retraite, comme en témoignent le fait qu'ils aient laissé leur mobilier dans la maison en leur absence, et leur retour en 1979 . Le Gouvernement défendeur soutient que les liens des requérants avec Whiteknights étaient insuffisamment étroits et permanents pour que cette maison soit restée leur domicile, au sens de l'article 8 de la Convention, après le départ des requérants de Guernesey en 1960. II fait également référence à deux demandes de renseignements formulées par les requérants concernant la possibilité de vendre Whiteknights . pour prouver qu'ils ne considéraient pas cette propriété comme leur domicile . Il affirme, en outre, que s'il y a eu ingérence dans l'exercice du droit de s requérants au respect de leur domicile, celle-ci était justifiable aux termes de l'article 8, paragraphe 2, de la Convention, comme étant prévue par la loi et nécessaire, dans une société démocratique, au bien-être économique du pays et à la protection des droits et libertés d'autrui . L'article 8 de la Convention est ainsi libellé : - 1 . Toute personne a droit au respect de sa vie privée et familiale, de son domicile et de sa correspondance . 2 . II ne peut y avoir ingérence d'une autorité publique dans l'exercice de ce droit que pour autant que cette ingérence est prévue par la loi et qu'elle constitue une mesure qui, dans une société démocratique . est nécessaire à la sécurité nationale, à la sûreté publique, au bien-être économique du pays, à la défense de l'ordre et à la prévention des infractions pénales, à la protection de la santé ou de la morale, ou à la protection des droits et libertés d'autrui . +
La Commission rappelle en premier lieu qu'elle a eu à examiner l'application de dispositions analogues relatives à l'octroi d'autorisations à l'occasion de requêtes antérieures concernant Guernesey, y compris la requête N° 7456/76 . Wiggins c/Royaume-Uni (DR 13 p . 40), où elle a constaté une ingérence dans l'exercice du droit du requérant au respect de son donticile, qui s'est révélée justifiée aux termes de l'article 8, paragraphe 2 . de la Convention . En l'espèce, la Commission doit déterminer si Whiteknights continuait d'étre le domicile des requérants au sens de l'article 8 de la Convention malgré leur absence physique et, le cas échéant, si le refus de l'autorisation d'occuper cette propriété constituait une ingérence dans l'exercice du droit au respect de leur domicile qui était justifiée aux termes de l'article 8, paragraphe 2 . de la Convention . Il ne fait pas de doute que Whiteknights était le domicile des requérants jusqu'à leur départ de Guernesey en 1960 . Le Gouvernement défendeur soutient que, par la suite, les requérants n'ont plus eu un lien suffisant avec l a
- 117 -
maison pour qu'elle reste leur domicile, alors qu'elle était louée à divers locataires, et ce pendant une longue pé ri ode où ils n'y sont jamais retournés . Toutefois, la Commission constate que les requérants ont maintenu ce rt ains liens avec la maison pendant une absence rendue inévitable par la nature de leur travail out re -mer et que leur intention de retourner à Whiteknights a fi ni par se concrétiser en 1979 . Dans ces conditions, la Commission estime qu'il n'est pas exclu que Whiteknights soit resté le domicile des requérants, au sens de l'a rticle 8, paragraphe 1, de la Convention, auquel cas se pose une autre question qui consiste à savoir si le refus de l'auto ri sation de l'occuper constituait une ingérence dans l'exercice du droit des requérants au respect de leur domicile qui était justifiée par les faits de la cause . La Commission considère toutefois qu'il s'agit là de questions complexes concernant l'interprétation de la Convention et dont la solution doit dépendre d'un examen du fond de l'affaire . 11 s'ensuit que cette partie de la requête ne saurait être considérée comme manifestement mal fondée, au sens de l'article 27, paragraphe 2, de la Convention et qu'elle doit donc être déclarée recevable, aucun autre motif d'irrecevabilité n'ayant été établi' . 3 . Les requérants s'élèvent aussi contre les poursuites pénales dont ils ont fait l'objet pour occupation illicite de Whiteknights, bien qu'ils aient pris toutes les dispositions possibles pour exercer un recours contre le re fus d'autorisation de l'occuper pour un temps plus ou moins long, poursuites qui les contraignaient à résider à l'hôtel ou hors de Iile pour suivre la procédure d'appel civil . Ils soutiennent que le procès fait à M . Gillow n'était pas équitable, car il reposait sur un chef d'accusation incorrect et un délit d'• occupation . non défini . Ils allèguent en outre que la condamnation pénale de M . Gillow préjugeait de leur appel au civil contre le refus d'auto ri sations et que la procédure d'appel ulté rieure de M . Gillow contre sa condamnation a été vicié pour avoir été traitée par un t ri bunal composé pratiquement des mêmes juges que ceux qui avaient connu de l'appel au civil le mois précédent, et sans que les requérants soient réellement en mesure d'étudier les minutes du procès de première instance . Le Gouvernement défendeur soutient, en revanche, que les poursuites pénales intentées à l'encontre des requérants constituaient une mesure approp ri ée de mise en o :uvre des lois sur le logement, après qu'on se fût montré extrêmement indulgent envers les requérants, qui s'étaient vu accorder à plusieurs reprises des •su rs is à exécution » de la menace d'application des sanctions pénales, lesquelles finirent par devenir inévitables . La Commission doit examiner ces griefs à la lumière de l'article 6, paragraphe 1, de la Convention, qui prévoit notamment : •Toute personne a droit à ce que sa cause soit entendue équitablement , publiquement et dans un délai raisonnable, par un tribunal indépendan t - 1 l8 -
et impartial . établi par la loi, qui décidera, soit des contestations sur ses droits et obligations de caractère civil, soit du bien-fondé de toute accusation en matière pénale dirigée contre elle . Les griefs des requérants concernant leur appel au civil et les poursuites pénales sont toutefois étroitement liés à leurs griefs au titre de l'article 8 de la Convention et de l'article 1 du Protocole additionnel . Les poursuites dont ils se plaignent constituaient le point culminant de la procédure d'application des dispositions de la loi sur le logement au cas particulier des requérants . En outre, il s'agissait des mesures mêmes pour lesquelles les griefs des requérants au titre d'autres dispositions de la Convention ont déjà été déclarés recevabtes . La Commission considère que la question de l'application de l'article 6 et de la portée des garanties prévues par celui-ci pose, dans ces conditions, de délicates questions d'interprétation de la Convention qu'il convient de résoudre par un examen du fond de l'affaire . Il s'ensuit que cette partie de la requête ne saurait être considérée conime manifestement mal fondée, au sens de l'article 27, paragraphe 2, de la Convention et qu'elle doit donc être déclarée recevable, aucun autre motif d'irrecevabilité n'ayant été établi .
Par ces motifs, la Commission DÉCLARE LA REQUÊTE RECEVABLE, tout moyen de fond rése rvé
- 1 t9 -

Origine de la décision

Formation : Commission (plénière)
Date de la décision : 09/12/1982

Fonds documentaire ?: HUDOC

HUDOC
Association des cours judiciaires suprêmes francophones Organisation internationale de la francophonie

Juricaf est un projet de l'AHJUCAF, l'association des cours judiciaires suprêmes francophones,
réalisé en partenariat avec le Laboratoire Normologie Linguistique et Informatique du droit (Université Paris I).
Il est soutenu par l'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie et le Fonds francophone des inforoutes.