Facebook Twitter Appstore
Page d'accueil > Résultats de la recherche

§ STEWART c. ROYAUME-UNI

Imprimer

Type d'affaire : Decision
Type de recours : Partiellement recevable ; Partiellement irrecevable

Numérotation :

Numéro d'arrêt : 10044/82
Identifiant URN:LEX : urn:lex;coe;cour.europeenne.droits.homme;arret;1984-07-10;10044.82 ?

Analyses :

(Art. 6-1) DELAI RAISONNABLE


Parties :

Demandeurs : STEWART
Défendeurs : ROYAUME-UNI

Texte :

APPLICATION/REQUÉTE N° 10044/82
Kathleen STEWART v/the UNITED KINGDO M Kathleen STEWART c/ROYAUME-UN I
DECISION of 10 July 1984 on the admissibility of the application DÉCISION du 10 juillet 1984 sur la recevabilité de la requ@t e
Article 2 of the Convention : 77te list of situations in which a deprivation of life is not in contravention of this Anicle is eshaustive.
Article 2, paragraph 2 of the Convention : A corollary of the requirement of this Article to protect life is that it also covers situations where death is unintentionally inflicted. 7he ttse of force must be strict[y proportiotmte to the legitinmte aim pursued. Proportionalirv is to be assessed having regard to the nature of the aim pursued, the dangers to life and limb inherent in the situation and the risk that the force employed might result in loss of life . Article 2, paragraph 2 (c) of the Convention : Riot. In the light offacts established by the national judge after careful consideration ofall the evidence, and without new or contrarv evidence from the applicant, the Commission uses the facts established by the domestic judge . A hostile assembly of 150 people throwing missiles at a patrol ofsoldiers to the point that they risked serious injury is a"riot " .
Article 3 of the Convention : Where accidenta l harm is the consequence of a use of force found to comply with the requirements of Article 2 para . 2, no issue arises under Article 3 .
- 162 -
Article 2 de la Convention : L'énumération des situations dans lesquelles la mort peut étre infligée sans violation de cette disposition est limitative . Article 2, paragraphe 2, de la Convention : L'obligation de protéger la vie a pour corollaire que cene disposition vise également la mort infligée sans intention de la donner. L'usage de la force doit être strictement proportionné au but autorisé à atteindre. La proporiionnalité s'apprécie en fonction de la nature du but, du danger pour les vies humaines et l'intégrité corporelle inhérent à la situation et de l'ampleur du risque d'infliger la mort en faisanr usage de la force. Article 2, paragraphe 2, litt . c), de la Convention : Emeute. En présence de faits soigneusement établis aprés instruction complète par le juge national et en l'absence d'éléments de preuve contraires produits par le requérant, la Commission se fonde sur les faits établis par le juge national. Une assemblée hostile de 150 personnes jetant des projecti(es sur une patrouille de soldats au point de leur faire encourir le risque de graves blessures est une . émeute . . Article 3 de la Convention : Lorsqu'une atteinte accidentelle à['intégrité corporelle est une conséquence d'un usage de la force reconnu conforme aux conditions de l'article 2, par. 2, aucune question ne se pose sous l'angle de l'article 3 .
((rançais : voir p . 174)
THE FACTS
The application brought by Mrs Kathleen Stewart, at present residing in Northern ireland, arises out of the killing of her son Brian by a plastic baton round fired by the army in Northern Ireland . She is represented by Ms Barbara Cohen, solicitor for the National Council for Civil Liberties (NCCL), and Lord Gifford, Q .C ., of counsel . On 4 October 1976 the applicant's son Brian, who was then 13 years old, wa s struck on the head by a plastic baton round (also known as a plastic "bullet") fired by Corporal Smith, a British soldier serving in Northern Ireland . He died on 10 October 1976 from the injury which he had received . On 10 October 1976 an autopsy indicated that the cause of death was laceration, bruising and oedema of the brain caused by a fracture of the skull . On 7 December 1977 an inquest was held on the death of Brian Stewart before a coroner of the City of Belfast sitting with the jury . An open verdict was remmed . Proceedings were subsequently started by the applicant, as administratrix o f her son's estate, against the Ministry of Defence in the Belfast Recorders Court, claiming t 1,000 compensation for the death of her son . Her claim alleged negligenc e
- 163 -
of the defendant's servants or agents, or in the alternative, by reason of the assault, battery and trespass to the person of the deceased by the servants and agents of the defendant . The action was heard by His Honour Judge Brown on 23 May 1979 . He found that there was a riot in progress, that the lives of the army patrol were in peril and that the firing of the baton rounds was justified in the circumstances . The applicant appealed to the High Court where the case was reheard on 8, 9 and 10 March 1982 . On 12 March 1982 Lord Justice ]ones dismissed the appeal . The applicant called evidence in these proceedings to the effect that her son did not take part in any aggressive action against the patrol of which Corporal Smith was part at any time before he was struck, and that there was no riotous behaviour in progress at the time of the incident . One witness stated that there was a group of six or seven children, aged 7 to 9, nearby who were throwing stones at the soldiers . A different version of events was given in evidence by army witnesses who stated that Corporal Smith was a member of an 8-man patrol in the Turf Lodge area of Belfast . They were confronted on either side by a crowd numbered about 150 who showered them with stones and bottles . Lieutenant O'Brien, who was in charge of the patrol, ordered one baton round to be fired, but this had no effect . Stoning was severe and all members of the patrol were hit . Lieutenant O'Brien ordered Corporal Smith to fire a baton round at a leader among the rioters who had been throwing missiles . He did so, aiming at the youth's legs but he was stmck by two missiles on the leg and shoulder which made him jerk as he fired . As a result the baton round hit Brian Stewart who was standing beside the youth . Lord Justice Jones rejected the evidence given by witnesses called on behalf of the applicant in favour of the evidence given by army witnesses, to the effect that there was a riot in progress . He also found, as a fact, that Brian Stewart participated actively in the riot . In his judgment he expressed his findings in the following terms : " . . .there was a riot at the material time and up to about 150 people were doing their best to make life unbearable for the 8 soldiers . And those actions of the rioters included throwing missiles which in fact found their target, on occasions at any rate . When one considers the risks to which the army were subject in those circumstances, namely the risk of serious injury from direct contact and the risk of sniper attack, I take the view that it was fully justified on the pan of the Patrol Commander to order a baton round to be fired . " He found that the firing was reasonable for the prevention of crime in accordance with Section 3(1) of the Criminal Law Act 1967 * . • This provision provides as follows : "(I) A person nuy use such force as is reasonable in the circumstences in the prevenfion of crime, or in etfening or assisting in the lawful arrest of offender : or suspected oRenders or of persons unlawfully at large ."
- 16q -
He also held that because the baton gun is a potentially lethal weapon, its use must be judged against a high standard of care . However, Corporal Smith acted with reasonable care in firing . He found that he was an experienced gunner and that he could not be blamed for the disruption of his aim which resulted in the round striking Brian Stewart rather than the intended target . He also found that in a riot situation, failure to give warning was not of material significance . He concluded as follows : "Having carefully considered all the evidence and the circumstances which it discloses, I have come to the clear view that the firing of this baton round constituted reasonable force in the circumstances and that Corporal Smith exercised reasonable care in firing it . " Facts relevant to plastic baton rounds and their use in Northern Ireland, as submitted by the applican t In 1970 the "baton round" was first used in Northern Ireland, taking the form of a mbber bullet . Around 55,000 of the rubber bullets were fired by the Security forces in Northem Ireland between 1970 and 1975, when the mbber baton round was withdrawn . The use of the mbber bullets in Nonhem Ireland caused three deaths . In addition, numerous victims were blinded in one or both eyes, disfigured, or otherwise seriously injured . Between 1973 and 1975 the plastic baton round was gradually phased into use . It is fired from a longer form of gun which gives it greater accuracy . Whereas the rubber bullet was intended to be fired at the ground and to ricochet towards the target, the plastic bullet was intended to be fired directly at the person . In a parliamentary answer on 21 January 1977, Mr Wellbeloved, on behalf of the respondent Govemment, gave the following information about the plastic bullet : "The 25 grain plastic - PVC round currently used in Northern Ireland weighs approximately 135 grammes, is 3/" long and 1/" in diameter . Details of its kinetic energy and velocity are as follows : Range
5
yds
15 yds 25 yds 50 yds 75 yds
Information Velocity 60 60 56 47 not (meters per second) available Kinetic energy (Joules)
265
243
212
14 9
Tests on weapons of this nature being carried out in the United States by the Law Enforcement Assistants Administration (LEAA) showed that impacts greater than 122 Joules caused effects in the "severe damage region" . Accordingly, it was ,
- 165 -
or should have been known, to the respondent Government that the use of this weapon could cause death and se rious inju ry at a range of less than 50 metres . The relevant instmctions issued to soldiers for the firing of baton rounds are con tained in "Rules of Engagement for PVC Baton Rounds", which state as follows :
"Genera l 1 . Baton rounds may be used to disperse a crowd whenever it is judged to be minimum and reasonable force in the circumstances . 2 . The rounds must be fired at selected persons and not indiscriminately at the crowd . They should be aimed so that they strike the lower part of the target's body directly (i .e . without bouncing) . 3 . The Authority to use these rounds is delegated to the commander on the spot . 4 . Rounds must not be fired at a range of less than 20 metres except when the safety of soldiers or others is seriously threatened . The baton round was designed and produced to .5 disperse crowds . It can also b e used to prevent an escape from H .M . Prisons if it is, in the circumstances, still considered to constitute the use of minimum and reasonable force . If a prisoner can be apprehended by hand, the baton must not be used . "
The applicant submits that the facts show that the respondent Government has authorised the firing of baton rounds in the following situations : (a) as a method of crowd dispersa l (b) directly at the bodies of individual s(c)atr ngeswhic areknowntobefat l (d) in circumstances where there is no threat to the life or safety of soldiers or others . Prior to the death of Brian Stewart, the plastic baton rounds had also caused the death of a child, Steven Geddis, aged 10, hit on the side of the head on 28 August 1975 . Since the death of Brian Stewart a further nine people have been killed by plastic baton rounds in Northem Ireland, including four children aged between I 1 and 15 years . To the best of the applicant's knowledge plastic bullets are not used or authorised for use in the countries of the Council of Europe other than the United Kingdom . In some parts of the United Kingdom, other than Northern Ireland, plastic baton rounds have been issued to the police although there is no recorded incident of their being used . Their use was condemned by a large majority vote in the European Parliament on 13 May 1982 .
- 166 -
COMPLAINTS AND SUBMISSION S Article 2 The applicant complains that, even if the facts as claimed by the army witnesses and accepted by the court are to be accepted by the Commission the rights of her son under Article 2 of the Convention have been violated . She claims that the respondent Government have violated Article 2 of the Convention, in particular through the authorisation and widespread use of the baton round, a dangerous and deadly weapon, as a method of crowd control . 1t is submitted that it is irrelevant whether or not Corporal Smith intended to kill or to endanger the life of Brian Stewart or any other person . The applicant does not accept the view that the Commission appears to have taken in Application No . 2758/66 (Yearbook 12, p . 174) that an unintentional killing cannot give grounds for a claim under Article 2 . This decision ought to be reviewed . If a Govemment sanctions the use of deadly weapons, in circumstances which give rise to the high probability or near certainty that fatalities will occur from their use, a serious issue arises under Article 2 . By its authorisation and widespread use of this weapon the respondent Govemment has put at risk the lives of everyone the baton rounds may strike . It is also submitted that the force used in the shooting of Brian Stewart was not force that was "no more than absolutely necessary" either for the purpose of defending the army patrol from unlawful violence or for the purpose of quelling a riot . Furthermore the events which were taking place at the material time (assuming the account given by army witnesses to be correct) did not constitute a riot within the meaning of the Convention .
Article 3 The applicant funher complains that the respondent Government has violated Article 3 in authorising and directly causing Brian Stewart to be subjected to inhuman treatment or punishment through being struck by violent force on the head by a plastic bullet .
Article 14
'
Further, the applicant complains that the respondent Govemment has violated Article 14 in that the danger to loss of life and the inhuman treatment brought about by the use of baton rounds in Northern Ireland have been suffered wholly or predominantly by people of the Roman Catholic religion and/or of republican opinions .
Object of the clai m The applicant claimsjust satisfaction under Art . 50 of the Convention, claiming compensation of her grief, suffering and bereavement .
- 167 -
THE LAW (Extracts) I . The applicant complains of the death of her son Brian who was killed after being struck on the head by a plastic baton round ("plastic bullet") fired, by a British soldier serving in Northem Ireland, in the course of a civil disturbance . She submits that his death resulted from the use of force which was in contravention of Article 2 of Lhe Convention . She further complains of a breach of Articles 3 and 14 of the Convention .
As regards Article 2 6 . The Govermnent subntit that Article 2 only concems the intentional deprivation of life and does not apply to either accidents or negligent behaviour . They maintain, in the altemative, that Lhe action of the soldier in fuing the plastic baton round constituted the use of force which was no more than absolutely necessary "in defence of any person from unlawful violence" or "in action lawfully taken for the purpose of quelling a riot" within the meaning of Article 2 para . 2, (a) and (c) . They state that there was a serious riot in progress at the time and that members of the army patrol ran the risk of being seriously injured . In addition, the soldier who fired the round had been struck by a missile at the moment of firing with the consequence that his aim was upset . 7 . The applicant does not accept the version of facts as found by Lord Justice Jones in the High Court . She denies that there was a riot in progress at the time of the incident . However she submits that even if the facts as found by the High Court are accepted, the force used in the circumstances was disproportionate to the threat or risk of injury confronting the soldiers . She claims, in this regard, that the plastic baton round is a lethal weapon which is known to inflict grievous and sometimes fatal injuries, particularly when it strikes the head . To permit Lhe use of such a weapon in circumstances where there is no actual threat to life and where an error in using it can result in death, constitutes the use of force which is more than "absolutely necessary" contrary to Anicle 2 . She also submits that the facts as found by the High Court do not amount to a "riot" within the meaning of Anicle 2 para . 2 (c) which contemplates a civil disturbance of much greater magnitude than that which was found by the High Court to have actually occurred . 8 . The Commission notes that the applicant does not accept the facts as found by the High Court and that she challenges the court's finding that there was a riot in progress at the time her son was killed . However, the national judge, unlike the Commission, has had the benefit of listening to the witnesses at first hand and assessing the credibility and probative value of their testimony after careful consideration . Accordingly, in the absence of any new evidence having been brought before the Commission and of any indications that Lhe trial judge incorrectly evaluated the evidence before him, the Commission must base its examination of the Convention issues before it on the facts as established by national courts .
- 168 -
9 . The Commission will thus examine the issue under Article 2 in the light of the facts as found by Lord Justice Jones in the High Court . 10 . Article 2 states as follows : I . Eve ryone's ri ght to life shall be protected by law . No one shall be deprived of his life intentionally save in the execution of a sentence of a court following his conviction of a crime for which this penalty is provided by law . 2 . Deprivation of life shall not be regarded as inflicted in contravention of this Article when it results from the use of force which is no more than absolutel y necessary ; (a) in defence of any person from unlawful violence ; (b) in order to effect a lawful arrest or to prevent the escape of a person lawfully detained ; (c) in action lawfully taken for the purpose of quelling a riot or insurrection .
Preliminary remarks concerning the Interpretation of Article 2 11 . The Commission's approach to the interpretation of Article 2 must be guided by a recognition that it constitutes one of the most important rights in the Convention, from which no derogation is permissible, even in times of public emergency (Anicle 15 para . 2) . 12 . Article 2 requires that the right to life "shall be protected by law", and sets limits to the circumstances and conditions, in which the taking of life by a public authority may be permitted . Four different sets of situations are enumerated in which deprivation of life is not to be regarded as a violation of the right to life . The first is found in the second sentence of paragraph I, and the remaining three are enumerated in paragraph 2 . 13 . These situations, where deprivation of life may be justified, are exhaustive and must be narrowly interpreted, being exceptions to, or indicating the limits of, a fundamental Convention right (see, e .g . Eur . Court H .R ., judgment of 6 November 1980, Guzzardi case, Series A, N° 39, para . 98) . It must be noted that only the first of these situations refers to intentional killing . In paragraph 2 no express mention is made of whether the provision covers only intentional or unintentional or both types of deprivation of life . This question has been raised, in the present case, by the respondent Government who submit that Article 2 extends only to intentional acts and has no application to negligent or accidental acts . 14 . It would appear from the finding of the Commission in the case of X . v . Belgium (Application N° 2758/66, Yearbook 12, pp . 174) that Article 2 was seen as not comprehending unintentional killing although this question was not specifically addressed by the Commission in its decision . However, the Commission has adopted a broader interpretation in Application N° 7154/75, (Association X . v .
- 169 -
United Kingdom Dec . 12 .7 .78, D .R . 14 p . 31) where, in response to the submission that only intentional deprivation of life wa.s covered, it stated as follows : "The Commission considers that the first sentence of Article 2 imposes a broader obligation on the State than that contained in the second sentence . The concept that "everyone's right to life shall be protected by law" enjoins the State not only to refrain from taking life "intentionally" but, further, to take appropriate steps to safeguard life . (ibid ., p . 32) " 15 . The Commission considers that the above interpretation, which views the sphere of protection afforded by Article 2 as going beyond the intentional deprivation of life, flows from the wording and structure of Article 2 . In particular, the exceptions enumerated in paragraph 2 indicate that this provision is not concerned exclusively with intentional killing . Any other interpretation would hardly be consistent with the object and purpose of the Convention or with a strict interpretation of the general obligation to protect the right to life . In the Commission's opinion the text of Article 2, read as a whole, indicates that paragraph 2 does not primarily define situations where it is permitted intentionally to kill an individual, but defines the situations where it is permissible to "use force" which may result, as the unintended outcome of the use of force, in the deprivation of life . The use of the force-which has resulted in a deprivation of life-must be shown to have been "absolutely necessary" for one of the purposes in sub-paragraphs (a), (b) or (c) and, therefore, justified in spite of the risks it entailed for human lives . 16 . As regards the interpretation of the concept "absolutely necessary" guidance can be sought in the Court's and Commission'sjurisprudence . In the Handyside Case (judgment of 7 .12 .76, Eur . Court H .R ., Series A N° 24, para . 48) the Court stated the following in the context of Article 10 para . 2 : "The Court notes at this juncture that, whilst the adjective "necessary", within the meaning of Article 10 para . 2, is not synonymous with "indispensable" (cf . in Articles 2 para . 2 and 6 para . 1, the words "absolutely necessary" and "strictly necessary" and, in Article 15 para . l, the phrase "to the extent strictly required by the exigencies of the situation"), neither has it the flexibility of such expressions as "admissible", "ordinary" (cf . Article 4 para . 3), "useful" (cf. the French text of the first paragraph of Article I of Protocol N° 1), "reasonable" (cf . Articles 5 para . 3 and 6 para . 1) or "desirable" . " 17 . The Court has reaffirmed that "necessary" implies a "pressing social need" in the Sunday Times Case (judgment of 26 .4 .79, Series A N° 30, para . 59)-also in the context of Article 10 para . 2-and in the Dudgeon Case Qudgment of 22 .10 .81, Series A N° 45, para . 51) in the context of Article 8 para . 2 . 18 . Above all, the test of "necessity" includes an assessment as to whether the interference with the Convention right was proportionate to the legitimate aim pursued (Sunday Times Case, loc . cit ., para . 62, p . 38) . Finally, the qualification o f
- 170 -
the word "necessary" in Article 2 para . 2 by the adverb "absolutely" indicates that a stricter and more compelling test of necessity must be applied . 19 . Having regard to the above, the Commission thus considers ihat Article 2 para . 2 permits the use of force for the purposes enumerated in sub-paragraphs (a), (b) and (c) subject to the requirement that the force used is strictly proportionate to the achievement of the permitted purpose . In assessing whether the use of force is strictly proponionate, regard must be had to the nature of the aim pursued, the dangers to life and limb inherent in the situation and the degree of the risk that the force employed might result in loss of life. The Conunission's examination must have due regard to all the relevant circumstances surrounding the deprivation of life . Application of Article 2 to the facts of the cas e 20 . The Commission recalls that it will examine the issue under Article 2 in the light of the facts as found by Lord Justice Jones in the High Court on 12 March 1982 (see para . 8 above) . His description of the situation confronting the eight soldiers prior to the Firing of the round is as follows : . . . There was a riot at the material time and up to about 150 people were doing their best to make life unbearable for the 8 soldiers . And those actions of the rioters included throwing missiles which in fact found their target, on occasions at any rate . When one considers the risks to which the army were subject in those circumstances, namely the risk of serious injury from direct contact and the risk of sniper attack, I take the view that it was fully justified on the part of the Patrol Commander to order a baton round to be fired . " 21 . He also found, as a fact, that the soldier who fired the baton round was trained and experienced in its use ; that he intended no injury to the applicant's son ; that he aimed at a rioter standing next to him and that a blow on the shoulder from a missile disturbed his aim with the result that Brian Stewart was hit on the head by the baton round . 22 . The respondent Government submit that in these circumstances the use of the plastic baton round constituted the use of force which was no more than "absolutely necessary" to defend the soldiers from unlawful violence and for the purpose of quelling a riot within the meaning of sub-paragraphs (a) and (c) . The appticant contends, however, in essence, that to use such a dangerous weapon constitutes a disproportionate response of force to the situation confronting the soldiers . 23 . The Commission must first examine whether the aim pursued in using the force was permissible under paragraph 2 . In particular, the question arises whether the action was "lawfully taken for the purpose of quelling a riot . . ." under subpatagraph (c) . 24 . The Commission is aware, in this context, that the legal definition of a "riot" is a ma tter on which there may be differences in the law and practice of membe r
- 171 -
States . As with other concepts in the Convention it must, therefore, be regarded as "autonomous" and thus subject to interpretation by the Commission and European Court of Human Rights (see Eur . Court H .R ., Künig case, judgment of 28 .6 .78, Series A N° 27, para . 88, p . 29) . 25 . The Commission does not consider it necessary to attempt an exhaustive definition or elucidation of the term "riot" in sub-paragraph (c) . In the present case, the Commission considers that an assembly of 150 persons throwing missiles at a patrol of soldiers to the point that they risked serious injury must be considered, by any standard, to constitute a riot . There can be no doubt also, in view of the decisions of the Northern Ireland courts, that the action of the soldiers was lawful under Northern Irish law (Section 3 of the Criminal Law Act (Northern Ireland) 1967) . The aim pursued, therefore, falls within sub-paragraph (c) . 26 . The Commission must now examine whether the force used in pursuit of the above aim was "absolutely necessary" within the meaning of paragraph 2 . As stated above, it must consider the proportionality of the use of the plastic baton round to the aim pursued, having regard to the situation confronting the soldiers, the degree of force employed in response and the risk that the use of force would result in the deprivation of life . 27 . In assessing this question, the Commission must also bear in ntind that the events took place in Northem Ireland which is facing a situation of continuous public disturbance that has given rise to much loss of life (see e .g . Case of Ireland v . the United Kingdom, Series A, Vol . 25) . Moreover, rioting of the kind which occurred in the present case is a frequent occurrence and gives rise to the apprehension, as adverted to by Lord Justice Jones, that the disturbance will be used as a cover for sniper attack, although no claim has been made in the present case that the patrol actually came under such attack . Finally, the Commission must also observe, in this context, that the Convention specifically envisages, in sub-paragraph (c), the right of the authorities to take action to quell a riot without imposing any requirement of retreat or avoiding action in the face of mounting violence . 28 . The Commission notes that the use of the plastic baton round in Northern Ireland has given rise to much controversy and that it is a dangerous weapon which can occasion serious injuries and death, particularly if it strikes the head . However, information provided by the parties conceming casualties, compared with the number of baton rounds discharged, shows that the weapon is less dangerous than alleged . 29 . It recalls that the group of soldiers were confronted with a hostile and violent crowd of 150 persons who were attacking them with stones and other missiles, and, further, that the soldier's aim was disturbed at the moment of discharge when he was struck by several missiles .
- 172 -
30 . The Commission is of the opinion, taking due account of all the surrounding circumstances, referred to above, that the death of Brian Stewart resulted from the use of force which was no more than "absolutely necessary" "in action lawfully taken for the purpose of quelling a riot . . ." within the meaning of Article 2 para . 2 (c) . In view of this finding the Commission does not consider it necessary to examine the respondent Govemment's altemative plea that the force was no more than "absolutely necessary" "in defence of any person from unlawful violence" under sub-paragraph (a) .
As regards Article 3 31 . Article 3 of the Convention states as follow s "No one shall be subjected to torture or to inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment . " 32 . The applicant alleges that her son was subjected to inhuman treatment or punishment through being struck violently on the head by the plastic baton round . The respondent Government submit that "treatment" falling within Article 3 must be shown to be deliberate treatment and that a person cannot be subjected to inhuman treatment or punishment by mistake or by an accident . 33 . The Commission refers to its above finding (para . 30) that the facts do not reveal a breach of Article 2 pare . I in the present case and that the use of force was justified under paragraph 2 (c) . The Commission considers that in such circumstances, where force is used in conformity with Article 2 resulting in accidental harm, as in the present case, no issue of treatment in breach of Article 3 can arise .
As regards Article 1 4 34 . The applicant also alleges that plastic baton rounds have been used only against the Roman Catholic or Republican community in Northern Ireland in breach of Article 14 . 35 . This provision is in the following terrns : "The enjoyment of the rights and freedoms set forth in this Convention shall be secured without discrimination on any ground such as sex, race, colour, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, association with a national minority, property, birth or other status . " 36 . The Commission does not consider that this complaint has been in any way substantiated by the applicant who has adduced no evidence in support of her allegation .
- 173 -
Conclusio n 37 . The Commission concludes that the applicant's complaints reveal no appearance of a breach of the Convention and that they fall to be rejected as manifestly ill-founded within the meaning of Art . 27(2) of the Convention .
For these reasons, the Commissio n DECLARES THE APPLICATION INADMISSIBLE .
(TRADUCTION) EN FAIT La requête introduite par M"" Kathleen Stewart, résidant actuellement en Irlande du Nord, concerne la mort de son fds Brian, tué d'une balle en matiére plastique tirée par l'année en Irlande du Nord . Elle est représentée par Mm` Barbara Cohen, solicitor au •National Council for Civil Liberties (NCCL)• et par Lord Gifford, Q .C ., avocat (•counsel .) . Le 4 octobre 1976, le fils de la requérante, Brian, qui était alors âgé de 13 ans, a été aueint à la tête par une balle en plastique tirée par le caporal Smith, soldat britannique servant en Irlande du Nord . Il est décédé le 10 octobre 1976 des suites de ses blessures . Une autopsie a révélé que son décès était dû à une déchirure, un hématome et un oedéme du cerveau provoqué par une fracture du crâne, le 10 octobre 1976 . Le 7 décembre 1977, une enquête judiciaire sur la mort de Brian Stewart s'est déroulée devant un «coroner» de la ville de Belfast, siégeant avec jury . Un rapport ne fonnulant aucune conclusion a été rendu . La requérante a ensuite entamé une procédure, en tant qu'administratrice de la succession de son fils, contre le ministère de la Défense, devant le tribunal des +Recorders - de Belfast, réclamant 1000 livres de dommages-intérêts pour la mort de son fds . Elle invoquait la négligence des préposés du défendeur ou, subsidiairement, les coups et blessures et l'atteinte à l'intégrité de la personne du défunt par les préposés du défendeur . L'affaire est passée en jugement le 23 mai 1979 devant le juge Brown . Celui-ci a estimé qu'une émeute était en cours, que la vie de la patrouille de l'armée était en péril et qu'il était justifié, dans ces circonstances, d e
- 174 -
tirer les balles en plastique . La requérante s'est pourvue en appel auprès de la « High Coun • où l'affaire a fait l'objet d'une nouvelle audience les 8, 9 et 10 mars 1982 . Le 12 mars 1982, Lord Justice Jones a rejeté l'appel . La requérante a produit, au cours de cette procédure, des témoignages pour établir, d'une part, que son fils n'avait panicipé à aucun moment, avant d'être abattu, à un quelconque acte d'agression contre la patrouille dont faisait partie le caporal Smith et, d'autre part, qu'aucune émeute n'était en cours au moment de l'incident . L'un des témoins a déclaré qu'il y avait à proximité un groupe de six ou sept enfants, âgés de 7 à 9 ans, qui jetaient des pierres aux soldats . Les témoins de l'armée ont donné une version différente des faits, déclarant que le caporal Smith faisait partie d'une patrouille de huit hotrlmes du quartier Turf Lodge de Belfast . lls étaient en butte, de chaque c6té, à une foule d'environ 150 personnes qui les bombardaient de pierres et de bouteilles . Le lieutenant O'Brien, qui commandait la patrouille, ordonna qu'on tire une balle en plastique, mais cela n'eut aucun effet . Les pienes tombaient dru et tous les membres de la patrouille étaient touchés . Le lieutenant O'Brien ordonna au caporal Smith de tirer une balle en plastique sur l'un des meneurs des émeutiers qui lançaient des projectiles . II le fit, visant les jambes du jeune homme, mais il fut atteint par deux projectites à la jambe et à l'épaule, ce qui le ftt vaciller au moment où il tirait, si bien que la balle toucha Brian Stewart qui se tenait à côté du jeune homme . Lord Justice Jones a écarté les dépositions des témoins cités par la requérante pour leur préférer celles des témoins de l'armée, selon lesquelles une émeute était en cours . Il a aussi considéré comme établi que Brian Stewart participait activement à l'émeute . Dans son jugement, il a exprimé ses constatations de la manière suivante : . . . Il y avait une émeute au moment des faits et près de 150 personnes faisaient de leur mieux pour rendre la vie insupportable aux huit soldats . Et, entre autres activités, les émeutiers lançaient des projectiles qui atteignaient leur cible, en tout cas de temps à autre . Si l'on considère les risques auxquels était soumise l'armée dans ces conditions, à savoir le risque de recevoir directement des blessures graves ou le risque d'être attaquée par des tireurs embusqués, j'estime que le commandant de la patrouille était pleinement fondé à ordonner que soit tirée une balle en plastique .Il a admis que le tir était raisonnable pour la prévention d'infractions pénales, conformément à l'article 3(I) de la loi de 1967 relative au droit pénal (.Criminal Law Act 1967») (') . (•) Ce tt e disposition est ainsi libellée : .(1) II est permis de recourir à la force, dans une nrsure raisonnable comple tenu des circonstunces, pour emprcher des Infractions pénales ou pour effectuer ou faciliter l'arrestaaon légale de délinquants, de suspects ou d'évadés .•
- 175 -
Il a aussi déclaré que, la balle en plastique étant une arme potentiellement meurtrière, il fallait apprécier son utilisation selon un critàre élevé de prvdence . Néanmoins, le caporal Smith avait agi avec raison et prudence lorsqu'il avait tiré . Il s'agissait d'un tireur expérimenté auquel on ne saurait reprocher le fait que son coup ait été dévié, si bien que c'est Brian Stewart et non pas la cible prévue qui a été atteint . Il a aussi estimé que, dans une situation d'émeute, l'absence de sommations n'avait pas véritablement d'importance . Il a conclu en ces termes : . Après avoir étudié attentivement toutes les preuves el les faits qu'ils révèlent, j'en suis venu à la nette conclusion que le tir de cette balle en plastique constituait un usage raisonnable de la force étant donné les circonstances et que le caporal Smith a fait preuve, en tirant, de prudence et de diligence .
Informations concernant les balles en plastique et leur emploi en Irlande du Nord, telles qu'elles ont é té présentées par la requérant e C'est en 1970 qu'on a employé pour la premiére fois en Irlande du Nord la . balle-matraque - ( . baton round •), sous forme de balle en caoutchouc . Les forces de sécurité en Irlande du Nord ont tiré près de 55 .000 balles en caoutchouc entre 1970 et 1975, année où on les a retirées . L'emploi des balles en caoutchouc en Irlande du Nord est à l'origine de trois décès . En outre, de nombreuses victimes ont perdu un oeil ou les deux, ont été défigurées ou ont subi d'autres blessures graves . Entre 1973 et 1975, on a introduit progressivement la balle de plastique . Elle est tirée avec une arme à canon plus long qui lui donne une plus grande précision . Alors que la balle en caoutchouc devait être tirée vers le sol et ricocher vers la cible, la balle en plastique est destinée à être tirée directement contre la personne . Dans une réponse parlementaire du 21 janvier 1977, M . Wellbeloved a fourni, au nom du Gouvernement défendeur, les renseignements suivants concernant la balle en plastique : - La balle en plastique PVC de 25 grains actuellement employée en Irlande du Nord pése environ 135 grammes et mesure 3 1/2 pouces de long et 1 1/2 pouce de diamètre . On trouvera ci-après des détails concernant son énergie cinétique et sa vitesse : Distance 5 yds 15 yds 25 yds 50 yds 75 yd s Renseignements Vitesse (mètres par 60 60 56 47 non seconde) disponibles Energie cinétique (Joules)
265 243 212 149
- 176 -
Des tests portant sur des armes de cene nature entrepris aux Etats-Unis par la • Law Enforcement Assistants Administration (LEAA)- ont indiqué que des impacts supérieurs à 122 Joules avaient des effets de type grave . En conséquence, le Gouvernement défendeur savait ou devait savoir que l'emploi de cette arme pouvait causer la mort et des blessures graves à une distance de moins de 50 mètres . Les instructions adressées aux soldats à propos du tir de balles-matraques figurent dans le - RBglement sur l'emploi des balles en PVC• . qui prévoit : - Instructions générales 1.
Il peut être fait usage de balles-matraques pour disperser une foule chaque fois que cela est considéré comme un exercice minimal et raisonnable de la force étant donné les circonstances .
2 . Les balles doivent étre tirées sur des personnes déterminées et non sans discrimination sur la foule . Il faut viser de manière à ce qu'elles frappent directement (c'est-à-dire sans ricochet) la pa rt ie inférieure du corps de la cibl e 3 . L'autorité nécessaire pour décider de l'emploi de ces balles est déléguée au commandant sur place . 4 . Les balles ne doivent pas ètre tirées à une distance de moins de 20 mètres sauf lorsque la sécurité des soldats ou d'autrui est gravement menacée . 5 . La balle-matraque a été con çue et fabriquée pour disperser les foules . Elle peut aussi servir à empêcher une évasion des p ri sons de Sa Majesté si, compte tenu des circonstances, on estinte encore que cela constitue l'exercice minimal et raisonnable de la force . Si un détenu peut être appréhendé sans arme, il ne faut pas employer de balles . » La requérante soutient qu'il resso rt des faits que le Gouvemement défendeur a autorisé le tir de balles-niatraques dans les situations suivantes : a . en tant que moyen destiné à disperser les foules b . en visant directement le corps d'individus c . à des distances connues pour ètre fatales d . dans des circonstances où il n'y a pas de menace pour la vie ou la sécurité de soldats ou d'autmi . Avant la mort de Brian Stewart, les balles en plastique avaient aussi causé la nion d'un enfant, Steven Geddis, âgé de dix ans, atteint à la tempe le 28 ao0t 1975 . Depuis la mo rt de Brian Stewart, 9 autres personnes ont élé tuées par des balles en plastique en Irlande du Nord, y compris quatre enfants àgés de 11 à 15 ans . Pour autant que la requérante puisse le savoir, à l'exception du Royaume-Uni, aucun pays du Conseil de l'Europe n'emploie ou n'autorise l'emploi de balles en plastique . Dans cenaines parlies du Royaume-Uni, autres que l'Irlande du Nord, des balles en plastique ont été remises à la police mais on ne signale aucun incident révélant leur emploi . Celui-ci a été condamné par un vote du Parlement européen à une large majorité le 13 mai 1982 . - 177 -
GRIEFS ET ARGUMENTATION Article 2 La requérante soutient que, méme si la Commission retient les faits tels qu'ils ont été présentés par les témoins de l'armée et établis en justice, les droits de son fils au titre de l'article 2 de la Convention ont été violés . Elle allègue que le Gouvernement défendeur a violé l'article 2 de la Convention, notamment en autorisant et en employant largement la balle-matraque, arme dangereuse et meurtrière, comme méthode de dispersion des foules . Peu importerait que le caporal Smith ait eu ou non l'intention de tuer ou de mettre en péril la vie de Brian Stewart ou de toute autre personne . La requérante n'admet pas l'opinion que la Commission semble avoir adoptée dans la requète N° 2758/66, selon laquelle un meunre non intentionnel ne saurait justifier un grief au titre de l'article 2 . Cette décision devrait être révisée . Si un gouvernement approuve l'usage d'annes meurtrières, dans des circonstances où il est fort probable ou quasi certain que des morts en résulteront, un grave problème se pose au regard de l'article 2 . En autorisant cene arme et en en faisant un large usage, le Gouvernement défendeur a mis en péril la vie de toute personne pouvant être atteinte par les balles-matraques . Il est aussi allégué que la force employée pour tirer sur Brian Stewart n'était pas - absolument nécessaire - ni pour défendre la patrouille de l'armée contre la violence illégale ni pour réprimer une émeute . En outre, les événements qui se déroulaient au moment des faits (à supposer que le compte rendu des témoins de l'armée soit exact) ne constituaient pas une émeute au sens de la Convention .
Article 3 La requérante soutient en outre que le Gouvernement défendeur a violé l'article 3 en permettant et en faisant directement en sorte que Brian Stewart soit soumis à une peine ou un traitement inhumains en étant violemment frappé à la tête par une balle en plastique .
Article 1 4 En outre, la requérante allègue que le Gouvernement défendeur a violé l'article 14 en ce que le risque de perdre la vie et les traitements inhumains introduits par l'usage des balles-matraques en Irlande du Nord ont été subis totalement ou principalement par des personnes de religion catholique romaine et/ou d'opinions républicaines .
Objet de la plainte La requérante réclame une satisfaction équitable au titre de l'article 50 de la Convention, demandant réparation pour la perte cruelle qu'elle a subie .
- 178 -
EN DROIT (Extraits ) La requérante se plaint de la mort de son fils Brian, tué après avoir été frappé à la tête par une batle en plastique ( « plastic baton round» ou . plastic bullet •) tirée au cours d'une émeute par un soldat britannique servant en Irlande du Nord . Elle soutient que sa mort est le résultat d'un recours à la force en violation de l'article 2 de la Convention . Elle invoque en outre une violation des articles 3 et 14 de la Convention .
Sur l'article 2 6 . Le Gouvemement soutient que l'article 2 conceme uniquement la mort infligée intentionnellement et ne s'applique ni aux accidents ni au comportement négligent . Il allégue, à titre subsidiaire, que l'acte du soldat, lorsqu'il a tiré la balle en plastique, constituait un recours à la force rendu absolument nécessaire .pour assurer la défense de toute personne contre la violence illégale • ou . pour réprimer, conformément il la loi, une émeute •, au sens de l'article 2 par . 2(a) et (c) . Il affirme qu'une grave émeute avait lieu au moment des faits et que les membres de la patrouille de l'armée couraient le risque d'être gravement blessés . En outre, le soldat concerné avait été atteint par un projeclile au moment de tirer, ce qui avait dévié son coup . 7 . La requérante conteste la version des faits telle qu'elle a été établie par Lord Justice Jones devant la High Court . Elle nie qu'il y ait eu une émeute au moment de l'incident . Quoi qu'il en soit, elle soutient qu'à supposer admis les faits établis par la High Court, la force employée dans ces circonstances était disproportionnée à la menace ou au risque de blessures devant lesquels se trouvaient les soldats . Elle allégue, à cet égard, que la balle en plastique est une arme meurtrière connue pour infliger des blessures graves et parfois fatales, surtout quand elle atteint la tête . Autoriser le recours à une telle arme dans des circonstances où il n'y a pas de menace réelle pour la vie et où une erreur de maniement peut provoquer la mort représente un recours à la force qui n'est pas .absolument nécessaire ., en violation de l'article 2 . Elle soutient aussi que les faits, tels qu'ils ont été établis par la High Court, ne constituent pas une . émeute . au sens de l'article 2 par. 2(c) qui vise des troubles civils de bien plus grande ampleur que ceux qui, d'après la High Court, se sont réellement produits . 8 . La Commission constate que la requérante ne reconnaît pas les faits tels qu'ils ont été établis par la High Court et qu'elle conteste la conclusion de cette dernière selon laquelle une émeute avait lieu au moment où son fils a été tué . Néanmoins, le juge national, contrairement à la Commission, a eu l'avantage de pouvoir entendre les témoins directement el d'évaluer la véracité et la valeur probante de leur témoignage aprés un examen attentif. En conséquence, en l'absence de tout nouveau moyen de preuve présenté à la Commission et de toute indication selon laquelle l e
- 179 -
juge aurait évalué de manière incorrecte les éléments de preuve qui lui ont été présentés, la Commission doit fonder son examen des problèmes dont elle est saisie sous l'angle de la Convention sur les faits tels qu'ils ont été établis par les tribunaux nationaux . 9 . La Commission examinera donc le problème qui se pose sur le terrain de l'article 2 à la lumière des faits tels qu'ils ont été établis par Lord Justice Jones à la High Court . 10 . L'article 2 est ainsi libellé : 1 . Le droit de toute personne à la vie est protégé par la loi . La mort ne peut être infligée à quiconque intentionnellement, sauf en exécution d'une sentence capitale prononcée par un tribunal au cas où le délit est puni de cette peine par la loi . 2 . La mort n'est pas considérée comme infligée en violation de cet anicle dans les cas où elle résulterait d'un recours à la force rendu absolument nécessaire : a . pour assurer la défense de toute personne contre la violence illégale ; b . pour effectuer une arrestation réguliére ou pour empêcher l'évasion d'une personne régulièrement détenue ; c . pour réprimer, confortnément à la loi, une émeute ou une insurrectio n
Remarques préliminaires concernant l'interprétation de l'article 2 11 . Dans sa manière d'aborder l'interprétation de l'article 2, la Commission doit être guidée par la reconnaissance du fait qu'il s'agit d'un des droits les plus importants de la Convention, pour lequel aucune dérogation n'est permise, mème en cas di; danger public (article 15 par . 2) . 12 . L'article 2 exige que le droit à la vie soit «protégé parla loi» et il fixe des lintites aux circonstances et aux conditions dans lesquelles une autorité publique peut être autorisée à infliger la mon . Il énumère quatre types différents de situations dans lesquelles l'infliction de la mort ne doit pas être considérée comme une violation du droit à la vie . On trouve le premier dans la deuxième phrase du paragraphe 1 et les trois autres au paragraphe 2 . 13 . Cette liste de situations dans lesquelles l'infliction de la mort peut ètrejustifiée est exhaustive et appelle une interprétation étroite car il s'agit d'exceptions à un droit fondamental reconnu par la Convention ou d'indications des limites de celui-ci (voir, par exemple, Cour Eur . D .H ., arrèt Guzzardi du 6 novembre 1980, série A n° 39, par . 98) . II faut noter que seule la première de ces situations vise la mort infligée de façon intentionnelle . Le paragraphe 2 ne précise nullement si la disposition vise uniquement la mort infligée de maniére intentionnelle ou non intentionnelle ou le s
- 180-
deux . Cette question a été soulevée en l'espèce par le Gouvernement défendeur, qui soutient que l'article 2 s'applique uniquement aux actes intentionnels et nullement aux actes de négligence ou aux cas fortuits . 14 . II semble, d'après l'opinion de la Commission dans l'affaire X . c/Belgique (Requète N° 2758/66, Annuaire 12, p . 174-192), que l'article 2 ait été envisagé comme n'englobant pas la mort infligée de manière non intentionnelle, bien que la Commission n'ait pas abordé spécifiquement cette question dans sa décision . Mais la Commission a adopté une interprétation plus large à propos de la requête N" 7154/75, Association X . c/Royaume-Uni (D .R . 14 p . 31-39), où, en réponse à l'argument selon lequel seule la mort infligée intentionnellement relevait de l'article 2, elle a déclaré ce qui suit : • La Commission estime que la première phrase de l'a rt icle 2 impose à l'Etat une obligation plus large que celle que contient la deuxième phrase . L'idée que • le droit de toute personne à la vie est protégé par la loi . enjoint à l'Etat non seulement de s'abstenir de donner la mo rt • intentionnellement ., mais aussi de prendre les mesures nécessaires à la protection de la vie . - ( ibid, p . 36) . 15 . La Corrunission estime que l'interprétation ci-dessus, qui envisage la sphère de protection offe rte par l'art icle 2 comme ne se limitant pas à la mo rt infligée intentionnellement, découle du libellé et de la structure de l'a rt icle 2 . Les exceptions énumérées au paragraphe 2, notamment, indiquent que cette disposition ne vise pas exclusivement la mo rt infligée intentionnellement . Toute autre interprétation serait diffi cilement compatible avec l'objet et la finalité de la Convention ou avec une interprétation stricte de l'obligation générale de protéger le droit à la vie . Selon la Commission, le texte de l'a rt icle 2, pris dans son ensemble, indique que le paragraphe 2 ne définit pas avant tout des situations dans lesquelles il est permis de tuer intentionnellement un individu mais les situations où il est permis d'avoir . recours à la force . alors même que cela peut aboutir à la mo rt , comme conséquence non prévue du recours à la force . Il faut démontrer que le recours à la force - qui a abouti à la mo rt - é tait • absolument nécessaire . à l'un des objectifs mentionnés aux alinéas (a), (b) ou (c) et donc justifié malgré les ri sques qu'il impliquait pour des vies humaines . 16 . En ce qui conceme l'interprétation de la notion d'absolue nécessité, on peut s'aider de la jurisprudence de la Cour et de la Commission . Dans l'affaire Handyside (arr@t du 7 décembre 1976, Cour Eur. D .H ., série A n° 24, par . 48), la Cour a déclaré ce qui suit dans le cadre de l'art icle 10 par . 2 : • La Cour note à cette occasion qui si l'adjectif . nécessaire ., au sens de l'article 10, par . 2, n'est pas synonyme d'• indispensable . (comp ., aux articles 2 par. 2 et 6 par . I, les mots • absolument nécessaire» et • strictement nécessaire et, à l'article 15, par . 1, le membre de phrase •dans la stricte mesure où l a
- 181 -
situation l'exige•), il n'a pas non plus la souplesse de termes tels qu'«admissible-, « normal •(comp . l'article 4 par . 3), « utile » (comp . le prentier alinéa de l'article 1 du Protocole N° 1), •raisonnable• (comp . les articles 5 par . 3 et 6 par 1) ou •opportun- . • 17 . La Cour a réaffirmé que l'adjectif .nécessaire» impliquait un •besoin social impérieux . dans l'affaire Sunday Times (arrêt du 26 avril 1979, série A n° 30, par . 59) - éga)ement dans le cadre de l'article 10 par . 2- et dans l'affaire Dudgeon (arrêt du 22 octobre 1981, série A n° 45, par . 51) dans le cadre de l'article 8 par . 2 . 18 . Avant tout, le critère de la • nécessité • oblige à déterminer si l'ingérence dans l'exercice du droit reconnu par la Convention était proportionnée au but légitime poursuivi (affaire Sunday Times), loc . cit . par . 62, p . 38) . Enfin, le fait que le terme «nécessaire» de l'article 2 par . 2 ait été nuancé par l'adverbe •absolument+ indique qu'il faut appliquer un critère plus strict et plus contraignant pour évaluer la nécessité . 19 . Eu égard à ce qui précède, la Commission estime donc que l'article 2 par . 2 permet le recours à la force pour les objectifs énumérés aux alinéas (a), (b) et (c), à condition que la force employée soit strictement proportionnée à la réalisation du but autorisé . En évaluant si le recours à la force est strictement proportionné, il faut tenir compte de la nature du but recherché, du danger pour les vies humaines et l'intégrité corporelle inhérenCà la situation, et dc l'antpleur du risque que la rorce employée fasse des victimes . L'examen fait par la Commission doit tenir dûment conipte de tous les éléntents pertinents qui entourent la mon . Application de l'article 2 aux faits de l'espèce 20 . La Commission rappelle qu'elle examinera la question qui se pose au titre de l'article 2 à la lumière des faits tels qu'ils ont été établis par Lord Justice Jones, à la High Court, le 12 mars 1982 (voir par . 8 ci-dessus) . La description de la situation dans laquelle se trouvaient les huit soldats avant que la balle n'ait été tirée est la suivante : . . . . Il y avait une émeute au moment des faits et près de 150 personnes faisaient de leur mieux pour rendre la vie insupportable aux huit soldats . Et, entre autres activités, les émeutiers lançaient des projectiles qui atteignaient leur cible, en tout cas de temps à autre . Si l'on considère les risques auxquels était soumise l'armée dans ces conditions, à savoir le risque de recevoir directement des blessures graves ou le risque d'être attaquée par des tireurs embusqués, j'estime que le commandant de la patrouille était pleinement fondé à ordonner que soit tirée une balle en plastique . • 21 . Il a aussi établi, sur le plan des faits, que le soldat qui avait tiré la ballematraque était bien entrainé et habitué à son maniement ; qu'il n'avait nullement l'intention de blesser le fds de la requérante ; qu'il visait un émeutier qui se tenait - 182 -
à cbté de ce dernier et qu'un coup sur l'épaule d0 à un projectile avait dévié son coup, si bien que Brian Stewart avait été touché à la tête par la balle-matraque . 22 . Le Gouvernement défendeur soutient que, dans ces conditions, l'emploi de la balle en plastique constituait un recours à la force rendu •absolument nécessaire» pour défendre les soldats contre la violence illégale et pour réprimer une émeute, au sens des alinéa (a) et (c) . La requérante affirme néanmoins, pour l'essentiel, que l'emploi d'une arrne aussi dangereuse constituait une réaction de force disproportionnée à la situation dans laquelle se trouvaient les soldats . 23 . La Commission doit d'abord rechercher si le but poursuivi en employant la force était permis par le paragraphe 2 . II s'agit notamment de savoir si le recours à la force était nécessaire •pour réprimer, conformément à la loi, une émeute• . . . en application de l'alinéa (c) . 24 . La Commission n'ignore pas, à cet égard, que la définition légale d'une •émeute . est une question à propos de laquelle il peut y avoir des différences dans le droit et la pratique des Etats membres . A l'instar d'autres concepts de la Convention, il faut donc considérer celui-ci comme • autonome » et donc soumis à l'interprétation de la Commission et de la Cour européennes des Droits de l'Homme (voir Cour Eur . D . H ., arr2t Künig du 28 juin 1978, série A n° 27, par . 88, p . 29) . 25 . La Commission estime inutile de tenter de donner une définition ou une explicalion exhaustives du mot •émeute• à l'alinéa (c) . En l'espèce, la Commission considère qu'une assemblée de 150 personnesjetant des projectiles sur une patrouille de soldats au point que ceux-ci risquaient d'@tre gravement blessés doit être considérée, quel que soit le critère appliqué, comme constituant une émeute . Il est indéniable aussi, eu égard aux décisions des tribunaux d'trlande du Nord, que les actes des soldats étaient légaux selon de droit d'Irlande du Nord (article 3 de la loi de 1967 relative au droit pénal (Irlande du Nord)) . Le but poursuivi relève donc de l'alinéa (c) . 26 . La Cottunission doit maintenant rechercher si la force employée à la poursuite du but susmentionné était .absolument nécessaire•, au sens du paragraphe 2 . Ainsi qu'il a été dit plus haut, elle doit étudier la proportionnalité de l'emploi de la balle de plastique par rapport au but poursuivi, eu égard à la situation dans laquelle se trouvaient les soldats, au degré de force employé pour réagir et au risque de voir le recours à la force entraîner la mort . 27 . Pour évaluer ce point, la Commission doit aussi garder à l'esprit le fait que les événements se sont produits en Irlande du Nord qui se trouve dans une situation d'agitation permanente, situation qui a fait beaucoup de victimes (voir, par exemple, l'affaire Irlande c/Royaume-Uni, Public . Cour Eur . D .H ., série A, vol . 25) . En outre, il se produit fréquenunent des émeutes comme celle qui a eu lieu en l'epèce et elles font redouter, ainsi qu'y a fait allusion Lord Justice Jones, que les troubles ne servent de couverture à des attaques de tireurs embusqués, bien qu'en l'espèce il n'y ait eu aucune allégation selon laquelle la patrouille aurait véritablement été exposée à une telle attaque.
- 183 -
Enfin, la Commission doit aussi faire observer, à cet égard, que la Convention envisage précisément, à l'alinéa (c), le droit qu'ont les autorités de prendre des mesures pour réprimer une émeute sans obligation de se replier ou d'éviter d'agir face à la montée de la violence . 28 . La Commission constate que l'emploi des balles en plastique en Irlande du Nord a suscité de nombreuses controverses et qu'il s'agit d'une anne dangereuse qui peut occasionner des blessures graves et la mon, surtout si elle atteint la tête . Néanmoins, il ressort des renseignements communiqués par les panies en ce qui conceme les victimes par reppon au nombre de balles tirées que cette anne est moins dangereuse qu'il n'a été allégué . 29 . Elle rappelle que le groupe de soldats était en butte à une foule hostile et violente de 150 personnes qui l'attaquait avec des pierres et d'autres projectiles et qu'en outre le coup avait été dévié au moment où le soldal tirait parce qu'il avait été atteint par plusieurs projectiles . 30 . Après avoir tenu dùment compte de toutes les circonstances évoquées ci-dessus, la Commission estime que la mort de Brian Stewart a été le résultat d'un recours à la force rendu .absolument nécessaire• pour réprimer, confonnément à la loi, une émeute . . . ., au sens de l'article 2 paragtaphe 2 (c) . Eu égard à cette conclusion, la Commission estime qu'il n'y a pas lieu d'examiner le moyen subsidiaire du Gouvernement défendeur selon lequel le recours à la force était rendu • absolument nécessaire • - pour assurer la défense de toute personne contre la violence illégale», au sens de l'alinéa (a) .
Sur l'article 3 31 . L'anicle 3 de la Convention est ainsi libellé : • Nul ne peut étre soumis à la tonure ni à des peities ou traitements inhumains ou dégradants . • 32 . La requérante allégue que son fils a été soumis à une peine ou un traitement inhumains car il a été frappé violemment à la téte par la balle-matraque en plastique . Le Gouvernement défendeur soutient que pour qu'un •traitement» relève de l'article 3, il faut établir qu'il s'agit d'un traitement délibéré et qu'une personne ne peut étre soumise à une peine ou traitement inhumain par erreur ou par accident . 33 . La Commission se référe à sa conclusion ci-dessus (paragraphe 30) selon laquelle les faits ne révèlent pas de violation de l'article 2 paragraphe I en l'espèce et le recours à la force était juslifié, au sens du paragraphe 2 (c) . La Commission estime qu'en de telles circonstances où un recours à la force confonne à l'article 2 aboutit, comme en l'espèce, à un préjudice accidentel, il ne saumit être question de traitement violant l'article 3 .
- I8q -
~ ^ry ~ . .
. _ . _.
:St . : .a~
.
~ Y .
.
.
.. ~ . r ~`~
.;ZA ;~.
'
•'
~t~ ~. ]
_ . ' .
.
ç
. . . ~p1;1 . . ' ï~` -' Y
.
.
.
.
:• ;:7 Sur l'artlcle 1 4
.
34 . La requérante allègue aussi que les balles en plastique n'ont é té employées qu'à l'encontre de la communauté catholique ou républicaine d'Irlande de Nord, en violation de l'anicle 14 .
.
~;; :. .i,
. ~
..
-
.
.-•.ï,
35 . Cette disposition est ainsi libellée : • La jouissance des droits et libenés reconnus dans la présente Convention doit être assurée, sans distinction aucune, fondée notamment sur le sexe, la race, la couleur, la langue, la religion, les opinions politiques ou toutes autres opinions, l'o ri gine nationale, la fortune, la naissance ou toute autre situation . • . .r,N
36 . La Commission estime que ce grief n'a é té nullement étayé par la requérante, qui n'a produit aucune preuve à l'appui de son allégation . Concluslôn 37 .La Commission conclut que les griefs de la requérante ne rév2lent aucune apparence de violation de la Convention et qu'ils doivent étre rejetés comme manifestement mal fondés ; au sens de l'article 27 par . 2 de la Convention n
.Parcesmotif,lC
DÉCLARE LA REQUETEIRRECEVABLE .
- 185 -
.
.
..
.
.
.
. • i~ ':' : ~.:. : .,

Origine de la décision

Formation : Commission (plénière)
Date de la décision : 10/07/1984

Fonds documentaire ?: HUDOC

HUDOC
Association des cours judiciaires suprêmes francophones Organisation internationale de la francophonie

Juricaf est un projet de l'AHJUCAF, l'association des cours judiciaires suprêmes francophones,
réalisé en partenariat avec le Laboratoire Normologie Linguistique et Informatique du droit (Université Paris I).
Il est soutenu par l'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie et le Fonds francophone des inforoutes.