Facebook Twitter Appstore
Page d'accueil > Résultats de la recherche

§ HERRICK c. ROYAUME-UNI

Imprimer

Type d'affaire : Decision
Type de recours : Radiation du rôle (solution du litige)

Numérotation :

Numéro d'arrêt : 11185/84
Identifiant URN:LEX : urn:lex;coe;cour.europeenne.droits.homme;arret;1985-03-11;11185.84 ?

Analyses :

(Art. 13) DROIT A UN RECOURS EFFECTIF, (Art. 14) DISCRIMINATION, (Art. 3) PEINE DEGRADANTE, (Art. 3) PEINE INHUMAINE


Parties :

Demandeurs : HERRICK
Défendeurs : ROYAUME-UNI

Texte :

APPLICA77ON/REQUETE N° 11185/8 4 Muriel HERRICK v/the UNITED KINGDO M Muriel HERRICK c/ROYAUME-UN I DECISION of I I March 1985 on the admissibility of the application DÉCISION du 11 mars 1985 sur le recevabilité de la requête
Article 8 or the Convention : A limitation on user of property in a green zone prohibiting residence there is a measure which, in a democratic sociely, is necessary for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others. £xamination of the balance to be struck between protection of the individual's right to respect for his home and protection of the rights and freedoms of others. Article / , paragraph 2 of the First Protocol : User as residence of property in green zone prohibited under environmental protection legislation : such prohibition constitutes a control of the use of property in accordance with the general interest . 77+e threat of criminal proceedings for user in contravention of the law does not, of itself, render the measure disproportionate to its goal . Article 8 de la Convention : La limitation de l'usage (escluant la résidence) d'une construction dont on est propriéiaire et qui se trouve dans une zone d'environnement protégé constitue une mesure qui, dans une société démocratique, est nécessaire à la protection des droits et libertés d'autrui . Examen de l'équilibre à ménager entre la protection du droit de l'individu au respect de son dondcile et la protection des droits et libertés d'autrui . Article 1, paragraphe 2, du Protocole additionnel : L'interdiction, fondée sur la législation protégeant l'environnement, d'utiliser comme résidence une construction dont on est propriétaire et qui se trouve dans une zone protégée, constitue une réglementation de !'usage des biens conformément à l'intérét général .
275
La simple menace de poursuites pénales pour usage non confonne à la législation ne rend pas la mesure disproporrionnée à son but .
THE FACTS
((rançais : voir p . 281 )
The facts as they have been submitted by the applicant, a British citizen born in 1927 and living in Jersey may be summarised as follows :
In 1963 the applicant acquired by way of gift a property known as Hillside . This property included on some adjoining land the construction which is the subject of the present application, namely a former bunker constructed during the occupation of Jersey for the storage of explosives . In 1963 the applicant put a door on the bunker and installed two beds, and whilst she lived in St . Helier she used to spend one or two nights from time to time in the bunker during the summer months . Subsequently this user increased, and she allowed relations to use the bunker in the same way, although at this time it had no sanitation or cooking facilities . This was the position relating to the applicant's user of the bunker on I April 1965, which is the relevant reference date for planning control in Jersey . The applicant subsequently sold Hillside in 1972 and the bunker became her permanent summer home . By late 1977 she had installed electricity and mains water, together with sanitation and cooking facilities . This additional use came to the notice of the Island Development Committee (IDC) of the States of Jersey (the local planning authority) which visited the property in 1977, and formed the view that the applicant's user was in breach of the relevant planning regulations . The IDC served a notice upon the applicant requiring her to cease inhabiting the bunker . Correspondence passed between the IDC and the applicant's legal representative without any agreement being reached . The IDC then noticed a technical error in the notice in that it was stated to exercise its powers pursuant to the wrong statutory provisions . The IDC consequently served a further notice on her dated 29 March 1979 pursuant to Article 8(I) of the Island Planning (Jersey) Law 1964('the 1964 Act'), which requires the permission of the IDC in respect of development of any land from its use on I April 1965 . The notice ordered the applicant to : "cease any habitable use of [the] former explosives store situated on the bank to the west of Hillside . Le Mont Pinel, St . Ouen before 30 June 1979" . After service of the notice in 1979 various negotiations took place, but in Jun e 1980 a summons was served on the applicant alleging a breach of Article 8 (3) of the 1964 Act, by virtue of her continuing habitation of the bunker, and requiring he r
276
to appear before the Police Court of Jersey . On 17 November 1981, the applicant appealed to the Royal Court against the notice of 29 March 1979 issued by the IDC . The Royal Court heard the appeal on 16 September 1982 and found that the applicant had established a certain, limited, user of the bunker prior to the entry into operation of the 1964 Act, but that this limited user did not amount to user as a residence . The Court referred the question of defining the extent of the applicant's right to use the bunker to the parties for negotiation with a view lo their agreeing the terms of such user . Such negotiations did not bear ftvit, and the applicant appealed from the decision of the Royal Court to the Jersey Court of Appeal for a determination of the validity of the notice, and for a definition of her right to occupy the bunker . This appeal was heard between 2 and 4 May 1984 . The Court of Appeal held that the notice served on the applicant was bad, since it was insufficiently clearly drafted, and could not form the basis of clear interpretation or, if its terms were broken, provide the basis for a criminal prosecution of the applicant for breach of the planning regulations . The Court therefore allowed the applicant's appeal and declared that the bunker could be used as : "an occasional shelter not amounting to use as a residence, between I April and 30 November in any year, including (a) occasional use as a place of rest or recreation during the day (b) occasional use as a place for sleeping during that period but for no more than two consecutive nights at any one time and (c) the right to keep in the shelter such furniture and facilities as are incidental to the use of the shelter . " The effect of this decision of the Court of Appeal was to remove the threat of criminal proceedings pursuant to the terms of the notice se rved on the applicant by the IDC in June 1980 .
COMPLAINTS The applicant complains that during the period from 1977 to date she occupied the bunker as ber home, between April and November of each year, and that the restrictions on her occupancy of the bunker imposed by the Court of Appeal, which prevent her from using it as a residence and limit the number of occasions when she can sleep there to a maximum of two consecutive nights, are oppressive, unreasonable, and contrary to the provisions of Article 8 of the Convention and Article I ofProtocol No . 1 . She also complains that she has been subject to repeated criminal prosecution for her use of the bunker prior lo the decision of the Court of Appeal . She submits that this constituted inhuman and degrading treatment, contrary to Article 3 of the Convention .
277
THE LA W I . The applicant complains that the restrictions upon her use of her bunker imposed by the Jersey Court of Appeal following the notice issued by the Island Development Committee (IDC) pursuant to Article 8(1) of the Island Planning (Jersey) Law 1964 ("the 1964 Act") and the threat of criminal prosecution are oppressive, unreasonable and contrary to the provisions of Articles 3 and 8 of the Convention and Anicle I of Protocol No . I . With regard to the applicant's reference to Article 3 of the Convention, which forbids, inter alia, inhuman and degrading treatment, the Commission finds that the matters about which she complains do not attain the degree of seriousness to give rise to an issue under that provision . The Commission will therefore examine these complaints first under Article I of Protocol No . 1, which provides as follows : "Every natural or legal person is entitled to the peaceful enjoyment of his possessions . No one shall be deprived of his possessions except in the public interest and subject to the conditions provided for by law and by the general principles of intemational law . The preceding provisions shall not, however, in any way impair the right o f a State to enforce such laws as it deems necessary to control the use of property in accordance with the general interest or to secure the payment of taxes or other contributions or penalties . " The Commission considers that the use of the bunker allowed to the applicant was a restriction on her right to the peaceful enjoyment of her possessions contained in the first sentence of Anicle I of Prolocol No . I . Such a restriction, imposed pursuant to the legislation concerned to protect the environment through planning regulations, amounts to a control of the use of the applicant's property pursuant to the second paragraph of Article I of Protocol No . I . The Commission must therefore consider whether, on the facts of this particular case, the measures applied were proponionate and necessary to control the use of the applicant's property in accordance with the general interest . The applicant's bunker is situated in an area of particular landscape value, known as the Green Zone . The Jersey Court of Appeal described it as being "situaled among rising ground in one of the many areas of outstanding natural beauty on this Island" . The 1964 Act requires the permission of the IDC in respect of the development of any such land . Equivalent planning requirements exist in many of the Member States of the Council of Europe and their role is recognised to be important in safeguarding areas of outstanding beauty from unsuitable development . By its decision of 23 September 1982 the Royal Court held that the notice issued by the IDC was valid, though it feh unable to identify precisely the extent t o 278
which the applicant had acquired a limited occasional user of the bunker prior to the entry into force of the 1964 Act . The applicant and the IDC failed to agree on the extent of such user, and the applicant eventually appealed to the Jersey Court of Appeal . The Jersey Court of Appeal held that, although the statutory notice purported to be issued by the IDC pursuant to the 1964 Act was invalid as being imprecise and ambiguous, the fact that the applicant had no right to use the bunker as a permanent residence during the summer months had been established by the Royal Court . The Jersey Coun of Appeal then defined the user to which the applicant was entitled pursuant to the provision of the 1964 Act . The Commission recognises that planning controls are necessary and desirable in order to preserve areas of outstanding natural beauty for the enjoyment of both the inhabitants of Jersey and visitors to the island . The terms imposed by the Jersey Court of Appeal upon the applicant were thus prinm facie in accordance with general interest . Concerning the proportionality of the measures employed the Commission notes that Article 8 (3) of the 1964 Act provides that if a person continues to use land in contravention of a notice issued pursuant to the 1964 Act requiring the discontinuance of any such use, he or she shall be guilty of an offence and liable to criminal proceedings and a possible fine . In the present case, as a result of her failure to cease the unauthorised use of the bunker, the applicant was issued with a summons dated 23 May 1980 to appear before the Police Court of Jersey . The applicant was therefore exposed to a criminal charge but criminal proceedings were not in fact pursued, although they remained pending until the decision of the Jersey Court of Appeal following the hearing of 2 to 4 May 1984 which quashed the notice . The Commission therefore finds that although the threat of criminal proceedings may raise an issue as to the proportionality of enforcement measures, the summons issued in this case did not render the restrictions on the applicant's use of her bunker disproportionate . The Commission finds that a proper balance has been struck between the applicant's and the general interest . The control of the use of her property is therefore in accordance with the requirements of Article I of Protocol No . I and it follows that this part of the application is manifesUy ill-founded within the meaning of Article 27 para . 2 of the Convention . 2 . The applicant has also invoked Article 8 of the Convention in respect of these complaints, which provides as follows : "I . Everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, his home and his correspondence . 2 . There shall be no interference by a public authority with the exercise of this right except such as is in accordance with the law and is necessary in a democratic sociery in the interests of national security, public safety or th e
279
economic well-being of the country, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others . " The Jersey Court of Appeal considered it established that the applicant would be in breach of the 1964 Act if she were to use the bunker as a permanent residence during the summer months . However, the court held that one could legitimately use the bunker in a more restricted manner .
The Commission need not decide, but may assume for the purposes of this decision, that the bunker is to be regarded as the applicant's home because, even assuming that this is so, and that the decision of the Jersey Court of Appeal therefore interfered with the applicant's right to respect for her private life or her home, the Commission considers that any such interference was justified under Article 8 para . 2 of the Convention . It was in accordance with the law, and, for the reasons set out below, the Commission also ftnds that any such interference pursued a legitimate aim in a proportionate manner namely the protection of the rights of others through the operation of planning controls, which is an aim recognised as necessary in a democratic society in the Member States of the Council of Europe . The Commission recalls that in the sphere of restrictions on the use of private property such as a private dwelling, although the requirements of Article 8 are more stringent than those of Article I of Protocol No . 1 in respect of the legitimacy of the aim sought to be achieved by the measure in question, the test of the proportionality of the interference is substantially similar in respect of both provisions (No . 9261/81, Dec . 3 .3 .82, D .R . 28 p . 177) . The Commission has already found that the restrictions on the applicant's use of the bunker, including the threatened criminal sanctions, were lawful and necessary and were not disproportionate and were therefore justified under Article I of Protocol No . 1 . Under Article 8 of the Convention the Commission must equally recognise that proportionate measures to regulate the use of property which may be an individual's home may be justified as necessary in a democratic society for the protection of the rights of others, where those rights are clearly identified and directly at risk . This involves striking a balance between the protection of the individual's right to respect for his or her home against the necessity for protecting other rights specified in Article 8 para . 2 . The existence and operation of planning controls which delimit areas where domestic development may be extended is a legitimate control measure to protect the amenity value of rural areas and thereby to protect the rights of others . In view of this, and the fact that the applicant remains able to make substantial use of the property, which use she is merely prevented from extending funher, the Commission finds that a proper balance has been struck be tween the applicant's and the general interest . Any interference with the applicant's right to respect for her home and private life is therefore in accordance with th e 280
requirements of Article 8 para . 2 of the Convention and necessary in a democratic society for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others . It follows that this aspect of the applicant's complaint is also manifestly illfounded within the meaning of Article 27 para . 2 of the Convention . For these reasons, the Commission DECLARES THE APPLICATION INADMISSBLE .
(1'RADUCT7ON) EN FAI T Les faits, tels que les a exposés la requérante, ressonissante britannique née en 1927 et habitant Jersey . peuvent se résumer comme suit . En 1963, la requérante a acquis par donation une propriété, - Hillside•, où se trouvait, sur un terrain y att enant, le bâtiment qui fait l'objet de la présente requéte : un ancien bunker construit pendant l'occupation de Jersey pour y stocker des explosifs . En 1963, la requérante posa une po rte et installa deux lits dans le bunker . Habitant à St . Hélier, elle prit l'habitude l'été d'y passer de temps à autre une ou deux nuits . Par la suite, elle multiplia les séjours dans le bunker et autorisa des parents à l'utiliser bien qu'il n'y eût à cette époque ni sanitaires ni cuisine . Telle était la situation concernant l'utilisation du bunker par la requérante au I - avril 1965, date choisie pour un contrôle d'urbanisme à Jersey . Par la suite, la requérante vendit Hillside en 1972 et le bunker devint sa résidence d'été . Fin 1977, elle y avait installé l'électricité et le tout-à-l'égout, ainsi que des sanitaires et une cuisine . Ce tte nouvelle utilisation vint à la connaissance de la Commission d'aménagement de l'ile (IDC) des Etats de Jersey ( serv ice local de l'urbanisme) qui visita la propriété en 1977 et estima que l'utilisation du bunker p ar la requérante était contraire à la réglementation en vigueur en matière d'urbanisme . L'IDC mit la requérante en demeure de cesser d'habiter le bunker . Un échange de correspondance eut lieu entre I'IDC et l'avocat de la re quérante sans que les parties pa rv iennent à un accord . L'IDC releva alors un vice de forme dans la mise en demeure où ell e
281
déclarait exercer ses pouvoirs en vertu des dispositions d'un règlement qui n'était pas le bon . L'IDC envoya en conséquence à la requérante une autre mise en demeure en date du 29 mars 1979, conformément à l'article 8 par . I de la loi de 1964 sur l'aménagement de l'ile de Jersey (- la loi de 1964 .) qui exige l'autorisation de l'IDC pour modifier l'usage d'un terrain à partir du I° 1 avril 1965 . La sommation ordonnait à la requérante de : «cesser avant le 30 juin 1979 tout usage d'habitation de l'ancien entrepôt d'explosifs située sur la côte à l'ouest d'Hillside . Mont Pinel . St . Ouen» . Après signification de la mise en demeure, eurent lieu en 1979, diverses négo-
ciations mais en juin 1980, la requérante fut citée à comparaitre devant le tribunal de simple police de Jersey pour infraction à l'article 8 par . 3 de la loi de 1964, puisqu'elle persistait à habiter le bunker . Le 17 novembre 1981, la requérante se pourvut devant le tribunal royal contre la mise en denteure du 29 mars 1979 par l'IDC . Le tribunal entendit l'affaire le 16 septembre 1982 et estima que la requérante avait acquis un certain droit d'usage, limité, sur le bunker avant l'entrée en vigueur de la loi de 1964 mais que ce droit d'usage limité n'était pas le droit d'utiliser le bunker comme résidence . Le tribunal renvoya la question de la définition des limites du droit d'usage du bunker à la négociation des parties qui devaient se meure d'accord sur les conditions de cet usage . Les négociations n'aboutirent pas et la requérante fit appel de la décision du tribunal royal devant la cour d'appel de Jersey pour une décision sur la validité de la mise en demeure et la définition de son droit d'occuper le bunker . L'appel fut exantiné du 2 au 4 mai 1984 . La cour d'appel déclara que la mise en demeure signifiée à la requérante était mauvaise : son libellé n'était pas assez clair, elle ne permettait pas d'interpréter clairement la situation et si ses clauses en étaient méconnues, elle ne pouvait pas foumir le point de départ de poursuites pénales contre la requérante pour contravention à la réglementation sur l'urbanisme . La cour fit donc droit à l'appel de la requérante et déclara que le bunker pouvait être utilisé comme : «un abri occasionnel excluant la résidence et pouvant être utilisé entre le I - avril et le 30 novembre de chaque année, la requérante pouvant notamment (a) s'en servir occasionnellement comme lieu de repos ou de loisir pendant la journée : (b) s'en servir occasionnellement pour dormir pendant cette période, mais pas plus de deux nuits consécutives à chaque fois et (c) y garder les meubles et ustensiles inséparables de son utilisation comme abri- . Cette décision de la cour d'appel eut pour effet de lever la menace des poursuites pénales suite à la mise en denteure signiFiée à la requérante par l'IDC en juin 1980 .
GRIEFS La requérante se plaint que, de 1977 à aujourd'hui, le bunker lui ayant serv i de maison d'avril à novembre chaque année, les restrictions imposées par la cou r
282
d'appel dans l'occupation du bâtiment - interdiction de s'en se rv ir comme résidence et limitation du nombre de fois où elle peut y dormir à deux nuits consécutives au maximum - ont un caractère oppressif, déraisonnable et contraire aux dispositions de l'a rt icle 8 de la Convention et de l'a rticle I du Protocole additionnel . Elle se plaint également d'avoir été soumise à des poursuites pénales répétées pour avoir utilisé le bunker avant l'arrêt de la cour d'appel . Selon elle, cela constituerait un traitement inhumain et dégradant contraire à l'article 3 de la Convention .
EN DROIT 1 . La requérante se plaint que les restrictions apportées à l'utilisation du bunker et imposées par la cour d'appel de Jersey après la mise en demeure de la commission d'aménagement de l'ile (IDC), émise conformément à l'article 8 par . 1 de la loi de 1964 sur l'aménagement de l'île de Jersey (• la loi de 1964 •), et la menace de poursuites pénales sont oppressives, déraisonnables et contraires aux dispositions des articles 3 et 8 de la Convention et de l'article I du Protocole additionnel . S'agissant de la référence que fait la requérante à l'article 3 de la Convention qui interdit notamment les traitements inhumains et dégradants, la Commission estime que les questions dont se plaint l'intéressée n'atteignent pas le degré de gravité nécessaire pour poser un problème au regard de cette disposition . Dès lors, la Commission examinera tout d'abord les griefs de la requérante au regard de l'article I du Protocole additionnel, ainsi libellé : •Toute personne physique ou morale a droit au respect de ses biens . Nul ne peut être privé de sa propriété que pour cause d'utilité publique et dans les conditions prévues par la loi et les principes généraux du droit international . Les dispositions précédentes ne portent pas atteinte au droit que possèdent les Etats de mettre en vigueur les lois qu'ils jugent nécessaires pour réglementer l'usage des biens confortnément à l'intérét général ou pour assurer le paiement des impôts ou d'autres contributions ou des amendes . • La Commission estime que l'usage du bunker laissé à la requérante est une restriction au droit au respect de ses biens, garanti par la première phrase de l'article I du Protocole additionnel . Cette restriction, imposée conformément à la législation de protection de l'environnement par la réglementation de l'urbanisme, équivaut à réglementer de l'usage des biens de la requérante confortnément au deuxième paragraphe de l'article I du Protocole additionnel . La Commission doit dès lors examiner si, compte tenu des faits de la cause, les mesures appliquées étaient proportionnées et nécessaires pour réglementer l'usage du bien de la requérante conformément à l'intérét général . Le bunker de la requérante est situé dans une région d'intérêt paysager particulier . dénommée Zone verte . La cour d'appel de Jersey le décrit comme étant • situ é
283
sur une éminence dans l'une des nombreuses régions de l'île où la nature est d'une beauté exceptionnelle . . La loi de 1964 exige l'autorisation de l'IDC pour aménager un terrain de ce genre . Bon nombre d'Etats membres du Conseil de l'Europe, ont en matière d'aménagement des exigences équivalentes, dont ils reconnaissent l'importance pour préserver des zones d'exceptionnelle beauté contre une exploitation impropre . Dans sa décision du 23 septembre 1982, le tribunal royal déclara que la mise en demeure émise par l'IDC était valable mais qu'il ne s'estimait pas en mesure de préciser exactement les limites du droit d'usage occasionnel du bunker acquis par la requérante avant l'entrée en vigueur de la loi de 1964 . La requérante et l'IDC ne s'étant pas entendues sur les limites de cet usage, la requérante se pourvut finalement devant la cour d'appel de Jersey .
La cour d'appel de Jersey déclara que si la mise en demeure réglementaire censée avoir été émise par l'IDC conformément à la loi de 1964 était entachée de nullité pour imprécision et ambiguité, le fait que la requérante n'avait pas le droit d'utiliser le bunker conuoe résidence d'été avait cependant été établi par le tribunal royal . La cour définit ensuite le droit d'usage auquel la requérante pouvait prétendre en vertu de la loi de 1964 . La Commission reconnait que des contrôles d'aménagement sont nécessaires et souhaitables pour préserver les zones où la nature est d'une beauté exceptionnelle et ce, au double bénéfice des habitants et des visiteurs de Jersey . Les conditions posées par la cour d'appel à la requérante étaient donc à premiére vue conformes à l'intérét général . Sur le caractère proportionné des mesures utilisées, la Commission relève que l'article 8 par . 3 de la loi de 1964 stipule que si une personne continue d'utiliser un terrain contrairement à une mise en demeure émise conformément à la loi de 1964 et exigeant d'interrompre cet usage, elle sera coupable d'une infraction et passible de poursuites pénales, plus éventuellement d'une amende . En l'espèce, la requérante n'ayant pas mis fin à l'usage non autorisé du bunker se vit signifier le 23 mai 1980 une citation à comparaitre devant le tribunal de simple police de Jersey . Elle était dès lors sous le coup d'une accusation pénale mais en fait les poursuites ne furent pas engagées méme si elles pouvaient l'être jusqu'à la décision de la cour d'appel de Jersey qui, après l'audience du 2 au 4 mai 1984, annula la mise en demeure . La Commission estime dès lors que si la menace de poursuites pénales peut poser un problème quant au caractère proportionné des mesures d'eXécution, la citation à comparaitre émise en l'espèce n'a pas rendu disproportionnées les restrictions apportées à l'usage du bunker par la requérante . La Commission constate qu'un équilibre correct a été instauré entre l'intérét particulier de la requérante et l'intérét général . La réglementation de l'usage du bien de la requérante est dès lors conforme aux exigences de l'article 1 du Protocole additionnel et il s'ensuit que la requéte est, sur ce point, manifestement mal fondée au sens de l'anicle 27 par . 2 de la Convention .
284
2 . La requérante a également invoqué l'article 8 de la Convention à propos de ces griefs . Cette disposition est ainsi li bellée : . I . Toute personne a droit au respect de sa vie privée et familiale, de son domicile et de sa correspondance . 2 . II ne peut y avoir ingérence d'une autorité publique dans l'exercice de ce droit que pour autant que cette ingérence est prévue par la loi et qu'elle constitue une mesure qui, dans une société démocratique, est nécessaire à la sécurité nationale, à la sOreté publique, au bien-étre économique du pays, à la défense de l'ordre et à la prévention des infractions pénales, à la protection de la santé ou de la morale, ou à la protection des droits et libertés d'autrui . • La cour d'appel de Jersey a estimé établi que la requérante contreviendrait à la loi de 1964 si elle devait utiliser le bunker en permanence comme résidence d'été . La cour a cependant déclaré que l'on pouvait légitimement se servir du bunker pour un usage plus limité . La Commission n'a pas besoin de se prononcer sur ce point, mais elle peut supposer, aux fins de la présente décision, que le bunker doit être considéré comme le domicile de la requérante car, même si c'est le cas et si la décision de la cour d'appel de Jersey a donc porté atteinte au droit au respect de la vie privée et du domicile de la requérante, la Commission estime que cette atteinte éventuelle se justifie au regard de l'article 8 par . 2 de la Convention . Elle était prévue par la loi et, pour les raisons indiquées ci-après, la Commission estime également que toute ingérence de ce type poursuivait de maniére proportionnée un but légitime (la protection des droits d'autrui) par la mise en jeu des contrôles d'aménagement, but reconnu comme nécessaire dans une société démocratique dans les Etats membres du Conseil de l'Europe .
La Commission rappelle que, dans le domaine des restrictions apportées à l'usage d'une propriété privée telle qu'une maison, si les exigences de l'article 8 sont plus rigoureuses que celles de l'article 1 du Protocole additionnel en ce qui conceme la légitimité du but visé par la mesure en question, le critère de la proportionnalité de l'ingérence est pour l'essentiel analogue pour l'une et l'autre dispositions (No 9261/81, déc . 3 .3 .82, D .R . 28 p . 177) . La Commission a déjà constaté que les restrictions apportées à l'usage du bunker par la requérante, y compris la menace de sanctions pénales, étaient légitimes, nécessaires, non disproportionnées et dès lors justifiées au regard de l'article 1 du Protocole additionnel . Selon l'article 8 de la Convention, la Commission doit également reconnaître que des mesures proponionnées, destinées à réglementer l'usage d'un bien qui peut être le domicile d'un individu, peuvent ètre justifiées comme nécessaires dans une société démocratique à la protection des droits d'autrui lorsque ces droits sont clairement identifiés et directement mis en danger . Cela implique qu'il faille instaurer un équilibre entre la protection du droit de l'individu au respect d e
285
son domicile et la nécessité de protéger d'autres droits énumérés à l'article 8 par . 2 . L'existence et l'application de contrôles d'urbanisme qui délimitent les zones où un aménagement à des fins domestiques est possible constituent une mesure légitime de contrôle propre à protéger la valeur de zones rurales bien placées et donc à protéger les droits d'autrui . Cela étant, et puisque la requérante a toujours la possibilité de faire de son bien un usage imponant, qu'il lui est seulement interdit d'étendre, la Commission estime qu'un juste équilibre a été maintenu entre l'intérêt de la requérante et l'intérét général . Toute ingérence dans le droit de la requérante au respect de son domicile et de sa vie privée est dés lors conforme aux exigences de l'article 8 par . 2 de la Convention et nécessaire dans une société démocratique à la protection des droits et libertés d'autrui . Il s'ensuit que la requète est, sur ce point également, manifestement mal fondée au sens de l'article 27 par . 2 de la Convention . Par ces motifs, la Commission DÉCLARE LA REQUÉTEIRRECEVABLE .
286

Origine de la décision

Formation : Cour (chambre)
Date de la décision : 11/03/1985

Fonds documentaire ?: HUDOC

HUDOC
Association des cours judiciaires suprêmes francophones Organisation internationale de la francophonie

Juricaf est un projet de l'AHJUCAF, l'association des cours judiciaires suprêmes francophones,
réalisé en partenariat avec le Laboratoire Normologie Linguistique et Informatique du droit (Université Paris I).
Il est soutenu par l'Organisation internationale de la Francophonie et le Fonds francophone des inforoutes.